Tag Archives: rose clay powder

Sep
27

Natural Soap Colorants: Katie Makes Soap Part 2


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, citrus notes, melt and pour soap, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Wholesale, red Moroccan clay, Rose Clay, soap, soap colorants, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Natural Soap ColorantsHi, there! It’s me, Katie, again. I’ve already told you about my first attempt at soapmaking. and guess what? I made more soap! Or at least tried to. This time I decided to experiment with natural soap colorants in melt and pour soap. (Different soap processes can affect natural colorants differently, but you’re generally OK with melt and pour- read the pages on the colorants for more information.) I wanted to make a color gradient with natural soap colorants, and I had the following powders: Red Moroccan Clay Powder, Orange Peel Powder, Carrot Powder, Rose Clay Powder, and Lemon Peel Powder. I used red clay, orange peel, and carrot in my first soap, and I got rose clay and lemon peel for a pink lemonade soap idea that I had (didn’t work out, going to try again- that blog will be coming soon!).

So, when you want to disperse a powder evenly in soap for coloring purposes, you want to ‘wet’ it with vegetable glycerin. Soap loves glycerin. I got a two pound slab of Shea Butter Melt and Pour, and first cut it in half because I was using a 1lb loaf mold. Then- lucky me- that slab was divided evenly into 20 squares- five rows of four- and I had five powders- so I separated my melt and pour base into five cups of four squares each. Then I measured out 0.1 oz of each powder into separate lil glass bowls. (One tenth of an ounce is the smallest amount [in ounces] that my scale would register.) I added 0.1 oz of veggie glycerin to each of my fruit and veggie powders, but the lemon peel powder was not mixing well- so I added more! I used 0.2 oz veggie glycerin for my fruit and veggie powders. I had to beat out the lumps of the carrot powder but with the extra veggie glycerin, it ended up being a very thin liquid. The others were more like pastes. I added 0.1 oz of veggie glycerin to my clay powders and that was enough to turn them into a workable texture. Woohoo! Here are my powders lined up:Powders

Out of habit, I had originally thought the lemon peel mixture would be the lightest- yellow, right? But it was actually a light brown. Hmm. Well. My eyes didn’t lie. So I lined the powders up this way since it seemed to be the most aesthetically pleasing- looked like a gradient and that’s what I was going for.

This time, I used the microwave for my melting and wow, that was so much faster and easier than trying to use the stove. I still wasn’t 100% sure on my carrot, orange, and lemon powders being in the correct order for a proper gradient (lemon = yellow, right, brain?) so I put my four squares each of melt and pour (cut up, of course, for easier melting) into three glass containers with spouts and thoroughly stirred in my powder-glycerin mixtures.

Natural Soap Colorants

Lemon was clearly the darkest of the three. It was a close call between carrot and orange, but orange was definitely closer to the color of the lemon powder soap. Well, alright. I had to melt them again because melt and pour isn’t really designed for stopping and taking photos and then I began pouring them into the mold one layer at a time. I poured my carrot layer first and sprayed the top with rubbing alcohol to get rid of air bubbles. I let that sit for.. I’m not sure exactly- about half an hour? It was only 1/5 of a pound so it didn’t take too terribly long to set up. Then I sprayed the top of that layer with rubbing alcohol (it evaporates out- so no worries there) and poured the next layer, sprayed it with rubbing alcohol, and let it set up. I repeated these steps for all five layers.

Natural Soap ColorantsI let the soap sit for a while before I popped it out of the mold to admire it, and then waited even longer before I cut it. I ended up with five ~1″ thick bars. I just cut it on a cutting board with a big knife- nothing fancy, so it’s not exact. And behold these beauties: the dark spots in the middle layers are likely spots where my powder clumped up but the carrot powder also seemed to settle into little specks on the bottom. I like it. It’s super cute. The lemon layer is also the most malleable, the other layers are quite hard and the lemon layer has a small bit of give. This bar smells slightly citrus-y near the lemon and orange layers, but overall, no overwhelming scent – I was more focused on the appearance anyway. It lathers like a dream, though. <3

Natural Soap ColorantsWhat did I learn? Well, the concentration of your powder is very important in determining coloring. That failed soap I mentioned above? I used the same amount of rose clay powder (and veggie glycerin to color an entire pound of it and you can really tell the difference 5x colorant concentration makes. The red clay layer actually looks closer to the solid-colored soap. Interesting. I think if I made another gradient soap, I would pick one colorant and do the different layers in different concentrations. No guess work when it comes to the proper order that way. It’s also been brought to my attention that certain non-clay powders may have the tendency to oxidize and eventually turn brown. I think they worked well in this soap not to mention the added benefits, but I may stick with clay for colorants in the future.

Here’s my first soap side-by-side with my second soap. So cute! Different combinations and different concentrations make different colors. I can’t wait to experiment with this further!

SidebySide

Dec
12

Uses of Rose Clay


This entry was posted in All About Rose Clay, Cosmetic Rose CLay, How to Use Rose Clay, Rose Clay, Rose Clay Benefits, Rose Clay in Cosmetics, Rose Clay in Soap, Uses of Rose Clay, What is Rose Clay and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

uses of rose clayUses of Rose Clay

Hello everyone! For all you crafters out there, are you working on any new projects? Are you looking for new projects to try? Have your customers been asking you for something new and exciting? Or maybe you’re just looking for a new way to spice up your future crafts or for a new product to use for beautiful homemade gifts for your friends? Well, have you ever tried anything with cosmetic clays before? Actually, rose clay to be exact? Yes, clays can actually be used in cosmetics! Rose clay can be used in many different products and industries! And we also offer six other different cosmetics clays here at Nature’s Garden as well! Rose clay is definitely the product to use in your next projects!

Did you know that rose clay is also known as pink clay? Actual rose clay can only be produced when the right weather conditions have worn down minerals containing aluminum silicate. While it is native to and originally found in France, rose clay can also be found in Australia, India, Germany, Bulgaria, Brazil, Iran, the United Kingdom, and many other countries worldwide. Rose clay is actually a very gentle and very mild clay that is amazing when used for sensitive and mature skin.

There are many wonderful benefits to the uses of rose clay. It can actually be used in many different products and industries, one of them being an amazing ingredient in many bath and body products and cosmetics! Common products that can include rose clay are salt scrubs, face masks, bath bombs, soaps, mud baths, herbal tea infusions, and sugar scrubs. Do you know how rose clay gets its color? The pink color in the clay actually comes from the many iron oxides contained within the clay. There are many health and medicinal benefits from rose clay, especially when used in these bath and body products! For your skin, rose clay actually helps to reduce inflammation, remove dead skin cells, tighten pores, fade hyperpigmentation, and it also removes harmful toxins. Rose clay is also a great exfoliant for the skin, it reduces irritation, increases circulation, regenerates collagen, promotes new cell growth for skin, and also regenerates elastin within the skin.

Are you wondering how to get your hands on this wonderful clay as soon as possible? Well then I’ll tell you! All you have to do is type “rose clay” into the search bar on our website. That will take you directly to our Rose Clay Powder page. But don’t hurry away so fast, because rose clay just keeps getting better! Here at Nature’s Garden, we offer many free classes and recipes using rose clay.  Try our Candy Cane Facial Mask or our Perfectly Pampered Shaving Soap, both just happen to be made with rose clay! When you are actually on our Rose Clay Powder page, there is a little green “Recipe” box on top of the clay picture. If you click on that, it will actually show you the name and picture of both of those fantastic recipes. By clicking either those, they are actually direct links straight to the recipes! Make sure to check out all of our other cosmetic clays as well! Enjoy this product and watch out for more Enlightened by Layla!

rose clay page

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