Tag Archives: candle scent oil

Jun
29

Common Candle Making Questions


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Common Candle Making QuestionsCommon Candle Making Questions

All of us at Natures Garden understand that it can be difficult to create perfect candles. Especially if you have serious scent throw issues popping up, it can be frustrating to put time and money into candles that don’t work that way you want. So, we want to answer some common candle making questions to prevent confusion and save you from all that extra troubleshooting. So, let’s talk about common problems so we can get back to creating gorgeous homemade candles!

Common Candle Making Questions About Candle Wax

First, we are going to talk about questions that often come up in relation to candle wax.

Common Candle Making Questions: How Do You Melt Candle Wax at Home?Common Candle Making Questions: How Do You Melt Candle Wax at Home?

You can use a pouring pot and a stove top to melt your wax at home. Also, we recommend using a double boiler method where you have a larger pot with water in it and set your pouring pot full of wax inside. Turn the stove on to medium and allow the water in your pot to boil. This will safely heat your wax without letting it get too hot.

Common Candle Making Questions: Which is the Best Wax for Candle Making?

Choosing the best wax all depends on preference of what you prefer in a finished candle. First, we have soy waxes that are vegan, gluten free, and natural candle waxes. This is the least expensive wax, has a fantastic cold throw, and has a cleaner burn, but it is tricky to get a great hot throw with some fragrances. Also, Soy Wax often has frosting and a rougher finish.

Next, we have paraffin wax, which has the best scent throw, and is in both the Wow Wax and Joy Wax. The Joy wax uses a mixture of paraffin and soy, so it has a cleaner burn due to the soy wax and a really good hot scent throw due to the paraffin wax. Also, it clings to the candle containers better and has less frosting. An option for creating a translucent candle is gel wax, but it isn’t compatible with all fragrances.

Additionally, you can use palm wax, which comes from sustainable sources, has a beautiful crystal finish, and has a great scent throw. Natures Garden carries sustainable palm container and pillar wax. Lastly, Pillar of Bliss Wax and Palm Pillar wax are great options for creating pillars or wax tarts.

Common Candle Making Questions For Making Soy Candles

Since soy wax is so popular among our customers, we wanted to answer some of the most common questions asked about making soy candles.

Common Candle Making Questions: What is the Best Temperature to Pour Soy Wax?Common Candle Making Questions: What is the Best Temperature to Pour Soy Wax?

This temperature depends on the type of soy wax being used. We recommend pouring our 100% soy wax at 110 degrees Fahrenheit. For the Golden Brands 444 or Golden Brands 464, we suggest pouring at 135 degrees Fahrenheit

Common Candle Making Questions: What is the Best Temperature to Add Fragrance to Soy Wax?

For heavier fragrance oils with high flash points, we recommend adding the scented oil at 185 degrees Fahrenheit. However, lighter fragrances with lower flash points, Ike citrus scents, would be added around 160 degrees Fahrenheit

Common Candle Making Questions: Which Wick is Best for Soy Candles?

Many customers perfer to use a cotton wick for their soy candles. We have two types of cotton wicks available, which are HTP and CD candle wicks.

Common Candle Making Questions: How Do You Make Soy Wax Melts?

Although we don’t carry soy wax in a pillar form for melts, you can still create soy wax melts with container wax. Often, customers will use individual portion cups to package wax melts like these, which can be used to squeeze the wax into the wax burner. This is because it is softer than pillar wax and is difficult to get out of clamshells. However, this wax will not hold the shape from a mold. In fact, it will get stuck in your mold and be difficult to clean.  Another option when making wax melts with a container wax is to add stearic acid to the wax to harden it.

Common Candle Making Questions About Candle Fragrance

Fragrance is important for creating great scented candles, so its important to know how to get your scented candle oil to work for you!

Common Candle Making Questions: Why Don’t My Candles Have a Good Scent Throw?

This issue could have a few different possible causes. First, you may not have added enough fragrance, which should be 1 oz. per pound on average. However, Natures Garden waxes will allow you to add up to 10% in most cases.  Also, your candle may have a clogged wick. This could be due to adding too much fragrance, vybar, or another additive. Also, additives like mica and crayons will clog your wick.

Another possibility is the type of wax you are using. A wax like paraffin will have a better scent throw than soy waxes. Finally, it is possible that you have the wrong size wick. If you wick is too small, then the flame will not be hot enough to get the aroma into the air. On the other hand, a wick that is too large will burn the scent oil before it can be released into the air.

Common Candle Making Questions: What is Vybar Used for in Candle Making?Common Candle Making Questions: What is Vybar Used for in Candle Making?

If you have a poor scent throw and you have tried trouble shooting, then you may want to use vybar. The vybar can be used to increase scent throw by adding some amount between a fourth and a half teaspoon per pound of wax. Just be cautious not to add too much or it can clog your wick and reduce your scent throw. We suggest using Vybar 103 for pillar candles and Vybar 206 for container candles.

Common Candle Making Questions: Why Is Fragrance Oil Settling to the Bottom of the Candle?

If you notice that fragrance is settling at either the top or bottom of your candle, then there could be a few reasons to explain it. First, you’ve added too much fragrance oil. Another option is that the wax you are using isn’t porous enough and you may need a more porous wax. Along with this idea, waxes that have been burned or heated too much may reduce in their ability to hold fragrance.  Finally, you may have not stirred enough to fully incorporate the fragrance oil.

Common Candle Making Questions: Can You Use Essential Oils in a Wax Warmer?Common Candle Making Questions: Can You Use Essential Oils in a Wax Warmer?

While some essential oils can be used in wax warmers, it can be a bit tricky. You need to make sure that they are diluted with either a carrier oil or DPG. Additionally, some essential oils have flashpoints that are too low for a wax warmer. So, you will want to do some testing with the essential oils that you choose.

Common Candle Making Questions About Candle Wicks

Choosing the right wick is another important part of candle making. Otherwise, your candle might not be as effective as it could be.

Common Candle Making Questions: Why is My Candle Wick Drowning Out?Common Candle Making Questions: Why is My Candle Wick Drowning Out?

This could be due to either a small wick or a high candle. First, the wick you used may be too small for a candle of this diameter, which you can use our Candle Wick Chart for reference. Also, your wick could be drowning if you poured your candle wax up too high. You should stop pouring before the wax passes the part of the candle jar that changes shape and begins to curve for the lip.

Common Candle Making Questions: Why Isn’t My Candle Wax Not Burning Evenly All of the Way Down?

Uneven burning could be due to either the wax or the wick. First, the wick may be too small for your candle’s size. Also, the wax that you chose could be too hard. While you could use a softer wax instead, you could also switch to a hotter wick.

Common Candle Making Questions About General Candle Making

Lastly, we have some general questions about making candles that could be useful for crafting perfect candles.

Common Candle Making Questions: Sometimes I Follow All Recommendations and I Still Can’t Seem to Get it Right. Why is That?

There are many factors that can influence the outcome of your homemade candles. First, fragrance oils can impact a candle, as thicker scented oils require you to wick up to get a hotter burn. Also, the room temperature can effect your candles. If the room is too cold, then you can have more issues with glass adhesion and frosting because your candle will setup very quickly.

Additionally, you could have an issue where the scent doesn’t smell as strong because you are used to it. When you are around a scent for too long, your nose will adjust and you won’t notice it as much. If this happens to you, then don’t worry too much just take a break from the scent for awhile and your nose will recognize it again after a long enough break.

Common Candle Making Questions: Why are My Layers Bleeding in my Candle?

This color issue could have one of a few different causes. First, the layers were too hot. If you don’t wait long enough or pour your wax too soon, then the layers can melt one another and start to run into one another. Also, it could be due to over saturating your candle with fragrance, as the extra scented oil will blend with colorant and bring the color with it as it seeps out of the candle.

Common Candle Making Questions: Can I Use Mica in Candles?Common Candle Making Questions: Can I Use Mica in Candles?

We recommend that you don’t mix mica into the candle itself, because it will clog the wick. But, you can use mica to decorate the outside of pillar candles! After your pillar is created you can then, use the mica on the outer portion of your candle. This shimmery mixture can be used to provide a beautiful sparkle on the outside of your candles.

Common Candle Making Questions: Can Mica be used in Wax Melts?

Sure! Since we don’t have to worry about clogging the wick, you can mix it straight into the candle wax.

 

Common Candle Making Questions: How Do I Get Rid of the Air Bubbles in My Candles?

There are a few reasons why air bubbles could get trapped in your candles, which include water exposure and pouring at a cooler temperature. So, how do you prevent air bubble in a homemade candle? First, keep water away from your work station. Also, you can try pouring your wax at a hotter temperature. Further, pour your candle wax slowly and make sure to stop before you hit pour point where your jar begins to change shape. 

Common Candle Making Questions: Can You Melt Old Candles to Make New Ones?Common Candle Making Questions: Can You Melt Old Candles to Make New Ones?

We don’t recommend re-purposing old candles to make new ones. While this may seem like a create idea to take all you half used candles and make a new one, the scent is a big concern in this case. If these candles are scented, then they will already contain fragrance oil. Once you melt your old candles, the scent may fade, but many of the wax particles are still holding on to some of the scent oil. This means that you won’t be able to add enough fragrance oil without over saturating your candle. Since the candle already is holding scent, this extra fragrance will seep out and sit on the top of your candle, which is dangerous and can result in a flame that is too large.

Common Candle Making Questions: Reach Out to UsCommon Candle Making Questions: Reach Out to Us

Hopefully, we were able to get some of your more pressing questions answered. If you have any more questions or concerns about making your own candles, then please reach out to us. We are always happy to help! You can stop by the store, give us a call, or talk to us on social media. If you want to find us online, we have a Natures Garden Facebook page, Twitter (@ngscents), and Instagram (@ngscents). Good luck and have fun with candle making!

Jun
14

Candle Making Terminology


This entry was posted in candle colorant, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle molds, candle recipe, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, candles and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Candle Making TerminologyCandle Making Terminology

We at Natures Garden know that there is a lot of candle making terminology and techniques that you need to know to make great homemade candles. So, we are going to answer some common candle making questions and problems to make your experience more fun. So, set aside your candle making equipment and let’s figure out how to make gorgeous scented candles!

Candle Making Terminology: Types of Candles

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Pillar Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Pillar Candle?

Pillar candles are free-standing candles that don’t require a container. These often use a harder type of candle wax that is made for creating pillar candles, like Pillar of Bliss Wax or Palm Pillar Wax.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Votive Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Votive Candle?

Votive Candles are a smaller kind of candle. The average size is 1.5 ounces and they are about two inches tall and one and a half inches wide. These are often made with a Votive Mold.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Tealight Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Tealight Candle?

Tea Lights are very small candles that are about an inch and a half wide and a half inch tall. They can be made in Tea Light Cups .

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Fragrances

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Fragrance Load Mean?

In candle making, fragrance load refers to the amount of fragrance oil that you are using in your homemade candle recipe.

Candle Making Terminology: My Candle Wax Will Hold a 10% Fragrance Load. How Do I Know How Much to Add?Candle Making Terminology: My Candle Wax Will Hold a 10% Fragrance Load. How Do I Know How Much to Add?

All you need to do is some simple math that we will walk you through! First, weigh the amount of candle wax you are using. Then, multiply this amount by 0.10, which is 10% to determine the amount of fragrance oil that you can use.

  • Formula: Candle Wax Weight X Fragrance Percentage = Amount of Fragrance That Can Be Added
  • Example: 20 (ounces of candle wax) X 0.10 = 2 ounces of fragrance oil So, since your candle wax is in ounces, the fragrance amount that can be added to the candle wax will also be in ounces.
Candle Making Terminology: What Does Scent Throw Mean?

The scent throw is the strength of fragrance that the candle releases into the air. Cold throw is the strength of scent when the candle is not lit yet. Hot throw is the strength of the scent throw when the candle is lit and burning.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Waxes

Candle Making Terminology: What Kind of Wax Should I Use for Candles?Candle Making Terminology: What Kind of Wax Should I Use for Candles?

Choosing a candle wax type depends on the type of candle that you want to create. So, the isn’t a universal answer to the question, “Which is the best wax for candle making?” For example, pillar candles would require a pillar wax, which includes Pillar of Bliss Candle Wax and Palm Pillar Wax. The Pillar of Bliss Wax is a blend of soy and paraffin that has a great scent throw and a creamy finish. The Palm Pillar Wax has a crystal finish, has a wonderful scent throw, and comes form sustainable sources.

However, container candles would be best with a container wax, which includes soy wax, Joy wax, WOW Wax, palm wax, and gel wax. Soy wax would make a great, inexpensive addition to your natural candle making supplies. It has a clean burn and and excellent cold throw, but it can be tricky to get a good hot throw from certain fragrances. Wow wax is mostly paraffin and has an amazing hot throw, but has a less clean burn. Joy wax is a perfect blend of paraffin wax and soy wax, as well as veggie wax and proprietary ingredients, that provides a cleaner burn with an amazing scent throw. Gel wax has a neat translucent look, but is not compatible with all fragrance oils. Our palm wax comes from sustainable sources that aren’t harming the rainforest, has a beautiful crystal appearance, and a great scent throw.

Candle Making Terminology: What is Granulated Wax?Candle Making Terminology: What is Granulated Wax?

Simply, this is wax that is grainy and looks kind of like sand. This wax can be scented and colored without melting, so it is a easy and fun way to create candles with kids. We have made candle recipes like the Bacon Candle Recipe and the Hydrangea Candle Recipe with this type of wax.

Candle Making Terminology: Crucial Temperatures

Candle Making Terminology: Do I Need to Worry About the Temperatures When Making Candles?Candle Making Terminology: Do I Need to Worry About the Temperatures When Making Candles?

Yes, this is very important for creating quality homemade candles! There are a few key moments where you will need a thermometer to be aware of the temperature of your wax. First, you need to make sure that your fragrance oil isn’t added at a temperature that is too hot. If your fragrance is added at a temperature that is too high, then some of the notes may burn off and leave you with a less satisfying scent. Another issue is pouring your wax into the container too soon. If you pour at a temperature that is too cool, you could have improper adhesion, wet spots, sinking, and other issues. So, be sure to check your wax’s description to see the temperature that is should be poured.

Candle Making Terminology: What does sinkhole mean?

Sinkhole is a hole or cavity that appears on your candle as it is setting up. Often, this occurs when the candle wax is poured at too low of a temperature.

Candle Making Terminology: Can You Cool a Candle in the Fridge?Candle Making Terminology: Can You Cool a Candle in the Fridge?

No, candles should cool as slowly as possible on their own. If you place a candle in the fridge to cool, they may not adhere to the glass properly, which can lead to wet spots.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Wicks

Candle Making Terminology: Choosing the Right WickCandle Making Terminology: Choosing the Right Wick

The size of your wick depends on the diameter of your container. You can see the radius for each wick under it’s description. However, you will still need to test because there are many variable between wax type and fragrance oil. A fragrance with a high flash point and high specific gravity, like vanilla, requires a hotter burn. But, low flash point scents with low specific gravity, like citrus, need a smaller wick. Also, you may hear the terms “wick up’ and “wick down” when talking about find the right wick size. Wick down means that you should use a wick that is smaller than what you have been using and wick up means that you should use a wick that is larger than what you use for candles this size.

Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Stop a Candle From Tunneling?Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Stop a Candle From Tunneling?

If you don’t know, tunneling is often the answer for the question, “Why isn’t my candle wax not burning evenly all of the way down?” Tunneling can happen for a few reasons, which includes issues with wick size. If your wick is too small for the diameter of your candle, then it will not burn all the way to the outside edge. So, you may either need a larger wick, multiple wicks, or a different type of wick that will burn hotter.

However, there are a few other issues that could cause tunneling. If you think your wick is the right size, then look into some of these potential issues, First, you may have a clogged wick, which can cause uneven burning. Also, it could be that you didn’t do a memory burn for the candle’s first use to ensure a proper burn. Finally, you may need to use a wax that has a lower melt point that is easier for you chosen wick to handle.

Candle Making Terminology: Why Are My Candle Jars Black After I Burn My Candles?

Often, this occurs when you wick is too big for your jar or your wick is too long. If your wick is trimmed down to 1/4 inch, then the length is fine. You can check the suggested radius for your wick to see if you need to get a smaller size. Also, using too much fragrance can clog the wick and cause more soot than normal.

Candle Making Terminology: Do Candle Wicks Contain Lead?

No, candle wicks in the Unites States, like ours, do not contain lead. In fact, lead core wicks were banned in the US in 2003.

Candle Making Terminology: Proper Burning

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Memory Burn?

This is the first burn of your candles and is the most important. This burn will set the boundary of your melt pool and will determines whether the edges of your candle will be reached. A guide is to burn an hour for every inch your candle is wide to ensure that it will burn properly as it is used in future burns. Also, you will want to make sure that you wick isn’t too low and isn’t longer than 1/4 inch high.

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Melt Pool Mean?

Melt Pool is the candle wax that has melted on the top of the candle. Ideally, you will want this to be all the way across the top of your candle to ensure an even burn.

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Mushrooming Mean in Candle Making?

When I notice black clumps on top of my wick, I know that it is mushrooming. While all wick produce this carbon as they burn, some are worse than others. Also, factors that clog the wick can increase the mushrooming effect. The CD wicks produce the least amount of mushrooming, but there isn’t a way to completely stop it due to it being a product of burning the wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Coloring

Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Color a Candle?Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Color a Candle?

There are a few different candle colorant options for your home made candles. First, you can use our Liquid Candle Dyes, which are extremely concentrated and will last a long time. Also, you can use a color block, which is made with paraffin, vegan, and can color up to 15 pounds of wax. Lastly, you can use a bit of powder dye. Just be careful not to use too much because it can clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Can You Use Crayons to Make Candles?

We do not suggest using crayons to color candles. They don’t burn properly and are likely to clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a UV Light Inhibitor?Candle Making Terminology: What is a UV Light Inhibitor?

Since UV light from the sun can bleach the color out of candles, the UV light inhibitor is used to protect the color of your candles. This candle ingredient is most useful for preventing fading in burgundy, blue, and violet candle colors due to direct sunlight.

Candle Making Terminology: How Do I Color My Candles White?

While titanium dioxide can be used to create white pillar candles, you don’t want to add it straight to your container candles as it can clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Apearance

Candle Making Terminology: How Do I Get Rid of Wet Spots on My Candles?

Wet spots are air pockets that are formed when your candle didn’t adhere properly to your candle jar. You can take a few steps to prevent this if you are having problems. First, try warming your candle jars to give you wax more time to cool. Also, you can try pouring your wax at a hotter temperature. Another good tip is to make sure the room your are making your candles in a room that is warm.

Candle Making Terminology: What Is Frosting In Candle Making?

Frosting is the white stuff that appears on waxes that contain soy wax. You can use a heat gun or blow dryer to re-melt the surface and give it a smoother finish. While you can lessen the effect of frosting, you can’t eliminate it completely.

Candle Making Terminology: What Are Jump Lines?

These are the line that you can see on the side of either a container candle or a pillar candle.

Candle Making Terminology: Progression of Candles

As you can tell, there is a lot that goes into candle making. But, it is a process that has been developed overtime and takes time to master. If you are interested in learning a bit about the evolution of candles, then check out The History of Candles from Prehistoric Times Until Now by Pioneer Thinking.

Candle Making Terminology: Talk to UsCandle Making Terminology: Talk to Us

If you have any more questions about candle making, you can look at our candle making classes or just ask us! We are on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter (@ngscents).

Apr
30

Plumeria Candle Recipe


This entry was posted in candle fragrance oils, candle making supplies, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, wholesale fragrance oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Plumeria Candle RecipePlumeria Candle Recipe

If you are looking for some beautiful candle making recipes, then you will definitely want to check out our Plumeria Candle Recipe! This Natures Garden recipe is perfect for creating a gorgeous, floral scented candle that is absolutely gorgeous. Plus, this recipe walks you through creating homemade flower wax embeds for your candles! Together, the floral scent of our Plumeria Fragrance Oil and the flower wax embeds creates a unique recipe that you will absolutely want to try out!

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Ingredients Available From Natures Garden

Joy Wax

Sunflower Wax

Plumeria Fragrance Oil

CD Candle Wicks (100 wicks)

Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye Burgundy

Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye- Purple

Pouring Pot

Thermometer

Silicone Soap Mold (optional)

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Other Ingredients and Supplies

Mixing Spoon

Hot Glue Gun

Stove

Scale

A Pot (for double boiler)

Apothecary Jar

Toothpicks

Paper Bowl and Wax Paper (or Silicone Soap Mold)

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Weights and Amounts

3 ounces of the Joy Wax

30 grams of the Sunflower Wax

3 grams of the Plumeria Fragrance Oil

A tiny bit of the Burgundy Liquid Candle Dye

A Few Drops of the Purple Liquid Candle Dye

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Sanitize and Prepare Your Work Space

Before you begin creating your scented candles, you will want to organize and clean your work space. You can start by making sure you have enough space to work on your candle. Also, you will need to wipe down your work space. Next, you will want to gather your supplies and equipment. If any of your equipment is dirty, then make sure that you wash them before beginning your project. After everything has been cleaned and prepared, you are ready to move on to the next step.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare Double Boiler

For this recipe, you are going to need a double boiler. If you know how to create a double boiler for candlemaking, then move on to your recipe. Otherwise, we can explain to you how it works. Since you will need to use an pouring pot, this will act as the inner portion of your double boiler. The pouring pot will hold your melting wax and will be placed inside the larger pot. The larger pot will hold the heated water. Now that the double boiler has been made, it will be placed on the stove top on medium heat to melt your wax.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Get the Sunflower Wax Ready

First, you will need to use the double boiler to melt the Sunflower Wax. So, weigh out 30 grams of this wax and add it to the double boiler. As the wax melts, you should be mixing every so often. While the double boiler will help prevent scorching, you should keep an eye on it and stir occasionally. After your wax has entirely melted, you will be ready to move on to the next steps for coloring and scenting.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Adding the Candle ColorantPlumeria Candle Recipe: Adding the Candle Colorant

Then, you will be adding some candle colorant to your melted Sunflower Wax. Since we are going to be adding less than a drop of the liquid dye, we will need a toothpick to add this amount. So, take the toothpick and dip it into the purple Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye to your Sunflower Wax. Then, you will need to swirl the dipped toothpick in the melted wax. Make sure that you mix this well to fully incorporate the color.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Scent the Sunflower WaxPlumeria Candle Recipe: Scent the Sunflower Wax

Next, you are going to want to scent your freshly melted wax.  We will be using Plumeria Fragrance Oil, which is perfect for this candle and has a gorgeous floral scent. This fragrance is a sweet, fruity floral aroma that is composed of tropical Plumeria flowers, fresh fruity top notes, on a lovely green bottom. So, take three grams of this delightful candle oil and add it to the melted Sunflower Oil.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Preparing Your Flower Parts

Now,  you are going to start preparing the wax for your flower candle embeds. This wax will need to be a thin layer, which we will use to cut out the flowers. One way you can create this is pouring a small amount into the bottom of a mold, like the square loaf mold. Alternatively, you can line a pan with wax paper and pour a thin layer of wax in this. Either way, you will need to remove the wax at a point where it has set up but still warm.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Cut Out Your Flower PartsPlumeria Candle Recipe: Cut Out Your Flower Parts

Once your thin layers of wax are set up, you will want to cut out your petals and circles. You can use a knife, toothpick, or anything that you have that is pointy and tough enough to cut out your shapes. Also, you will need to have two circles and about twelve or so petals. The exact number of petals you will need depends on their size. Since you will need a couple extra petals on top of the candle, you will want to make a few extra petals. So, the exact number that you need for your flowers isn’t extremely important yet.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Creating the Other Flower PartsPlumeria Candle Recipe: Creating the Other Flower Parts

Now, you are going to need to repeat these previous steps using two different colors. For one of the rounds you will use one drop of purple liquid candle colorant. After these pieces are created, you can move on to the last set of flower parts. The last round will be colored with a tiny amount of the burgundy candle colorant. Again, you can use a toothpick to add this color to your melted Sunflower Wax.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare the Candle JarPlumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare the Candle Jar

Before we start adding the candle wax to the container, you will need to prepare the candle jar. So, heat up your hot glue gun to adhere two of the CD-12 candle wicks to the bottom of your jar. You will want to make sure that they are as straight and even as possible. Otherwise, your finished candle won’t burn evenly and could result in tunneling. Plus, awkwardly placed wicks could ruin the pretty design! So, it would be best to be careful on this step.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare the Purple LayerPlumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare the Purple Layer

Now, we are ready to create the first layer for our scented candle. We will start by weighing 3 ounces of Joy Wax and melting it in the double boiler. Remember to mix the melting wax every so often. Once this is melted we are going to add in the colorant. Put two drops of the purple Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye into the melted wax and stir to fully incorporate the color.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Pouring the Bottom LayerPlumeria Candle Recipe: Pouring the Purple Layer

Next, you are going to scent and pour the purple layer. So, add 0.3 ounces of the Plumeria Fragrance Oil to the melted purple wax and mix to incorporate the scent. After, you are ready to pour this layer into the jar. Once this layer has been carefully poured into the jar you will need to straighten your wicks before the wax sets up. You may want to have something across the top of the jar to steady your wicks.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Adding the Wax Embed Flowers Plumeria Candle Recipe: Adding the Wax Embed Flowers

Now, you are ready to start setting up your embed flowers. So, you are going to begin adhering your flower parts to the jar. Start by pressing one of your circles to the inside of the glass jar. Make sure that you hold the wax circle in place by pressing gently until it has completely adhered. Then, adhere the petals of a different color around the circle in a similar fashion to the picture to the left. You will continue to evenly space out the rest of your flowers around the jar. We had six flowers total, but this amount may vary depending on the size of your petals.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Preparing the White LayerPlumeria Candle Recipe: Preparing the White Layer

Next, you are going to create the white layer for behind your wax flower embeds. So, weigh out 11 ounces of Joy Wax and add it to the apothecary jar. You will need to melt the wax using the double boiler method with occasional mixing. After, you will need to add 1.1 ounces of the Plumeria Fragrance Oil. Before you go to pour in this layer you need to measure the temperature. Otherwise, you could possibly melt and mess up your wax flower embeds! Use a thermometer to determine when your wax has dropped to about 150 F, which is a safe temperature range to pour your white layer. Once it reaches this temperature you can pour in this layer.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Allow the White Layer to Set UpPlumeria Candle Recipe: Allow the White Layer to Set Up

Now that you poured in the white layer into the base of your candle, your creation is nearly complete! Just make sure that both of your wicks are centered. Make sure that you center your wicks before this white layer completely sets up. Then, you just need to wait for this top layer to harden and set up. Once your white layer has set up you can move on to creating the whipped topping.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare the Whipped WaxPlumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare the Whipped Wax

Next, we are going to create the whipped wax topping for this candle. So, weigh out 8 ounces of Joy Wax and put it into the apothecary pot. After the wax has completely melted, you can add 0.8 ounces of the Plumeria Fragrance Oil. After, let your wax begin to set up. Before it completely sets up, you will need to whip the wax. Once the wax is well whipped and before it completely sets up, you can put the wax on top of the base of your candle.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Decorating the Top of the CandlePlumeria Candle Recipe: Decorating the Top of the Candle

Immediately after adding your whipped wax you will want to start adding your extra petals to the top of your candle. This will make sure that your petals stick to the candle and won’t fall off. So, start taking your differently colored petals and placing them on top of the candle. Make sure that you press them lightly into the wax, so they are able to stay in place. Once all your petals have been placed, use a pencil to curl your two candle wicks.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Letting Your Candles Set UpPlumeria Candle Recipe: Letting Your Candles Set Up

Finally, your candles are complete! But, you are going to want to wait a day or two for your candle to cure before using your candle. While it can be tempting to use your candle early, it will be worth the wait and work so much better after letting it cure! Allowing your candle to cure for 24-48 hours will give the wax time to absorb the scent and provide a better scent throw.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: History of Plumeria Plumeria Candle Recipe: History of Plumeria

If you love the aroma of the Plumeria Fragrance Oil, then you may want to learn more about the history of this gorgeous, tropical flower. One interesting fact about these exotic flowers is that their origin was not actually Hawaii. While the gorgeous Plumeria flowers are commonly associated with these exotic islands, these were actually brought to Hawaii from Mexico in the nineteenth century. However, this beautiful flower has been incorporated in many lovely, tropical lands, like Hawaii, the Carribean, Indonesia, and many others! For those that are interested in finding out more, you can learn even more about this flower and others by clicking here to read all about the Plumeria History by Tropical Flowers and Plants.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Find Us On Social Media

Reaching out to Natures Garden on social media is a quick and easy way to get questions answered, share your creations, or see what we are up to. Not only would we love to see what you have created with our products, but we are often creating new and exciting craft recipes. So, there is always a great reason to find us online. You can find us on the Natures Garden Facebook page. Also, we are available on both Twitter and Instagram with @ngscents. We hope to hear from you soon!

Aug
08

Wisteria BLVD Fragrance Oil


This entry was posted in candle making supplies, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, Soap making supplies, wholesale fragrance oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Wisteria BLVD Fragrance OilWisteria BLVD Fragrance Oil – Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Wisteria BLVD Fragrance Oil is a fruit and floral scent by Natures Garden. This aroma is a gorgeous and very feminine scent that floral and fruit scents with soft undertones of vanilla and musk that create a fragrance oil perfect for women. Whether you are looking to scent your scrubs, lotions, perfumes, or even handcrafted soaps this lovely fragrance oil is perfect for your creations.

What Does Wisteria BLVD Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

Compare this fragrance oil by Natures Garden to Wisteria Lane.  This classic floral fragrance comprises ultra-feminine notes of Wisteria, Rose, Violet and Ylang with undertones of precious woods and tender musks for a captivating and enchanting scent.

Top Notes: Melon, Peach, Coconut, Apple
Middle Notes: Ylang Ylang, Rose, Jasmine, Violet, Wisteria
Base Notes: Vanilla, Musk

How Do Our Customers Use Wisteria BLVD Fragrance Oil in Room Scenting Recipes?

Many of our customers that enjoy room scenting creations can enjoy this this lovely floral fragrance oil in their products. For those making homemade potpourri, this sweet scent can be used at a 50% rate. Also, incense stick and incense cone recipes can contain up to 50% of this floral fragrance oil. Natural homemade household cleaners are able to include a maximum of 5% of this scent. Diy aroma beads air freshener recipes can be created with this sweet musk aroma.

Also, customers create homemade scented candles with this feminine fragrance oil. Candles that are made of either vegetable waxes or paraffin wax can use up to 10% of this scent. Candle products made of either wow wax or joy wax have been found to perform perfectly. Strongly scented soy candles can be made perfectly with this feminine aroma as well. If you would enjoy coloring your wax creations, then we would like to suggest that you use purple color blocks. Another option, two drops of Spectrum purple liquid candle dye will work nicely. If you choose to color these products differently, then we would recommend that you avoid crayons as they clog wicks.

How Do Our Customers Use Wisteria BLVD Fragrance Oil in Bath and Body Recipes?

Homemade cosmetic makers can include Wisteria Blvd fragrance oil in their bath and body recipes. Handmade body butters, scented creams, homemade perfumes, and other related products can use up to 5% of this floral aroma. If you are wanting to use this fragrance in soap, then check out its characteristics in soap from our cold process soap testing video. Soap batches that use this floral scent will have no acceleration, no ricing, and no separation. Also, the bars will have no discoloration and the scent will remain very strong after the soaps all cure. If you would like to color any of your bath and body products that use this classy fragrance oil, then we would like to suggest that you include some purple liquid candle dye in the amount that you would prefer. Those who color their creations differently should never include any form of candle dye.

We hope that you enjoy this sweet vanilla, floral, and musk blend in your own handcrafted creations!