Tag Archives: trace acceleration

Sep
30

Beach Daisies Fragrance


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Beach Daisies FragranceBeach Daisies Fragrance Oil Spotlight

The beach daisy is an adorable little flower known for being a fast-spreading groundcover. It can grow to be up to 18 inches tall and flowers year round in the southern parts of Florida. This plant thrives in mostly dry and even slightly salty environments– ideal for the beach! It even helps keep sand from eroding. Both butterflies and birds are attracted to this beautiful beach bloom.

What Does Beach Daisies Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

Imagine sweeping yourself away to the beach; where you will smell the aromas of fresh spring flowers and green grass while walking on the warm sands.  Natures Garden’s beach daisies fragrance begins with top notes of Asian lemongrass, dune grass, and daisy petals; followed by middle notes of gardenia bloom, ylang ylang, and clove leaf; sitting on base notes of blond woods, amber sands, and sheer musk.

How Do Our Customers Use Beach Daisies Fragrance Oil?

Candles! This refreshing floral fragrance performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. It is gel wax compatible! This means you can put adorable wax embeds in your gel wax candles; we’ve got a cute retro flowers embed mold and even a daisies embed mold! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this inviting aroma in vegetable waxes and paraffin waxes is 10%. Our coloring suggestions are to use 3 drops of yellow plus a little orange liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax or shred an ample amount of yellow and orange color block into your melted wax. Never use crayons to color your candles; it will clog the wick!

Room scents! This sunny scent comes across nice and strong in aroma beads and its maximum recommended usage percentage in incense and potpourri is 50%. We’ve got an adorable daisy cookie cutter– ideal for making aroma bead air fresheners

Soaps! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this alluring aura in bath gels, bath oils, and soaps is 5%. Our cold process soap testing found that this vacation fragrance caused acceleration in CP soap, so we recommend soaping this scent at lower temperatures. Otherwise, there was no discoloration, no ricing, no separation, and very strong scent retention! Our coloring suggestions are to use yellow and orange soap colorants in the amount that satisfies you. You’re welcome to try natural soap colorants, but pay close attention to the description on the individual pages, some colorants may be affected by different soapmaking processes.

We’ve also got some awesome flower-shaped soap molds: the tried and true flower-shaped mold Bailey uses in our soap testing videos, another marvelous mold for making large retro flowers, a mold for making small retro flowers, and my personal favorite the bite-sized daisy mold. We have a couple of sunflower soap molds as well– beach daisies are often called beach sunflowers, so it works out perfectly!

Body products! This beach scent performs perfectly in perfumes and its maximum recommended usage percentage in lotions and body sprays is 5%.

Cleaning products! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this summer-y scent in cleaning products is 5%.

Aug
20

Apple Butter Pie Fragrance


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Apple Butter Pie FragranceApple Butter Pie Fragrance Oil Spotlight

This is yet another one of those fragrances that gives you a sweet scent without putting in all the work of making the real-life version it is modeled after. Our Apple Butter Pie Fragrance Oil page features an apple butter pie recipe, which seems simple enough, but you still need to make apple butter before making your apple butter pie. And that alone is enough to fill your house with the sweet smell of spicy apples. But who is to say how long that will last? This fragrance oil allows you to maintain that amazing apple aroma long after the last piece of pie would have been lovingly devoured.

What Does Apple Butter Pie Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

The perfect arrangement of tart pie apples, apple butter, evaporated milk, cinnamon, and buttery, flaky pie crust.  Both an NG Original Scent and a best seller! 

How Do Our Customers Use Apple Butter Pie Fragrance Oil?

Candles: this freshly baked fragrance performed perfectly in joy wax and wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. It is not gel wax compatible. The maximum recommended usage percentage in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. Our coloring recommendations for candles are two drops of red liquid candle dye and two drops of brown liquid candle dye per four pounds of wax, or shred a small amount of cinnamon color block into your melted wax. Remember to never use crayons to color your candles. It’ll clog the wick, the candle won’t work, it’s a whole mess. You could even use the stainless steel tart floater candle mold to make small pie-shaped, pie-scented wax melts using our Pillar of Bliss Wax.

Soaps: the maximum recommended usage percentage for this apple aroma in soaps, bath gels, bath oils, and cleaning products is 1%. Apple Butter Pie fragrance performs well in bath and body products. The vanillin content is 0%, so it is unlikely to discolor your bath and body products too much. Our cold process soap testing results found that in CP Soap, this sweet, spicy scent caused slight acceleration, but no ricing and no separation, and discolored the soap to a straw color. Vanilla White Color Stabilizer might not be very helpful when attempting to correct discoloration of products made using this fragrance because the vanillin content is 0%, so it’s more likely that the cause of discoloration in this oil is something other than vanilla. You can always test it to be sure. Our coloring recommendations for soap are: use red soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you. Or you could use a little bit of brown soap colorant to make it pie-colored and use this pie heart mold to make pie-shaped soap. How cute is that?

Lotions and perfumes: this mouth-watering scent performs perfectly in perfumes and the maximum recommended usage percentage in lotions and perfumes is 1%.

Room scents: the maximum recommended usage percentage for this apple butter pie aura in incense and potpourri is 50% and it comes across nice and strong in aroma beads.

Jul
08

What is Trace in Soap Making?


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What is trace in soap makingWhat is Trace in Soap Making?

What is trace? Baby, don’t blend me; don’t stir me, just pour. Trace is when you’ve reached emulsion- your oils are blended with your lye mixture and are no longer capable of separating. How can you tell when your mixture is at trace? The easiest way is to use your stirring utensil: hold it a few inches above your mixing container and move it back and forth. If the soap batter dripping off the stirring utensil leaves little lines that sit on top of the mixture in the bowl- that’s trace. It can be difficult to capture in photographs, but you’ll know it when you see it in motion.

heavy traceSo I reach trace and that’s it? Well, yes and no. There are different degrees of trace, but the important thing to remember is that once a mixture has reached trace- it’s only going to continue to solidify from there. Light trace is considered the bare minimum. Light trace is helpful when you’re looking to make swirls or other designs that require easily pourable, almost-liquid soap. Moderate trace is in the goopmiddle and means you’re ready to pour your soap into the mold. Heavy trace is when your soap gets thick. The picture above shows heavy trace. A soap batter at heavy trace is resistant to change shape and almost impossible to pour into a mold. Heavy trace may result in the need to scoop your soap into the mold, seen in the photo on the left. Not a pretty sight. Work quickly to ensure the soap does not set before you are ready.

What Causes Different Levels of Trace?

Trace can be affected both by your ingredients and your blending method.

Ingredients:

  • ‘Hard’ oils, including palm oil and coconut oil, and butters will reach trace much faster. Using softer oils such as olive oil or canola will decrease the speed of trace, but your end product soap will be much softer. Increasing the amount of oil to superfat your recipe will also slow down trace. (Be careful not to add too much or you’ll have an excess of unreacted oils.)
  • In addition, fragrance oils can accelerate trace. (Check out our CP Soap Testing results to see how our fragrance oils perform in the CP soaping process.)
  • Inversely, the more water you use, the slower your soap will reach trace. A water discount (using less water than the recipe called for) will accelerate trace and is recommended for only advanced soapers when they see fit.

Blending:

  • The speed at which you blend can accelerate trace. Using a stick blender as opposed to stirring manually with a spatula will increase the speed of the reaction and trace will be reached faster. If you suspect that the mixture will accelerate, stir it manually to slow the rate of trace.
  • Furthermore, the temperature at which you blend your ingredients will affect trace. Higher temperatures accelerate trace. If you wish to slow down trace, let your lye mixture cool down to about 100 degrees Fahrenheit before you add it to your oils.
  • The order also matters. If the fragrance oil you’re using is known to have a tendency to accelerate trace, be sure to add it last, after you’ve made your soap mixture and added any colorant, and be ready to move.

False Trace

All this talk about trace and the need to rush your soap process may have you running around like a chicken with its head cut off- but BEWARE FALSE TRACE. False trace usually occurs when oils in your mixture begin to cool down and solidify without going through emulsion or saponification. So, much like Goldilocks, you don’t want your mixture to be too hot or too cold, but juuuuust right.

Ahhh!

I know it seems like a lot- but if you pay attention to the factors listed here- you should be alright. Remember to have all of your ingredients ready before you start soaping (always, but especially) in case of any unexpected trace acceleration. You can do this, I promise. And if something goes wrong, you can always melt down your soap and try again. Thanks for reading and happy soaping!