Tag Archives: soap making kits

Jun
26

Soap Making Terms


This entry was posted in cold process soap, cold process soap scents, cold process soap vs melt and pour soap, free soap recipes, handcrafted soap, hot vs cold process soap, how to make cold process soap, melt and pour soap, Natures Garden, soap, soap fragrance, soap making problems, Soap making supplies, soap recipe, soap scent, soapmaking, wholesale fragrance oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Soap Making Terms

If you want to learn about different soaping methods and get help for potential problems, then it helps to know common soap making terms. Whether you are a beginner or experienced, you are likely to come across something new with your batches at least once. So, we are here to help you understand what to do and how to solve any soap-making issues.

Soap Making Terms: How Much Fragrance Oil Can I Add to Soap?

While you should always check the usage rate for each individual fragrance, the maximum that we recommend is 5%. Sometimes you can a scent where the IFRA sheet allows more and you can do more if you’d like. After you know the usage rate, you just need to do some simple multiplication to figure out how much scent you need.

Formula: Weight of Soap x Usage Rate = Weight of Fragrance Oil
Example: 912 grams of soap x 0.05 (which is a 5% usage rate) = 45.6 grams of fragrance

Soap Making Terms: Why Did My Soap Turn Brown?

Often fragrance oils that contains a high amount of Vaniilin will turn soap brown. Also, the color will be a darker brown with scented oils with higher amounts of Vanillin. We can use Vanilla White Color Stabilizer to reduce these effects and still use the scent. Since this ingredient is added to provide a vanilla scent, strong vanilla fragrance oils will almost always turn soap brown without the color stabilizer.

Soap Making Terms: Can I Use Essential Oils in Soap Making?

Yes, essential oils can be used to scent soap. We find that essential oils hold up better in MP soap than in soap made from scratch. This is because the saponification process can cook off the essential oil, which doesn’t have middle notes to anchor the scent. You may have some scent after the soaps cure, but it won’t be as strong as it is in MP soap.

Soap Making Terms: How Much Essential Oil Can I Use in Soap?

This can be different for each essential oil, so you will need to check the IFRA sheet for the usage rate. Then, you can figure out how much you need using the same method as you would for fragrance oils.

Soap Making Terms: How Do You Make Soap White?

You can add titanium dioxide to soaps to make them white. In fact, many of our white soap bases use this ingredient. If you wanted, you could use this ingredient to turn your clear soaps to white.

Soap Making Terms: What is Melt and Pour Soap Making?Soap Making Terms: What is Melt and Pour Soap Making?

Another option for soap making is melt and pour soap. This method starts with a soap base that has already gone through the saponification process. So, you cut need to cut and melt the amount your need before you are ready to add colorants, fragrance, or herbs. Then, you can pour the melted soap into a mold and spray the top with rubbing alcohol. As soon as the soap is hardened, it is ready to use!

Soap Making Terms: How Much Melt and Pour Soap Will I Need for My Mold?

For each ounce by volume in your mold you will need 31 grams of soap. Say the soap mold will hold 16 ounces, you will need 496 grams of soap

Formula: Constant Value for Soap Needed to Fill Mold x Volume of Mold = Weight of Soap
Example:
31 grams per ounce x 16 ounce mold = 196 grams of MP soap

Soap Making Terms: How Long Should Melt and Pour Soap Stay in the Mold?

This can vary based on the size of soap you are creating. Smaller soaps will take less time compared to bigger soaps. Just make sure that they are hardened all the way before you remove them. Also, you should be able to feel that the mold is no longer warm to touch.

Soap Making Terms: How Do I Get My Melt and Pour Soap Out of the Mold?

While you should be able to hold your molds upside down and lightly push, sometimes they get stuck. If you place your soaps in the refrigerator for a short amount of time, this should make it easier for you to remove your mp soap.

Soap Making Terms: How Do I Get Fingerprints Off My Melt and Pour Soap?

Sometimes when you are removing your soaps from the mold, you can transfer a fingerprint. Just use some rubbing alcohol to dampen a cotton swab and  gently swab the fingerprint. It should begin to fade as you do this.

Soap Making Terms: Can Melt and Pour Soap Be Used Right Away?

Of course! The saponification process is already complete before you get your soap base. So, there is no active lye to worry about. This means that you can use your soaps as soon as they harden.

Soap Making Terms: Why Is My Melt and Pour Soap Sweating?

There are a few reasons why your soap would sweat. First, it could be due to adding too much oil. Whether it is fragrance oil or carrier oil, the soap can only hold on to so much before the oil begins to leak out to create beads on the surface. More often, it is due to the soap drawing moisture from the air. Since your soap base uses vegetable glycerin, a humectant, it will draw moisture to it. Although this is great for you skin, it can lead to your soap sweating . However, you can prevent the latter by wrapping your soap as soon as it comes out of the mold. This way it can’t pull moisture from the air.

 

Soap Making Terms: What is Hot Process Soap Making?Soap Making Terms: What is Hot Process Soap Making?

Another way to make soap from scratch is hot process soap. This process is very similar to cold process soapmaking. However, in this method you will have a heat source to speed up the saponification process. You can use a crock pot or stove top to heat your soap mixture. After, you can technically use the bars immediately. However, letting them cure a week will provide you with harder, milder bars.

Soap Making Terms: Does Natures Garden Offer Any Hot Process Soap Recipes with Shea Butter?

Yes, we have a few! For example, we have our Manly Soap Recipe, the Beard Soap Recipe, and more that you can find under the Hot Process Soap Recipes page!

Soap Making Terms: How Long Do You Have to Wait to Use Hot Process Soap?

Yes. Although you don’t have to wait as long for your soaps to cure, there is still some lye left that needs to react. Typically, you will need to wait 1-2 week(s) before using your hp soap.

Soap Making Terms: What Does Rebatch Mean?

If you want to redo a soap batch or add more ingredients, then this is a great idea for you! It is common to rebatch to correct issues like seizing or forgotten ingredients. Also, this can be done to add ingredients that wouldn’t react well during the saponification process, like natural exfoliates or essential oils. First, take the soaps that you aren’t necessarily pleased with and grate them into pieces. Place these pieces in a crock pot and melt them with milk, water, or another liquid to prevent scotching. Also, add any additional oils that you want in these soaps. Allow you batch to reheat for one hour at which point it will by thick. After, add the color, scent, and herbs before scooping this soap into a mold.

Soap Making Terms: What is Cold Process Soap Making?Soap Making Terms: What is Cold Process Soap Making?

This process is one of a few that are refereed to as making soap from scratch because in uses water, lye, and oils to create bars of soap. Another key characteristic of this method is that you don’t need outside heat, as the lye provide enough heat for saponification. Once trace occurs, you are able to add colorants, scented oils, and herbs can be added at this point. After 24 hours, you can remove the soap from the mold and cut. However, you must let your soap cure for a period of 4-6 weeks.

Soap Making Terms: What is Lye in Soap Making?

Lye is a caustic base that is a key component for soap, as it drives the saponification process. It is sometimes referred to as sodium hydroxide for bar soaps and potassium hydroxide for liquid soaps.

Soap Making Terms: What Does Saponification Mean?

This is the process of lye reacting with the oils/fats/butters to produce soap. Saponification will produce both the soap and the glycerin in the soap.

Soap Making Terms: What Does Cure Time Mean?

Cure time is the period where the soap finishes the soaponification process until there is no more active lye present in the bars.

Soap Making Terms: What Does the Term Trace Mean in Soap Making?

In soaping, trace is when the lye water and the oils/butters have been fully combined. You will know that you’ve hit trace because the batter will thicken to a pudding-like consistency. Also, you can check to see whether you are at trace by using a spatula to “trace” a line of soap in the batter. You will notice that the line will not immediately disappear and you can see a trace of the soap you drizzled in.

Soap Making Terms: What Does Light Trace Mean in Soap Making?

Light trace is the point right before your soap comes to trace. You will begin to see a trace, but it won’t stay for more than a few seconds. So, the batter is about to hit trace where it will be thick enough to see the soap for a bit longer.

Soap Making Terms: How Long Does It Take for Soap Batter to Get to Trace?

The time is takes to get to trace will vary between batches for a number of reasons. The ingredients in a recipe can lead to different times. Also, fragrance oils and some soap additives can accelerate or slow trace in your batch.

Soap Making Terms: What Does Seize Mean in Soap Making?

If your soap seizes, then it means that your soap has gone through saponification enough that the batter is beginning to turn from liquid to solid. While this isn’t bad on its own, it makes it impossible to pour soap that is still in the bowl. This hardening soap that hasn’t yet made it to the mold will be too thick to mix and, at best, will be chunky in the mold.

Soap Making Terms: Why Do I Have Lye Pockets in My Cold Process Soap?

If you use too much lye in your soap recipe, then you can
Lye pockets can form in cold process soap most often when too much lye is used. However, it could also be a recipe that wasn’t properly formulated, an oil was left out, the soap seized, or even when the lye solution was not fully mixed. If the lye was not completely saponified you can always rebatch the soap and hot process the soap adding additional oil. Also, it is possible that it could be used in recipes such as laundry soaps that can utilize soap with a higher pH level.

Soap Making Terms: Can I Change the Soap Making Recipes?

Unlike many other bath and body recipes, you can’t simply swap out oils in the Natures Garden formulated recipe. Each oil has a certain saponification value that determines how much lye it will react with. So, switching an oil could result in your batch being lye heavy. Even if you wait longer to cure, there won’t be enough oils to react with the lye and the bars will irritate the skin or even cause burning. Instead, use SoapCalc to determine what you would have to change to get the recipe that you want!

Soap Making Terms: Reach Out to UsSoap Making Terms: Reach Out to Us

If you have any other questions or concerns about soapmaking, then please reach out to us! One easy way to ask us something is on social media. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Have fun soaping!

 

Jun
20

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions


This entry was posted in handcrafted soap, handmade soap, homemade soap, make your own soap, melt and pour soap, natural melt and pour soap, soap colorants, soap fragrance, soap making problems, soap making recipes, soap making supplies, soap method, soap molds, soap recipes, soapmaking and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Common Melt and Pour Soap QuestionsCommon Melt and Pour Soap Questions

At Natures Garden, we are here to help you succeed! We are going to answer some common melt and pour soap questions that we get asked frequently by customers.  Since these questions are common, its likely that these are the issues most soap makers will come across when making their melt and pours soaps. So, let’s get these soaping issues solved so you can create some gorgeous bars of mp soap!

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Does Natures Garden Offer Melt and Pour Soap Supplies?

Yes, we do! We offer all kinds of melt and pour soap making supplies! Click on the Soap Making Supplies tab on the website and you will find soap base, soap colorants, an mp soap kit, soap additives, and soap molds. Everything that you could need right in one easy place!

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Can I Make Soap Without Using Lye?

Since the mp soap base has already been made, you can create melt and pour soap without worrying about the lye. If you are wondering “What is the difference between melt and pour soap and cold process soap?”, then this is a big difference. While melt and pour is pre-made and can be remelted, cold process soap is made from scratch using lye.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Can Melt and Pour Soap Be Used Right Away?

Since mp soap was already made and the saponification process has already taken place, you don’t have to wait to use your soap. As soon as the melt and pour soaps have hardened in the molds, you can pop them out and use them!

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Where Do I Find the Melt and Pour Soap IngredientsCommon Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Where Do I Find the Melt and Pour Soap Ingredients?

You can find the soap base ingredients in two places. The first place is online, as each mp soap base has the ingredients listed in the description. Also, these ingredients can be found on the label of the base itself.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: What Soap Making Supplies Do I Need to Make Melt and Pour Soap?

Most importantly, you will need a microwave or double boiler and mp soap. Also, you will need a cutting board, knife, a microwave safe dish, spoon, rubbing alcohol in a spray bottle, and a soap mold. If you want fragrance, color, or herbs you will need to have these out, too .

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: How Do I Melt Soap Into a New Bar?

Melt and Pour soap can be melted using a double boiler on a stove top or a bowl in the microwave. Just make sure that you use 30 second intervals to warm the soap int the microwave. Otherwise, it may get too hot and your soap will be ruined. Also, make sure that you are watchful when melting soap on the stove. While a double boiler on medium heat will help to protect your soap, you don’t want to heat it too much longer after it is liquid.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: How Much Soap Will I Need for My Mold?Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: How Much Soap Will I Need for My Mold?

For every ounce by volume that your mold is you will need 31 grams of soap by weight. So, let’s go to the Soap Mold page and pick one. I choose Ollie Octopus,which says it holds 4.5 ounces in the description. So, we are going to take  4.5 times the 31 to give us 139.5 grams

Formula: (Weight Needed Per Ounce) x (Ounces Mold Holds) = Total Weight

Equation: 31 grams per ounce  x  4.5 ounces = 139.5 grams of soap

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: How Do I Get My Melt and Pour Soap Out of the Mold?

Sometimes your soap may get stuck in the mold. You can place the mold in the fridge for a short amount of time. Once the chilled soap mold is removed, the soaps should pop out fairly easily.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: What Temperature Should I Pour Melt and Pour Soap?

Melt and Pour soap should be poured in a liquid state, which should be around 140 degrees Fahrenheit. So, you can pour your soap once it has all completely melted.

 

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Why Do I Have Bubbles in My Melt and Pour Soap?Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Why Do I Have Bubbles in My Melt and Pour Soap?

Although making air bubbles is unavoidable, you can get rid of them by spraying lightly with rubbing alcohol. These are often air bubbles that form when you pour, so you can release them by spraying right after you pour. However, bubbles that are a light-yellow color are fragrance oil and won’t go away by spraying. This is either due to adding too much fragrance oil or not mixing thoroughly.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Why is My Homemade Soap So Oily?

One reason that you soaps would be oily is that they contain too much oil. So, you can try reducing the amount of the fragrance oil and/or the carrier oil that you are adding to your soaps. If your bars look like they are sweating, then it could be due to not wrapping the soap soon enough. Since your soap contains an ingredient, vegetable glycerin, that pulls moisture to it, it will pull moisture out of the air to create “sweat”. But, you can lessen your chances of this by wrapping your soaps right after they are out of the mold.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Why is My Melt and Pour Soap Dissolving So Fast?

While a softer bar of soap is great for nourishing the skin, it is more likely to dissolve quickly in water. So, you can add some extra oil to your soap to moisturize. However, adding too much will make your bar very soft and it will dissolve quickly in the shower.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: How Do I Swirl Melt and Pour Soap?Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: How Do I Swirl Melt and Pour Soap?

While it is possible to swirl mp soap, it is a bit trickier to swirl compared to cp soaps. On its own melt and pour soap won’t swirl. Instead, the colors will mix before the soap hardens. So, you need to add a cosmetic powder, like clay, fruit, or veggie powders. This will slightly thicken the soap and create tension between the two colors that are gong to create the swirl. We did this in our own Swirled Melt and Pour Soap Recipe!

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Why Won’t My Melt and Pour Soap Lather?

There are a few possible answers to this question. First off, soap can loose its lather due to an excess of oils and herbs being added to the bar. Also, some types of our soap base use ingredients that naturally lather better.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Why is My Soap Not Hardening?

If your melt and pour soap isn’t hardening, then it could be due to adding too much oil. Whether the culprit is fragrance oil, carrier oil, or both, it is most likely that this excess oil is to blame. Another possibility is that the soap was overheated, which resulted in a break down in the soaps that prevents it from working properly.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Can You Use Essential Oils in Melt and Pour Soap?

Of course! Many essential oils can be used in soap making and the rules for using them safely are just like the ones for fragrance oils. So, you need to check the IFRA sheet to determine usage rates and figure out whether the specific essential oil is body safe. You can find this IFRA statement on the page of each individual essential oil that we carry. Many are body safe scents, but some are not considered safe for prolonged skin contact.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: How Do I Color Melt and Pour Soap?Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: How Do I Color Melt and Pour Soap?

We have soap dye, soap colorants, and powdered herbs that can be used to color your homemade soaps. The soap dyes are great for solid color soaps, but tend to bleed when used in layered soap. Also, the white soap base will provide a more pastel color and the clear soap will give a more true color. The FUN Soap Colorants are vibrant colors that are more true in all soap bases. Lastly, the natural form of coloring soaps is cosmetic herbs, which are perfect for a rustic or natural look. Just be aware that herbs can oxidize over time and cause discoloration of the soap.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Do You Offer Melt and Pour Soap Recipes?

Of course! We have a wide variety of melt and pour soap recipes and soap making ideas. On the top of the website you will see a box with the words “Free Recipes & Classes”. After you click on this fine the melt and pour soap recipes and you will find all of our recipes using mp soap.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Does Natures Garden Offer Soap Making Kits?

Yes! We have the Melt and Pour Soap Kit available with options to choose either Goats Milk MP Soap or Ultra Clear MP Soap.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Why Won’t My Soap Frosting Setup on My Melt and Pour Soap?Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Why Won’t My Soap Frosting Setup on My Melt and Pour Soap?

If you are making cupcake soap wholesale, then the frosting is a pretty big deal. You are going to want to use the whipped soap base, melt and pour soap, and vegetable glycerin. The soap base allows the frosting to harden on the cupcake, while the vegetable glycerin allows for a little flexibility.  If you are curious and thinking, “How do I make melt and pour soap frosting?”, then check out our Soap Frosting Recipe to see how we make the frosting for our soap cupcakes. While the recipe goes into more detail, basically it is equal parts of mp soap base and whipped soap base with 5% of vegetable glycerin and fragrance oil all whipped into a frosting consistency.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: I Would Like to Know If Most Recipes are Showing Oils Measured in Weight Ounces Or in Fluid Ounces?

In our soap recipes we will use weight ounces. We do this because weight ounces are more accurate than fluid ounces. So, we highly recommend weighing your ingredients using a gram scale. This will allow you to be precise in your measurements and prevent accidental mix ups.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: What is the Best Way to Wrap Melt and Pour Soap?

There are a few different ways that you can package your finished soaps. We prefer to use shrink wrap, but you can use ziplock bags, or a decorative box.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: How Should Soap Be Stored?

After your soap is wrapped, you can store it in a cool, dry place for later use.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Does Natures Garden Offer Any Melt and Pour Soap Recipes with Shea Butter?Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Does Natures Garden Offer Any Melt and Pour Soap Recipes with Shea Butter?

We sure do! If you go to the Shea Butter Melt and Pour Soap page of the website and click on the Recipe tab, you will see all kinds of melt and pour soap recipes. For example, we have the Zebra Print Soap Recipe and the Graffiti Melt and Pour Soap Recipe that both use shea butter mp soap.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: History of Soap

Today, there are all kinds of different types of soap from melt and pour soap recipes to commercially made soaps. However, the first soaps ever made weren’t too fancy. In fact, the first known use of soap was by ancient Babylonians that used animal fats and ashes as their ingredients. If you want to learn more interesting  soap facts, then check out History of Soap and Soap Interesting Facts by Soap History.

Common Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Ask Us Your QuestionsCommon Melt and Pour Soap Questions: Ask Us Your Questions

Hopefully, this blog was helpful in learning a bit more about melt and pour soap. If you have anything else that you aren’t sure of, then please ask us your questions. One easy way to reach out and talk to us is social media. We have an account on Facebook, Twitter (@ngscents), and Instagram (@ngscents).