Tag Archives: palm oil

Nov
14

Olive Oil in Soap Making


This entry was posted in Natures Garden, olive oil, recipes, soap supplies, soapmaking and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Olive Oil PomaceOlive Oil in Soap Making

At Natures Garden we have many different methods for soap making, which we like to share with our customers through website descriptions, recipes, pictures, and videos. You can hot process soap, cold process soap, or make melt and pour soap, as some examples. We also sell many different waxes, butters, and oils that you can use to make your soap. For instance, we have Joy Wax, Pillar of Bliss Wax, Shea butter, cocoa butter, castor oil, and what we will be discussing today: olive oil. You will be learning a lot about our Pomace Olive Oil and how to use olive oil in soap making. There are so many recipes on our website that use this product, which we will introduce you to. Whether you are trying this method out for the first time, or you are an experienced master at it, there is a lot to learn!

Pomace Olive Oil

Using olive oil in soap making is actually a very common method. It is generally the number one oil used in most soap makers’ recipes! This oil is easily available, easy to use, and highly beneficial, which is why it is so common. Pomace olive oil is both thick and rich in texture. It has a greener shade than some other olive oils out there that are more yellow in color. Extra virgin olive oil and Grade A oils are made from the pits of olives that go through solvent extraction. Once there have been multiple pressings and extractions, what is left over is what makes up the pomace grade olive oil.

There are multiple reasons that this is such a common ingredient in soap making. Many essential fatty acids are present in olive oil including palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic. Olive oil is rich in antioxidants and these ingredients provide benefits for the hair and the scalp when used in shampoo. They help promote health of the scalp, treat dry scalp, and can treat hair loss. It boosts hair growth because it massages and increases blood flow to the hair follicles as well. There are additional benefits that olive oil provides to the skin. It is incredibly moisturizing, which makes it a popular element of massage oils. Olive oil is used to make bars of soap that are a good hard texture. You can also use olive oil to make lip balms, scrubs, lotions, and more!

Castile Soap

Castile is one type of soap that is made from 100% olive oil. This type of soap contains only olive oil, lye, and water. There are many benefits to using this product. A major benefit of soap containing olive oil is that they are great for sensitive skin and dry skin. Castile soap is typical to use on babies because they have sensitive skin and this type of soap is highly conditioning and super gentle. Olive oil gives soap a moisturizing texture, nourishes and restores skin by making it feel extra smooth. Different kinds of soap have certain properties about them. Castile is made with 100% olive oil, which means it is not a cleansing soap. Other types of soap blend a few types of oils to balance out different properties, such as cleansing and conditioning. Bastille soap, for example, blends separate oils together to do this.

Bastille Soap

Another type of soap made from olive oil is called Bastille Soap. Unlike Castile soap, which is made with 100% olive oil, Bastille is made up of 75%. The olive oil is mixed with other oils as well, including coconut oil and castor oil. It is made up of water, lye, olive oil (75%), coconut oil 76 (20%), and castor oil (5%). As previously mentioned, olive oil is highly conditioning but not cleansing. Coconut oil is highly cleansing, but not conditioning, which causes this soap to balance itself out. The castor oil is high in conditioning, bubbly lather, and creamy lather. This helps the soap bubble better, have a softer texture for your skin, and nourishes dry skin. Without this balance, your soap could leave your skin dry and dehydrated. We have a list of soaping oil properties that you can help you understand the properties of soaping oils.

Marseille Soap

A third type of soap that contains olive oil is called Marseille. This type must contain at least 72% olive oil. Marseille soap is composed of some other vegetable oils, palm oil, and coconut oil. Palm oil adds hardness and creamy lathering properties to this soap, balancing out the conditioning of the olive oil. There are also benefits such that it is an anti-bacterial and it being a very gentle type of soap, which are both bonuses for your skin. This soap can also be used in shampoos, shaving soaps, and shower gels. There are many other products that it can be used to create as well, like laundry detergent, a jewelry cleaner, or a detergent for your dishwasher. Now we will get into some recipes from Natures Garden that contain olive oil that we would like to share with you!

Cold Process Soap Making Class

We are going to be mentioning some of our recipes that use olive oil and are cold processed soap. Before we begin, we would suggest taking a look at our FREE class for making cold process soap. If you are unfamiliar with this process and would like to gain a better understanding of it before attempting it yourself, this class can help with that. Cold process soap is made with fresh lye, which can be highly dangerous if it is not handled properly. Lye is used to make all soap and you need to be sure that you are taking the proper precautions. This is why it is important to educate yourself about the ingredients that you will be working with.

Blueberry Cheesecake Cold Process SoapRecipes with Olive Oil: Blueberry Cheesecake Cold Process Soap

We would like to talk about using olive oil to make cold process soap. This is our handcrafted recipe for Blueberry Cheesecake Cold Process soap. This will provide you with four pounds of soap. In this recipe you are going to combine the olive oil with palm oil, coconut oil 76, fractionated coconut oil, castor oil, safflower oil, and Shea butter. Most soaps combine several oils with butters just like this one does. This mixture creates the soft and moisturizing properties that customers desire in soap and other products. The perfect blue swirls in this cold processed soap make the finished product look so beautiful. Another bonus is that it smells delicious because it is made with our Blueberry Cheesecake fragrance oil. This handcrafted cp soap recipe is unique in that we have used milk instead of water for a portion of our lye solution.

Doggy Shampoo Cold Process SoapRecipes with Olive Oil: Doggy Shampoo Cold Process Soap

This is such a fun recipe that anyone out there can create. We actually got this recipe idea when we saw cute cupcakes with dogs on them and thought we could turn it into soap! You will be able to get three doggy shampoo soaps out of this. They make the perfect addition to your shower routine and can also add something cute to your bathroom counter or shower shelf. It can be a cute gift to give to a friend as well.

This creation uses coconut oil 76, palm oil, castor oil, fractionated coconut oil, and of course, the olive oil. The combination of each of these oils makes this soap into a buttery, smooth texture. The overall product definitely has a strong conditioning component added to it by the olive oil. Our Sage Leaf Fragrance Oil adds scent to it, which is reminiscent of fresh sage leaves. You can also switch this recipe up and make it your own by shaping the dog however you want, or by adding different FUN soap colorants if you would like to.

Other Recipes That Use Olive Oil

Although olive oil is very common when making cold process soap, it can be used for other things as well. Many of our other homemade recipes use it as well, other than those with soap making. We have a large variety of these listed on our website, but the possibilities are endless when you have the creativity! The ones that we are going to be talking about today are our Black Cherry Bath Bomb and Fruity Rings Sugar Scrub.

Black Cherry BombBlack Cherry Bath Bomb

Taking a bath from time to time can be relaxing and rejuvenating to the body and the mind. You might even enjoy adding a bubbly bath bomb to the hot water. We have created many of these on our website with multiple fragrance oils, other types of oils, powders, and soap colorants to give them some color. To create your bubbly bath, hold the bath bomb underneath the hot water as you are filling up the tub. It will begin disintegrating, fizzing, and forming into a swirling bubble bath full of color and a strong, yummy scent. This recipe uses one of the Natures Garden original fragrances and this one is one of our top sellers: Black Cherry BOMB. It has a VERY strong scent of black cherry that is sweet but not overly sweet.

To make this, you will mix the olive oil in with the fragrance oil and the castor oil. These ingredients will moisturize your skin when you are taking a bath using this bath bomb. There are some dry ingredients that contribute to the softening of the skin and provide other benefits as well. The Beet Root Powder gives the pink and red color to the bath bomb and provides multiple nutrients such as beta carotene, vitamins B5, B1, and C. It also contains selenium, potassium, phosphorous, glycine, tyrosine, zinc, magnesium, and tryptophan. Bentonite Clay Powder helps clean skin impurities, helps with oily skin, and in this case, makes the bath bomb harder and more durable in order to disintegrate better. This recipe makes five large bath bombs, which lasts for a while!

Fruity Ring Sugar ScrubFruity Rings Emulsified Sugar Scrub

This Fruity Rings Sugar Scrub recipe will make eight 4 ounce jars of product, which is a lot! The directions are simple to follow, and the results will definitely leave your skin feeling silky smooth and rejuvenated. To make this scrub, combine the olive oil with sweet almond oil, cocoa butter deodorized, Shea butter, beeswax, and the emulsifying wax. Each one of these ingredients will help to create a sugar scrub that moisturizes exceptionally and thoroughly nourishes the skin on a deeper level.

Shea butter actually contains many of the same essential fatty acids that olive oil does. It has palmitic, stearic, linoleic, and oleic. We use Shea butter in many of our products because it has the perfect texture for loads of recipes. We use it to make lip gloss, lip balms, and many bath and body products including lotion, body scrubs, and of course, soap. When it is used to make soap, it can add really great conditioning and creamy lathering properties to it. There are some added aesthetic benefits to this sugar scrub as well, which we all love. It has a rainbow look to it when placed in the jar in layers, and give off the delicious scents of lemon, verbena, vanilla sugar, and grapefruit that flow wonderfully together!

All of the recipes we have mentioned in this blog are our very own and have all been handmade. We hope that you have enjoyed getting to learn more about pomace olive oil and how useful it can be for your soap making!

Dec
17

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners


This entry was posted in cold process soap, melt and pour soap, Natures Garden, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners

We at Natures Garden have 15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners. These various soap making classes are perfect for beginning soap makers. These soap classes will help beginners gain knowledge about different types of soap making and learn how to make homemade soap. So, you will be able to learn everything that you need to know about soap making. Of course, these classes vary from important safety tips to specific advice for making both cold process soap and melt and pour soap. This will provide you with all of the information that you will need to create gorgeous homemade soap!

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Soap Making Safety15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Soap Making Safety

Before you begin learning how to create homemade soap, you need to make sure that you know all about important soap safety. Learning about how to be safe during this process is especially important for making cold process soap. While you need to careful with lye when making cold process soap, there are some things that you can do to keep yourself safe when making melt and pour soap. So, any of our beginning soap makers should take a look at the Soap Making Safety class. So, you can use this class to make sure that they know how to stay safe as they learn how to make soap.

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Soap Making: Where Do I Start15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Soap Making: Where Do I Start

If you have never made your own soap, then you will benefit from the information in our class called Soap Making: Where Do I Start. This soap making class will break down the four different types of soap making methods. First, our beginning soap makers will learn all about the cold process soap method. This will allow you to combine water, lye, and cosmetic oils to create a perfect soap with the best soap properties.

Also, you can learn about the benefits and process of melt and pour soap. If you enjoy the benefits of cold process soap, then you may be interested in making soap from scratch with a shorter cure time. So, you may enjoy learning about either hot process soap or oven process soap. This way new soap makers can learn how to make these different soap making methods. Whether you find out that you enjoy one type of soap or you want to create all types of soap, you can determine which particular methods that you would like to try to create!

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Melt and Pour Soap Information15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Melt and Pour Soap Information

If you are interested in creating melt and pour soap for the first time, then you may benefit from checking out our Melt and Pour Soap Information. First, the soap making class will share with you various cosmetic ingredients and additives that you can use to make a fantastic batch of melt and pour soap. Also, this class on soap making will explain the process of making a batch of melt and pour soap, which includes picking out the perfect mp soap base. Plus, this soap class shares additives like cosmetic oils and herbs that will improve the bar of soap. Further, this soap making class will share with you various tips and tricks for making sure that your finished soap turns out conditioning for the skin and beautiful!

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Easy Directions for Making Melt and Pour Soap15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Easy Directions for Making Melt and Pour Soap

One of the easiest ways to make homemade soap is to use a melt and pour soap base! This will allow you to create scented soap at home without formulating your own recipe. So, you can do all the fun parts of soaping, like adding scents, wonderful colorants, and using great soap molds. If you are curious about learning how to make fun melt and pour soap, then check out a class on our Easy Directions for Making Melt and Pour Soap! This soap making class will go over all of the advice for making soap with a great mp soap base.

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Common Soap Making Questions15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Common Soap Making Questions

Anyone that wants to get into cold process soap making may find that there are some unfamiliar terms. This can be confusing for beginning craft makers. So, we have created a list of important soap terms that you may come across as a beginning soap maker. Whether you want to know what trace or rebatch means, you can find out ll about these terms and much more! If you have any questions about a confusing term, then check out our class on Common Soap Making Questions.

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Soap Making Terminology15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Soap Making Terminology

As you begin to get more into soap making, you may find that some instructions and recipes have some unfamiliar terms. If you ever come across a new word that seems specific to soap making, then the class on Soap Making Terminology will be very useful. This soap making class defines all kinds of soap terms and abbreviations that are related to the process of making soap from scratch. So, this is a soap class that will be extremely useful for beginning soap makers.

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Cold Process Soap Class 10115 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Cold Process Soap Class 101

There are all kinds of benefits for making soap from scratch. However, there are some things that you should know before you gather all your soap making supplies. Not only do you need to determine which cosmetic oils you want to use, but you will want to determine the proportions as well. Plus, you will want to figure out which fragrance oils would be best for making cp soap. If you are a bit overwhelmed with all of these options, we have a basic soap making recipe that is perfect for beginning soap makers in our Cold Process Soap Class 101. Not only will you find an easy to follow recipe, but this helpful guide will help you with all the other important choices for soaping. So, there are all kinds of great tips you can benefit from in this soap class!

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Fragrances Tested in CP Soap Results

Another important decision that you will need to make for creating your soaps is the fragrance oil. Not only do you need to pick your favorite scents, but you need to find a scent that works well in soap making. If you want to make sure that the fragrance you want to use is good for soaping, then check out our class on Fragrances Tested in CP Soap Results. This list of fragrances will provide you with details about how the scent will perform in your cp soap.

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Making Your Own Soap Recipe15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Making Your Own Soap Recipe

This soap making class will help you calculate the amounts and types of conditioning oils for your own soap recipe. Of course, there is a nice website that you can use that will help you through the process of formulating your own soap recipe. So, you can choose your oils and cosmetic ingredients to create a bar of soap with all the best properties. Further, our soap making class will walk you through the various sections of the soap calculator. So, our class on Making Your Own Soap Recipe would be a great place for beginning soap makers to start learning how to formulate your own cp soap.

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Soap Making - Finding the Perfect Recipe15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Soap Making – Finding the Perfect Recipe

All of the cosmetic ingredients that you will need for making homemade soaps will have different properties that you can benefit from. Plus, the different cosmetic oils will each have unique properties and different skin benefits. If you are interested in finding, then you may be interested in checking out our soap class on Soap Making- Finding the Perfect Recipe. With your new knowledge of the properties of each cosmetic oil, you can create a bar with all the soap properties you would want in a bar of soap.

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Soaping Oil Properties15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Soaping Oil Properties

When you are creating your homemade soap recipes, it can be useful to know about the different properties that cosmetic oils can have for your soap recipes. In order to make a great soap recipe, you will want to combine cosmetic oils to create a nice balance between hardness, cleansing, conditioning, bubbly lather, and creamy. If you are interested in learning about the specific properties of soap making oils, then you may want to check out our class on Soaping Oil Properties.

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Essential Oils Class15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Essential Oils Class

Not only can you use fragrance oils to scent your soap, but you can use essential oils as well! If you want to learn more about how to scent soap with essential oils, then check out our Essential Oils Class. Not only does this soap making class share which oils are body safe and other advice, but the class goes into the detail of how essential oils are created.

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Exfoliant Class15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Exfoliant Class

There are all kinds of great soap making ingredients that you can use to make fantastic herbal soap bars. You can make fantastic soaps using cosmetic herbs. These great soap additives will add beneficial properties to your scented soap recipe. There are all kinds of reasons why you would add herbs to your cosmetic recipes. Some of our cosmetic herbs can be used to exfoliate the dead skin from your body. In our Exfoliant Class, we will share with you all kinds of cosmetic ingredients that can be used to create an exfoliating batch of soap. So, you will have a soap recipe that will exfoliate dead skin cells and grime as you clean your skin.

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Soap Coloring Class15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Soap Coloring Class

Another fun soap making ingredient that you can use to make gorgeous soap is cosmetic colorants. First, you can use natural colorants to add some color to your soap bars. In fact, there are some cosmetic herbs that are pigmented and will provide your soap with beautiful hues. Also, you can use soap making colorants to create some bold colored soap. Further, you can use some of our mica dust powder to create a glittery, beautiful bar of soap. If you are curious about what you can use to create colorful soaps, then take a look at your options in our class on Soap Coloring Class.

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: The History of Soap Making15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: The History of Soap Making

Homemade soap has been made by human civilizations for thousands of years. Although the purpose of soap is always to clean the body, the ways people make their soap has changed throughout time. There were quite a few methods for soap making and they had to go through quite a bit of trial and error to refine the process over the years. If you are interested in learning more about the ways that soap has been made in the past, then check out our soap making class on The History of Soap Making.

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Homemade Gift Ideas

One great reason for you to create homemade soap is to give as gifts to your loved ones. Of course, making homemade soap from scratch is a fantastic idea for creating gifts for the holidays. Not only do we at Natures Garden believe that scented soap is a fantastic gift idea, but the organized mom blog talks about how great a gift soap is in their DIY Gift Ideas: Why homemade soap is the perfect gift article.

15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Reach Out to Us15 Soap Making Classes for Beginners: Reach Out to Us

If you have any more questions about soap making, then you can feel free to reach out to us at Natures Garden! You can reach out to us in the store, on the phone, and online. An easy way to reach out to us online is through social media. You can find us on our Facebook page, Also, you can use the handle @ngscents to find us on Twitter and Instagram. So, we hope to hear from you soon and we wish you the best with your soap making!

Jul
03

Common Cold Process Soap Questions


This entry was posted in bath and body, cold process soap, Natures Garden, soap, soap fragrance, soap ingredients, Soap Making, Soap making supplies, soap method, soap molds and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Common Cold Process Soap QuestionsCommon Cold Process Soap Questions

We at Natures Garden love to supply our customers with the best soap making ingredients and soap equipment that they need to succeed. But, you can’t utilize these tools if you don’t know how to. So, we want to answer some of the most common cold process soap questions that we get. This way we can help make your soap making experience as fun and exciting as possible!

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: What is the Shelf Life of Lye?Common Cold Process Soap Questions: What is the Shelf Life of Lye?

The shelf life of lye, sodium hydroxide, when properly stored is one year. After a year it is possible for your lye to work, but you should do a small batch to test whether the lye is still good. If it is actually expired, then it may not come to trace quickly or could separate after it is poured or set up. So, you will be able to notice an obvious difference if you make a small testing batch,

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: How Do I Make My Cold Process Soap Last Longer?

There are a few things that you can change to make your homemade soap last even longer. First, you can use additives, like sodium lactate or stearic acid, to harden the bar. Also, harder oils, like palm oil, can be helpful. Lastly, increasing the cure time, as water evaporates out, and decreasing the time in the shower will create a harder bar.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Is It Possible to Use Baby Oil as One of the Oils in a Soap Recipe?

No, you shouldn’t use baby mineral oil in your soap recipe for two reasons. First, it has already been scented. Second, the mineral oils won’t saponify.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: How Do Your Make Cold Process Soap?Common Cold Process Soap Questions: How Do Your Make Cold Process Soap?

If you ever wondered how to make soap from scratch, then this is the answer. Before you begin you will either need to formulate a recipe or choose a recipe already formulated, we suggest using our Beginners Cold Process Soap Recipe if this is your first time. We also recommend reading through our cold process soap making classes, especially the soap making safety class. While there is a little more detail and safety practices to follow, this is the most basic method for soaping. First, you create a lye solution by slowly adding lye to water. In a separate bowl, you will have your weighed and melted oils and butters. You will combine these ingredients at a similar temperature and mix until your batter trace, which is a thicker consistency.  The soap is then poured into a soap mold. Once it has setup, it is removed from the mold and allowed to cure.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Why Are My Citrus Scents So Light in my Cold Process Soap?

Citrus scent oils often have a low flash point, so they are more likely to burn off the fragrance during the saponification process. During this process, the soap will reach very hot temperatures, which are able to burn off certain scents. It is common for citrus scents to be affected by this issue. How can I prevent this? First, make sure that the maximum amount for fragrance has been added. Also, you can anchor the scented oil by using a scent with a that is heavier, like vanilla. Alternatively, some soapers use kaolin clay to enhance the scent, but it can make your soap too slick.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Are Fragrance Oils or Essential Oils Better for Cold Process Soap?

You can use both essential oils and fragrance oils to scent cp soap. However, fragrances tend to hold better and the scent lasts longer. This is because fragrance oils have top, middle, and base notes that will hold up better together. On the other side, some single note oils whether they be essential oils or fragrance oils, are more likely to burn off. So, you will want to test each oil in cold process soap.

 

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Can Cold Process Soaps Be Molded into Different Shapes?Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Can Cold Process Soaps Be Molded into Different Shapes?

Of course! There are many different styles of molds that you can use for soap making. Just don’t forget that this type of soap gets very hot. So, you need to make sure that you either use a silicone soap mold or a very thick plastic mold, like some of our Mold Market Soap Molds. However, plastic embed molds are not thick enough to hold your soap without melting and making a big mess. If you are unsure about a certain mold, it might be best to just save that shape for melt and pour soaps.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: When Can I Cut Cold Process Soap?

Before you can cut your finished soap loaf, you need to wait for a bit. While the exact time varies for each batch depending on size and ingredients, we suggest waiting for 24-48 hours before removing and cutting your nearly finished soaps. However, you can use a gloved hand to check the soap to determine whether the soap is too soft. On the other hand, you don’t want to wait too long or the soap may dry too much and crumble as you cut.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: How Long Does Soap have to Cure?

The exact amount of time your soaps take depends on your recipe that the amount of lye in it. However, most batches take about 2-6 weeks for the soaps to fully cure and be safe to use.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Does Natures Garden Offer Cold Process Soap Making Recipes?Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Does Natures Garden Offer Cold Process Soap Making Recipes?

Yes, we have all kinds of cold process soap recipes under the Cold Process Soap Recipes parts of the in the Free Recipes and Classes section of the NG site. There are so many options that it can be difficult to choose!

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: What Kind of Conditions Does CP Soap Need to Cure After it is Removed From Mold?

After your soap has been removed from the mold and sliced into bars, you will need to allow them to cure for a while. First, you will want to make sure that they are in a cool, dry environment. Also, you want to make sure that the bars a few inches apart. This will expose more of the bar to the air, which allows them to dry and set up properly.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: What Will Make Cold Process Soaps Freeze or Set Up too Soon?

The oils that you use will come into play. Too much of some harder oils and butters can cause the soap to set up faster than others.  Additives can also cause your batter to accelerate.  However, often, this is an issue caused by the fragrance oil. Each fragrance performs differently in cp soap and the ones that cause too much acceleration can lead to seizing, or a sudden setting up, in the soap batter before it has made it to the mold. Further, there are some fragrance oils that will actually slow down the process and give you time to really work on a recipe.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Do You Have Any Tips for Working with Problem Fragrance Oils in Cold Process Soap?Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Do You Have Any Tips for Working with Problem Fragrance Oils in Cold Process Soap?

It’s always a bummer when a scent you enjoy is a “problem fragrance oil”, but there are some things that will allow you to work with this fragrance oil anyway. First, we have the issue of acceleration. While we can’t fix the fragrance, we can cool our oils and lye water to room temperature before we start the saponification process. The cooler temperature takes longer to get to trace, which will help balance the acceleration from the fragrance oil. Also, you can formulate a soap recipe with oils that will slow trace, like sunflower oil. Although these two tricks can be used to slow an accelerated trace, it can’t stop a soap from seizing.

Second, we have the issue of separation. Sometimes a fragrance that separates from the mixture can be stick blended back in with enough effort. Also, it is possible for the scent to reabsorb during the curing process. You just need to keep an eye on these to determine whether the fragrance is worth using in cp soaps. Third, we have the issue of ricing, which is when little chunks form in your batch. While this can’t be prevented, it can be stick blended until the ricing is smoothed out. However, this only works in some cases.

Finally, some fragrance oils can cause your soap to discolor. Some scents can’t be prevented, but there are some cases when a soap additives can do the trick. If the description of your scent says it contains vanillin, it will discolor your soap to a shade of brown. However, you can use Vanilla White Color Stabilizer to help lessen any discoloration due to vanillin. Other kinds of discoloration will just have to be included into the soap design.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: What is the Best Way to Clean Up Cold Process Soap?Common Cold Process Soap Questions: What is the Best Way to Clean Up Cold Process Soap?

After you pour your batch into the soap mold, you may realize that you have a mess on your hands. Whether you spilled a few drops, made a complete mess, or only have the bowls to wash out, you are going to need to know how to safely clean up your lye mixtures. Before you get started, it is extremely important to have something on hand to neutralize the soap batter. So, you will need vinegar, which we prefer to have in a spray bottle to make it easy to apply in case of skin contact. After all the batter on the counter and soap equipment has been neutralized, you can begin cleaning with soapy water, we use dawn dish soap, to clean everything up again.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Is it Okay to Use My Soaping Bowls and Utensils for Cooking After Using it for CP Soapmaking If I Prewash It and Then Run It Through the Dishwasher?

No, it is very unsafe to use your soap making equipment in the kitchen. After you’ve used a bowl, mold, or other utensil for soaping you should never use it for anything other than soapmaking. Lye is very reactive and has the potential to do some serious harm after ingestion. So, it is a horrible idea to put this soaping equipment in contact with food or cooking utensils.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: What Would Cause a Batch of Soap to Erupt While in the Soap Mold?Common Cold Process Soap Questions: What Would Cause a Batch of Soap to Erupt While in the Soap Mold?

Natural sugars in soaping ingredients can lead to an eruption, as  the soap gets hotter than it typically does. CP soap can erupt due to improperly  adding things like beer, wine, or milk. First, freezing these ingredients before adding them is helpful. If you are using beer, then make sure that you release all of the carbonation before including it in soap. Also, you will want to boil wine before adding it to your soap.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Can I Use Cup Measurements for Soap Making?

For soap making, we would recommend using weighted measurements . Using a scale is much more accurate and will ensure that you have a quality batch of soap. Otherwise, you may accidentally do something to mess up your soaps. For example, you could add to little oils and create a lye heavy batch.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Can You Make Good Quality Soap Using the Cold Process Soap Method Without Palm Oil?Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Can You Make Good Quality Soap Using the Cold Process Soap Method Without Palm Oil?

Absolutely. One of the best parts about making cp soap is that you can include whatever oils and butters you want. You can use SoapCalc to combine your favorite soaping ingredients in a perfect batch of soap! If you would rather follow a recipe that we have formulated, Natures Garden has a few recipes under Free Recipes and Classes that are made without palm oil. For example, there is  our Calendula Sunshine Cold Process Soap Recipe and our Argan Soap Recipe.

Common Cold Process Soap Questions: Reach Out to UsCommon Cold Process Soap Questions: Reach Out to Us

We hope that you learned something useful for making cold process soap in this blog. If you have any further questions, you can reach out to us in the store, on the phone, or online. If you want to reach out to us online, then try out social media. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter (@ngscents), and Instagram (@ngscents). Have fun soapmaking!

Jun
22

What is a Carrier Oil?


This entry was posted in Carrier Oils, cosmetic ingredients, cosmetic recipe, craft recipes, lip balm supplies, Natures Garden craft recipes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

What is a Carrier Oil?What is a Carrier Oil?

What is a Carrier Oil? These are all the natural cosmetic oils that you can use in your homemade recipes. They are perfect for creating homemade soap, crafting a skin-loving lotion recipe, and making many of the other kinds of cosmetic recipes. So, knowing about these oils is important for creating the types of bath and body products that you need!

What is a Carrier Oil?: Making Soap Supplies

If you are looking for a good recipe for making soap, then it is going to have some carrier oils in it. Anyone making soap from scratch knows that the carrier oils you choose can influence the quality of your bars. So, these ingredients are essential for cold process soap recipes. You can see specifics on how each oil affects the soap on our Soaping Oil Properties. Even melt and pour soap recipes can benefit by adding some carrier oils to the soap base, which is often done to make the bar more conditioning to the skin.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Lotion Making

Also, our bulk carrier oils can be used to create an amazing homemade lotion recipe. These are the oils that we include to nourish and moisturize your skin. In fact, the oils are what do the majority of the skin care in lotions. While you can use butters along with your oils, they can lead to a thicker cream or even a body butter. So, lighter lotions need key carrier oils to perform effectively!

What is a Carrier Oil?: Using Essential Oils

Although essential oils are natural, they aren’t safe to put directly on your skin. Plus, adding a carrier oil will help hold on to the aroma longer than on its own. So, it is actually beneficial for your scent to mix an essential oil with a carrier oil before applying. One of the best carrier oils for essential oils would have to be Sweet Almond Oil or Argan Oil.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Kinds of Carrier OilsWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Kinds of Carrier Oils

There are many different kinds of carrier oils that you can mix together for your recipes. Depending on your skin type or level of dryness, you may want to have lighter or heavier oils. Also, some oils are better for face lotions or for foot care. So, the blend of carrier oils that you want varies based on your product and its purpose.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Apricot Kernel OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Apricot Kernel Oil

First, we have Apricot Kernel Oil, an oil that is light and excellent for skin care. While this oil is light enough to not block pores, it is conditioning enough to be a luxurious oil for cp soap. It’s great for making lotions that don’t leave a greasy feeling and skin into the skin. Also, its perfect in soap because the oil will sink into the skin quickly to fully moisturize the skin. We’ve used this wonderful oil in many bath and body recipes, including the Chamomile Light Lotion Recipe and the Strawberries and Champagne CP Soap Recipe.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Argan OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Argan Oil

Next, we have an oil that is amazing for skin care. Argan Oil is easily absorbed into the skin and won’t leave a greasy feeling on your skin. Plus, this cosmetic oil allows your skin to breathe and doesn’t block pores. In fact, this ingredient is used in many acne-fighting recipes. We included this oil in a few cosmetic recipes, like the Argan Soap Recipe and the Sour Watermelon Sugar Scrub Cubes Recipe. In our cp soap recipe, this oil increased the lather and nourished the skin beautifully.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Avocado OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Avocado Oil

Also, adding Avocado Oil to your homemade recipes is a perfect way to increase the moisturizing ability of your product. This cosmetic ingredient is a heavy oil that is perfect for providing dry, damaged skin with the nourishment it deserves. Plus, the high level of unsaponifiable fatty acids and high vitamin content make this skin-sensitive oil great for adding some extra conditioning power to your soap bars, which you can see in the Gentle Avocado Cold Process Soap Recipe.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Castor OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Castor Oil

Another great oil for your homemade cosmetic recipes is Castor Oil. Not only is this oil thick and perfect for nourishing dry, damaged skin, but this oil is a humectant. This means that oil will pull moisture to it, which will further moisturize your skin as it absorbs. Perfect for creating lotions for feet, like the Natural Salve Recipe , which are often one of the most damaged areas of skin. While this oil would provide some conditioning properties and a rich, creamy lather, it can make your soap sticky. So, avoid adding too much of this oil in your cp soap formulations. By limiting the amount of Castor Oil, we were able use the beneficial properties without as many drawbacks, like with our St Pattys Day Cold Process Soap Recipe as well as many other soaps.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Coconut OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Coconut Oil

Coconut Oil is a great oil for skin that sinks in well and is perfect for scrub recipes like the Foaming Hibiscus Scrub Recipe. Also, this sensitive oil is perfect to add to lip balm supplies for making recipes like the Kahlua and Cream Lip Balm Recipe. For soapmaking, this oil provides a hard bar with a bubbly lather that is cleansing. Many find that adding more than 20% of this oil is drying for the skin, so some people may include more conditioning oils to the recipe or even super fat the formula to include more oils.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Grapeseed OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Grapeseed Oil

Another fantastic oil for bath and body recipes is Grapeseed Oil. This oil is perfect for cosmetic supplies because it is a lightweight moisturizer that is effective without being too greasy for the skin. So, this oil is perfect for creating lotions sensitive enough for the face, like our Natural Facial Night Cream Recipe. Also, this oil is perfect for soap-making, like our Raspberry CP Soap Recipe. This oil is moisturizing, and even anti-acne, for soap but it doesn’t leave a greasy, heavy oil feeling on the skin.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Jojoba OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Jojoba Oil

While Jojoba Oil is technically a liquid wax, it is still fantastic for skin care products. This cosmetic ingredient is perfect for everything from lotions like our Shea Lotion with Herbal Infusion Recipe to lip care products like our Green Apple Lip Balm Recipe. In your soap recipes, this cosmetic ingredient is just as conditioning as luxury oils. But, this oil has a longer shelf life.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Lanolin OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Lanolin Oil

Lanolin Oil is a great cosmetic oil that is wonderful for moisturizing and protecting damaged hair and dry skin. This oil contains very few saponifiables, so it maintains its conditioning properties and provides the bar with a silky feeling. So, we used this wonderful oil in our Strawberries and Champagne CP Soap Recipe. Also, you can use lanoin in a solid form, which still absorbs well and is great for protecting damaged skin. This thicker oil has all of the same beneficial properties and can even be used in soaps, like our Beard Soap Recipe.

Raspberry CP Soap Recipe What is a Carrier Oil?: Macadamia Nut Oil

Next, we have Macadamia Nut Oil, which is an oil that is light and perfectly absorbs into the skin. This non-greasy oil is perfect for creating lotions, like our Almond Body Cream Recipe. Also, this oil is perfect for adding conditioning properties to your soap and is even great for mature skin types. So, we included this oil in our Lavender Cold Process Soap Recipe.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Meadowfoam Seed OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Meadowfoam Seed Oil

Another great oil that skins into the skin beautifully is Meadowfoam Seed Oil. Not only does this oil work to repair damaged skin, but it has a long shelf life due to its high level of antioxidants. So, it worked wonderfully in our Honey Vanilla Lip Balm Recipe. Also, this cosmetic oil can be used to superfat soap, reduce rancidity, and increase the fragrance’s lifespan. So, this oil was a great addition to our Raspberry CP Soap Recipe.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Olive Oil

Olive Oil is often a top choice for soapers, because it is very conditioning, helps harden the bar, and creates a mild bar of soap. While some soapmakers may use only olive oil in Castille soap or mostly olive oil in Marseille soap, it makes the bar a bit slimy and barely has a lather. So, many soapers will combine this oil with others to create a great soap recipe, like in our Creamy Cocoa Craziness Cold Process Soap Recipe.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Palm OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Palm Oil

Next, we have another great oil for creating soaps, which is Palm Oil. This soap making ingredient creates a hard, white bar that has a rich, creamy lather. We have used this wonderfully cleansing oil in many recipes, like our Calendula Swirl Soap Recipe and our Beer Cold Process Soap Recipe. 

You may find that your cosmetic oil has solidified, this is because the melt point is slightly above room temperature. Luckily, this is easy to fix. All you have to do is set your bottle in a bowl of warm water until the oil melts again.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Pumpkin Seed OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Pumpkin Seed Oil

Pumpkin Seed Oil is rich in vitamins and minerals, which provide great properties for the skin. This oil sinks into the skin without leaving oily residue to repair damaged skin. So, it was a perfect addition to our Pumpkin Sugar Scrub Recipe.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Rice Bran OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Rice Bran Oil

Rice Bran Oil has benefits similar to Olive Oil, so it is conditioning and great for soaps! So, we included this lovely soaping oil in our Wine Cold Process Soap Recipe as well as other great cp soap recipes. Plus, this rich, conditioning bar is perfect for both mature and sensitive skin types.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Safflower OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Safflower Oil

Also, we have a nourishing and skin-loving oil that is perfect for homemade products. Safflower Oil is moisturizing and nourishing for the skin, so we included it in many soap recipes and our own Hair Conditioner For Redheads Recipe.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Sesame Seed OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Sesame Seed Oil

Another great cosmetic oil is Sesame Seed Oil, which is a light cosmetic ingredient full of nutrients for the skin. We include this lovely oil in recipes like our Giraffe Bubble Bars Recipe or our Beard Balm Recipe. Also, this oil can be used in cp soap to help slow trace, nourish the skin, and provide a silky lather.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Sunflower OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Sunflower Oil

Also, Sunflower Oil works well with palm oil and olive oils to provide a rich creamy lather. Plus, this oil is very moisturizing and will provide a silky feel to the soaps. So, this is perfect for adding to our soap recipes and bath products, like our Natural Beet Root Lip Gloss Recipe.

What is a Carrier Oil?: Sweet Almond OilWhat is a Carrier Oil?: Sweet Almond Oil

Lastly, we have a light oil that will perfectly absorb into the skin Sweet Almond Oil. So, it was a great choice for bath and body recipes like Tranquility Bath Melts Recipe or Fruity Rings Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe. Plus, this oil is perfect for adding some conditioning properties to your soaps.

 

What is a Carrier Oil? : Reach Out to UsWhat is a Carrier Oil? : Reach Out to Us

We hope that you were able to find some carrier oils that you enjoy for your bath and body products. Not only are there many to choose from, but there are many combinations that you can try for your recipes. Just start with your favorites and build from there! If you have anymore questions about these oils and how they will work in your recipes, then reach out to us. An easy way to get in contact with us is to reach out on social media. We are on Facebook, Instagram (@ngscents), and Twitter (@ngscents).

Oct
09

Oils For Soap Making


This entry was posted in cosmetic ingredients, free soap recipes, handmade soap, make your own soap, moisturizing ingredient, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Wholesale, soap ingredients, Soap Making, Soap making supplies, soap recipe, soap supplies, soapmaking, wholesale craft supplies, wholesale supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Oils For Soap MakingOils For Soap Making

There are quite a few different kinds of oils for soap making. Each type of cosmetic oil has different properties that can be used to create batches of soap with different qualities. The main qualities that these oils can provide for your soap are hardness, cleansing, conditioning, bubbly lather, and creamy lather. Whether you are in interested in creating a moisturizing bar of soap, extremely cleansing bar of soap, or want to create a different kind of soap there are a few things you will need to know, a bit about the oils you are using is just one of those things. So, it can be useful to understand the impact that each of these cosmetic oils can have on your soap batch. At Natures Garden you can find all kinds of bulk oils for soap making that would be wonderful for making your own soap recipes! So, we will go over a few of the soaping oils that you could use to create your homemade soap making.

Oils For Soap Making Apricot Kernel OilOils For Soap Making Apricot Kernel Oil

First, we have a lovely cosmetic oil that is perfect for moisturizing the skin. Apricot kernel oil will easily absorb into your skin and provide your skin with the deep nourishment that it deserves. This oil is perfect for soap making and can be used in either cold or hot process soap with a recommended usage rate of 5%-10%. This oil is excellent, luxurious, and very conditioning! In fact, this oil will provide you soap bars with some amazing conditioning properties. Since this oil is such a skin loving cosmetic ingredient, it is sure to transfer this ability to your handmade soaps. Also, this oil will provide your bars with a slightly harder finished soap with a creamier lather.

Oils For Soap Making Avocado OilOils For Soap Making Avocado Oil

Another great soaping oil that you can add to your homemade recipes is avocado oil with a usage rate of 5%-30%. This lovely oil is perfect for skin care and would be wonderful in your homemade cold process soap. Not only is this oil wonderful for moisturizing your skin, but this cosmetic oil is gentle enough for even sensitive skin. Further, this soaping ingredient will provide a creamy lather as well as a conditioning properties that you will love in your homemade products! 

Oils For Soap Making Castor OilOils For Soap Making Castor Oil

Also, you can use castor oil to create lovely soap by adding this oil to your own recipes. Castor oil is a humectant so, it will attract moisture to your skin. This oil provides your soap with conditioning properties as well as a lather that is both very creamy and bubbly! You will love this oil in your homemade recipes. You can use about 5%-7% to get these lovely properties in your bars. Just make sure that you don’t use too much because more than 10% could make your soaps sticky.

Oils For Soap Making Coconut OilOils For Soap Making Coconut Oil 76

Further, you can incorporate coconut oil 76 in your homemade soap recipes. Coconut oil 76 will stay in a solid state in temperatures below 76 degrees Fahrenheit. Coconut oil will provide you with a harder and whiter soap bar with a bubbly lather. Also, this cosmetic ingredient is a very cleansing oil that is perfect for soap making. While this oil is not very conditioning, this can be countered by superfatting the recipe. Since this oil can strip the skin of natural oils and leave the skin dry when used above 30-35%, you can use a higher amount of other oils that are highly conditioning for the skin. This will allow your bar to be cleansing as well as moisturizing. We recommend no more than 20% of oil for soap making in your recipe.

Oils For Soap Making Coconut Oil FractionatedOils For Soap Making Fractionated Coconut Oil

Although, fractionated coconut oil has similar properties to coconut oil 76 in a bar of soap, there are also some differences. Fractionated coconut oil will contribute to making a bar of soap that will both be cleansing and provide a more bubbly lather. Furthermore, this cosmetic oil will provide you with a bar soap that is harder. While this oil won’t provide your bar of soap with any conditioning properties, you can easily pair this oil with other ingredients that are more conditioning. Combining ingredients with differing traits will make sure that you have a bar of soap with properties that are well-rounded. In addition, fractionated coconut oil contains only the medium-chain triglycerides of coconut oil making it liquid at room temperature. Finally, it has an almost unlimited shelf life.

Oils For Soap Making Grapeseed OilOils For Soap Making Grapeseed Oil

Also, you can use grapeseed oil in your own homemade recipes for making soap from scratch. This cosmetic oil is useful for adding some extra conditioning properties to your soap bars. In fact, this oil is typically used to superfat a recipe. So, this oil would be great for pairing with coconut oil to create a cleansing recipe that won’t dry out your skin. Plus, grapeseed oil will absorb easily into the skin. This means that your skin will be perfectly moisturized without a greasy feeling.  Further, this cosmetic ingredient will provide your recipe with a bit of a creamy lather and a slightly harder bar. Our recommended usage rate for grapeseed oil is up to 5%.

Oils For Soap Making Jojoba OilOils For Soap Making Jojoba Oil

Jojoba oil is another lovely cosmetic oil that can be used for soap making. Plus, this ingredient is a luxurious oil that is perfect for conditioning your skin. So, this oil will provide your soap with a bit of a conditioning property. Not only is this ingredient perfect for moisturizing the body, but this oil has remarkable absorption and will sink deep down into the skin. While this lovely oil is great for creating deeply moisturizing bars of soap, this ingredient may speed up trace, so you will want to be prepared to work a bit quicker with this batch. You can use 5-10% of this carrier oil in your soap making recipe. Further, jojoba oil has a long shelf, which is uncommon for luxury oils, of about 1-2 years. 

Oils For Soap Making Macadamia Nut OilOils For Soap Making Macadamia Nut Oil

Next, you can use macadamia nut oil for soap making. Macadamia nut oil provides wonderful nourishment for aging skin. In addition, this skin loving oil will easily absorb into your skin without a greasy feel left behind. This lovely carrier oil is is high in both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Since the levels of antioxidants are high, macadamia nut oil is not prone to rancidity. We recommend using no more than 10% of this oil in your handmade soap recipe.

Oils For Soap Making Meadowfoam Seed OilOils For Soap Making Meadowfoam Seed Oil

Furthermore, you can use meadowfoam seed oil for soap making. Adding this soaping oil to your soap from scratch will provide both conditioning and a bit of cleansing properties. While this oil has no fatty acids, it is still quite conditioning for the skin. In fact, this oil is so conditioning that meadowfoam seed oil is often used to superfat the soap batch. Also, this oil has an excellent resistance to oxidation and is not prone to rancidity. Additionally, this cosmetic oil can be used as a binder that may help to increase the life of fragrance oil. So, this oil is perfect to make scent in soap last longer. You can use this cosmetic oil at about 5-10%.

Oils For Soap Making Olive OilOils For Soap Making Olive Oil

Olive oil is a very popular cosmetic ingredient that can be used to create homemade soap. This oil is a very conditioning oil that is perfect for creating a moisturizing bars of soap. Due to this property, many people can use this cosmetic ingredient to create Castille Soap, which is also referred to baby soap. This soft baby soap is made from olive oil with no other cosmetic oils added. Another type of soap that this oil is used to create is Marseille soap, which is made with 72% or more of this oil. This second type of soaping recipe is created to add other oils and create a better lather. Since Olive Oil can leave a lather that is a bit “slimy” with limited bubbles, many would prefer to add other oils to create a better kind of lather. Also, this soap making oil can be used to add some hardness to the bar and a bit of a creamy lather to your batch.   

Oils For Soap Making Palm OilOils For Soap Making Palm Oil

Additionally, you can use palm oil to create your homemade soap recipes. In fact, this oil, along with olive oil and coconut oil, is one of the most common oils that is used for making soap. This cosmetic additive will provide your batch of soap with a few different beneficial properties. Due to the properties of conditioning, a creamy lather, and a hard bar that are added to the bar from the soaping oils, this batch of soap is commonly enjoyed by soap makers. It is solid a room temperature. Although this cosmetic ingredient is great for making quality bars of soap, you need to be ready as it can speed up trace.

Oils For Soap Making Pumpkin Seed OilOils For Soap Making Pumpkin Seed Oil

Also, pumpkin seed oil is a great soap making oil that you can use for your handcrafted bars of soap. This cosmetic ingredient is a dark oil that contains nutrients to the skin, like vitamins A,C,E,K, and zinc. As well as providing nutrients to the skin, this oil can provide some lovely qualities to the batch of soap. This cosmetic oil mostly provides conditioning properties. Further, the oil can provide a bit of hardness and a creamy lather and has a slight nutty aroma. Finally, the recommended usage rate is 5-10%.

Oils For Soap Making Rice Bran OilOils For Soap Making Rice Bran Oil

Further, you can use rice bran oil in your homemade soap making recipes, containing lots of antioxidants and vitamins. This cosmetic oil is perfect for mature and sensitive skin types. Not only is this oil great for more sensitive types of skin, but rice bran oil can provide your bars with some lovely properties. First, this oil can give your bar conditioning properties. Also, this oil can give your bar wonderful creamy lathering properties. So, soaps that use this cosmetic oil will create a soap batch with a conditioning, rich, creamy lather.

Oils For Soap Making Safflower OilOils For Soap Making Safflower Oil

Also, safflower oil is a lovely cosmetic oil that can be used to create nice bars of homemade soap. First of all, this soap making oil is very conditioning. Plus, oil can provide slight properties of hardness and creamy lather to the soap. So, you can create a mild and very moisturizing bar of soap with this oil. You can use up 5-15% of this ingredient.

Oils For Soap Making Sesame Seed OilOils For Soap Making Sesame Seed Oil

Another great oil for soap making is sesame seed oil. This lovely ingredient is said to be helpful in treating eczema and psoriasis. Further, this cosmetic oil will provide conditioning power, a creamy, stable lather, and a silky feel. Furthermore, this ingredient can be used to slow down the trace in your batch. Also, sesame seed oil has a natural, nutty aroma with a long shelf life, this oil is not prone to rancidity. You can use 5-10% of this oil in your batch.

Oils For Soap Making Sunflower OilOils For Soap Making Sunflower Oil

Furthermore, you can add sunflower oil to your soap making recipe. This cosmetic ingredient is most commonly chosen to slow down trace, which is very helpful for creating some swirled soap. So, you will have more time to work with your batch and get creative! Also, this cosmetic oil can provide lovely properties of this batch of cold process soap. This oil will add conditioning properties, a creamy lather, and a silky feel. Further, Sunflower Oil can naturally resist rancidity due to its high vitamin E content. If you choose to use this oil in your soap batch, then you can use up to 25% in soap batches. Just realize that using a high percentage of this oil will create a softer bar. So, it may be helpful to pair this oil with another ingredient that will strengthen your bar.

Oils For Soap Making Sweet Almond OilOils For Soap Making Sweet Almond Oil

Another cosmetic oil that you can include in your homemade soap making recipes is sweet almond oil. This ingredient is a light oil that is perfect for adding some skin care qualities to the soap bars. This soaping oil is perfect for conditioning purposes. Furthermore, this oil will absorb perfectly into your skin and provide your deepest layers with nourishment. Also, you can use 5-10% of this cosmetic oil in your soaping batch.

Creating Your Own Homemade Soap

Now that you have learned a bit more about the soaping ingredients can impact your final product, it would be a great time to create you very own soap recipe! You can choose a few of your favorite cosmetic oils and use the Recipe Calculator on Soapcalc to perfectly formulate the perfect soap making recipes. While it is super fun to make your very own recipe, you can check out our formulations. The Cold Process Soap Recipes page on the Natures Garden website has quite a few different types of soap recipes that may be great for you. All you have to do is take a look through the recipes we created and try your favorites.

Jul
08

What is Trace in Soap Making?


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, Soap making supplies, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

What is trace in soap makingWhat is Trace in Soap Making?

What is trace? Baby, don’t blend me; don’t stir me, just pour. Trace is when you’ve reached emulsion- your oils are blended with your lye mixture and are no longer capable of separating. How can you tell when your mixture is at trace? The easiest way is to use your stirring utensil: hold it a few inches above your mixing container and move it back and forth. If the soap batter dripping off the stirring utensil leaves little lines that sit on top of the mixture in the bowl- that’s trace. It can be difficult to capture in photographs, but you’ll know it when you see it in motion.

heavy traceSo I reach trace and that’s it? Well, yes and no. There are different degrees of trace, but the important thing to remember is that once a mixture has reached trace- it’s only going to continue to solidify from there. Light trace is considered the bare minimum. Light trace is helpful when you’re looking to make swirls or other designs that require easily pourable, almost-liquid soap. Moderate trace is in the goopmiddle and means you’re ready to pour your soap into the mold. Heavy trace is when your soap gets thick. The picture above shows heavy trace. A soap batter at heavy trace is resistant to change shape and almost impossible to pour into a mold. Heavy trace may result in the need to scoop your soap into the mold, seen in the photo on the left. Not a pretty sight. Work quickly to ensure the soap does not set before you are ready.

What Causes Different Levels of Trace?

Trace can be affected both by your ingredients and your blending method.

Ingredients:

  • ‘Hard’ oils, including palm oil and coconut oil, and butters will reach trace much faster. Using softer oils such as olive oil or canola will decrease the speed of trace, but your end product soap will be much softer. Increasing the amount of oil to superfat your recipe will also slow down trace. (Be careful not to add too much or you’ll have an excess of unreacted oils.)
  • In addition, fragrance oils can accelerate trace. (Check out our CP Soap Testing results to see how our fragrance oils perform in the CP soaping process.)
  • Inversely, the more water you use, the slower your soap will reach trace. A water discount (using less water than the recipe called for) will accelerate trace and is recommended for only advanced soapers when they see fit.

Blending:

  • The speed at which you blend can accelerate trace. Using a stick blender as opposed to stirring manually with a spatula will increase the speed of the reaction and trace will be reached faster. If you suspect that the mixture will accelerate, stir it manually to slow the rate of trace.
  • Furthermore, the temperature at which you blend your ingredients will affect trace. Higher temperatures accelerate trace. If you wish to slow down trace, let your lye mixture cool down to about 100 degrees Fahrenheit before you add it to your oils.
  • The order also matters. If the fragrance oil you’re using is known to have a tendency to accelerate trace, be sure to add it last, after you’ve made your soap mixture and added any colorant, and be ready to move.

False Trace

All this talk about trace and the need to rush your soap process may have you running around like a chicken with its head cut off- but BEWARE FALSE TRACE. False trace usually occurs when oils in your mixture begin to cool down and solidify without going through emulsion or saponification. So, much like Goldilocks, you don’t want your mixture to be too hot or too cold, but juuuuust right.

Ahhh!

I know it seems like a lot- but if you pay attention to the factors listed here- you should be alright. Remember to have all of your ingredients ready before you start soaping (always, but especially) in case of any unexpected trace acceleration. You can do this, I promise. And if something goes wrong, you can always melt down your soap and try again. Thanks for reading and happy soaping!

Jan
26

Goat’s Milk Soap


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, goats milk soap, melt and pour soap, Natures Garden, soap, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

goats milk soapGoat’s Milk Soap

Hi everybody! Hope you’re all having an awesome day! For all you melt and pour soapers out there, what is your favorite kind to use? Maybe it’s Shea Butter or Diamond Clear? Have you ever tried our Goat’s Milk Soap? This is one amazing melt and pour soap, and one that you should definitely be using for any upcoming projects and creations you may be working towards! Goat’s Milk is a wonderful kind of melt and pour soap, and one that we just happen to have many free recipes for! Make sure to try all of these out as soon as possible!

Are you curious as to all of the ingredients in Goat’s Milk soap? Allow me to explain! Goat’s Milk melt and pour soap includes the following: coconut oil, palm oil, titanium dioxide, sunflower oil, purified water, sodium cocoate, sodium myristate, sodium stearate, vegetable glycerin, Germall Plus, and of course goat’s milk. Each of these ingredients brings its own special purpose to the soap!

Coconut Oil: Coconut oil actually helps to soften and smooth your skin.

Palm Oil: Palm oil helps to bring a great lather to the soap as well as working to help harden the soap. It also helps to remove oils and dirt from your skin.

Titanium Dioxide: Titanium dioxide works to whiten the soap and can sometimes be used as a wonderful sunscreen, helping to protect the skin from any harmful UVA and UVB rays.

Sunflower Oil: Sunflower oil is great for treating many skin conditions like eczema and acne. It also works to help the skin retain moisture.

Purified Water: Purified water is another great treatment for skin conditions, helping to treat psoriasis, eczema, and acne. It also helps to hydrate and soften your skin.

Sodium Cocoate: (derives from coconut oil) Sodium cocoate works as a surfactant, helping to cleanse the skin and making it easier to remove oils and dirt.

Sodium Myristate: (the sodium salt derived from myristic acid) Sodium Myristate removes dirt and cleanses the skin, working as an emulsifying agent.

Sodium Stearate: (the sodium salt that comes from stearic acid) Sodium stearate works as another surfactant to make it easier to remove dirt and grime.

Vegetable Glycerin: Vegetable glycerin keeps the skin moisturized and cool, and also pulls in oxygen.

Germall Plus: Germall Plus works as a natural preservative for your soap.

Goat’s Milk: Goat’s Milk helps with treating many skin conditions like acne, reduces inflammation, and soothes damaged and dry skin. It also softens the skin as well as working as a natural moisturizer.

 

Are you just dying to try out our Goat’s Milk soap now? Check out some of our awesome recipes made with our Goat’s Milk soap! When you go to our Goat’s Milk Melt and Pour Soap page, click on the little “Recipe” tab above the picture. This will show you all of our free recipes made with goat’s milk soap, like our Floating Noah’s Ark Soap, our Solid Sugar Scrub, our Raspberry Zinger Bath Fizzies, and many many more! Make sure to check out all the rest of our free classes and recipes as well! Please don’t hesitate to contact us here at Nature’s Garden if you have any thoughts, questions, or concerns, and keep watching for more Enlightened by Layla!

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Jan
23

Shea Butter Soap


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, melt and pour soap, Natures Garden, shea butter, soap, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

shea butter soapShea Butter Soap

Hello all of you amazing people! I hope this finds you all having a fantastic day! For all you soap makers out there, what is your absolute favorite kind of soap to make? Maybe you’re more into cold process soap making, or melt and pour soaping, or maybe your favorite is even to make your own hot process soap recipes? No matter what your favorite kind is, each kind is unique and wonderful! Let’s talk about melt and pour soap right now, specifically Shea Butter Soap! This is one wonderful kind of soap that you’re sure to want to use as soon as possible!

Are you wondering about the ingredients in our Shea Butter Soap? Well, let me tell you all about them! Shea Butter melt and pour soap contains the following: vegetable glycerin, titanium dioxide, coconut oil, sodium stearate, sodium myristate, palm oil, sodium cocoate, purified water, sunflower oil, and shea butter. Each of these ingredients bring their own special benefits to your skin when used in soaps.

Vegetable Glycerin: This helps to cool the skin, pulls in oxygen, and retains moisture in the skin.

Titanium Dioxide: This is will whiten soap.  Also, it is sometimes used to help protect the skin from harmful UVA and UVB rays, working as a great sunscreen.

Coconut Oil: Coconut oil helps to smooth and soften skin.

Sodium Stearate: This ingredient is the sodium salt that comes from stearic acid.  It works as a surfactant, and emilsifying agent, and helps to thicken the soap.

Sodium Myristate: This ingredient is the sodium salt derived from myristic acid.This works as an emulsifying agent, also helping to cleanse the skin and remove dirt.

Palm Oil: Palm Oil helps to remove oils and dirt from the skin, as well as working to restore natural oils within the skin.

Sodium Cocoate: Sodium Cocoate derived from coconut oil, it helps to cleanse the skin and works as a surfactant, helping to make it easier to remove dirt and grime from your skin.

Sunflower Oil: Helps to retain moisture in the skin, as well as helping to treat conditions like acne, eczema, and psoriasis.

Purified Water: Purified water helps to soften and hydrate the skin, as well as working to treat eczema, dry skin, psoriasis, and many other skin conditions.

Shea Butter: Shea butter works to hydrate the skin, as well as working as a sunscreen, helping to heal cuts and burns, and helps to treat wrinkles and fine lines.

 

Here at Nature’s Garden, we offer many free recipes and classes. Are you looking for some cool new projects to try using Shea Butter Melt and Pour Soap? Well, when you’re on our Shea Butter page, make sure to check out all of our awesome recipes under the Recipe tab on top of the picture! I recommend our Zebra Print Soap…but what can I say? I’m a sucker for animal prints! We have many others as well, like our Fish Kiss Soap, our Clamshell Kiwi Sugar Cubes, and be sure to try out our delicious looking 7 Up Bundt Cake Soap! These projects and creations will definitely be ones that all of your friends, family, and even your customers will love and adore! These are definitely ones that you can’t pass up! Enjoy this wonderfully amazing soap and keep watching for more Enlightened by Layla!

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