Tag Archives: hot process soap making

Jun
28

Common Hot Process Soap Questions


This entry was posted in cosmetic supplies, craft recipes, fragrance oil, hot process soap, hot vs cold process soap, soap, soap making problems, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies, soap supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Common Hot Process Soap QuestionsCommon Hot Process Soap Questions

Although hot process soap recipes have some things in common with the cold process soap recipes, there are a few new steps that can be confusing. So, we at Natures Garden felt it would be useful to answer some common hot process soap questions that our customers have asked us. This way we can equip you with all the soap making supplies and information that you need to make all kinds of wonderful homemade soaps!

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: What are the Hot Process Stages?

First, melt your oils and butters in a crock pot. Then, create your lye solution and add it to your crock pot. Use a stick blend to mix to trace and cover the crock pot. After about 15 minutes, stir the batter and replace the lip. Continue to stir every 15 minutes until the soap batter has the consistency of mashed potatoes. Then, place the soap in a mold and allow it to set up for 24 hours. After, remove from mold, cut, and allow it to cure for about 1-2 weeks. Although the bar may technically be safe to use, allowing it to cure will provide a harder, better quality bar of soap.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Can I Use the Pan or Crockpot I Used for Soapmaking for Food?Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Can I Use the Pan or Crockpot I Used for Soapmaking for Food?

No, you should never return your soaping equipment to the kitchen. So, make sure that you use a pan or crock pot that you aren’t overly fond of for your hot process soap recipes. Hopefully, you can find a pan or crock pot that is cheap or old to use for soap. Once anything in your kitchen is used for soapmaking, it should be moved into your soap making supplies permanently.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Do I Have to Use a Crock Pot for Hot Process Soap?

No, you don’t have to use a crock pot to be successful in making hot process soap. Many people like to use an old crock pot, but if you aren’t able to dedicate one to soap making it is okay to use something different. In fact, you can use a stove top and it works just as well. Honestly, your hot process soap will work just fine as long as your soap has a constant heat source.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: What Are The Hot Process Soap Benefits?

Since hot process soap has some similar steps to cold process soap, hp soap has many of the same benefits. Of course, for both methods, you can control all of the ingredients to avoid ingredient that may trigger allergies or irritate skin conditions. But, the biggest thing that sets the hp soap making method apart from the cold process soap is the cure time. Since hot process soap uses a heat source, like a crock pot or pan, that keeps the soap batter at higher temperatures. These higher temperatures will speed up the saponification process. So, your hot process soaps won’t need to cure as long as they would if they were made using the cp soap method.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Does Natures Garden Offer Hot Process Soap Recipes?

Natures Garden offers a few different recipes for hot process soap that you can choose between. We have regular hp soap recipes, laundry soap recipes, and even a beard soap recipe. So, there are a lot of fun ideas for making hot process soaps! You can find all of our recipes under Hot Process Soap Recipes on the Free Recipes and Classes page.

 

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: When Do I Color Hot Process Soap?Common Hot Process Soap Questions: When Do I Color Hot Process Soap?

You will want to add your soap colorant after the batch is done cooking. So, mix in the coloring once the soap is a mashed potato consistency. Also, you can still do multiple colors with this method. Just split your cooked soap into different bowls and mix in color to each. Once the soap is colored, you can add more ingredients or scoop the soap to the mold.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: When Do I Add Fragrance to Hot Process Soap?

Again, you will want to add your fragrance oil after the soap has fully cooked and before you stick the soap in the mold. So, you can add your scent right after you add your colorant.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: How Long Do I Need to Cook Hot Process Soap?

The cooking time can vary depending on both the individual hot process soap recipe and the soaping ingredients used. Also, the crock pot or pan that you are using can affect the time, too. Some cases take about an hour and other instances may take a few hours. However, you can tell that your soap is done based on consistency. As your soap heats it will begin to get thicker, which you will notice as you are periodically checking the batter. At one point the soap batter will go through a gel phase, which gives a gel-like appearance. Right after this, the soap will get a mashed potato consistency. At this point, you are ready to scoop the soap into your soap mold.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why is My Hot Process Soap Changing Color?Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why is My Hot Process Soap Changing Color?

There are a few reasons why a soap would discolor. Most often, this kind of change is due to the vanillin content in a fragrance oil. This ingredient is what gives scented oils its vanilla notes. So, this type of discoloration can be minimized by using vanilla white color stabilizer. basically, all of the brown discoloration caused by vanillin and oxidation. Vanilla White Color Stabilizer will slow the oxidation of vanillin. However, there are many other ingredients in fragrance oils that can cause discoloration that we can’t reduce or control. This means that it is possible that this additive won’t solve discoloration if the vanillin content isn’t very high. You can find out whether a fragrance discolors and if its maintainable by looking in the description for that scented oil. Another reason that your soaps could change color is herbs, which can oxide over time. This will fade the initial color of the herb and likely become a dull color or change color.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why Is My Hot Process Soap Separating In My Mold?

If your hp soap is separating in the soap mold, then it is a sign that the soap needed to cook longer. No need to rebatch. All you have to do is scoop the soap back into the crock pot or the pan and cook for a bit longer. It could also be caused by a recipe that wasn’t formulated properly or was not weighed out properly.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: How Long Do You Have to Wait to Use Hot Process Soap?

While hot process soap shortens the cure time, you still have a bit of waiting left to do. You will want to let your soap bars set for about 1-2 weeks, depending on your batch this could vary.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why Is My Hot Process Soap Cracking?

Overheating can cause your hot process soap to crack in some places or develop strange patterns. Occasionally, it will just be a simple crack in the soap and other times you can end up with soap with peaks and craters. Sometimes soap can even get an appearance referred to as alien brains, which is kind of looks like a brain pattern.  Also, certain ingredients can lead to an increase in heating, like additives with natural sugars. So, you are more likely to overheat with milk, wine, honey, or fruit and veggie purees. Not only can these ingredients heat you soap, but they have the potential to cause a volcano effect in your soap. So, be sure to use caution for those ingredients with sugars.  

 

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Does Natures Garden Offer Any Hot Process Soap Recipes with Shea Butter?Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Does Natures Garden Offer Any Hot Process Soap Recipes with Shea Butter?

Yes, we do! We have quite a few free soap recipes for hot process soap, which includes the Beard Soap Recipe, the Game On HP Soap Recipe, and the Apricotie Hottie Soap Recipe. If you would like to see more of these types of soap-making recipes, then you can check out our Free Recipes and Classes page under the Hot Process Soap Recipes section.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why is My Hot Process Soap Hard and Crumbly?

If you have soap that is too hard and crumbly, then stick around to learn about why your hot process soap would be this way and how you can fix it. Also, anyone that wants to learn how to make their hot process soap more fluid may want to start here. First, your soap batter could be over cooked, which makes the soap dry and hard. Alternatively, the recipe could contain too many hard oils, which could be saved by re-batching with more soft oils. Or, it could be that you didn’t add enough water. Also, it could be that an ingredient was forgotten or the recipe wasn’t formulated correctly. Another possibility is that there is too much of a soap additive, like sodium lactate, that increased the hardness too much. Often, you can simply fix the mistake and rebatch your soap.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: How Do I Rebatch Hot Process Soap?

Have you ever wondered can you melt a bar of soap and remold? It can be tempting to just scrap a failed batch of soap and start over. If you feel the same, then you will definitely want to hear about rebatching soap. Whether you forgot an ingredient, a hot process soap rebatch is a great idea for you to try. Plus, rebatching your old soap is a fairly simple process. First, grate your old soap and put these pieces in a crock pot. Then, you will need to melt this down with water and whatever you wanted to include in these soaps. If you want a more detailed set of instructions, then you can look at a previous blog on How to Rebatch soap.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why Is My Hot Process Soap Soft and Crumbly?

Also, there are a few reasons why your soap could turn out soft and crumbly. One reason could be that you have too many soft oils and need more hard oils added to the recipe. Also, it could be an issue of not having enough lye for the amount of liquid added. So, it is possible that you may need to formulate the recipe again, which can be made easier with the help of SoapCalc. If your recipe is fine, then you may just need to cook your soap a bit longer. Another option is that you could’ve accidentally added a soap ingredient twice. While you may have a missing ingredient or need to add some different ingredients, it is okay because you should be able to rebatch and save the soap.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Why Is My Hot Process Soap So Soft? I Did Everything Right and It Is Still Soft.

When you first unmold and cut your hp soap, it may be softer than you like. It is common to be a little soft initially for hot process soaps. However, the soap will harden as it cures. Although the soap is safe to use, the bars after about a week, they may still be too soft. For hard soaps, we suggest allowing your soap to cure for 3-4 weeks.

Common Hot Process Soap Questions: Just Ask UsCommon Hot Process Soap Questions: Just Ask Us!

We hope that you were able to learn something interesting about hot process soap making! If you have any other questions or concerns about the hp soap-making method, then reach out and ask us. We are available in the Natures Garden store, on the phone, and on social media. You can reach out to us on the NG Facebook page, Twitter (@ngscents), or Instagram (@ngscents). Have fun soaping and we wish you the very best!

Apr
14

Brittle Soap


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, handmade soap, homemade soap, how to make cold process soap, make your own soap, natural colorants, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies, soap mold, soap recipe, soap supplies, sodium lactate and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

soap that has too much sodium lactate
Warning, the following pictures may disturb some soapers!

Here was the scenario:  Using a Hot Process Recipe, we made a soap batch that we thought would work.  However, we got a little too sodium lactate happy.  As a result, our soap bars were not functional.  And, to be completely honest, some of our soap could not even be classified as a bar.

Can you feel the soaping life lesson coming on?

Our hot process soap was molded and ready to be removed and sliced.  The end was trimmed off, and we went in for our first cut… that was when the slice fell, and broke into two pieces.

brittle slice of soap

Again we tried, but to no avail…

crumbly soap

That was when we thought to slice the bars thicker.  Still the same result, a broken bar of soap.

high amount of sodium lactate

Heart broken, we came to the conclusion that there was too much sodium lactate in our recipe.

Yes, sad but true; we have brittle soap.  And, a 4 pound batch at that!  Even though the soap was brittle, we still wanted to find out how it performed.  So, we washed our hands with the bar pieces.  This action made the finished bars completely crumble as we rubbed them together under the running water.

testing the processed soap

The original recipe was a failure, but not a complete one.  We were able to see first hand what happens to soap when too much sodium lactate is added.

soap that needs a rebatch

In one of the earlier Natures Gardens blog posts, we wrote that using too much sodium lactate in your soap recipe will produce finished bars that crumble or are brittle.  This soap is the perfect example of exactly how this worked.

The recipe that we used contained 1 ounce of sodium lactate per pound of soaping oils in our recipe.  We thought that this would help harden the bar, especially since the soap was made from very soft oils.

Well, we were wrong.  This is why testing is highly suggested when dealing with soaping additives like sodium lactate.

Mar
19

Hot Process Soap


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, fragrance oil, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, hot process soap, Natures Garden, Soap making supplies, soap mold, sodium lactate and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

hot process soap Hello everyone!

I just finished my second round of training in…..wait for it…..HOT PROCESS SOAP MAKING….(insert scream)….dunt, dunt, duuunnnn!!!

Yep, that was my initial thought as the word Lye came into the conversation.  However, going through the checklist and noting that safety glasses, gloves, and a mask are extremely necessary for any recipe containing this soaping ingredient, I felt safer.  Although, the well written instructions helped as well.

This hot process soap recipe is pretty lengthy and I almost felt like I was engaged in a major project.  So I decided to take each step slowly and precisely.

After reviewing the process, something I thought was interesting was that I would be using a crockpot to slowly cook the ingredients.  Now, I will certainly never look at my crockpot the same way again!  Please remember that you CAN NOT use this or any other household item you use for these types of recipes (containing Lye) for everyday cooking.  They MUST be kept separate!

Now, another key factor for soaping is that all of the measurements must be exact in order for your recipe to work properly.  Hot process is similar to cold process but you are “cooking” your ingredients in the crockpot.  This heat speeds up the “saponification” process.  Yea that IS a big word!  What does it mean?  It means “the process of the chemical reaction that the lye solution and the oils/fats/butters go through when making soap.”  Another interesting thing I learned during my adventure was a little thing called a soap calculator.  Yea, it’s a calculator used to determine if all of the ingredients you want to use are going to work together and figures out how much of everything you will need.  This is a definite must in the world of soap making.

I knew I was gonna like this recipe when I was told to watch for when my creation looked like mashed potatoes and when it does…it’s done!  I mean, who doesn’t like mashed potatoes?  Keep in mind you must be patient when making this type of soap because the process is slow going.  The stirring and cooking and watching is the longest part, aside from the setting up of the soap.  This soap doesn’t look as pretty as some of the other recipes while in the molds, but the results are ones you will be happy with.  If you don’t make your own soap, but you buy other peoples; I hope after reading this, you look at it a bit differently.  Just knowing what all is involved in the homemade soap making process, gives you a whole new understanding.

However, I hope you all try this recipe if you have never made soap before.  

Please Note: With the exemption of the lye and water, all other soaping ingredients can be purchased at Natures Garden.  Also, if this is the first time you are attempting the process of making soap (like me), please review these classes to familiarize yourself with the processes.

Soap Making Safety
Making Your Own Soap Recipe
Soap Making Terminology
Finding the Perfect Recipe
Soaping Oils Properties

Here are the steps that I took to make my very first batch of Hot Process Soap.  I also included pictures to show you the process.  In the end, I ended up with (4) beautiful 1 pound loaves of soap.

Step 1:  Prior to making this hot process soap recipe, clean and sanitize your work area.  Then, put on your safety gear.  You will want to wear gloves, a face mask, and safety glasses while preparing this recipe.

safety gear for soap making

Step 2:  Now, turn your crockpot on a low heat setting.  Then, place one of your mixing bowls on your scale.  Next, weigh out the 503 grams of Olive Oil, 408 grams of Coconut Oil 76, 109 grams of Castor Oil, and 340 grams of Palm Oil.

hot process soaping ingredients

Step 3:   Once you have all your oils weighed out, place them into the crockpot.  Heat this on low until the palm oil and coconut oil 76 are in a liquid state.  Stir occasionally.

soaping oils in the crockpot
Step 4:  Now, get your two mixing bowls.  In one bowl, weigh out your 188 grams of lye.  In the second bowl, weigh out your 517 grams of water.

weigh out your lye and water
Step 5:  Next, take your lye and water bowls to a well ventilated area.  NEVER add the water to the lye!  Slowly add small amounts of the lye to the water.  Stir in between each addition of the lye to the water.  DO NOT breath in the fumes.  Continue doing this until all of the lye has been mixed into the water.

stirring the lye water

Step 6:  Now, weigh out and add the 50 grams of sodium lactate to the lye water.  Using your spatula, stir this slowly to incorporate.

adding sodium lactate to the recipe

Step 7:  Carefully, add the mixture of the lye water and sodium lactate to the crockpot.  Then, give this a quick stir with your spatula.

adding the lye water to the crockpots

Step 8:  Now, get your stick blender.  Place the stick blender into the crockpot and start to blend.  You will want to do this for about 10 minutes off and on.  Keep your blend periods short.  In between blending, use your spatula to clean the sides of the crockpot.

stick blending the soap batter

Step 9:  Once the batter has been well blended, add 8 grams Teal Fun Soap Colorant.  Now, stick blend to incorporate the color.

adding the colorant to hp soap

Step 10:  As you blend in the color, you will notice the soap batter will resemble pudding.  Now, take your spatula with a little bit of soap batter on it and carefully in a spatter like motion, let the batter fall back into the crockpot.  You are looking for trace.  You will know trace when you can see “lines” of batter from your spatula.  A full trace is reached when the line stays on top of the rest of the soap batter.

soap batter at trace

Step 11:  After trace has been reached in your soap batter, place your lid on your crockpot.

Step 12:  Stirring periodically with your spatula, allow your soap mixture to cook.  You will want to check it every 15 minutes or so.  This is done to ensure that the soap cooks evenly, and does not scorch on the bottom.  As the soap cooks, you will notice along the sides of the crockpot that the soap looks dry.  The soap batter will even take on a waxy look.

soap batter with a waxy look
Step 13:  After about an hour has elapsed, your soap batter will have the consistency of mashed potatoes.  Now, place your mold on a flat surface near your crockpot.  Please Note:  This hour time can vary based on your soaping oils.

the look of hot process soap batter before adding fragrance oil

Step 14:  You will want to move quickly for this step.  If you are using herbs or other additives, you will want to add them now.  If not, add 85 grams Purrs & Paws Fragrance Oil.  Then, stick blend to fully incorporate.

adding fragrance oil to hot process soap

Step 15:  Now, in a scooping manner; begin filling your pound loaf molds individually.

filling your mold with hot process soap

Step 16:  When the mold cavities are all filled, carefully hit the mold against the counter top.  This motion will release any bubbles of air that may be trapped in your soap batter.

filled soap mold with hp
Step 17:  Now, insulate your soap.  Once the soap has been covered, let it cool and harden overnight (for about 12 hours).

insulate your hot process soap
Step 18:  The next day, when your soap has completely cooled and hardened, you can remove it from the mold.  Then, cut the soap into bar size.  Your soap is now ready to use.  Please Note:  If you are seeking a harder bar, allow the soap to cure longer.

finished hot process soap

Overall, making this soap really was a lot of fun and I felt really creative, like a mad scientist….mmmwwaahahaha…(clearing throat)…

Well kids, until my next adventure, have a FABULOUS day!
Cindy

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.