Tag Archives: how to make a bubble bar

Feb
13

How Do You Make A Bubble Bar?


This entry was posted in bath products, Bubble Bar Recipes, Bubble Bars, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

How Do You Make a Bubble Bar?How Do You Make A Bubble Bar?

If you love to take relaxing bubble baths, this blog is for you! Baths can be the best thing and just what you need after a  long day at work. If you are looking for some new products for your bath routine, we can definitely help you out. We at Natures Garden carry every ingredient you could possibly need to make all of the bath products you could ever want! We also come up with and share our own recipes that can be found on our website page. One of our biggest markets is for bath and body items. Therefore, we have endless recipes which cater specifically to that. There are bath bomb recipes, bath salts recipes, body scrub recipes, lotions, make up, and our topic in today’s blog, bubble bar recipes.

The market is seriously growing out there with people who want to make their own cosmetics and stuff to use in the bath. With the ingredients that we sell, the recipes we have shared, and the classes that we offer, it is entirely possible. In this blog, we are going to be answering a popular question: How Do You Make A Bubble Bar? These are great to use in the bath, they are amazing for the skin, and are simple to make. Even if you are a beginner to this industry or you just want to try something new, you can create bubble bars too!

Wet Ingredients in a Bubble Bar

Similarly to bath bombs, there are quite a bit of ingredients that are needed to make bubble bars. When making this type of recipe, we find it helpful to split the ingredients up. We like to do this by separating everything we need into the wet ingredients and the dry ingredients. The wet portion of most bubble bar recipes will usually include vegetable glycerin, any colorants used, and some fragrance oil. Before adding in fragrance oil, not just to bubble bars, but with any home made body product, one thing is super important to remember. You should always ensure that the fragrance oil you are using is body safe and can be used in your products. There are some that unfortunately can not be used to make products like body scrubs, body lotions, body wash, etc. due to some elements in them. To find out whether or not they are, you should always perform your own testing with something like this. Trusting what some companies advertise and claim about their merchandise may not always be a good idea.

Vegetable glycerin gets added to bubble bars because it is a humectant, which means it draws moisture to the surfaces of the skin. This is desirable in any bath product. We add different dyes to these as well to give them some color. Natures Garden has a ton of soap colorants, including Neon Pink, Ultramarine Blue, and Yellow Oxide. The last wet ingredient added into bubble bars is the fragrance oil. Out of the more than 800 fragrance oils that we carry, only 29 of them are not safe to be used in body products.

Dry Ingredients in a Bubble Bar

Now, we will talk about the dry ingredients. Most bubble bar recipes use the same common dry powders. Depending on the specific recipe, some of these can be swapped out with another powder, or be completely left out. The dry ingredients include baking soda, cream of tartar, corn starch, xanthum gum, and the surfactant that you choose to use. We will explain more about what surfactants are in a little bit.

Baking soda is a common house held item that is commonly added to cosmetic recipes. This will add a couple of different elements to your bubble bars. It has some properties in it that cleanse and help to make your skin feel very soft. The cream of tartar acts as a stabilizer in bubble bars, which allows for all of the other ingredients to come together and adhere in a formula. It also helps to make them fluffy and airy.

Corn starch is another common ingredient that is added to cosmetic recipes. This is because it can relieve irritations to the skin and makes the skin feel great. When this is put in bubble bars and bath bombs, it helps to give softness and silkiness to the skin. Finally, there is xanthum gum. This is an all natural thickener that is often used in bath gel, bubble bath, and liquid soap. It thickens your cosmetic products and keeps them together. You might want to add some other dry ingredients to your cosmetic recipes as well. Natures Garden sells plenty of fresh herbs that we are always incorporating into different products. You could also add extra powders, such as vanilla or cocoa.

SLSA vs. SCI

The last dry ingredient that you will need to make a bubble bar is a surfactant. At Natures Garden, we carry a couple of surface acting agents, which are commonly known as surfactants. These help bath products like bath bombs and bubble bars to create bubbles and foam when they react with the water in the bath. The ones that we have are Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate (SLSA) and Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate (SCI). SLSA is derived naturally, it is gentle, and can be used on all types of skin. This surfactant works nicely for people who have sensitive skin and skin conditions including eczema, psoriasis, and chronic acne problems. People with dry skin also really enjoy this in their products because it can help make their skin feel hydrated. SLSA can be added into multiple cosmetic recipes, and when it is, it helps create amazing lather and foam, which softens the skin. SCI is also very gentle and creates great foam too. It helps cleanse the skin and will make your skin feel silky, softened, and smooth.

One of the classes that we have uploaded to our website is called Surfactants in Cosmetics. This is a very helpful tool that can be easily referred to when you need some information. If you are a beginner, you might like to take a look at this since it goes into much more detail about surfactants. It mentions different types, such as anionic, amphoteric, cationic, and nonionic. This class also includes a list of some of the more common surfactants used, offering nearly 20 of them to choose from.

Bubble Bar Safety Gear

If you are learning how to make a bubble bar, there are a few important things to keep in mind. Another thing we want to mention is to wear safety gear when preparing bubble bars. This is mostly only necessary when preparing the dry ingredients. When working with dry powders, especially when it is multiple, a lot of that can get released into the air.

First, we suggest wearing a safety face mask. This will prevent the loose powders that flow into the air from getting in your face. Along with this, safety goggles might be a good option to wear. They can prevent the loose powders, like baking soda, from wafting into your eyes. Putting on gloves is great too because you will be working with your hands to mix the ingredients together. Wearing an apron is also a good idea for recipes like this one.

Benefits of Bubble Bars

There are elements of bubble bars that people tend to really enjoy. The surface acting agents certainly contribute to these benefits. Most people who like to take baths also like them to have a lot of bubbles. Due to ingredients like SLSA, SCI, SLS, etc., your bubble baths will never be the same! These create a ton of lather, they have great foaming qualities, and they are beneficial for the skin. As we mentioned, one reason these are added into bubble bars is to make your skin feel amazing. Soft, silky skin is a feeling that cannot be beat. Another great thing about them is that you can create any shape you want. As long as you have a mold for it, your bubble bars could be shaped like candy, donuts, hearts, four leaf clovers, and more!

How Bubble Bars Are Different Than Bath Bombs

A common question that we receive from customers and beginners is how are bubble bars different than bath bombs? One of the biggest differences between them is how they affect your bath. Traditional bath bombs are made with baking soda and citric acid. When these two are combined, they create a chemical reaction. This is what causes them to fizz up when they hit your bath water. All you have to do with bath bombs are plop them into the water and this will activate the chemical reaction.

Bubble bars on the other hand are created for a different purpose. As opposed to fizzing, they create a lot of lather and foam. This is perfectly ideal for a bubble bath. These cannot just be dropped in the bath water like bath bombs are, however. If they were just thrown in there, nothing would happen. When you are using bubble bars, they are meant to be run underneath the bath water and crumbled up into pieces. Your bath will automatically start bubbling up due to the surfactant that is a part of your recipe. Bath bombs do not create this type of foam that a lot of people are looking for. Therefore, bubble bars can be a great bath product alternative if this is what you have been wanting!

Natures Garden Bubble Bar Recipes

Now, we wanted to share some of the Natures Garden bubble bar recipes with you. These show three different ways that bubble bars can be made to look. They all serve the same purpose, but they have variety to them. The first one is our Pumpkin Roll Bubble Bar Recipe. We got our inspiration for this idea from the delicious dessert that is commonly made around the holidays. It uses a lot of the ingredients we have been talking about, such as SCI, baking soda, vegetable glycerin, soap colorants, and more. The link above lays out all of the steps to this recipe and make it easy to follow along with.

Another type that we created is our Watermelon Bubble Bar Recipe. This was a fun project to make because they look like mini ice cream scoops! These are awesome in a bubble bath. They create so much foam and truly make a difference in how your skin feels. You will love how soft and silky you will be feeling after taking a bath with these scoops! We have several other bath scoop recipes just like these up on our website as well. A third way that you can make bubble bars is shown with our Orange Juice Cake Bubble Bar Recipe. This is actually a brand new recipe that we came up with to resemble the dessert of orange juice cake. We made these using a bundt cake mold and drizzled melted soap on top to look like icing. These were also fun and simple to make!

Natural DIY Bubble Bath Bar Recipe

There are plenty of people in our industry who also enjoy making their own homemade bath projects. This article by Debra Maslowski shows how to make a natural DIY bubble bath bar. This is an interesting recipe to take a look at since she is explaining how bubble bars can be made without using a surfactant. Instead, she uses arrowroot powder, baking soda, citric acid, milk powder, cocoa butter, and a few other ingredients. The results from this recipe end up being super cute and they are just as easy to use as any other bubble bar. We hope that you enjoyed our blog today and learning all about how you can make your own bubble bars!

Feb
05

Orange Juice Cake Bubble Bars Recipe


This entry was posted in bath products, bubble bar recipe, Natures Garden', orange juice cake fragrance and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Orange Juice Cake Bubble Bars RecipeOrange Juice Cake Bubble Bars Recipe

The Natures Garden fragrance oil of the month for February 2020 is Orange Juice Cake! To showcase this delicious homemade pastry scent, we created a few new recipes using it. We will be writing and sharing blogs on each of them! The first one we would like to introduce is this Orange Juice Cake Bubble Bars Recipe. These turned out beautifully, looking like a mini version of actual orange juice cake! This cake is an original recipe coming from the Natures Garden owner’s family! It is scrumptious, moist, and bursting with fresh flavors. We designed this fragrance oil to emulate this cake perfectly. Our recipe for this bubble bar is going to make your skin feel incredibly soft, as well as creating a ton of foam and bubbles for your baths. They are made using a surfactant that we just recently brought to the website, SLSA. You are going to love how this product feels and how it smells too! We can’t wait to share each of these new recipes with all of you.

Ingredients Found at Natures Garden:

Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate
Sodium Bicarbonate- Baking Soda
Cream of Tartar
Corn Starch
Orange Juice Cake Fragrance Oil
Vegetable Glycerin
Fractionated Coconut Oil
Vanilla White- Color Stabilizer
Cocoa Powder Organic
Orange Oxide 1 oz. – FUN Soap Colorant
Yellow Oxide 1 oz. – FUN Soap Colorant
Black Oxide 1 oz. – FUN Soap Colorant
Shea Butter Melt and Pour Soap
Orange Peel Cut & Sifted
Silicone Soap Mold- 4 Bundt Cake Mold
Gloves for Safety
Safety Mask
Safety Glasses
Natures Garden Apron
Flexible Silicone Mat

Other Ingredients and Equipment You Will Need:

Mixing Bowls
Mixing Spoons
Scale
Rubbing Alcohol

Total Recipe Amounts for Bubble Bars:

330 grams Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate
460 grams Sodium Bicarbonate- Baking Soda
224 grams Cream of Tartar
72 grams Corn Starch
14 grams Orange Juice Cake Fragrance Oil
200 grams Vegetable Glycerin
24 grams Fractionated Coconut Oil
4 grams Cocoa Powder Organic mixed with 20 grams Vegetable Glycerin
15 drops Orange Oxide FUN Soap Colorant
5 drops Yellow Oxide FUN Soap Colorant
2 drops Black Oxide FUN Soap Colorant

Total Recipe Amounts for Icing:

5 cubes Shea Butter Melt and Pour Soap
6 grams Orange Juice Cake Fragrance Oil
6 grams Vanilla White Color Stabilizer
4 heaping teaspoons Orange Peel Cut & Sifted

Clean and sanitize your workstation along with all of your utensils. There are many dry ingredients involved with this recipe, which can create clouds of powder in the air. Therefore, it is suggested by us that you wear gloves, an apron, a face mask, and a hair net while when preparing this. Also, you will want to prepare your bottle of rubbing alcohol that will be used in one of the last steps.

Mixing the Dry IngredientsMixing the Dry Ingredients

To begin, you are going to need a couple of mixing bowls and a digital scale for weighing. We will be measuring and working with the dry ingredients in the recipe first. Take out a larger mixing bowl for this portion. First, we are going to weigh out 330 grams of the SLSA. This product is very important in this recipe. SLSA is a surfactant that is a great foaming agent for products like bubble bars, shampoo bars, and bath bombs. It helps your skin to feel extra soft after use and creates so many bubbles for the bath. Next, add to the same bowl 460 grams of the baking soda, 224 grams of the cream of tartar, and 72 grams of the corn starch. Mix all of these powder ingredients together well, using your hands.

Break Up the ClumpsBreak Up the Clumps

We use our hands in the mixture to help break up any clumps of powder we might find. Baking soda tends to be very clumpy, and it is important to break all of these up. Otherwise, your bubble bars will not be mixed as thoroughly and there might be bits of powder in the mixture, which you do not want for your finished product.

Combining the Liquid IngredientsCombining the Liquid Ingredients 

Set the dry ingredients bowl to the side. Now, place a separate mixing bowl on the scale. You need to weigh out 200 grams of the vegetable glycerin, 24 grams of the fractionated coconut oil, and 14 grams of the Orange Juice Cake Fragrance Oil. We chose fractionated coconut oil as our carrier oil due to the properties it has. This oil contributes to the hardness, cleansing, and bubbly lather in cosmetic products. Each one of these qualities is desirable in bubble bars, which you want to create a lot of bubbles in the bath and cleanse the skin at the same time. Our Orange Juice Cake Fragrance Oil is a combination of pound cake, orange zests, vanilla, caramel, and coconut. This scent is original to Natures Garden and one of our best sellers!

Combining the Mixing BowlsCombining the Mixing Bowls

For the next step, we are going to add the bowl with the wet ingredients to the bowl containing all of the powdered ingredients. Then, you can start mixing them together with your hands. We used our hands because using a spoon may cause the powders to get released into the air and we could lose some of our product, which we do not want to happen.

Forming the DoughForming the Dough

Continue to thoroughly mix the ingredients together. You want to keep going until it reaches the consistency of dough. It may take some time working with it before it reaches this point. Remember to lift and fold the mixture continuously to get the powders at the bottom of the bowl fully incorporated into the rest of it.

Creating the Brown ColorantCreating the Brown Colorant

Next, you will need to get out a small bowl. We are going to be hand making the brown colorant portion of this batter. This step is similar to mixing a facial mask. In your small bowl, weigh out 4 grams of cocoa powder organic. To this, add 20 grams of vegetable glycerin. Mix the ingredients together thoroughly, until there are no longer any clumps from the cocoa powder. Spoon this mixture into the dough batter.

Mix in the ColorantMix in the Colorant

After you have added in the cocoa powder mixture, fully incorporate it into the dough. Evenly fold over the batter repeatedly until you no longer see clumps of brown throughout it. This is just one of the colorants we will be adding to these bubble bars!

Add in Additional ColorantsAdd in Additional Colorants

Once the brown colorant has been fully mixed in, we can move onto the other colors we need. Natures Garden carries multiple FUN Soap Colorants that offer vibrant shades to give color to your soap and body products. For this recipe, we used the shades Orange Oxide, Yellow Oxide, and Black Oxide. Add in 15 drops of the orange, 5 drops of the yellow, and 2 drops of the black. We added these one at a time to see what shade we would be getting, and we were satisfied with our result. This combination gives a nice color to the dough that resembles the look of actual orange juice cake.

Incorporate the Colorants TogetherIncorporate the Colorants Together

After each color is added, we are once again going to use our hands to mix everything together. Continue to knead the dough, especially at the bottom, until the color is evenly dispersed throughout it. An important thing to remember is if the bubble bar dough is too crumbly, you can always add a bit more vegetable glycerin to help. We did not end up having to do this for this recipe, but depending on how your ingredients were measured, you may need to. However, make sure not to add too much vegetable glycerin, or your dough will become too wet and the product will not set up properly. 

Pack the Soap MoldPack the Soap Mold

Now we are all finished with the dough! Take out the silicone bundt cake soap mold and pack the bubble bar dough tightly into it. There should be enough batter to fill all four of the bundt cake cavities. You want to pack it in tightly so that your product is cohesive and sets up together. Allow your bubble bars to set up. You will know they are ready once they have hardened. It took ours approximately 24-48 hours to set up completely. However, it can take longer depending on the climate of your environment.

Remove the Bubble Bars Remove the Bubble Bars

Once the bubble bars have had enough time to finish setting up, you can go ahead and pop them out of their molds. Make sure that you have waited enough time before this step. If not, the bubble bars may crack and crumble instead of remaining in one piece. We removed ours onto a silicone mat to prepare for the next few steps, which can get messy.

Cut Up the Melt and Pour SoapCut Up the Melt and Pour Soap

Now, we are going to prepare the icing for our bundt cake bubble bars! You will need to take 5 cubes from a slab of one of our white melt and pour soap bases. We decided to use Shea Butter, but any of the white colored bases will work fine to resemble icing. Slice the cubes up into smaller pieces and place them in a microwave safe bowl. Then, melt them in the microwave in 30 second intervals until the soap is fully melted. 

Fragrance the IcingFragrance the Icing

After it is melted, add to it 6 grams of Orange Juice Cake Fragrance Oil. We also want to match that with 6 grams of Vanilla White Color Stabilizer. This is because some fragrance oils can cause discoloration to soap and we need ours to stay white in order for it to look like icing. Once those two are added, stir to incorporate everything.

Apply the Soap IcingApply the Soap Icing

Carefully, drizzle the melted soap over your bundt cake bubble bars. Pour it gently and in a back and forth motion, as you would ice cinnamon rolls. Then, grab your bottle of rubbing alcohol that you prepared at the beginning of this recipe. Spray the bubble bars with the melted soap on them with the rubbing alcohol. This will help out for the last step.

Top the Bubble Bars OffTop the Bubble Bars Off

The final step in the recipe is to top our bubble bars off with “nuts”. We needed to spray the icing with rubbing alcohol in order to get these to stick. Take orange peel, cut and sifted, and sprinkle it on top of the bubble bars. This step helps complete the look of authentic orange juice cake. Allow some time for everything to dry before moving them. Once they are finished drying, you have completed this fun project!

Your Orange Juice Cake Bubble Bars are now ready to be used! When you want to put the bubble bars to use, all you have to do is simply crumble up some pieces from one of them. Place these under your warm running bath water and see the wonderful bubbly lather these create! We hope you enjoyed following along with us to make these!

Sweet Rolls Dessert Recipe

Since these orange juice cake bubble bars look like real cinnamon rolls, we thought we would share a delicious dessert with all of you! These Homemade Orange Sweet Rolls by Sally’s Baking Addiction are a perfect representation of our bubble bars. This is a blog full of all different kinds of recipes that are simple to make and delicious to eat. All of the orange lovers out there will really like this take on traditional cinnamon rolls. The orange flavored glaze adds a really nice touch to these as well. Give them a try and enjoy!

 

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is the responsibility of our customers. If you plan to resell any of the recipes that we provide, it’s your responsibility to follow all FDA regulations. We cannot offer any advice on where to buy the products and ingredients listed in our recipes if they are not sold by Natures Garden. When you use our recipes and/or raw ingredients, you are agreeing to indemnify Natures Garden against any liability of performance, any lack of performance, or any problems that you encounter with the finished products.

Mar
01

Bath Bombs vs Bubble Bars


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath bombs, Bubble Bars, Natures Garden, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Bath Bombs vs Bubble BarsBath Bombs vs Bubble Bars

We are often asked about what the differences are between a bath bomb and a bubble bar.  The short answer, you will get fizz with bath bombs vs bubble bars which produce foam.  However, below, we will go into a little more detail.  In addition, we will show you a couple of bath bomb recipes and bubble bar recipes.

Bath Bombs vs Bubble Bars: Bath Bombs

First, let’s take a closer look at bath bombs.  We will talk about why they fizz and how to make them.  So, learn how to color them, scent them, and create them.

Bath Bombs:  Why Do They Fizz?

First, let’s look at bath bombs, also known as bath fizzies.  I am sure you have looked at videos of bath bombs fizzy and creating beautiful colors and designs in bath water.  Well, do you ever wonder why they fizz?  A basic bath bomb is created by combining citric acid with baking soda.  Now, once that combination is placed in water, a chemical reaction is produced.  The product of that chemical reaction is carbon dioxide.  The carbon dioxide is what causes all that fizzing.

Bath Bombs:  How Are They Made?

Creating a very basic bath bomb is quite simple.  You simply mix baking soda and citric acid together.  Once you have mixed your ingredients together, you will begin to lightly mist the mixture with witch hazel.  Witch hazel basically causes the ingredients to slightly react, in the same way water would.  Then, the powders in your mixture are able to attach to each other, thus they can be put in a mold, and once setup, your bath bomb is ready to use.

Although that is all it really takes to create a bath fizzy, you can make it more interesting and beneficial.  Some will add oil to give their skin a little extra love.  Cosmetic clays can also be added to harden the bath bombs and provide your skin with extra nourishment.  The sky really is the limit from micas to herbs, and foaming agents to corn starch.  Of course, bath bombs can also be scented and colored.

Bath Bombs:  How Are They Colored?

We are often asked by clients, how they should color their bath bombs.  Since we carry several types of colorants, it can be a little confusing.  There really are a few ways you could color your bath bombs.  First, you could use Da Bomb Soap Dyes.  These are simply FD&C dyes.  Yes, they will work, BUT since they are water based, they will cause your bath fizzies a slightly activate.  I highly recommend the FUN Soap Colorants.  The FUN Soap Colorants are pigments dispersed in vegetable glycerin.  They stay vibrant and true to color.  They are my personal choice for coloring bath bombs.  However, you can also use natural herbal colorants.

To add color to your bath bombs, simply add the colorant right to your powdered mixture.  Then, use your hands to mix the ingredients together.  It can take quite a bit of mixing to get the colorant fully dispersed.  Of course,  I would highly recommend wearing gloves.  When using multiple colors, you would want to wear clean gloves for each color that you are mixing.

Bath Bombs:  How Are They Scented?

Bath bombs can be scented very easily.  They can be scented with either body safe essential oils or fragrance oils.  As far as the amount of fragrance oil or essential oil to use in a bath bomb, generally our maximum recommendation for fragrance oil is 5% in a body product, but when creating a bath bomb, we tend to use around 1%-3%.  Ultimately though, you don’t want to use any more than 10% total liquids in your bath bomb recipe.

Bath Bombs:  What Kind of Mold Should I Use?

As far as molds and shapes, you really have numerous options.  You can mold them in a round acrylic molds, place them in silicone molds, place them in a jar, or even scoop them!  In fact, bath bombs can even be formed with your hands, just like you would pack a snow ball.

Bath Bombs:  A Few Bath Bomb Tutorials

Below, I will give links to a few bath bomb tutorials.  I will link you to one of each type so, whether you want to mold them, hand sculpt them, scoop them, place them in a jar, or add a little foam, you will find something below.

A Few Bath Bomb Tutorials: Sphere Bath Bombs

First, we will talk about traditional round sphere bath bombs.  To the left, you will see our Sinus Relief Bath Bomb Recipe.  I chose this recipe because, not only does it use peppermint powder as a natural colorant, it also incorporates bentonite clay powder and cut and sifted spearmint leaves.  Finally, it is scented with Natures Garden’s Sinus Relief Fragrance Oil.

A Few Bath Bomb Tutorials: Hand Sculpted Bath Bombs

Now, let’s talk about hand sculpted bath bombs like our Camouflage Bath Bomb Recipe.  So, I know what you’re thinking.  That bath bomb looks round, why can I just use a mold.  Well, to get the army toy in there and the camo look, we needed to hand sculpt it.  You see, this bath bomb has an army toy inside that will come out when it is used.  In addition, we wanted to add camo colors.  So, the best way to create our bath bomb was to hand sculpt it.  Can you imagine, how much your kid would love this bath bomb with a toy that surprises him at bath time?

A Few Bath Bomb Tutorials: Silicone Mold Bath Bombs

Next, we have bath bombs that are placed in silicone molds.  Our Mother’s Day Bath Bomb Recipe is the perfect example.  This bath bomb not only uses a silicone mold, it also uses arrowroot powder and calendula flowers.  Lastly, we scented these bath bombs with Happy and Free Fragrance Oil.  The nice thing about a silicone mold is that it makes removing your finished product a breeze.  Just use caution when choosing your silicone mold.  If you choose one that has too much detail, it may not come through in your finished products very well.

A Few Bath Bomb Tutorials: Ice Cream Scoop Bath Bombs

This type of bath bomb breaks the mold, using an ice cream scoop to create our bath fizzies.  Simply, scoop the bath fizzy mixture just like you would real ice cream.  Give this Rainbow Sherbet Bath Fizzies Recipe a try!  This recipe uses our FUN Soap Colorants for a vibrant rainbow sherbet color!  But, it doesn’t stop there, it’s also scented with Natures Garden’s Rainbow Sherbet Fragrance Oil.

A Few Bath Bomb Tutorials: Bath Bombs That Foam

Now, let’s talk about a sort of bath bomb/bubble bar combo.  Ok, so while it isn’t really a combo in terms of creating a full bubble bath, it will produce a little bit of foam.  The foam is created by the addition of a foaming agent such as SLS, SLSA, or SCI.  Take, for example, our Foaming Rose Petal Bath Bomb recipe.  This rose petal bath bomb contains SCI, so, not only will it fizz, it will also foam.  In addition, SCI, or Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate is a gentle surfactant.  It will leave your skin feeling soft and silky smooth.

A Few Bath Bomb Tutorials: Bath Bombs in a Jar

Finally, bath fizzies can also be placed in a jar.  Then, you can simply place a few spoonfuls of the mixture into your bath water.  However, the mixture can also be placed in a disposable tea bag so you can add herbs without them getting in the tub and going down the drain.  For example, our Fairy Dust Bath Fizzy Recipe will show you how to do just that!  In addition, we added some diamond dust mica pigment to give the fizzy some sparkle and shine!

Bath Bombs vs Bubble Bars: Bubble Bars

Next, let’s look at bubble bars.  While bubble bars are not quite as popular as bath bombs, they are quickly gaining in popularity.  This leaves many people wondering exactly what they are.  While bath bombs fizz, bubble bars produce a ton of bubbles for a relaxing bubble bath.

Bubble Bars:  Why Do They Bubble?

Bubble bars are perfect when you are looking for the ultimate bubble bath.  But, why do they bubble?  The main reason is due to surfactants that are added to bubble bars.  For more information on surfactants, and to read our free class, click here.  Bubble bars contain ingredients such as Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate or Sodium Lauryl Sulfate.  These ingredients are foaming agents that produce the bubbles in your bath tub.  My personal favorite surfactant is sodium cocoyl isethionate or SCI.

Bubble Bars:  How Are They Made?

A bubble bar’s bubbles are created with a foaming agent, such as SLS or SCI.  However, there are several other ingredients used as well.  First, baking soda, corn starch, and cream of tartar are the powdered base of a bubble bar.  In addition, vegetable glycerin is added to moisten the ingredients, turning it into a dough.  Once a bubble bar is formed, no matter the shape or type, it will need time to harden.  It can take several days for the bubble bars to harden.  However, once they have hardened, they can be crumbled under warm running bath water and will create a bubble bath.  While it is a solid bar, it will create a bubble bath the same way a traditional liquid bubble bath would.

Bubble Bars:  How Are They Colored?

When coloring a bubble bar, you can use either our Da Bomb Soap Dyes or our FUN Soap Colorants.  Either one will work in a bubble bar.  Both will create a beautifully colored bubble bar.  In addition, you can add powdered herbs to naturally color your bubble bars.

Bubble Bars:  How Are They Scented?

Bubble bars can be scented with any of Natures Garden’s body safe fragrance oils.  We recommend using 1%-2% of the concentrated fragrance oil in your bubble bar recipe.

Bubble Bars:  How Do I Shape the Bubble Bars?

Bubble bars are formed, often times, into a rolled loaf, then, sliced like a loaf of bread.  However, they can also be hand formed into a variety of shapes.  You can create a unicorn horn, a rainbow, an animal, a flower, or even ice cream scoops.  The possibilities are endless.

Bubble Bars:  How Are They Used?

Bubble bars are very simple to use.  You simply crumble a bubble bar under warm running water.  Then, your bath tub will fill with bubbles.

Bubble Bars:  A Few Bubble Bar Tutorials

Below, we will talk about a few of the bubble bar recipes we have created.  We will talk about the scoopable bubble bars as well as one of our rolled bubble bars recipes.  These tutorials will give you step by step instruction on creating bubble bars.

A Few Bubble Bar Tutorials:  Scoopable Bubble Bars

First, one of our scooped bubble bar recipes.  The dough for these types of bubble bars are created just like any bubble bar.  Then, it is place in the mixing bowl.  Finally, it is scooped just like ice cream.  Then, the ice cream scoop bubble bars simply need time to setup before using them.  You can create our Galaxy Bubble Bars, pictured to the left, in this manner.

A Few Bubble Bar Tutorials: Rolled Bubble Bars

Now, we will talk about a rolled loaf bubble bar recipe.  This type of bubble bar is rolled out just like cookie dough.  You can create multiples layers simply placing rolled out layers directly on top of each other.  Then, you roll the bubble bar dough, in the same manner, you would roll up a pumpkin roll or a jelly roll.  Finally, you simply slice the rolled like just like you would a loaf of bread.  Once the bubble bar hardens, you can use a slice for your bubble bath.  To use your bubble bar, simply crumble a slice under your warm running bath water.

Hopefully, this helps to give you an understanding bath bombs vs bubble bars. Both have a wonderful and fun purpose but they are two different types of products.  If you are looking for even more bubble bar or bath bomb tutorials, click here.  You will find an array of recipes that you can create and use at home or for your business.