Tag Archives: how to make hot process soap more fluid

Jun
28

Common Hot Process Soap Questions


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Common Hot Process Soap QuestionsCommon Hot Process Soap Questions

Although hot process soap recipes have some things in common with the cold process soap recipes, there are a few new steps that can be confusing. So, we at Natures Garden felt it would be useful to answer some common hot process soap questions that our customers have asked us. This way we can equip you with all the soap making supplies and information that you need to make all kinds of wonderful homemade soaps!

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: What are the Hot Process Stages?

First, melt your oils and butters in a crock pot. Then, create your lye solution and add it to your crock pot. Use a stick blend to mix to trace and cover the crock pot. After about 15 minutes, stir the batter and replace the lip. Continue to stir every 15 minutes until the soap batter has the consistency of mashed potatoes. Then, place the soap in a mold and allow it to set up for 24 hours. After, remove from mold, cut, and allow it to cure for about 1-2 weeks. Although the bar may technically be safe to use, allowing it to cure will provide a harder, better quality bar of soap.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Can I Use the Pan or Crockpot I Used for Soapmaking for Food?Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Can I Use the Pan or Crockpot I Used for Soapmaking for Food?

No, you should never return your soaping equipment to the kitchen. So, make sure that you use a pan or crock pot that you aren’t overly fond of for your hot process soap recipes. Hopefully, you can find a pan or crock pot that is cheap or old to use for soap. Once anything in your kitchen is used for soapmaking, it should be moved into your soap making supplies permanently.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Do I Have to Use a Crock Pot for Hot Process Soap?

No, you don’t have to use a crock pot to be successful in making hot process soap. Many people like to use an old crock pot, but if you aren’t able to dedicate one to soap making it is okay to use something different. In fact, you can use a stove top and it works just as well. Honestly, your hot process soap will work just fine as long as your soap has a constant heat source.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: What Are The Hot Process Soap Benefits?

Since hot process soap has some similar steps to cold process soap, hp soap has many of the same benefits. Of course, for both methods, you can control all of the ingredients to avoid ingredient that may trigger allergies or irritate skin conditions. But, the biggest thing that sets the hp soap making method apart from the cold process soap is the cure time. Since hot process soap uses a heat source, like a crock pot or pan, that keeps the soap batter at higher temperatures. These higher temperatures will speed up the saponification process. So, your hot process soaps won’t need to cure as long as they would if they were made using the cp soap method.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Does Natures Garden Offer Hot Process Soap Recipes?

Natures Garden offers a few different recipes for hot process soap that you can choose between. We have regular hp soap recipes, laundry soap recipes, and even a beard soap recipe. So, there are a lot of fun ideas for making hot process soaps! You can find all of our recipes under Hot Process Soap Recipes on the Free Recipes and Classes page.

 

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: When Do I Color Hot Process Soap?Common Hot Process Soap Questions: When Do I Color Hot Process Soap?

You will want to add your soap colorant after the batch is done cooking. So, mix in the coloring once the soap is a mashed potato consistency. Also, you can still do multiple colors with this method. Just split your cooked soap into different bowls and mix in color to each. Once the soap is colored, you can add more ingredients or scoop the soap to the mold.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: When Do I Add Fragrance to Hot Process Soap?

Again, you will want to add your fragrance oil after the soap has fully cooked and before you stick the soap in the mold. So, you can add your scent right after you add your colorant.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: How Long Do I Need to Cook Hot Process Soap?

The cooking time can vary depending on both the individual hot process soap recipe and the soaping ingredients used. Also, the crock pot or pan that you are using can affect the time, too. Some cases take about an hour and other instances may take a few hours. However, you can tell that your soap is done based on consistency. As your soap heats it will begin to get thicker, which you will notice as you are periodically checking the batter. At one point the soap batter will go through a gel phase, which gives a gel-like appearance. Right after this, the soap will get a mashed potato consistency. At this point, you are ready to scoop the soap into your soap mold.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why is My Hot Process Soap Changing Color?Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why is My Hot Process Soap Changing Color?

There are a few reasons why a soap would discolor. Most often, this kind of change is due to the vanillin content in a fragrance oil. This ingredient is what gives scented oils its vanilla notes. So, this type of discoloration can be minimized by using vanilla white color stabilizer. basically, all of the brown discoloration caused by vanillin and oxidation. Vanilla White Color Stabilizer will slow the oxidation of vanillin. However, there are many other ingredients in fragrance oils that can cause discoloration that we can’t reduce or control. This means that it is possible that this additive won’t solve discoloration if the vanillin content isn’t very high. You can find out whether a fragrance discolors and if its maintainable by looking in the description for that scented oil. Another reason that your soaps could change color is herbs, which can oxide over time. This will fade the initial color of the herb and likely become a dull color or change color.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why Is My Hot Process Soap Separating In My Mold?

If your hp soap is separating in the soap mold, then it is a sign that the soap needed to cook longer. No need to rebatch. All you have to do is scoop the soap back into the crock pot or the pan and cook for a bit longer. It could also be caused by a recipe that wasn’t formulated properly or was not weighed out properly.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: How Long Do You Have to Wait to Use Hot Process Soap?

While hot process soap shortens the cure time, you still have a bit of waiting left to do. You will want to let your soap bars set for about 1-2 weeks, depending on your batch this could vary.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why Is My Hot Process Soap Cracking?

Overheating can cause your hot process soap to crack in some places or develop strange patterns. Occasionally, it will just be a simple crack in the soap and other times you can end up with soap with peaks and craters. Sometimes soap can even get an appearance referred to as alien brains, which is kind of looks like a brain pattern.  Also, certain ingredients can lead to an increase in heating, like additives with natural sugars. So, you are more likely to overheat with milk, wine, honey, or fruit and veggie purees. Not only can these ingredients heat you soap, but they have the potential to cause a volcano effect in your soap. So, be sure to use caution for those ingredients with sugars.  

 

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Does Natures Garden Offer Any Hot Process Soap Recipes with Shea Butter?Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Does Natures Garden Offer Any Hot Process Soap Recipes with Shea Butter?

Yes, we do! We have quite a few free soap recipes for hot process soap, which includes the Beard Soap Recipe, the Game On HP Soap Recipe, and the Apricotie Hottie Soap Recipe. If you would like to see more of these types of soap-making recipes, then you can check out our Free Recipes and Classes page under the Hot Process Soap Recipes section.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why is My Hot Process Soap Hard and Crumbly?

If you have soap that is too hard and crumbly, then stick around to learn about why your hot process soap would be this way and how you can fix it. Also, anyone that wants to learn how to make their hot process soap more fluid may want to start here. First, your soap batter could be over cooked, which makes the soap dry and hard. Alternatively, the recipe could contain too many hard oils, which could be saved by re-batching with more soft oils. Or, it could be that you didn’t add enough water. Also, it could be that an ingredient was forgotten or the recipe wasn’t formulated correctly. Another possibility is that there is too much of a soap additive, like sodium lactate, that increased the hardness too much. Often, you can simply fix the mistake and rebatch your soap.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: How Do I Rebatch Hot Process Soap?

Have you ever wondered can you melt a bar of soap and remold? It can be tempting to just scrap a failed batch of soap and start over. If you feel the same, then you will definitely want to hear about rebatching soap. Whether you forgot an ingredient, a hot process soap rebatch is a great idea for you to try. Plus, rebatching your old soap is a fairly simple process. First, grate your old soap and put these pieces in a crock pot. Then, you will need to melt this down with water and whatever you wanted to include in these soaps. If you want a more detailed set of instructions, then you can look at a previous blog on How to Rebatch soap.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why Is My Hot Process Soap Soft and Crumbly?

Also, there are a few reasons why your soap could turn out soft and crumbly. One reason could be that you have too many soft oils and need more hard oils added to the recipe. Also, it could be an issue of not having enough lye for the amount of liquid added. So, it is possible that you may need to formulate the recipe again, which can be made easier with the help of SoapCalc. If your recipe is fine, then you may just need to cook your soap a bit longer. Another option is that you could’ve accidentally added a soap ingredient twice. While you may have a missing ingredient or need to add some different ingredients, it is okay because you should be able to rebatch and save the soap.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why Is My Hot Process Soap So Soft? I Did Everything Right and It Is Still Soft.

When you first unmold and cut your hp soap, it may be softer than you like. It is common to be a little soft initially for hot process soaps. However, the soap will harden as it cures. Although the soap is safe to use, the bars after about a week, they may still be too soft. For hard soaps, we suggest allowing your soap to cure for 3-4 weeks.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Just Ask UsCommon Hot Process Soap Questions: Just Ask Us!

We hope that you were able to learn something interesting about hot process soap making! If you have any other questions or concerns about the hp soap-making method, then reach out and ask us. We are available in the Natures Garden store, on the phone, and on social media. You can reach out to us on the NG Facebook page, Twitter (@ngscents), or Instagram (@ngscents). Have fun soaping and we wish you the very best!

Jun
26

Soap Making Terms


This entry was posted in cold process soap, cold process soap scents, cold process soap vs melt and pour soap, free soap recipes, handcrafted soap, hot vs cold process soap, how to make cold process soap, melt and pour soap, Natures Garden, soap, soap fragrance, soap making problems, Soap making supplies, soap recipe, soap scent, soapmaking, wholesale fragrance oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Soap Making Terms

If you want to learn about different soaping methods and get help for potential problems, then it helps to know common soap making terms. Whether you are a beginner or experienced, you are likely to come across something new with your batches at least once. So, we are here to help you understand what to do and how to solve any soap-making issues.

Soap Making Terms: How Much Fragrance Oil Can I Add to Soap?

While you should always check the usage rate for each individual fragrance, the maximum that we recommend is 5%. Sometimes you can a scent where the IFRA sheet allows more and you can do more if you’d like. After you know the usage rate, you just need to do some simple multiplication to figure out how much scent you need.

Formula: Weight of Soap x Usage Rate = Weight of Fragrance Oil
Example: 912 grams of soap x 0.05 (which is a 5% usage rate) = 45.6 grams of fragrance

Soap Making Terms: Why Did My Soap Turn Brown?

Often fragrance oils that contains a high amount of Vaniilin will turn soap brown. Also, the color will be a darker brown with scented oils with higher amounts of Vanillin. We can use Vanilla White Color Stabilizer to reduce these effects and still use the scent. Since this ingredient is added to provide a vanilla scent, strong vanilla fragrance oils will almost always turn soap brown without the color stabilizer.

Soap Making Terms: Can I Use Essential Oils in Soap Making?

Yes, essential oils can be used to scent soap. We find that essential oils hold up better in MP soap than in soap made from scratch. This is because the saponification process can cook off the essential oil, which doesn’t have middle notes to anchor the scent. You may have some scent after the soaps cure, but it won’t be as strong as it is in MP soap.

Soap Making Terms: How Much Essential Oil Can I Use in Soap?

This can be different for each essential oil, so you will need to check the IFRA sheet for the usage rate. Then, you can figure out how much you need using the same method as you would for fragrance oils.

Soap Making Terms: How Do You Make Soap White?

You can add titanium dioxide to soaps to make them white. In fact, many of our white soap bases use this ingredient. If you wanted, you could use this ingredient to turn your clear soaps to white.

Soap Making Terms: What is Melt and Pour Soap Making?Soap Making Terms: What is Melt and Pour Soap Making?

Another option for soap making is melt and pour soap. This method starts with a soap base that has already gone through the saponification process. So, you cut need to cut and melt the amount your need before you are ready to add colorants, fragrance, or herbs. Then, you can pour the melted soap into a mold and spray the top with rubbing alcohol. As soon as the soap is hardened, it is ready to use!

Soap Making Terms: How Much Melt and Pour Soap Will I Need for My Mold?

For each ounce by volume in your mold you will need 31 grams of soap. Say the soap mold will hold 16 ounces, you will need 496 grams of soap

Formula: Constant Value for Soap Needed to Fill Mold x Volume of Mold = Weight of Soap
Example:
31 grams per ounce x 16 ounce mold = 196 grams of MP soap

Soap Making Terms: How Long Should Melt and Pour Soap Stay in the Mold?

This can vary based on the size of soap you are creating. Smaller soaps will take less time compared to bigger soaps. Just make sure that they are hardened all the way before you remove them. Also, you should be able to feel that the mold is no longer warm to touch.

Soap Making Terms: How Do I Get My Melt and Pour Soap Out of the Mold?

While you should be able to hold your molds upside down and lightly push, sometimes they get stuck. If you place your soaps in the refrigerator for a short amount of time, this should make it easier for you to remove your mp soap.

Soap Making Terms: How Do I Get Fingerprints Off My Melt and Pour Soap?

Sometimes when you are removing your soaps from the mold, you can transfer a fingerprint. Just use some rubbing alcohol to dampen a cotton swab and  gently swab the fingerprint. It should begin to fade as you do this.

Soap Making Terms: Can Melt and Pour Soap Be Used Right Away?

Of course! The saponification process is already complete before you get your soap base. So, there is no active lye to worry about. This means that you can use your soaps as soon as they harden.

Soap Making Terms: Why Is My Melt and Pour Soap Sweating?

There are a few reasons why your soap would sweat. First, it could be due to adding too much oil. Whether it is fragrance oil or carrier oil, the soap can only hold on to so much before the oil begins to leak out to create beads on the surface. More often, it is due to the soap drawing moisture from the air. Since your soap base uses vegetable glycerin, a humectant, it will draw moisture to it. Although this is great for you skin, it can lead to your soap sweating . However, you can prevent the latter by wrapping your soap as soon as it comes out of the mold. This way it can’t pull moisture from the air.

 

Soap Making Terms: What is Hot Process Soap Making?Soap Making Terms: What is Hot Process Soap Making?

Another way to make soap from scratch is hot process soap. This process is very similar to cold process soapmaking. However, in this method you will have a heat source to speed up the saponification process. You can use a crock pot or stove top to heat your soap mixture. After, you can technically use the bars immediately. However, letting them cure a week will provide you with harder, milder bars.

Soap Making Terms: Does Natures Garden Offer Any Hot Process Soap Recipes with Shea Butter?

Yes, we have a few! For example, we have our Manly Soap Recipe, the Beard Soap Recipe, and more that you can find under the Hot Process Soap Recipes page!

Soap Making Terms: How Long Do You Have to Wait to Use Hot Process Soap?

Yes. Although you don’t have to wait as long for your soaps to cure, there is still some lye left that needs to react. Typically, you will need to wait 1-2 week(s) before using your hp soap.

Soap Making Terms: What Does Rebatch Mean?

If you want to redo a soap batch or add more ingredients, then this is a great idea for you! It is common to rebatch to correct issues like seizing or forgotten ingredients. Also, this can be done to add ingredients that wouldn’t react well during the saponification process, like natural exfoliates or essential oils. First, take the soaps that you aren’t necessarily pleased with and grate them into pieces. Place these pieces in a crock pot and melt them with milk, water, or another liquid to prevent scotching. Also, add any additional oils that you want in these soaps. Allow you batch to reheat for one hour at which point it will by thick. After, add the color, scent, and herbs before scooping this soap into a mold.

Soap Making Terms: What is Cold Process Soap Making?Soap Making Terms: What is Cold Process Soap Making?

This process is one of a few that are refereed to as making soap from scratch because in uses water, lye, and oils to create bars of soap. Another key characteristic of this method is that you don’t need outside heat, as the lye provide enough heat for saponification. Once trace occurs, you are able to add colorants, scented oils, and herbs can be added at this point. After 24 hours, you can remove the soap from the mold and cut. However, you must let your soap cure for a period of 4-6 weeks.

Soap Making Terms: What is Lye in Soap Making?

Lye is a caustic base that is a key component for soap, as it drives the saponification process. It is sometimes referred to as sodium hydroxide for bar soaps and potassium hydroxide for liquid soaps.

Soap Making Terms: What Does Saponification Mean?

This is the process of lye reacting with the oils/fats/butters to produce soap. Saponification will produce both the soap and the glycerin in the soap.

Soap Making Terms: What Does Cure Time Mean?

Cure time is the period where the soap finishes the soaponification process until there is no more active lye present in the bars.

Soap Making Terms: What Does the Term Trace Mean in Soap Making?

In soaping, trace is when the lye water and the oils/butters have been fully combined. You will know that you’ve hit trace because the batter will thicken to a pudding-like consistency. Also, you can check to see whether you are at trace by using a spatula to “trace” a line of soap in the batter. You will notice that the line will not immediately disappear and you can see a trace of the soap you drizzled in.

Soap Making Terms: What Does Light Trace Mean in Soap Making?

Light trace is the point right before your soap comes to trace. You will begin to see a trace, but it won’t stay for more than a few seconds. So, the batter is about to hit trace where it will be thick enough to see the soap for a bit longer.

Soap Making Terms: How Long Does It Take for Soap Batter to Get to Trace?

The time is takes to get to trace will vary between batches for a number of reasons. The ingredients in a recipe can lead to different times. Also, fragrance oils and some soap additives can accelerate or slow trace in your batch.

Soap Making Terms: What Does Seize Mean in Soap Making?

If your soap seizes, then it means that your soap has gone through saponification enough that the batter is beginning to turn from liquid to solid. While this isn’t bad on its own, it makes it impossible to pour soap that is still in the bowl. This hardening soap that hasn’t yet made it to the mold will be too thick to mix and, at best, will be chunky in the mold.

Soap Making Terms: Why Do I Have Lye Pockets in My Cold Process Soap?

If you use too much lye in your soap recipe, then you can
Lye pockets can form in cold process soap most often when too much lye is used. However, it could also be a recipe that wasn’t properly formulated, an oil was left out, the soap seized, or even when the lye solution was not fully mixed. If the lye was not completely saponified you can always rebatch the soap and hot process the soap adding additional oil. Also, it is possible that it could be used in recipes such as laundry soaps that can utilize soap with a higher pH level.

Soap Making Terms: Can I Change the Soap Making Recipes?

Unlike many other bath and body recipes, you can’t simply swap out oils in the Natures Garden formulated recipe. Each oil has a certain saponification value that determines how much lye it will react with. So, switching an oil could result in your batch being lye heavy. Even if you wait longer to cure, there won’t be enough oils to react with the lye and the bars will irritate the skin or even cause burning. Instead, use SoapCalc to determine what you would have to change to get the recipe that you want!

Soap Making Terms: Reach Out to UsSoap Making Terms: Reach Out to Us

If you have any other questions or concerns about soapmaking, then please reach out to us! One easy way to ask us something is on social media. You can find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Have fun soaping!