Tag Archives: colorants

Nov
22

Melting Snowman Candle Project


This entry was posted in candle making, homemade, Natures Garden, recipes, snowman craft and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Melting Snowman Candle ProjectMelting Snowman Candle Project

In this blog we are highlighting a brand new homemade candle that we recently made! This is a recipe original to Natures Garden, as we have not seen it done before. We wanted to try something new and make a cute craft for the holidays! This melting snowman candle project was the perfect Christmas creation for our vision. Our candle project is an added bonus for anyone out there who loves snowmen decorations as well. The scent from the Snowman Balls Fragrance Oil really gives it the smell of a minty Christmas! It can be used as a decorative candle around the house, or it could be given as a cute, fun, unique gift to any friends, family, coworkers, teachers, and more! Although this is a newer recipe of ours, the Natures Garden website carries MANY homemade products such as embed molds, fragrances, and ornaments that are related to Christmas. These can be used to make several more fun, homemade, Christmas recipes! We even have a free class section dedicated to all sorts of Christmas Craft Recipes, including cold process soap, bath bombs, potpourri, and candles. Now we can go ahead and get started with this melting snowman candle project!

Ingredients Found at Natures Garden:

Joy Wax- 1 SLAB
BEESWAX White Pastilles
Snowman Balls Fragrance Oil
Yellow Color Blocks Dye
Orange Color Blocks Dye
Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye- BLACK 1 oz.
CD Candle Wicks (100 wicks)
POURING POT
Flexible Silicone Mat

Directions:

Other Ingredients & Equipment You’ll Need:

(4) 16 oz Glass Apothecary Jars
Scale
Bowls
Stove-top Pot
Hand Mixer
Mixing Spoons
Knife
Hot Glue Gun and Stick

Before we begin, it is important to make sure that you have a clean work space to create this project. Sanitize all of your packaging materials before using them. As you should know, only use materials that are for soap making and candle making. Do not ever put food or anything like that in these same packaging materials. Especially with soap, since lye can be deadly if ingested. It is suggested that you wear gloves and protective clothing when preparing this recipe.

This recipe will make approximately 4 scented candles.

Prepare the Double BoilerPrepare a Double Boiler

As usual, we are going to be using the double boiler method to make this recipe. Grab a normal stove-top pot that you use only for soap making and candle making. You will also need a pouring pot. Place a couple inches of water in the stove-top pot and put it on the burner to heat it up. Then, each time you need to melt an ingredient for this recipe, add it to the pouring pot and place that inside of the stove-top pot. The first thing we need to melt is the Beeswax.

Melting the Beeswax

To begin, we need to weigh out 5 grams of the Beeswax White Pastilles. This type of wax is extracted and filtered from the honeycomb of a beehive. Beeswax is commonly used in cosmetics, toiletries, and candle making. As we mentioned, this will be the first ingredient that we melt using the double boiler method. Place the beeswax into your pouring pot and add that to the heated water that is in the stove-top pot.

Incorporating the Orange and Yellow ColorantsIncorporating the Orange and Yellow Colorants

Once the beeswax white pastilles have completely melted, we are going to incorporate the colorants. These will be essential for the faces of the snowmen. Using the color blocks dye, shave off a tiny piece of the yellow color dye and a very tiny piece of the orange color dye. Add both of them to the melted beeswax. After everything has fully melted together, transfer the mixture to a plate to allow them to set up for about a minute.

Wipe out the contents from the pouring pot that are left over from creating the orange colorant. Next, measure out an additional 5 grams of the beeswax white pastilles. Put them into a pouring pot and melt them down again with the double boiler method. Then, add one drop of the black spectrum liquid candle dye. Once it has evenly mixed in with the beeswax, pour it out onto a plate just as we did before. Give this about a minute to set up.

Pouring Out the ColorantsCreating the Facial Pieces of the Snowman

Once the color blocks are set up, it is time to cut our pieces out! Using a knife, we are going to cut out snowman noses with the orange portion. All you need to do is angle the knife to create a long triangular shaped nose. Then, we need to shape the snowman eyes and mouth out of the black portion. To do this, take the knife and hold it vertically. Place it in the black portion and move it in a circular Creating the Facial Pieces of the Snowmanmotion. We made four black circles for the mouth and obviously two for the eyes. Now you will have all of the parts to their faces that you need! We will of course place each of these onto the snowmen heads in a later step so hang tight!

Weighing Out the Joy WaxWeighing Out the Joy Wax

Now, weigh out two pounds of the Natures Garden Joy Wax. This was created by Natures Garden and is only sold here! Joy Wax is a great container candle wax which provides both hot and cold scent throw. It also requires zero curing time! Fragrance holds much more to Joy Wax than other types of wax on the market, and there is no seeping. It only requires a single pour, it clings to jars really nicely, and its appearance is both glossy and creamy. When you weigh it out for this recipe, it does not need to be exact–as you can see from the picture, we measured a little bit over two pounds. Put the Joy Wax into the pouring pot, place it in the stove-top pot with heated water once again, and melt it down.

Incorporating the Fragrance OilIncorporating the Fragrance Oil

Measure out 2.5 ounces of Snowman Balls Fragrance Oil. We have not gotten to use this fragrance in many recipes, so we decided to incorporate it into this one. It is very fitting for a melting snowman candle and fits right into winter and the holiday theme! This fragrance oil is an original scent made by Natures Garden. It blends together the scents of peppercorn, nutmeg, fresh clove, elderberries, blackberries, plums, green oak moss, carbonated pop, and to top it off, cool mint. The main element of this scent that comes through is the cool mint, which fits right in with winter. It is also a great fragrance to use in body perfume, soap, bath oils, lotions, potpourri, and incense! After you measure out the 2.5 ounces, add them to the melted Joy Wax.

Combining the MixtureCombining the Mixture

Once you have taken the melted mixture of the Joy Wax and Snowman Balls Fragrance Oil off of the burner, pour it into a mixing bowl. Using an electric mixer with attachments, begin stirring the mixture back and forth. Doing this step will prevent any clumps from forming at the bottom of the bowl. Once this has been done for a minute or so, set the electric mixer to the side. Then, get a larger mixing bowl and put some ice cubes in it. Place the smaller bowl with the mixture in it inside of the larger bowl. Doing this with the ice in the larger bowl will allow the mixture to cool down much more quickly.

Forming the MixtureForming the Mixture

Once you have your bowl with the mixture inside of the larger bowl with ice, it will begin to cool down. Start by stirring it with a mixing spoon every once in a while. Then, use the electric mixer once again to begin thickening the mixture. Continue stirring until it becomes the consistency of a thick frosting.

Setting Up the WicksSetting Up the Wicks

Meanwhile, you can start setting up the CD candle wicks in the candle jars while you wait for the mixture to keep cooling down. We used the Natures Garden CD candle wicks in 100 count. We also sell Hemp, Zinc Core, and HTP candle wicks in sample size, 100, and 1000 count. Take your candle wicks and get a hot glue gun with a hot glue stick. Squirt a small amount of the glue onto the silver part of the wick. Then, stick them to the bottom of each of the candle jars, quickly, before the glue dries. Make sure to center them.

Pouring the Mixture Into JarsPouring the Mixture into the Jars

After you have your candle wicks set up and centered in the jars, pour your thick frosting like mixture into each of the candle jars. Try your best to avoid pouring it over the candle wicks. Now your candles can have a bit of time to set up while we make the snowman heads!

The first thing we need to do is to weigh out one pound of Natures Garden Joy Wax. Put it into the pouring pot once again, in the stove-top pot with the heated water and melt it. We are going to use this portion of Joy Wax for the heads of the snowmen. When the wax has fully melted, add in one ounce of the Snowman Balls Fragrance Oil once again.

Forming the Mixture to Create the Snowman HeadsForming the Mixture to Create the Snowmen Heads

Next, transfer the mixture to a mixing bowl and place it inside of a larger bowl with ice once again. It will cool down much faster with this method, which we need to happen in order to add them onto the candle jars. You can alternate between the electric mixer and a mixing spoon to stir it all up. Continue to stir and mix until it finally becomes thick enough to roll into balls. This step may take a while because it takes time for the mixture to become that thick for the snowmen heads. Keep working with it and it will eventually become as thick as the picture shows!

Rolling Out the Snowman HeadsRolling Out the Snowmen Heads

The next step is to actually create the heads of the snowmen with that thick mixture of Joy Wax and Snowman Balls Fragrance Oil. Take out a silicone mat to make it easier to roll these into balls. Roll your wax into four balls, one head for each jar. Decorate them with the eyes, nose, and mouth pieces that we cut out. Allow the balls to set up in the freezer for about ten minutes to harden. Since Joy Wax is so soft and smooth, touching it can quickly cause it to start melting. Placing them in the freezer after they have been formed will help to make it easier when placing them in the candle jars.

Using a straw, poke holes through the center of the snowman heads. Push the straw completely through each of the heads. This step is necessary in order to feed the candle wicks through the heads.

Finishing the Melting Snowman Candle ProjectFinishing the Melting Snowman Candle Project

Finally, you can place each of the balls on top of the melted snowman bodies in your candle jars. Feed the CD candle wicks through the hole in the snowman heads. Trim the candle wicks and your project is all finished! Although this picture only depicts three candles, the recipe does make enough for a fourth candle. Thanks for following along and we hope that you enjoyed making these adorable Melting Snowman Candles!

Reach out on our social media to share with us your own Melted Snowman Candle Project! Our Facebook page is under Natures Garden, and the handle @ngscents can be searched to find us on either Instagram or Twitter.

Trying Out a Recipe for Melted Snowman Cookies

Not only can you create these awesome melted snowman candles, but you can also try out a cookie recipe for the holidays! These are Melted Snowman Sugar Cookies from a recipe by Betty Crocker. They are simple to make with only six ingredients. We think that this would be the perfect dish to bring to family gatherings this Christmas if you would like to try it out for yourself!

Nov
21

Reindeer Poo Cold Process Soap Recipe


This entry was posted in cold process soap, free soap recipes, Natures Garden, soap recipes, soap safety and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Reindeer Poo Cold Process Soap RecipeReindeer Poo Cold Process Soap Recipe

Today we are going to be talking about cold process soap making. This is a popular method of making  various creations of soap, so it is good to know all about it! If you have never experimented with cold process soap before, there is a lot to learn about. This particular CP soap recipe uses the very popular Natures Garden scent Reindeer Poo fragrance oil, which gives a fun Christmas scent to your soap. This is a great fragrance to use around Christmas because it a blend of eucalyptus and pine. Let’s get started on making our Reindeer Poo Cold Process Soap Recipe!

Ingredients Found at Natures Garden

Other Supplies That You Will Need:

Distilled Water
Mixing Bowls
Mixing Spoons
Rubber Spatula
Scale
Stick Blender
Vinegar
Piping Bag
Decorating Tip for Piping Bag
Saran Wrap

Total Recipe Weights for Cold Process Soap:

344 grams Distilled Water
126 grams Lye
18 grams Sodium Lactate
(added to cooled lye solution)

136 grams Palm Oil
181 grams Mango Butter
226 grams Coconut Oil 76
181 grams Sunflower Oil
90 grams Castor Oil
90 grams Grapeseed Oil
45 grams Reindeer Poo Fragrance Oil
45 grams Vanilla White Color Stabilizer

Colorants for Green Soap:
4 grams FUN Soap Colorant Neon Green
2 grams FUN Soap Colorant Kelly Green

Colorant For White Soap:
7 grams Titanium Dioxide
Mixed with a small amount of soaping oils

Colorant For Red Soap:
4 grams FUN Soap Colorant Tomato Red

Before we get started, it is important that you always clean and sanitize your work area and all of the packaging materials you will be using. You do not want soap making supplies to mix together from past creations, and you want to be extra careful with everything when using lye. We would also suggest that you wear safety glasses, gloves, a face mask, and protective clothing.

You can check out our Basic CP Soap Making Class to become familiar with this process before hand. We would also advise that you read about our Soap Making Safety Class before attempting to make any cold process soap if you have not made it before. Taking the proper precautions when making soap is a must.

Cold Process Soap

Cold process soap is made from the chemical reaction that happens when you mix together water, oils, and lye. As you may have heard before, this type of soap has no element of heat added to it when forming all of your soap creations. This is the main difference between cold process soap and hot process soap. Since there is no heat added, the curing time is much longer than it would take for hot process soap to cure. One benefit of cold process soap recipes is that your overall finished product will look nicer and more pristine. It may take longer to have the soap completed and ready to use, but it is worth the wait for an awesome end result! This recipe will provide you with three pounds of soap. Before we move on to making the cold process soap, it is important that we understand what goes into it.

Soap Making SuppliesSoap Making Supplies: Some of the Ingredients We Will Be Using

Before we begin creating the reindeer poo cold process soap recipe, let’s take a closer look at some of the ingredients that we will be working with.

Reindeer Poo Fragrance OilReindeer Poo Fragrance Oil

This Christmas season, laugh, have fun, and embrace a good sense of humor.  When creating Reindeer Poo Fragrance Oil, Natures Garden did just that!  This holiday fragrance will lift your spirits, and add a little magic to your life!  This scent starts with top notes of apples and pears. Then, those top notes are followed by middle notes of eucalyptus, pine, and geranium. Finally, it is balanced with bottom notes of patchouli, vanilla, and cedarwood. Reindeer Poo Fragrance Oil is both a Natures Garden original and a best selling fragrance oil!

FUN Soap ColroantsFUN Soap Colorants

The FUN Soap Colorants from Natures Garden are perfect for soap making. These colorants are pigments dispersed in vegetable glycerin. They don’t morph in cp soap. They are great for soap making because they allow you to create beautiful vibrant colors that will hold up to the saponification process.

Sodium Hydroxide LyeSodium Hydroxide Lye
The first step in our recipe is to prepare the lye solution. Before doing so, I would like to get the chance to educate you about lye. Lye is used in all kinds of soap, and you can not make soap without it! Sodium Hydroxide is the chemical name for lye. Lye is a necessity for making soap because it is an emulsifier, while soap is an emulsion. Soap is made up of different butters, oils, and water. Using basic chemistry, we know that water and oil do not mix with each other. In order to get them to mix, we need to add an emulsifier to it. Lye allows the butters, oils, and water that are needed to create soap to combine together, which otherwise would not be possible without this chemical reaction. Another type of soap to make is melt and pour. This is made differently than cold process soap, and the main difference between them is that melt and pour soap has already previously undergone the chemical reaction with lye. Therefore, even though you are not working directly with lye, your soap base was still created using it. 

Preparing the Lye SolutionPreparing the Lye Solution

To prepare the lye solution, measure out 126 grams of Lye and 344 grams of distilled water. Slowly and in intervals, add the water to the lye solution. Never add water to Lye, as it can create a volcanic effect. With each interval, add a small amount of lye and stir slowly until it dissolves. Allow the Lye to completely dissolve and to cool to room temperature before moving on. At this point,
 add 18 grams of sodium lactate to your cooled lye solution. 

Preparing the Soaping OilsPreparing the Soaping Oils

Now, we can take the time to prepare the soaping oils that we will use in this recipe. Begin by weighing out 136 grams of Palm Oil, 226 grams of Coconut Oil 76, 181 grams of Sunflower Oil, 90 grams of Castor Oil, 90 grams of Grapeseed Oil, and 181 grams of Mango Butter. Melt all of these ingredients together in a bowl. After combining and melting all of these oils together, allow them to cool to room temperature just like with the lye solution. Once they are cooled down, we can move onto the next step.

Combining the Oils and LyeCombining the Soaping Oils and the Lye Solution

After both the lye solution and the soaping oils have completely cooled down to around 110 degrees Fahrenheit, combine them together into one bowl. Add the lye solution to the soaping oils. Using a stick blender, stir the two together and to create an emulsification. Next, incorporate the Natures Garden Reindeer Poo Fragrance Oil along with the vanilla white color stabilizer. Use the stick blender once again to blend all ingredients together.

Blending the Colorant into the Soap BatterAdding the FUN Soap Colorants

For the next step, we are going to divide the soap batter we have just mixed into three bowls with portions that are all of equal size. We will be making a white soap, a green soap, and a red soap to mix for this recipe. To the first bowl, which will be our white soap, add 7 grams of titanium dioxide mixed with a small amount of your soaping oils. Use the stick blender again to mix together and leave that bowl alone for now. To the second bowl, just add 4 grams of the neon green colorant and 2 grams of the Kelly green FUN Soap Colorant, then stick blend. To the third and final bowl, add the tomato red FUN Soap Colorant colorant and stick blend as well so that the color is fully incorporated.

Incorporating the Batters TogetherIncorporating the Batters Together

Now, we are going to pull an empty bowl for the next part. Beginning with the red soap batter you have created, drop several “plops” into it in a clockwise motion. Keep dropping these in different sections around the bowl until all of the red soap batter has been used. You are going to repeat this same process with the green batter, by placing it in different areas around the bowl than you did for the red batter. Lastly, repeat this step for the white soap batter. Place a spatula into the bowl and move it around in a circular motion throughout the bowl to create swirls. Once you are happy with your swirls, allow the soap batter to thicken.

Putting Your Soap Batter Into a Piping BagPutting Your Soap Batter Into a Piping Bag

Once your soap batter has reached a thick consistency that is similar to frosting, put it into a piping bag that has a rounded tip. These are just like the bags and tips you would use when applying frosting or icing onto cupcakes and other baked goods. This method is necessary to create the “poo” shape we want and to form your final product. If you do not have a decorating bag, you can use a gallon sized Ziploc bag.  You will just need to cut the corner and place the decorating in that corner.

The Finished Product!Your Finished Product!

Using the piping bag filled with the swirled and colorful soap batter, pipe it out onto a silicone mat as if you were frosting cupcakes. This motion will create the poop shape that you want for this creation! Piping this out will bring together the scent of the Reindeer Poo Fragrance Oil with a life like form of colorful reindeer poo!

Cleaning Up the Work Station

After you have finished with this Reindeer Poo Cold Process Soap recipe, it is time to clean the work station. We wanted to give you some tips here because you were working with lye and it is important to be safe with the clean up process, just as it was for every step before hand. When your project is all said and done, you will need to wash all of the materials you used like you normally would. However, there may be residue left over from un-reacted lye. Since vinegar is acidic, it will take care of and neutralize the un-reacted lye on these surfaces so that the next time your materials will be ready to go! Once you have wiped everything down well with the vinegar, it will be safe to wash the materials with soap and water.

We hope that you have learned a lot about this method of soap making and all of the proper precautions to take. We hope it was a lot of fun creating this Reindeer Poo Cold Process Soap recipe! If you would like to reach out to Natures Garden and show us this and other creations that you make, follow and share with us!

Twitter: ngscents
Facebook: Natures Garden
Instagram: ngscents

Jun
14

Candle Making Terminology


This entry was posted in candle colorant, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle molds, candle recipe, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, candles and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Candle Making TerminologyCandle Making Terminology

We at Natures Garden know that there is a lot of candle making terminology and techniques that you need to know to make great homemade candles. So, we are going to answer some common candle making questions and problems to make your experience more fun. So, set aside your candle making equipment and let’s figure out how to make gorgeous scented candles!

Candle Making Terminology: Types of Candles

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Pillar Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Pillar Candle?

Pillar candles are free-standing candles that don’t require a container. These often use a harder type of candle wax that is made for creating pillar candles, like Pillar of Bliss Wax or Palm Pillar Wax.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Votive Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Votive Candle?

Votive Candles are a smaller kind of candle. The average size is 1.5 ounces and they are about two inches tall and one and a half inches wide. These are often made with a Votive Mold.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Tealight Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Tealight Candle?

Tea Lights are very small candles that are about an inch and a half wide and a half inch tall. They can be made in Tea Light Cups .

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Fragrances

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Fragrance Load Mean?

In candle making, fragrance load refers to the amount of fragrance oil that you are using in your homemade candle recipe.

Candle Making Terminology: My Candle Wax Will Hold a 10% Fragrance Load. How Do I Know How Much to Add?Candle Making Terminology: My Candle Wax Will Hold a 10% Fragrance Load. How Do I Know How Much to Add?

All you need to do is some simple math that we will walk you through! First, weigh the amount of candle wax you are using. Then, multiply this amount by 0.10, which is 10% to determine the amount of fragrance oil that you can use.

  • Formula: Candle Wax Weight X Fragrance Percentage = Amount of Fragrance That Can Be Added
  • Example: 20 (ounces of candle wax) X 0.10 = 2 ounces of fragrance oil So, since your candle wax is in ounces, the fragrance amount that can be added to the candle wax will also be in ounces.
Candle Making Terminology: What Does Scent Throw Mean?

The scent throw is the strength of fragrance that the candle releases into the air. Cold throw is the strength of scent when the candle is not lit yet. Hot throw is the strength of the scent throw when the candle is lit and burning.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Waxes

Candle Making Terminology: What Kind of Wax Should I Use for Candles?Candle Making Terminology: What Kind of Wax Should I Use for Candles?

Choosing a candle wax type depends on the type of candle that you want to create. So, the isn’t a universal answer to the question, “Which is the best wax for candle making?” For example, pillar candles would require a pillar wax, which includes Pillar of Bliss Candle Wax and Palm Pillar Wax. The Pillar of Bliss Wax is a blend of soy and paraffin that has a great scent throw and a creamy finish. The Palm Pillar Wax has a crystal finish, has a wonderful scent throw, and comes form sustainable sources.

However, container candles would be best with a container wax, which includes soy wax, Joy wax, WOW Wax, palm wax, and gel wax. Soy wax would make a great, inexpensive addition to your natural candle making supplies. It has a clean burn and and excellent cold throw, but it can be tricky to get a good hot throw from certain fragrances. Wow wax is mostly paraffin and has an amazing hot throw, but has a less clean burn. Joy wax is a perfect blend of paraffin wax and soy wax, as well as veggie wax and proprietary ingredients, that provides a cleaner burn with an amazing scent throw. Gel wax has a neat translucent look, but is not compatible with all fragrance oils. Our palm wax comes from sustainable sources that aren’t harming the rainforest, has a beautiful crystal appearance, and a great scent throw.

Candle Making Terminology: What is Granulated Wax?Candle Making Terminology: What is Granulated Wax?

Simply, this is wax that is grainy and looks kind of like sand. This wax can be scented and colored without melting, so it is a easy and fun way to create candles with kids. We have made candle recipes like the Bacon Candle Recipe and the Hydrangea Candle Recipe with this type of wax.

Candle Making Terminology: Crucial Temperatures

Candle Making Terminology: Do I Need to Worry About the Temperatures When Making Candles?Candle Making Terminology: Do I Need to Worry About the Temperatures When Making Candles?

Yes, this is very important for creating quality homemade candles! There are a few key moments where you will need a thermometer to be aware of the temperature of your wax. First, you need to make sure that your fragrance oil isn’t added at a temperature that is too hot. If your fragrance is added at a temperature that is too high, then some of the notes may burn off and leave you with a less satisfying scent. Another issue is pouring your wax into the container too soon. If you pour at a temperature that is too cool, you could have improper adhesion, wet spots, sinking, and other issues. So, be sure to check your wax’s description to see the temperature that is should be poured.

Candle Making Terminology: What does sinkhole mean?

Sinkhole is a hole or cavity that appears on your candle as it is setting up. Often, this occurs when the candle wax is poured at too low of a temperature.

Candle Making Terminology: Can You Cool a Candle in the Fridge?Candle Making Terminology: Can You Cool a Candle in the Fridge?

No, candles should cool as slowly as possible on their own. If you place a candle in the fridge to cool, they may not adhere to the glass properly, which can lead to wet spots.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Wicks

Candle Making Terminology: Choosing the Right WickCandle Making Terminology: Choosing the Right Wick

The size of your wick depends on the diameter of your container. You can see the radius for each wick under it’s description. However, you will still need to test because there are many variable between wax type and fragrance oil. A fragrance with a high flash point and high specific gravity, like vanilla, requires a hotter burn. But, low flash point scents with low specific gravity, like citrus, need a smaller wick. Also, you may hear the terms “wick up’ and “wick down” when talking about find the right wick size. Wick down means that you should use a wick that is smaller than what you have been using and wick up means that you should use a wick that is larger than what you use for candles this size.

Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Stop a Candle From Tunneling?Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Stop a Candle From Tunneling?

If you don’t know, tunneling is often the answer for the question, “Why isn’t my candle wax not burning evenly all of the way down?” Tunneling can happen for a few reasons, which includes issues with wick size. If your wick is too small for the diameter of your candle, then it will not burn all the way to the outside edge. So, you may either need a larger wick, multiple wicks, or a different type of wick that will burn hotter.

However, there are a few other issues that could cause tunneling. If you think your wick is the right size, then look into some of these potential issues, First, you may have a clogged wick, which can cause uneven burning. Also, it could be that you didn’t do a memory burn for the candle’s first use to ensure a proper burn. Finally, you may need to use a wax that has a lower melt point that is easier for you chosen wick to handle.

Candle Making Terminology: Why Are My Candle Jars Black After I Burn My Candles?

Often, this occurs when you wick is too big for your jar or your wick is too long. If your wick is trimmed down to 1/4 inch, then the length is fine. You can check the suggested radius for your wick to see if you need to get a smaller size. Also, using too much fragrance can clog the wick and cause more soot than normal.

Candle Making Terminology: Do Candle Wicks Contain Lead?

No, candle wicks in the Unites States, like ours, do not contain lead. In fact, lead core wicks were banned in the US in 2003.

Candle Making Terminology: Proper Burning

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Memory Burn?

This is the first burn of your candles and is the most important. This burn will set the boundary of your melt pool and will determines whether the edges of your candle will be reached. A guide is to burn an hour for every inch your candle is wide to ensure that it will burn properly as it is used in future burns. Also, you will want to make sure that you wick isn’t too low and isn’t longer than 1/4 inch high.

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Melt Pool Mean?

Melt Pool is the candle wax that has melted on the top of the candle. Ideally, you will want this to be all the way across the top of your candle to ensure an even burn.

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Mushrooming Mean in Candle Making?

When I notice black clumps on top of my wick, I know that it is mushrooming. While all wick produce this carbon as they burn, some are worse than others. Also, factors that clog the wick can increase the mushrooming effect. The CD wicks produce the least amount of mushrooming, but there isn’t a way to completely stop it due to it being a product of burning the wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Coloring

Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Color a Candle?Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Color a Candle?

There are a few different candle colorant options for your home made candles. First, you can use our Liquid Candle Dyes, which are extremely concentrated and will last a long time. Also, you can use a color block, which is made with paraffin, vegan, and can color up to 15 pounds of wax. Lastly, you can use a bit of powder dye. Just be careful not to use too much because it can clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Can You Use Crayons to Make Candles?

We do not suggest using crayons to color candles. They don’t burn properly and are likely to clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a UV Light Inhibitor?Candle Making Terminology: What is a UV Light Inhibitor?

Since UV light from the sun can bleach the color out of candles, the UV light inhibitor is used to protect the color of your candles. This candle ingredient is most useful for preventing fading in burgundy, blue, and violet candle colors due to direct sunlight.

Candle Making Terminology: How Do I Color My Candles White?

While titanium dioxide can be used to create white pillar candles, you don’t want to add it straight to your container candles as it can clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Apearance

Candle Making Terminology: How Do I Get Rid of Wet Spots on My Candles?

Wet spots are air pockets that are formed when your candle didn’t adhere properly to your candle jar. You can take a few steps to prevent this if you are having problems. First, try warming your candle jars to give you wax more time to cool. Also, you can try pouring your wax at a hotter temperature. Another good tip is to make sure the room your are making your candles in a room that is warm.

Candle Making Terminology: What Is Frosting In Candle Making?

Frosting is the white stuff that appears on waxes that contain soy wax. You can use a heat gun or blow dryer to re-melt the surface and give it a smoother finish. While you can lessen the effect of frosting, you can’t eliminate it completely.

Candle Making Terminology: What Are Jump Lines?

These are the line that you can see on the side of either a container candle or a pillar candle.

Candle Making Terminology: Progression of Candles

As you can tell, there is a lot that goes into candle making. But, it is a process that has been developed overtime and takes time to master. If you are interested in learning a bit about the evolution of candles, then check out The History of Candles from Prehistoric Times Until Now by Pioneer Thinking.

Candle Making Terminology: Talk to UsCandle Making Terminology: Talk to Us

If you have any more questions about candle making, you can look at our candle making classes or just ask us! We are on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter (@ngscents).

May
22

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?


This entry was posted in bath and body, cosmetic recipes, cosmetic supplies, crafts as a hobby, handcrafted soap, herb, herbal infusion, herbs, herbs in cosmetics, natural colorants, natural ingredients, Natures Garden Wholesale, soap colorants and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?How Do I Naturally Color Soap?

Many people are curious about how they can color their homemade soaps naturally. Of course, there are vibrant soap pigments and dyes, but what are my options for coloring soap? More importantly for all natural soap makers, How Do I Naturally Color Soap? Well, its simple, just use some cosmetic herbs. While not every herb is pigmented, there are many herbs out there that can be used to provide some wonderful colors. Plus, many herbs come with some added benefits for the body. So, Natures Garden has compiled a short natural soap colorants list that can be handy for the average soap maker.

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: How Do You Add Herbs To Soap

Since herbs are a great way to naturally color your homemade soaps, you will want to know the ways that you can incorporate them into your recipes. Depending on the form that they come in, there are a few methods you may want to know. First, we have the easiest herb in incorporate, which is powdered herbs. The powder can simply be added to the recipe either before the CP soap reaches trace or before pouring your MP soap. Also, you can add the herb to vegetable glycerin to break up chunks before adding it, but this isn’t always necessary.

Next, we have the whole herbs, which include things like flower petals or cinnamon sticks. While there are instances where you want to add whole herbs to your soap, you don’t need this for coloring. So, these herbs can either be added in tea form or an oil infusion. For the tea all you need to do is steep your herbs in hot water to create a tea and use this as the water portion of your recipe. If you aren’t using water in your recipe, then you will want to do an oil infusion. So, you will need to create an herb oil by either allowing your herbs to soak in one of your oils for 4-6 weeks or add them to the pot as you oils melt. After, you will just need to strain out the herbs.

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: Creating a Yellow ColorHow Do I Naturally Color Soap?: Creating a Yellow Color

One fun color that you can achieve naturally in your homemade soaps is yellow. You can use highly pigmented herbs, like Annatto, Saffron, or Turmeric Ground, that are perfect for adding some color to your natural soaps. Plus, there are added benefits of turmeric powder in soap that you can get from a synthetic colorant. This cosmetic herb is well known for its many health benefits, which includes benefits for skin care. Turmeric is an anti-inflammatory, which has been found to help reduce redness or dark circles. Also, this herb is antibacterial, which could be beneficial for a clear face. Furthermore, this pigmented herb has antioxidant properties, which is a property that is perfect for anti-aging products. If you’d like to learn more about this herb, then check out Turmeric Class.

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: How to Color Soap Orange NaturallyHow Do I Naturally Color Soap?: How to Color Soap Orange Naturally

Another great natural colorant is Carrot Powder, which provides a creamy orange color. Plus, this herb is absolutely wonderful for the skin, as it is full of vitamins and minerals that skin loves. This herb repairs and tones the skin, reduces wrinkles and scars, improves circulation, increases elasticity, and nourishes the skin with beta carotene. Also, since this herb tends to clump you may want to use vegetable glycerin to incorporate this lovely herb.

 

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: How to Naturally Color Soap PinkHow Do I Naturally Color Soap?: How to Naturally Color Soap Pink

Another fun color that you can include in your natural homemade soap recipes is pink. Actually, there are a few different herbs that you can choose between to get some pretty pink hues. First, we have the Hibiscus Flower Powder. This herb is gorgeous, smells lovely, and is amazing for your skin. What’s not to love? In fact, hibiscus has been referred to as “the Natural Botox plant”, and for good reason. This herb is known to be gentle as it moisturizes, cleanses, tones, and reduces wrinkles! If you want to know more, check out our Hibiscus Class.

A second option for coloring your soaps is the Beet Root Powder herb. One great thing about this her is that it is perfect for taking care of your face. In fact, this herb has been known to work great for reducing skin blemishes, pore size, and acne. If you’d like to learn more about this herb, then check out our Beet Root Powder Class.

Lastly, you can create a gorgeous pink color for your bath and body products using the Rose Clay Powder. This pink cosmetic clay is gentle, natural ingredient that contains kaolinite. This herb gently exfoliates, draws out toxins, reduces inflammation, and increases circulation. Plus, it is gentle for even the most sensitive skin. It is a powerful and kind herb that is perfect for creating naturally colored soaps.

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: Recipe for Naturally Pink SoapHow Do I Naturally Color Soap?: Recipe for Naturally Pink Soap

We used the lovely beet root powder to create a wonderful recipe for face soap. Our Beet Root Facial Soap Recipe using only a few ingredients, including melt and pour soap, to create a recipe that is fantastic for the skin. The beneficial properties of this herb are perfect for skin care and beauty.

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: Natural Soap Colorants for Melt and PourHow Do I Naturally Color Soap?: Natural Soap Colorants for Melt and Pour

Also, you can use the Rose Clay Powder to create naturally colored melt and pour soap. We used this cosmetic pink clay in our Swirled Melt and Pour Soap Recipe, as herbs are the best way to be able to swirl soap. While this recipe also uses pink soap pigment to create a more vibrant pink, this clay can work perfectly all by itself too. In the Perfectly Pampered Shaving Soap Recipe, we used rose clay to perfectly color the bottom portion of this gorgeous bath and body recipe.

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: Creating a Brown ColorHow Do I Naturally Color Soap?: Creating a Brown Color

Also, you can use herbs to create a natural brown color in your homemade soaps. One herb that you can include in soaps is the Black Walnut Hulls Powder. Not only can this herb be used to create a brown hue, but it can be added to vibrant colors to mute the color. Furthermore, this cosmetic herb has some fantastic properties for the skin! This herb has antifungal properties that have been known to treat acne, herpes, athlete’s foot, cold sores, and even warts. Plus, it can even be used to treat yeast infections and ringworm. If you would like to learn more about the benefits of this herb, then take a look at our Black Walnut Hulls Class.

Another great herb that can be used to create a deep chocolate brown is Cocoa Powder Organic. This cosmetic herb was used as an organic colorant and for its beneficial properties. This cosmetic herb promotes healthy skin tissues, firms and renews skin cells, and promotes healthy skin cell development. Plus, it works as an antioxidant and helps to repair any damaged skin, improves blood flow to the skin, helps to improve skin hydration and complexion. It even absorbs UV light into the skin. If you want to learn more about this fantastic herb, then you can find out more in our Cocoa Powder Class.

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: Naturally Colored Chocolate SoapsHow Do I Naturally Color Soap?: Naturally Colored Chocolate Soaps

Cocoa powder is a perfect way to naturally color chocolate scented soaps. We have included this lovely herb in many recipes for both its perfect coloring properties and lovely skin properties. One delicious looking soap recipe that only uses this herb as a colorant is the Hot Fudge Brownies Cold Process Soap Recipe. This naturally colored cold process soap looks almost good enough to eat! Plus, you can you this herb to make some yummy melt and pour soaps, too. The Chocolate Cream Cheese Cupcake Soap Recipe is a scrumptious soap that is just the perfect shade of chocolate!

 

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: How to Color Soap BlackHow Do I Naturally Color Soap?: How to Color Soap Black

Another color that you can create naturally with herbs is black. Adding Activated Charcoal Powder is a sure way to get a pure black color in your homemade soaps. Not only will you get a fantastic color, but this cosmetic ingredient is wonderfully cleansing. Activated Charcoal is an adsorbent, which means that it is able to hold onto molecules and trap them on the surface. So, when you wash off the activated charcoal the grime goes along with it. Further, it has the power to pull dirt and oil both off your skin and out of your pores. Overall, this makes activated charcoal a powerful cosmetic ingredient that you will adore for soap-making.

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: Naturally Colored Black SoapsHow Do I Naturally Color Soap?: Naturally Colored Black Soaps

We included this cleansing cosmetic herb in our own homemade soap recipes. First, we incorporated activated charcoal into the Activated Charcoal Soap Recipe. The herb enhances this soap to create an even deeper cleansing soap. Plus, the MP soap bars have a stunning jet black layer that works perfectly with the poppy seeds in the clear layer. Such a fun and natural homemade soap!

Also, we included this fantastic colorant in our Total Hot Man CP Soap Recipe. While the red is a soap pigment, the black portion of the bar is all thanks to activated charcoal. So, you can tell that this herb works great in both CP soap and MP soap. Plus, this gorgeous bar of soap will maintain the powerful cleaning properties of activated charcoal. So, this bar of soap is great all around!

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: How to Color Soap Green NaturallyHow Do I Naturally Color Soap?: How to Color Soap Green Naturally

Also, you can use herbs to provide your soaps with a natural green color! Many herbs that come from plants containing chlorophyll will do the trick, but here are a few that we like to use in soaps. First, we have Parsley Leaf Powder. Not only does this herb provide a nice, earthy green color, but it will perfectly nourish your skin with nutrients. Also, you can use Green Tea Powder in any soaps to create a nice green color. Plus, this lovely herb will provide gentle exfoliation to the skin along with beneficial antioxidant properties. Either would be perfect for making some homemade soaps!

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: How to Color Soap Blue or Purple

While many other herbs can be used to naturally color any bath and body product, the Alkanet Root is for cold process soap only. This means that you, unfortunately, won’t be able to use this to make natural purple MP soap. However, you can create some pretty gorgeous and natural cold process soaps! We at Natures Garden don’t carry this particular herb, but we still thought it was a great one to mention since it can provide a pretty purple color. Also, this can be used in differing amounts to provide a pink or even a blue color!

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: What is Alkanet

If you are curious to learn more about Alkanet as a natural colorant, then Lovely Green’s Growing Alkanet. Lovely Green uses a touch of this very herb to lightly color her typical lavender soap. It is a natural, light purple hue that is very pretty. The color was especially for a lavender soap! So, you will definitely want to check this herb out.

How Do I Naturally Color Soap?: Reach Out to Us

We hope that you have enjoyed all of these options for naturally coloring your homemade soaps! These herbs are just some of the most common herbs that we know of or have used in the past. If you know of or use any other herbs that you use for your naturally colored soaps, we would love to hear about your favorite cosmetic herbs for soapmaking. Also, feel free to ask us any questions that you may have about natural colorants or soaping in general. We are happy to help! You can reach out to us on social media. There is a Natures Garden Facebook page. Also, you can find us on Instagram and Twitter with @ngscents. We can’t wait to hear from you!

Feb
14

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath bombs, bath products, Free Recipes, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food ColoringHow to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring

Are you curious about how to color bath bombs without food coloring? While food coloring may seem like a simple way to color your bath bombs, there are many other fun and beneficial ways to color your bath and body products. First, you can create a variety of lovely colors for your bath bombs with soap colorants. These soap dyes are perfect for creating some vibrant colors that are perfect for creating all kinds of wonderful designs. Also, you can use different powdered herbs to provide your products with colors naturally. While not all herbs can be used to color your bath products, powdered herbs that have vivid colors are perfect for coloring your homemade bath fizzies. Plus, these herbs can provide you bath bombs with some benefits for your skin. So, there are quite a few different options for creating different colors for your bath and body products.

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Natural Colorants

A great way to color your bath and body products is by adding some powdered herbs to your bath and body recipes. There are many different types of herbs that can be used to create some lovely shades in your products. Further, these herbs often provide your products with some extra beneficial properties for your skin. Some of these herbs are cleansing, full of nutrients, or soothing for your skin and body. This will provide you with both the benefits of a natural colorant and an effective skin care additive. Plus, coloring your products with herbs allows you to keep your products all natural. So, here are some herbs that we have used as colorants in our bath bomb recipes.

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Activated Charcoal PowderHow to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Activated Charcoal Powder

Firstly, you can add color to your bath and body products using activated charcoal powder. This herb is not only great for your skin, but activated charcoal has a rich, dark color that will certainly show in your products. So, this herb is perfect for providing a black color in your bath bombs. In fact, we used this herb to create the Lumps of Coal Bath Bomb. This bath product was made with black salt and natural black colorant to create a recipe that resembles an actual lump of coal! Plus, this festive recipe uses our Elf Sweat Fragrance Oil to add to the aesthetic of the bath bomb. So, you sure to have a perfect recipe for the holidays.

How to Color Bath Bombs With Food Coloring: Beet Root PowderHow to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Beet Root Powder

One way that you can naturally color your bath bombs is the lovely beet root powder. Simply add some of this powdered herb to your bath bomb recipe and you will have a wonderful color for your bath and body products. One color option for coloring is that you can provide your products with a pretty pink color. Alternatively, you can achieve more of a deep red pink color by adding even more of the powdered herb. Just keep adding the beet root herb until you have the perfect shade. Since we wanted a light shade of pink in the Black Cherry Bath Bomb Recipe, we only added a bit of Beet Root Powder to our recipe. But, you can always alter the colors for your own recipes.

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Peppermint Leaf PowderHow to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Peppermint Leaf Powder

Also, you can use herbs to naturally color your products with shades of green. Peppermint leaf powder is a perfect way to create lovely and natural earthy green hues. Not only does this herb provide a nice color for your products, but the peppermint herb has been known to be wonderful for clearing sinuses and providing a cooling effect for the skin. So, the Sinus Relief Bath Bomb Recipe is a perfect recipe for creating a naturally beautiful and effective bath product. This herb is used to provide half of our bath bomb with a green color and the other half has been left white with speckles of Peppermint Leaf Cut and Sifted. So, you are left with a very pretty bath bomb that is perfect for sinus relief.

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Cocoa Powder OrganicHow to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Cocoa Powder Organic

Another fun way to naturally color your bath and body products is Natures Garden’s organic cocoa powder. This powered cocoa is perfect for providing your products with a chocolate brown color that looks absolutely delicious. So, we obviously had to use this natural colorant to color the chocolate chip portion of the Mint Chocolate Chip Ice Cream Bath Fizzies Recipe. This provides you with adorable ice cream scoops scented with Peppermint Patty Fragrance Oil. So, these ice cream scoops will smell and look absolutely scrumptious.

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Cosmetic Colorants

While there are many colors that can be created with powdered herbs, there are some hues that can only be obtained with a good colorant. The Natures Garden FUN Soap Colorants are perfect for providing your recipes with bright, inviting colors that make your products look gorgeous. These colors provide you with the creative ability to make all kinds of bath bombs. So, you can use these vibrant colorants to create some amazing bath bomb recipes.

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Deep Purple Fun Soap ColorantHow to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Deep Purple Fun Soap Colorant

First, you can use some soap colorants to create some amazing shades of purple. The Deep Purple FUN Soap Colorant is an amazing, deep color that is perfect for making homemade bath and body products. One fun way to use this colorant is to create the  Blackberry Bling Bling Bubble Bar Recipe. These adorable little bath bomb scoops look just like ice cream. Plus, the mica adds to the colorant to create a beautiful color. Further, the appearance of this bath product pairs wonderfully with the Blackberry Bling Bling Fragrance Oil. So, you are sure to love this adorable bath and body product.

How to Color Bath Bombs With Food Coloring: Ultramarine Blue Fun Soap Colorant How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Ultramarine Blue FUN Soap Colorant

You can create some amazing colors for your bath and body products with Natures Garden soap colorants. One great colorant option is the Ultramarine Blue FUN Soap Colorant. This bath and body ingredient is perfect for creating gorgeous shades of blue. Anything from light baby blue to a deep royal blue can be created with this cosmetic colorant. Just change the amount of colorant you include to create a wide array of beautiful shades. We used this lovely blue colorant to create the Blueberry Bath Bomb Recipe. This bath recipe is colored half white and half blue to create a fun bath bomb. Plus, it is scented with our Blueberry Fragrance Oil. So, this bath bomb certainly has the perfect color for the freshly ripened aroma.

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Yellow Oxide FUN Soap ColorantHow to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Yellow Oxide FUN Soap Colorant

Plus, you can create some gorgeous bath bomb recipes with the Yellow Oxide FUN Soap Colorant. We created the lovely Golden Clover Bath Bomb Recipe with this colorant and it turned out absolutely beautiful. We used this lovely colorant to perfectly create a delightful gold color by combining the Yellow Oxide colorant with 24K gold mica. This provided our lucky clover bath bombs with the perfect gold color with a lovely shine. So, you will be able to create a gorgeous, shimmering bath bomb with this soap colorant that is sure to wow. 

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Neon Pink FUN Soap ColorantHow to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Neon Pink FUN Soap Colorant

Also, you can create some beautiful shades of color for your bath and body products with this cosmetic colorant. So, adding the Neon Pink FUN Soap Colorant to your bath bomb recipes can provide you with some amazingly vibrant shades of pink for your products. We used this colorant to perfectly color our Muddy Pig Bath Bomb Recipe. The majority of our bath bomb is the gorgeous shade of pink that is as pink as a little piglet. Then, there is a bit of brown added to the bath fizzy as well to create the look of a cute little muggy piggy. Finally, we add a little toy pig for a bath bomb the kids will love. This is the perfect bath and body product that is cute and great for your skin!

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Ultramarine Violet FUN Soap Colorant How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Ultramarine Violet FUN Soap Colorant

Another fun colorant that you can use in your homemade bath bombs is the Ultramarine Violet Soap Colorant. This cosmetic colorant is perfect for creating lovely shades of purple for your bath bomb creations. We at Natures Garden used this colorant to create the Sugar Plum Bath Bomb Recipe. This pretty bath bomb is a gorgeous light purple hue with mica dust sprinkled on top. So, the product goes perfectly with the Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy Fragrance Oil that is in this recipes, as well. You will love the combination of this lovely colorant with the sweet scent of this fragrance oil!

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Neon Green FUN Soap ColorantHow to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Neon Green FUN Soap Colorant

Plus, there are even more colors that you can use in your bath bomb recipes. You can create some gorgeous shades of green with the Neon Green FUN Soap Colorant. We used this color along with some of the Kelly Green FUN Soap Colorant to create the Green Apple Candy Bath Bomb Recipe. So, we were able to create the perfect green apple shade of green for our bath bomb! Further, this color perfectly pairs with the Green Apple Candy Fragrance Oil. This is sure to provide you with a gorgeous bath bomb that smells delicious.

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Neon Blue FUN Soap ColorantHow to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Neon Blue FUN Soap Colorant

Another great colorant that you can use in your bath and body products is the Neon Blue FUN Soap Colorant. This soap colorant is a brighter shade of blue that is perfect for creating some vivid shades of blue. We tried out this bath and body colorant in our Fish Toy Bath Bomb Recipe and it is absolutely perfect for this product. This recipe uses tiny fish sprinkles and a bright, ocean blue to create an amazing bath bomb recipe. Plus, the Mermaid Kisses Fragrance Oil matches this bath bomb perfectly. Try out our recipe or create your own beautiful blue colored bath bombs.

How to Color Bath Bombs Without Food Coloring: Using Your Food Dye

Since you have new coloring alternatives to food dye, you may want to figure out how else you can use your food dye. So, leave the soap colorant and naturally coloring herbs for making the bath recipes and let’s have some fun with the leftover food coloring. You can find a few fun ways that you can use food dyes in the article “12 Fun Things to Do With Food Dye”  by Escape Adulthood. This list of ideas contains a variety of fun ways that you can try using your food dyes. This includes recipes like mashed potatoes, coloring flowers, and many other fun ideas. So, check out this list to find some fun and colorful ideas!

We hope that you enjoyed some of the different ways there are to color your bath bomb recipes. If you are interested in finding more colors to work with, then you can find more soap colorants on our website under the FUN Soap Colorants page. Also, you can find more powdered herbs that can be used to naturally color your bath and body products. If you are curious about using any of these colorants or powdered herbs, then feel free to reach out to us either on the phone or on social media. We have a Natures Garden Facebook page. Also, we can be found on Instagram and Twitter, @ngscents. We hope to hear from you soon and that you enjoy creating your beautifully colored bath bombs!