Tag Archives: natural candle making supplies

Jan
14

Juniper Berry Benefits


This entry was posted in candle making, candle making supplies, cosmetic supplies, craft recipes, firestarters, herb, herbal oil infusion, herbal tea, herbs, herbs in cosmetics, Herbs in Soap, make your own, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Juniper Berry BenefitsJuniper Berry Benefits

There are many different ways to gain Juniper Berry benefits for your body. First, you can include these berries in your food to create some delicious and unique recipes. This may help provide your body with various nutrients and beneficial properties. Also, you could create bath and body recipes that integrate these properties to benefit the body. Plus, these Juniper Berries whole can be used to decorate various Natures Garden recipes. So, this herb is useful to both decorate your creations and provide beneficial properties for these recipes.

Juniper Berry Benefits: Growing ConditionsJuniper Berry Benefits: Growing Conditions

Juniper Berry plants are most common in the Northern Hemisphere and they come in a few different varieties. You can tell these varieties apart by their heights, as they are either one and a half feet tall, four feet tall, six feet tall, or twenty-five feet tall. So, these plants can vary from the sizes of small shrubs to large trees. Since they are similar to conifers, they have needles or scales that are useful for helping the plant survive droughts. But, this means that the Juniper plant can’t handle being over watered. If they have wet soil that doesn’t drain well, they will suffer. So, you should never need to water your plant unless there have been severe drought conditions. Although Junipers prefer acidic soil, they can grow in a variety of soil types. Also, they will prefer to be exposed to full sun.

Juniper Berry Benefits: Harvesting Your Juniper Berries

First, make sure that you do in fact have an edible variety of juniper before you begin your harvest. The most common edible variety of juniper is Juniperus communis, but there are many varieties out there that are poisonous or bitter tasting. After you are sure you have the correct tree, you will want to pick the soft berries that are a blue/black color. Make sure that you don’t pick unripe berries as they won’t dry properly. Then, you can dry your berries by allowing them to set inside at room temperature for approximately three weeks. Once the berries are dried you will need to remove any berries that are brown or have viable entrance holes. These berries will have bugs living inside them. Lastly, you can either use your berries immediately or store them in an airtight jar for up to a year.

Juniper Berry Benefits: Caution for Anyone that has Apple Trees

You may want to hold off on planting a juniper berry tree/shrub if you have an apple tree. There is a fungus that can infect your apple tree called cedar-apple rust. It will begin growing on the juniper trees or shrubs first. Then, the fungus can make its way to any of the apple trees nearby. So, you would be putting your apple trees at risk by planting juniper nearby. However, anyone without apple trees won’t have to worry about this disease transfer.

Juniper Berry Benefits: Industry Uses

You can find many different ways to use juniper berries in a variety of products. First, you can use this herb to spice up your meals or to flavor gin. Also, you can create a tonic or tea to benefit from some of the medicinal properties of juniper. Further, you can use this botanical herb to create wonderful bath and body recipes. So, let’s look into the benefits that you can gain from adding this herb to your products.

Juniper Berry Benefits: Medicinal Uses for Juniper BerriesJuniper Berry Benefits: Medicinal Uses

In ancient medicine, Juniper Berries were used to treat all kinds of illnesses. Plus, many different cultures developed ideas of how they could use this herb in their medical practices. This lovely herb was considered to be able to purify blood and was thought to boost stamina for the Greeks. Also, ancient Egyptians used Juniper to embalm their dead. Then, Juniper was made into a tonic that became popular by Europeans in the 17th century. While this was originally created as a diuretic, this juniper tonic quickly became known as gin.

Juniper Berry Benefits: Medicinal Uses for Juniper Berries

Today, there are many medicinal uses for juniper berries. Primarily, this herb continues to be used as a diuretic. These berries can be used to get your kidneys to work more efficiently, which will stimulate your urinary passages. While this can be useful for helping reduce renal insufficiency, weakness of the bladder, or weakness of the urethra, it is dangerous for a kidney infection. So, you should ask a doctor before using this herb if you have any urinary tract issues.

Plus, the antimicrobial and antifungal properties in this herb have been found to be useful against certain infections. For example, studies have shown that this herb can be used to fight the bacteria that cause illnesses like E. coli, pneumonia, gonorrhea, Staphylococcus aureus, and more! Further, this herb’s antiseptic properties are useful for treating scrapes and cuts to prevent infection. Also, this herb is a carminative agent that has been known to help move gas through the body. Further, it is thought to prevent more gas from being produced while it is in your system. So, this herbal property can be used to reduce indigestion, chest pain, and stomach aches. Furthermore, Juniper can be used to prevent stomach ulcers and get the stomach back on track. This is due to the herb promoting stomach bile secretion, which protects the inner lining of the stomach. 

Also, this herb can be used to reduce symptoms of joint pain, gout, and rheumatoid arthritis. Juniper can help with these conditions as this herb improves blood circulation and helps remove toxins from the body. These toxins are flushed out using excess sweating, which will help clear your pores, too. Further, there are properties in this cosmetic herb that help to reduce swelling. Also, this herb is useful for reducing muscle cramps and spasms.

Juniper Berry Benefits: Food and BeveragesJuniper Berry Benefits: Food and Beverages

In areas of Northern Europe, like  Scandinavia, Germany, or some regions of France, Juniper is commonly used as a spice for cooking. It is most popular to use Juniper to spice up meaty dishes, like chicken or beef. Just make sure not to overcook the herb, as it can draw out an unpleasant, bitter flavor. Instead, you may want to try toasting them. However, Americans are more likely to have added juniper in their gin than their meals. In fact, gin was named after Juniper in the Dutch language. The taste of juniper is uniquely refreshing and tangy with notes of pine and citrus. Anyone that wants to add more juniper into their diet should check out 16 Recipes That Make the Most of Juniper Berries by Brit + Co.

Juniper Berry Benefits: Bath and Body ProductsJuniper Berry Benefits: Bath and Body Products

Also, you can add this herb to various cosmetic recipes to provide the body with a variety of benefits. Of course, you can add these berries whole to your recipe. However, this is not the only way to use this herb. You can create an herbal tea with this cosmetic supply to add to your recipes, as well. Further, you can infuse your oils with the properties of dried Juniper Berries. So, there are many different ways that you can add some juniper berries to your products.

First, antibacterial and antiseptic properties have been found in Juniper. These properties can be useful for treating minor cuts and scrapes, as this herb will protect the body from infection. Also, the known astringent and detoxifying properties are useful for helping to control sebum production and balance oily skin. This is perfect for helping to prevent clogged pores or breakouts. Plus, these properties can be beneficial for improving skin tone and help to shrink your pore size. So, this is another way that Juniper can be used to help reduce the production of sebum. Not only is this property great for balancing the sebum production of oily skin, but it can be useful for preventing acne breakouts.

Plus, this herb is helpful for reducing blemishes, rashes, and eczema. Also, this herb will help bring more blood to the skin. This will help nourish skin cells and promote healthy growth. Also, the antioxidants in this herb can be used to fight oxidation damage, which can leave the skin looking aged. So, adding this herb to your skin care will help prevent signs of premature aging.

Juniper Berry Benefits: Natures Garden RecipesJuniper Berry Benefits: Natures Garden Recipes

We at Natures Garden have incorporated the Juniper Berries herb wholesale into a variety of homemade recipes. First, we Incorporated this herb and a few others into our Rustic Wax Melts Recipe. This blend of herbs creates an authentic aroma in the wax tart recipe. Also, we included this botanical herb in our Christmas Wreath Fire Starters Recipe. While this product is different from a candle, the herb provided a nice scent. Plus, the Juniper added to the wreath appearance. Additionally, we included this herb into the Berry Bewitching Bath Brew Recipe. The Juniper berries were useful in the bath tea as their natural menthol content, anti-inflammatory, and antiseptic properties. Further, we used juniper berries in our Acai Berry Smoothie Sugar Scrub Recipe to provide a decorative topping. Plus, it can be used with the poppy seed herb to help exfoliate the body.

Juniper Berry Benefits: Other BenefitsJuniper Berry Benefits: Other Benefits

Some people have found that this herb can be useful for disinfecting the air. Since this herb has antimicrobial properties, it is thought that Juniper can be used to purify the air. So, it could be beneficial to include this herb with your natural candle making supplies. You can either add this herb whole to your homemade wax melt recipes or allow this herb to soak using bath tea bags in your melting candle wax. This will allow you to create a candle that includes this aroma without the risk of adding whole herbs, which have a potential to catch on fire.

Juniper Berry Benefits: Attracting Birds to Your Home

If you enjoy bird watching, then you may want to consider using plants to attract birds to your home. This way you can enjoy all kinds of beautiful birds without having to leave the comfort of home. One great plant that you can use is Juniper! This plant will attract a variety of birds that like to eat the juniper berries. According to a birdwatcher, who with a juniper berry bush, the bird types that seem to frequent these bushes were cedar waxwings, bark creepers, blackbirds, grackles, robins, sparrows, and many others. He loved to watch them from his windows as they were feasting on the berries. While Juniper attracts birds, it isn’t the only plant you can use to attract birds to your area. You can find a list of different plants you can use on Birdscaping: Creating Your Landscape to Attract Birds from the Ohio Landscape Association.

Juniper Berry Benefits: Ask Us Your QuestionsJuniper Berry Benefits: Ask Us Your Questions

We hope that you learned something new about the Juniper Berries herb. If you have any more questions about this herb or any others, then feel free to ask us your questions. We are available in the store, on our HUG line, and online. An easy way to reach us online is our social media. We have a Facebook page and you can use @ngscents to find us on either Twitter and Instagram. Good luck and hope to hear from you soon!

Juniper Berry Benefits: Reminder About Our Herbs

Note: We at Natures Garden sell our Juniper Berries Whole herb for external use only. We do not sell our herbs as food items. The information that we provide on our herbs is for educational purposes only. We do not intend for this information to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease. The information we provide has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Make sure that you keep all herbs out of reach of children and pets. Also, pregnant and/or lactating women should take special care when handling any of our herbs. Natures Garden accepts no responsibility (written or implied) for any products that you make with our herbs. Further, all testing is the responsibility of the customer.

Jul
05

How Do I Make Wax Melts


This entry was posted in candle clamshell tarts, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle molds, candle recipe, Natures Garden, wholesale fragrance oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

How Do I Make Wax MeltsHow Do I Make Wax Melts

If you have been asking, “How Do I Make Wax Melts?”, then you are in the right place! Whether you are an experienced candle maker expanding into wax melts or a beginning crafter looking to make their own wax tarts, you can find everything you need to get started right here at Natures Garden. You can use this blog to figure out the ingredients that you will need. Then, head over to our site to find everything you need at a push of a button. Plus, there are even recipes for different wax melt ideas that provide you with step-by-step instructions for creating wax tarts. If you find you need a bit more guidance, then you can call our HUG line as well. We are here to help make this process both fun and easy!

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Candle Making SuppliesHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Candle Making Supplies

Just like with candle making, there is some equipment that you are going to need to get started. First, you will need a pouring pot to melt your wax. You will also need a pot filled with a few inches of water and a stove top. Your pouring pot will then be placed into the pot of warm water. Also, you will need a thermometer because you will need to add the fragrance oil at a certain temperature and you need to make sure the wax isn’t too hot when you pour.

Also, you will need to make sure you have a least have your basic supplies, which are candle wax, a scented oil, and packaging supplies. While there are many choices and options for customizing your wax melts, these two key ingredients are all you need to create your scented wax tarts. Also, you need to make sure that you have a plan for packaging your wax melts. There are many options, like clamshells, molds, and much more, and you just need one method to ensure that you are able to store your finished wax melts for later use.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Waxes for Making Wax TartsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Waxes for Making Wax Tarts

There are many different types of waxes available from Natures Garden. We recommend using a pillar wax for your melts if you are putting them into a mold. However, there are still quite a few that are great when it comes to making a wax melt using a container wax. Choosing the type of wax is very important to the quality of your scented wax melts. So, you may want to learn a bit about your options before choosing a wax.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Beeswax Wax MeltsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Beeswax Wax Melts

Beeswax is a great choice for making wax tarts. It is perfect for creating hard wax tarts that are easy to package and use. You can either scent this wax on its own or add about 5-10% to a paraffin wax. Adding beeswax to paraffin wax will increase the integrity of the wax melt, which will make it easy to package and then use later. Also, adding some beeswax to your recipe will improve the color and your burn time of your wax tart.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Wow Wax Wax TartsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Wow Wax Wax Tarts

Speaking of paraffin wax, WOW Wax is a paraffin blend that is soft, creamy and has an excellent scent throw. While you may want to use this wax to make wax tarts, it could be difficult to make tarts. When you go to remove a wax melt from your clamshell or mold, the wax is likely to stick the container. This will ruin the shape and lead to a mess. So, this is when the beeswax comes in handy! Adding a portion of stearic acid or beeswax will make the wax harder and easier to use for making wax tarts. Alternatively, you could package your soft wax melts into portion cups. This will make it easier to transfer the wax to the warmer and cut down on some of that mess.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Can I Use Soy Wax for Wax Melts?How Do I Make Wax Melts: Can I Use Soy Wax for Wax Melts?

While you can use soy wax to create your homemade wax melts, a softer wax like soy wax may be harder to remove from a mold or clamshell container. Similarly, Joy Wax is a candle wax that blends soy with other ingredients to enhance the quality. So, Joy Wax will be a bit soft, as well. However, there are ways that you can effectively use this wax. Again, you could use individually portioned containers and just squeeze the wax into your warmer. Also, you can use Stearic Acid to harden your wax tarts. 

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Best Wax for Clamshell TartsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Best Wax for Clamshell Tarts

One of the best waxes for making wax tarts is our Pillar of Bliss Wax, as it is a strong wax made to create pillar candles. So, it will be sure to maintain its shape in the packages. We have made our basic Candle Wax Tarts Recipe with this wax because it is one of the easiest for clamshell wax melts. Also, we have done a few other recipes, like the Pumpkin Delight Chamshell Tarts and the Candy Corn Clamshell Tarts Recipe, with this candle wax.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: How do I Scent Wax Tarts?

Scented oils are an important part of creating your own wax tarts. Your fragrance oil warmers won’t be able to do much without a great scent. Plus, you need to make sure that your scented oil is added correctly or it may not mix properly with the candle wax. So, you need to be able to add your fragrance oils at the right temperatures.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: What Temperature Do I Add My Fragrance Oil?How Do I Make Wax Melts: What Temperature Do I Add My Fragrance Oil?

One crucial thing that you need to remember with fragrance oils is that they should be added to the wax at the correct temperature. This can be found on the page for the individual candle wax. Each candle wax will be different. So, for the best results follow the instructions for that particular candle wax.  Each wax has been tested to find the temperature that will give you the best results using that particular candle wax.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: How to Scent Candles with SpicesHow Do I Make Wax Melts: How to Scent Candles with Spices

Not only are fragrance oils great for scenting your home, but there are some fragrance herbs that will do make you wax melts look amazing! Our Rustic Wax Melts Recipe was created with Cloves, Juniper Berries, Cinnamon, and Orange Peel that perfectly compliment the Christmas Wassail Fragrance Oil. It has such a wonderful spicy aroma that will fill up your whole house. If you want to find more herbs to try in your wax melts, then check out the Herbs & Spices page.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Shape and Packaging Ideas for Wax MeltsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Shape and Packaging Ideas for Wax Melts

Also, you need to make sure that you have an idea for packaging your wax melts. Otherwise, your tarts may set up before you are able to pour. Depending on the type of wax tart you are making, there are many different options. Here are a few of the most common options.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Clamshell Packaging for Wax MeltsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Clamshell Packaging for Wax Melts

First, we have clamshell wax tarts containers These are most often used for packaging because they are convenient to make and use. Plus, the divider allows you to easily create six individual wax melts in one container! If you want to use this method of packaging, Natures Garden has some high quality clamshell containers.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Portion CupsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Portion Cups

Another good option for wax melts is portion cups. These are especially useful for soft waxes, like container waxes. Many candle makers choose to use the same candle wax in their tarts that they use in their container candles. This way they do not have to purchase two different types of candle wax.  When using portion cups there will be less struggle trying to get the wax out of the container. Just squeeze the container and pop the wax into your wax warmer and don’t worry about a mess. This could also be a good container for transporting wax embeds of various shapes. For example, a few retro flower wax tarts could fit in a container for storage.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Candle MoldsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Candle Molds

Another perfect way to create your wax melts is to use silicone candle molds wholesale. This allows you to make all kinds of fun shapes and designs. We used this recipe to create our scrumptious Pumpkin Cheesecake Wax Melts Recipe, which is perfect for creating some little cupcake wax melts, too.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Other Ideas for Your Wax Potpourri WarmerHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Other Ideas for Your Wax Potpourri Warmer

Wax melts are great, but there are even more fun ideas out there that you can use for your wax burner. These fun craft recipes take candle wax and make unique creations that are perfect for scenting your home. Plus, you can even use these ideas to get yourself thinking about your own alternatives to typical wax tarts. Just start crafting and see what you can come up with!

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Shimmer Gel Potpourri RecipeHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Shimmer Gel Potpourri Recipe

One fun room scenting idea is the Shimmer Gel Potpourri Recipe. This wax burner potpourri uses a soft candle wax and uses an oil to create a gel consistency. Then, the recipe uses fragrance, mica. and bottles to finish off this great recipe. Now you can simply squeeze out some of this potpourri into your wax warmer and cut out all the worry about using soft soy wax.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Autumn Leaves Potpourri RecipeHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Autumn Leaves Potpourri Recipe

Next, we have a scoop-able wax potpourri recipe that uses cute leaf embeds. The Autumn Leaves Potpourri Recipe is a simple and fun way to create a room scenting recipe. Most of your wax doesn’t need to be melted and a PET jar is an easy way to package a finished product!

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Glistening Snowflakes Potpourri RecipeHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Glistening Snowflakes Potpourri Recipe

The Glistening Snowflakes Potpourri Recipe is similar to the previous recipe with a different wax embed. Part of the fun is being able to use all sorts of different shapes in your recipes.  You can find all of our embed molds here. If you wanted you could even just color the pillar of bliss wax and layer the product without embeds. It is all up to you!

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Make Your Own Wax Melts KitHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Make Your Own Wax Melts Kit

If you are new to making diy wax tarts, then you may want to try out a wax melts kit. This wax tart starter kit has all of the ingredients and packaging that you need to make homemade wax melts. The Clamshell Wax Tart Kit comes with fragrance oils, candle wax, and clamshell containers. Plus, this kit even has a complete set of instructions that will help to guide you through the process of making wax melts!

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Wax Melt Warmers

If you are looking for a new candle warmer, then you may want to check out Broad Review’s article on the Best Candle Wax Warmers. This article talks about five of the best-selling candle wax warmers on the market. Plus, they break down some of the best qualities in each to compare to other warmers. So, you may want to check out this article and see what they have found to be the best!

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Need Some Help?How Do I Make Wax Melts: Need Some Advise?

We are here to help! This craft blog is all to help you understand wax melts and hopefully learn something new! There are quite a few combinations for creating your wax melt recipe, but once you make your decision they are pretty easy to create. However, you can reach out to us with any questions that you make have about home made wax melts. Not only are you able to call or stop by the store, but you can find us on social media, too. We are on Facebook, Twitter (@ngscents), and Instagram (@ngscents). Good luck with your wax melts and fun some fun!

Jun
29

Common Candle Making Questions


This entry was posted in candle additives, candle colorants, candle company advice, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making questions, candle making supplies, candle scents, candle wicks, candles and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Common Candle Making QuestionsCommon Candle Making Questions

All of us at Natures Garden understand that it can be difficult to create perfect candles. Especially if you have serious scent throw issues popping up, it can be frustrating to put time and money into candles that don’t work that way you want. So, we want to answer some common candle making questions to prevent confusion and save you from all that extra troubleshooting. So, let’s talk about common problems so we can get back to creating gorgeous homemade candles!

Common Candle Making Questions About Candle Wax

First, we are going to talk about questions that often come up in relation to candle wax.

Common Candle Making Questions: How Do You Melt Candle Wax at Home?Common Candle Making Questions: How Do You Melt Candle Wax at Home?

You can use a pouring pot and a stove top to melt your wax at home. Also, we recommend using a double boiler method where you have a larger pot with water in it and set your pouring pot full of wax inside. Turn the stove on to medium and allow the water in your pot to boil. This will safely heat your wax without letting it get too hot.

Common Candle Making Questions: Which is the Best Wax for Candle Making?

Choosing the best wax all depends on preference of what you prefer in a finished candle. First, we have soy waxes that are vegan, gluten free, and natural candle waxes. This is the least expensive wax, has a fantastic cold throw, and has a cleaner burn, but it is tricky to get a great hot throw with some fragrances. Also, Soy Wax often has frosting and a rougher finish.

Next, we have paraffin wax, which has the best scent throw, and is in both the Wow Wax and Joy Wax. The Joy wax uses a mixture of paraffin and soy, so it has a cleaner burn due to the soy wax and a really good hot scent throw due to the paraffin wax. Also, it clings to the candle containers better and has less frosting. An option for creating a translucent candle is gel wax, but it isn’t compatible with all fragrances.

Additionally, you can use palm wax, which comes from sustainable sources, has a beautiful crystal finish, and has a great scent throw. Natures Garden carries sustainable palm container and pillar wax. Lastly, Pillar of Bliss Wax and Palm Pillar wax are great options for creating pillars or wax tarts.

Common Candle Making Questions For Making Soy Candles

Since soy wax is so popular among our customers, we wanted to answer some of the most common questions asked about making soy candles.

Common Candle Making Questions: What is the Best Temperature to Pour Soy Wax?Common Candle Making Questions: What is the Best Temperature to Pour Soy Wax?

This temperature depends on the type of soy wax being used. We recommend pouring our 100% soy wax at 110 degrees Fahrenheit. For the Golden Brands 444 or Golden Brands 464, we suggest pouring at 135 degrees Fahrenheit

Common Candle Making Questions: What is the Best Temperature to Add Fragrance to Soy Wax?

For heavier fragrance oils with high flash points, we recommend adding the scented oil at 185 degrees Fahrenheit. However, lighter fragrances with lower flash points, Ike citrus scents, would be added around 160 degrees Fahrenheit

Common Candle Making Questions: Which Wick is Best for Soy Candles?

Many customers perfer to use a cotton wick for their soy candles. We have two types of cotton wicks available, which are HTP and CD candle wicks.

Common Candle Making Questions: How Do You Make Soy Wax Melts?

Although we don’t carry soy wax in a pillar form for melts, you can still create soy wax melts with container wax. Often, customers will use individual portion cups to package wax melts like these, which can be used to squeeze the wax into the wax burner. This is because it is softer than pillar wax and is difficult to get out of clamshells. However, this wax will not hold the shape from a mold. In fact, it will get stuck in your mold and be difficult to clean.  Another option when making wax melts with a container wax is to add stearic acid to the wax to harden it.

Common Candle Making Questions About Candle Fragrance

Fragrance is important for creating great scented candles, so its important to know how to get your scented candle oil to work for you!

Common Candle Making Questions: Why Don’t My Candles Have a Good Scent Throw?

This issue could have a few different possible causes. First, you may not have added enough fragrance, which should be 1 oz. per pound on average. However, Natures Garden waxes will allow you to add up to 10% in most cases.  Also, your candle may have a clogged wick. This could be due to adding too much fragrance, vybar, or another additive. Also, additives like mica and crayons will clog your wick.

Another possibility is the type of wax you are using. A wax like paraffin will have a better scent throw than soy waxes. Finally, it is possible that you have the wrong size wick. If you wick is too small, then the flame will not be hot enough to get the aroma into the air. On the other hand, a wick that is too large will burn the scent oil before it can be released into the air.

Common Candle Making Questions: What is Vybar Used for in Candle Making?Common Candle Making Questions: What is Vybar Used for in Candle Making?

If you have a poor scent throw and you have tried trouble shooting, then you may want to use vybar. The vybar can be used to increase scent throw by adding some amount between a fourth and a half teaspoon per pound of wax. Just be cautious not to add too much or it can clog your wick and reduce your scent throw. We suggest using Vybar 103 for pillar candles and Vybar 206 for container candles.

Common Candle Making Questions: Why Is Fragrance Oil Settling to the Bottom of the Candle?

If you notice that fragrance is settling at either the top or bottom of your candle, then there could be a few reasons to explain it. First, you’ve added too much fragrance oil. Another option is that the wax you are using isn’t porous enough and you may need a more porous wax. Along with this idea, waxes that have been burned or heated too much may reduce in their ability to hold fragrance.  Finally, you may have not stirred enough to fully incorporate the fragrance oil.

Common Candle Making Questions: Can You Use Essential Oils in a Wax Warmer?Common Candle Making Questions: Can You Use Essential Oils in a Wax Warmer?

While some essential oils can be used in wax warmers, it can be a bit tricky. You need to make sure that they are diluted with either a carrier oil or DPG. Additionally, some essential oils have flashpoints that are too low for a wax warmer. So, you will want to do some testing with the essential oils that you choose.

Common Candle Making Questions About Candle Wicks

Choosing the right wick is another important part of candle making. Otherwise, your candle might not be as effective as it could be.

Common Candle Making Questions: Why is My Candle Wick Drowning Out?Common Candle Making Questions: Why is My Candle Wick Drowning Out?

This could be due to either a small wick or a high candle. First, the wick you used may be too small for a candle of this diameter, which you can use our Candle Wick Chart for reference. Also, your wick could be drowning if you poured your candle wax up too high. You should stop pouring before the wax passes the part of the candle jar that changes shape and begins to curve for the lip.

Common Candle Making Questions: Why Isn’t My Candle Wax Not Burning Evenly All of the Way Down?

Uneven burning could be due to either the wax or the wick. First, the wick may be too small for your candle’s size. Also, the wax that you chose could be too hard. While you could use a softer wax instead, you could also switch to a hotter wick.

Common Candle Making Questions About General Candle Making

Lastly, we have some general questions about making candles that could be useful for crafting perfect candles.

Common Candle Making Questions: Sometimes I Follow All Recommendations and I Still Can’t Seem to Get it Right. Why is That?

There are many factors that can influence the outcome of your homemade candles. First, fragrance oils can impact a candle, as thicker scented oils require you to wick up to get a hotter burn. Also, the room temperature can effect your candles. If the room is too cold, then you can have more issues with glass adhesion and frosting because your candle will setup very quickly.

Additionally, you could have an issue where the scent doesn’t smell as strong because you are used to it. When you are around a scent for too long, your nose will adjust and you won’t notice it as much. If this happens to you, then don’t worry too much just take a break from the scent for awhile and your nose will recognize it again after a long enough break.

Common Candle Making Questions: Why are My Layers Bleeding in my Candle?

This color issue could have one of a few different causes. First, the layers were too hot. If you don’t wait long enough or pour your wax too soon, then the layers can melt one another and start to run into one another. Also, it could be due to over saturating your candle with fragrance, as the extra scented oil will blend with colorant and bring the color with it as it seeps out of the candle.

Common Candle Making Questions: Can I Use Mica in Candles?Common Candle Making Questions: Can I Use Mica in Candles?

We recommend that you don’t mix mica into the candle itself, because it will clog the wick. But, you can use mica to decorate the outside of pillar candles! After your pillar is created you can then, use the mica on the outer portion of your candle. This shimmery mixture can be used to provide a beautiful sparkle on the outside of your candles.

Common Candle Making Questions: Can Mica be used in Wax Melts?

Sure! Since we don’t have to worry about clogging the wick, you can mix it straight into the candle wax.

 

Common Candle Making Questions: How Do I Get Rid of the Air Bubbles in My Candles?

There are a few reasons why air bubbles could get trapped in your candles, which include water exposure and pouring at a cooler temperature. So, how do you prevent air bubble in a homemade candle? First, keep water away from your work station. Also, you can try pouring your wax at a hotter temperature. Further, pour your candle wax slowly and make sure to stop before you hit pour point where your jar begins to change shape. 

Common Candle Making Questions: Can You Melt Old Candles to Make New Ones?Common Candle Making Questions: Can You Melt Old Candles to Make New Ones?

We don’t recommend re-purposing old candles to make new ones. While this may seem like a create idea to take all you half used candles and make a new one, the scent is a big concern in this case. If these candles are scented, then they will already contain fragrance oil. Once you melt your old candles, the scent may fade, but many of the wax particles are still holding on to some of the scent oil. This means that you won’t be able to add enough fragrance oil without over saturating your candle. Since the candle already is holding scent, this extra fragrance will seep out and sit on the top of your candle, which is dangerous and can result in a flame that is too large.

Common Candle Making Questions: Reach Out to UsCommon Candle Making Questions: Reach Out to Us

Hopefully, we were able to get some of your more pressing questions answered. If you have any more questions or concerns about making your own candles, then please reach out to us. We are always happy to help! You can stop by the store, give us a call, or talk to us on social media. If you want to find us online, we have a Natures Garden Facebook page, Twitter (@ngscents), and Instagram (@ngscents). Good luck and have fun with candle making!

Jun
14

Candle Making Terminology


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Candle Making TerminologyCandle Making Terminology

We at Natures Garden know that there is a lot of candle making terminology and techniques that you need to know to make great homemade candles. So, we are going to answer some common candle making questions and problems to make your experience more fun. So, set aside your candle making equipment and let’s figure out how to make gorgeous scented candles!

Candle Making Terminology: Types of Candles

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Pillar Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Pillar Candle?

Pillar candles are free-standing candles that don’t require a container. These often use a harder type of candle wax that is made for creating pillar candles, like Pillar of Bliss Wax or Palm Pillar Wax.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Votive Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Votive Candle?

Votive Candles are a smaller kind of candle. The average size is 1.5 ounces and they are about two inches tall and one and a half inches wide. These are often made with a Votive Mold.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Tealight Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Tealight Candle?

Tea Lights are very small candles that are about an inch and a half wide and a half inch tall. They can be made in Tea Light Cups .

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Fragrances

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Fragrance Load Mean?

In candle making, fragrance load refers to the amount of fragrance oil that you are using in your homemade candle recipe.

Candle Making Terminology: My Candle Wax Will Hold a 10% Fragrance Load. How Do I Know How Much to Add?Candle Making Terminology: My Candle Wax Will Hold a 10% Fragrance Load. How Do I Know How Much to Add?

All you need to do is some simple math that we will walk you through! First, weigh the amount of candle wax you are using. Then, multiply this amount by 0.10, which is 10% to determine the amount of fragrance oil that you can use.

  • Formula: Candle Wax Weight X Fragrance Percentage = Amount of Fragrance That Can Be Added
  • Example: 20 (ounces of candle wax) X 0.10 = 2 ounces of fragrance oil So, since your candle wax is in ounces, the fragrance amount that can be added to the candle wax will also be in ounces.
Candle Making Terminology: What Does Scent Throw Mean?

The scent throw is the strength of fragrance that the candle releases into the air. Cold throw is the strength of scent when the candle is not lit yet. Hot throw is the strength of the scent throw when the candle is lit and burning.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Waxes

Candle Making Terminology: What Kind of Wax Should I Use for Candles?Candle Making Terminology: What Kind of Wax Should I Use for Candles?

Choosing a candle wax type depends on the type of candle that you want to create. So, the isn’t a universal answer to the question, “Which is the best wax for candle making?” For example, pillar candles would require a pillar wax, which includes Pillar of Bliss Candle Wax and Palm Pillar Wax. The Pillar of Bliss Wax is a blend of soy and paraffin that has a great scent throw and a creamy finish. The Palm Pillar Wax has a crystal finish, has a wonderful scent throw, and comes form sustainable sources.

However, container candles would be best with a container wax, which includes soy wax, Joy wax, WOW Wax, palm wax, and gel wax. Soy wax would make a great, inexpensive addition to your natural candle making supplies. It has a clean burn and and excellent cold throw, but it can be tricky to get a good hot throw from certain fragrances. Wow wax is mostly paraffin and has an amazing hot throw, but has a less clean burn. Joy wax is a perfect blend of paraffin wax and soy wax, as well as veggie wax and proprietary ingredients, that provides a cleaner burn with an amazing scent throw. Gel wax has a neat translucent look, but is not compatible with all fragrance oils. Our palm wax comes from sustainable sources that aren’t harming the rainforest, has a beautiful crystal appearance, and a great scent throw.

Candle Making Terminology: What is Granulated Wax?Candle Making Terminology: What is Granulated Wax?

Simply, this is wax that is grainy and looks kind of like sand. This wax can be scented and colored without melting, so it is a easy and fun way to create candles with kids. We have made candle recipes like the Bacon Candle Recipe and the Hydrangea Candle Recipe with this type of wax.

Candle Making Terminology: Crucial Temperatures

Candle Making Terminology: Do I Need to Worry About the Temperatures When Making Candles?Candle Making Terminology: Do I Need to Worry About the Temperatures When Making Candles?

Yes, this is very important for creating quality homemade candles! There are a few key moments where you will need a thermometer to be aware of the temperature of your wax. First, you need to make sure that your fragrance oil isn’t added at a temperature that is too hot. If your fragrance is added at a temperature that is too high, then some of the notes may burn off and leave you with a less satisfying scent. Another issue is pouring your wax into the container too soon. If you pour at a temperature that is too cool, you could have improper adhesion, wet spots, sinking, and other issues. So, be sure to check your wax’s description to see the temperature that is should be poured.

Candle Making Terminology: What does sinkhole mean?

Sinkhole is a hole or cavity that appears on your candle as it is setting up. Often, this occurs when the candle wax is poured at too low of a temperature.

Candle Making Terminology: Can You Cool a Candle in the Fridge?Candle Making Terminology: Can You Cool a Candle in the Fridge?

No, candles should cool as slowly as possible on their own. If you place a candle in the fridge to cool, they may not adhere to the glass properly, which can lead to wet spots.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Wicks

Candle Making Terminology: Choosing the Right WickCandle Making Terminology: Choosing the Right Wick

The size of your wick depends on the diameter of your container. You can see the radius for each wick under it’s description. However, you will still need to test because there are many variable between wax type and fragrance oil. A fragrance with a high flash point and high specific gravity, like vanilla, requires a hotter burn. But, low flash point scents with low specific gravity, like citrus, need a smaller wick. Also, you may hear the terms “wick up’ and “wick down” when talking about find the right wick size. Wick down means that you should use a wick that is smaller than what you have been using and wick up means that you should use a wick that is larger than what you use for candles this size.

Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Stop a Candle From Tunneling?Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Stop a Candle From Tunneling?

If you don’t know, tunneling is often the answer for the question, “Why isn’t my candle wax not burning evenly all of the way down?” Tunneling can happen for a few reasons, which includes issues with wick size. If your wick is too small for the diameter of your candle, then it will not burn all the way to the outside edge. So, you may either need a larger wick, multiple wicks, or a different type of wick that will burn hotter.

However, there are a few other issues that could cause tunneling. If you think your wick is the right size, then look into some of these potential issues, First, you may have a clogged wick, which can cause uneven burning. Also, it could be that you didn’t do a memory burn for the candle’s first use to ensure a proper burn. Finally, you may need to use a wax that has a lower melt point that is easier for you chosen wick to handle.

Candle Making Terminology: Why Are My Candle Jars Black After I Burn My Candles?

Often, this occurs when you wick is too big for your jar or your wick is too long. If your wick is trimmed down to 1/4 inch, then the length is fine. You can check the suggested radius for your wick to see if you need to get a smaller size. Also, using too much fragrance can clog the wick and cause more soot than normal.

Candle Making Terminology: Do Candle Wicks Contain Lead?

No, candle wicks in the Unites States, like ours, do not contain lead. In fact, lead core wicks were banned in the US in 2003.

Candle Making Terminology: Proper Burning

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Memory Burn?

This is the first burn of your candles and is the most important. This burn will set the boundary of your melt pool and will determines whether the edges of your candle will be reached. A guide is to burn an hour for every inch your candle is wide to ensure that it will burn properly as it is used in future burns. Also, you will want to make sure that you wick isn’t too low and isn’t longer than 1/4 inch high.

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Melt Pool Mean?

Melt Pool is the candle wax that has melted on the top of the candle. Ideally, you will want this to be all the way across the top of your candle to ensure an even burn.

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Mushrooming Mean in Candle Making?

When I notice black clumps on top of my wick, I know that it is mushrooming. While all wick produce this carbon as they burn, some are worse than others. Also, factors that clog the wick can increase the mushrooming effect. The CD wicks produce the least amount of mushrooming, but there isn’t a way to completely stop it due to it being a product of burning the wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Coloring

Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Color a Candle?Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Color a Candle?

There are a few different candle colorant options for your home made candles. First, you can use our Liquid Candle Dyes, which are extremely concentrated and will last a long time. Also, you can use a color block, which is made with paraffin, vegan, and can color up to 15 pounds of wax. Lastly, you can use a bit of powder dye. Just be careful not to use too much because it can clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Can You Use Crayons to Make Candles?

We do not suggest using crayons to color candles. They don’t burn properly and are likely to clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a UV Light Inhibitor?Candle Making Terminology: What is a UV Light Inhibitor?

Since UV light from the sun can bleach the color out of candles, the UV light inhibitor is used to protect the color of your candles. This candle ingredient is most useful for preventing fading in burgundy, blue, and violet candle colors due to direct sunlight.

Candle Making Terminology: How Do I Color My Candles White?

While titanium dioxide can be used to create white pillar candles, you don’t want to add it straight to your container candles as it can clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Apearance

Candle Making Terminology: How Do I Get Rid of Wet Spots on My Candles?

Wet spots are air pockets that are formed when your candle didn’t adhere properly to your candle jar. You can take a few steps to prevent this if you are having problems. First, try warming your candle jars to give you wax more time to cool. Also, you can try pouring your wax at a hotter temperature. Another good tip is to make sure the room your are making your candles in a room that is warm.

Candle Making Terminology: What Is Frosting In Candle Making?

Frosting is the white stuff that appears on waxes that contain soy wax. You can use a heat gun or blow dryer to re-melt the surface and give it a smoother finish. While you can lessen the effect of frosting, you can’t eliminate it completely.

Candle Making Terminology: What Are Jump Lines?

These are the line that you can see on the side of either a container candle or a pillar candle.

Candle Making Terminology: Progression of Candles

As you can tell, there is a lot that goes into candle making. But, it is a process that has been developed overtime and takes time to master. If you are interested in learning a bit about the evolution of candles, then check out The History of Candles from Prehistoric Times Until Now by Pioneer Thinking.

Candle Making Terminology: Talk to UsCandle Making Terminology: Talk to Us

If you have any more questions about candle making, you can look at our candle making classes or just ask us! We are on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter (@ngscents).

Apr
30

Plumeria Candle Recipe


This entry was posted in candle fragrance oils, candle making supplies, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, wholesale fragrance oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Plumeria Candle RecipePlumeria Candle Recipe

If you are looking for some beautiful candle making recipes, then you will definitely want to check out our Plumeria Candle Recipe! This Natures Garden recipe is perfect for creating a gorgeous, floral scented candle that is absolutely gorgeous. Plus, this recipe walks you through creating homemade flower wax embeds for your candles! Together, the floral scent of our Plumeria Fragrance Oil and the flower wax embeds creates a unique recipe that you will absolutely want to try out!

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Ingredients Available From Natures Garden

Joy Wax

Sunflower Wax

Plumeria Fragrance Oil

CD Candle Wicks (100 wicks)

Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye Burgundy

Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye- Purple

Pouring Pot

Thermometer

Silicone Soap Mold (optional)

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Other Ingredients and Supplies

Mixing Spoon

Hot Glue Gun

Stove

Scale

A Pot (for double boiler)

Apothecary Jar

Toothpicks

Paper Bowl and Wax Paper (or Silicone Soap Mold)

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Weights and Amounts

3 ounces of the Joy Wax

30 grams of the Sunflower Wax

3 grams of the Plumeria Fragrance Oil

A tiny bit of the Burgundy Liquid Candle Dye

A Few Drops of the Purple Liquid Candle Dye

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Sanitize and Prepare Your Work Space

Before you begin creating your scented candles, you will want to organize and clean your work space. You can start by making sure you have enough space to work on your candle. Also, you will need to wipe down your work space. Next, you will want to gather your supplies and equipment. If any of your equipment is dirty, then make sure that you wash them before beginning your project. After everything has been cleaned and prepared, you are ready to move on to the next step.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare Double Boiler

For this recipe, you are going to need a double boiler. If you know how to create a double boiler for candlemaking, then move on to your recipe. Otherwise, we can explain to you how it works. Since you will need to use an pouring pot, this will act as the inner portion of your double boiler. The pouring pot will hold your melting wax and will be placed inside the larger pot. The larger pot will hold the heated water. Now that the double boiler has been made, it will be placed on the stove top on medium heat to melt your wax.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Get the Sunflower Wax Ready

First, you will need to use the double boiler to melt the Sunflower Wax. So, weigh out 30 grams of this wax and add it to the double boiler. As the wax melts, you should be mixing every so often. While the double boiler will help prevent scorching, you should keep an eye on it and stir occasionally. After your wax has entirely melted, you will be ready to move on to the next steps for coloring and scenting.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Adding the Candle ColorantPlumeria Candle Recipe: Adding the Candle Colorant

Then, you will be adding some candle colorant to your melted Sunflower Wax. Since we are going to be adding less than a drop of the liquid dye, we will need a toothpick to add this amount. So, take the toothpick and dip it into the purple Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye to your Sunflower Wax. Then, you will need to swirl the dipped toothpick in the melted wax. Make sure that you mix this well to fully incorporate the color.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Scent the Sunflower WaxPlumeria Candle Recipe: Scent the Sunflower Wax

Next, you are going to want to scent your freshly melted wax.  We will be using Plumeria Fragrance Oil, which is perfect for this candle and has a gorgeous floral scent. This fragrance is a sweet, fruity floral aroma that is composed of tropical Plumeria flowers, fresh fruity top notes, on a lovely green bottom. So, take three grams of this delightful candle oil and add it to the melted Sunflower Oil.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Preparing Your Flower Parts

Now,  you are going to start preparing the wax for your flower candle embeds. This wax will need to be a thin layer, which we will use to cut out the flowers. One way you can create this is pouring a small amount into the bottom of a mold, like the square loaf mold. Alternatively, you can line a pan with wax paper and pour a thin layer of wax in this. Either way, you will need to remove the wax at a point where it has set up but still warm.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Cut Out Your Flower PartsPlumeria Candle Recipe: Cut Out Your Flower Parts

Once your thin layers of wax are set up, you will want to cut out your petals and circles. You can use a knife, toothpick, or anything that you have that is pointy and tough enough to cut out your shapes. Also, you will need to have two circles and about twelve or so petals. The exact number of petals you will need depends on their size. Since you will need a couple extra petals on top of the candle, you will want to make a few extra petals. So, the exact number that you need for your flowers isn’t extremely important yet.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Creating the Other Flower PartsPlumeria Candle Recipe: Creating the Other Flower Parts

Now, you are going to need to repeat these previous steps using two different colors. For one of the rounds you will use one drop of purple liquid candle colorant. After these pieces are created, you can move on to the last set of flower parts. The last round will be colored with a tiny amount of the burgundy candle colorant. Again, you can use a toothpick to add this color to your melted Sunflower Wax.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare the Candle JarPlumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare the Candle Jar

Before we start adding the candle wax to the container, you will need to prepare the candle jar. So, heat up your hot glue gun to adhere two of the CD-12 candle wicks to the bottom of your jar. You will want to make sure that they are as straight and even as possible. Otherwise, your finished candle won’t burn evenly and could result in tunneling. Plus, awkwardly placed wicks could ruin the pretty design! So, it would be best to be careful on this step.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare the Purple LayerPlumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare the Purple Layer

Now, we are ready to create the first layer for our scented candle. We will start by weighing 3 ounces of Joy Wax and melting it in the double boiler. Remember to mix the melting wax every so often. Once this is melted we are going to add in the colorant. Put two drops of the purple Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye into the melted wax and stir to fully incorporate the color.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Pouring the Bottom LayerPlumeria Candle Recipe: Pouring the Purple Layer

Next, you are going to scent and pour the purple layer. So, add 0.3 ounces of the Plumeria Fragrance Oil to the melted purple wax and mix to incorporate the scent. After, you are ready to pour this layer into the jar. Once this layer has been carefully poured into the jar you will need to straighten your wicks before the wax sets up. You may want to have something across the top of the jar to steady your wicks.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Adding the Wax Embed Flowers Plumeria Candle Recipe: Adding the Wax Embed Flowers

Now, you are ready to start setting up your embed flowers. So, you are going to begin adhering your flower parts to the jar. Start by pressing one of your circles to the inside of the glass jar. Make sure that you hold the wax circle in place by pressing gently until it has completely adhered. Then, adhere the petals of a different color around the circle in a similar fashion to the picture to the left. You will continue to evenly space out the rest of your flowers around the jar. We had six flowers total, but this amount may vary depending on the size of your petals.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Preparing the White LayerPlumeria Candle Recipe: Preparing the White Layer

Next, you are going to create the white layer for behind your wax flower embeds. So, weigh out 11 ounces of Joy Wax and add it to the apothecary jar. You will need to melt the wax using the double boiler method with occasional mixing. After, you will need to add 1.1 ounces of the Plumeria Fragrance Oil. Before you go to pour in this layer you need to measure the temperature. Otherwise, you could possibly melt and mess up your wax flower embeds! Use a thermometer to determine when your wax has dropped to about 150 F, which is a safe temperature range to pour your white layer. Once it reaches this temperature you can pour in this layer.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Allow the White Layer to Set UpPlumeria Candle Recipe: Allow the White Layer to Set Up

Now that you poured in the white layer into the base of your candle, your creation is nearly complete! Just make sure that both of your wicks are centered. Make sure that you center your wicks before this white layer completely sets up. Then, you just need to wait for this top layer to harden and set up. Once your white layer has set up you can move on to creating the whipped topping.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare the Whipped WaxPlumeria Candle Recipe: Prepare the Whipped Wax

Next, we are going to create the whipped wax topping for this candle. So, weigh out 8 ounces of Joy Wax and put it into the apothecary pot. After the wax has completely melted, you can add 0.8 ounces of the Plumeria Fragrance Oil. After, let your wax begin to set up. Before it completely sets up, you will need to whip the wax. Once the wax is well whipped and before it completely sets up, you can put the wax on top of the base of your candle.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Decorating the Top of the CandlePlumeria Candle Recipe: Decorating the Top of the Candle

Immediately after adding your whipped wax you will want to start adding your extra petals to the top of your candle. This will make sure that your petals stick to the candle and won’t fall off. So, start taking your differently colored petals and placing them on top of the candle. Make sure that you press them lightly into the wax, so they are able to stay in place. Once all your petals have been placed, use a pencil to curl your two candle wicks.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Letting Your Candles Set UpPlumeria Candle Recipe: Letting Your Candles Set Up

Finally, your candles are complete! But, you are going to want to wait a day or two for your candle to cure before using your candle. While it can be tempting to use your candle early, it will be worth the wait and work so much better after letting it cure! Allowing your candle to cure for 24-48 hours will give the wax time to absorb the scent and provide a better scent throw.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: History of Plumeria Plumeria Candle Recipe: History of Plumeria

If you love the aroma of the Plumeria Fragrance Oil, then you may want to learn more about the history of this gorgeous, tropical flower. One interesting fact about these exotic flowers is that their origin was not actually Hawaii. While the gorgeous Plumeria flowers are commonly associated with these exotic islands, these were actually brought to Hawaii from Mexico in the nineteenth century. However, this beautiful flower has been incorporated in many lovely, tropical lands, like Hawaii, the Carribean, Indonesia, and many others! For those that are interested in finding out more, you can learn even more about this flower and others by clicking here to read all about the Plumeria History by Tropical Flowers and Plants.

Plumeria Candle Recipe: Find Us On Social Media

Reaching out to Natures Garden on social media is a quick and easy way to get questions answered, share your creations, or see what we are up to. Not only would we love to see what you have created with our products, but we are often creating new and exciting craft recipes. So, there is always a great reason to find us online. You can find us on the Natures Garden Facebook page. Also, we are available on both Twitter and Instagram with @ngscents. We hope to hear from you soon!