Tag Archives: candle making questions

Aug
21

Pearamel Candle Recipe


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Pearamel Candle RecipePearamel Candle Recipe

Looking for the best way to scent your home? If you are trying to find a great room scent recipe, then definitely check out the Pearamel Candle Recipe from Natures Garden.  This layered candle recipe uses fantastic candle making supplies to create candles with the best throw. Not only does this scented candle use quality soy candle wax, but these candles use the scrumptious aroma of our Pearamel Fragrance Oil. So, you can create some fantastic soy candles to have your home smell fresh!

Natures Garden Ingredients for the Pearamel Candle Recipe

Soy Wax 464
Caramel Color Block
Olive Color Block
White Color Block
Pearamel Fragrance Oil
CD Candle Wicks (100 wicks)
POURING POT
THERMOMETER
Disposable Pipette

Other Needed Ingredients for the Pearamel Candle Recipe

16 oz. Glass Apothecary Jar
Scale
Mixing Spoons
Hot Glue Gun
Pot (For Double Boiler)

Weights for the Pearamel Candle Recipe

Caramel Color Block (less than 1 gram)
510 grams of the Soy Wax 464
Olive Color Block (less than 1 gram)
50 grams of the Pearamel Fragrance Oil
White Color Block (less than 1 gram)

Make the Double Boiler for the Candle Recipe

Before you get started with this candle making recipe, you are going to need to make the double boiler for the candle recipe. The double boiler will be used to protect the candle wax wholesale from potentially scorching. First, you will need both a pouring pot and a regular stove-top pot that you use for craft making. You fill the stove-top pot with water. Once you fill the pot with water, you will need to place it on the burner and heat the water. When you are ready to melt the wax for this recipe, you will put the candle wax in the pouring pot.  Then, the pouring pot will be placed in the pot containing the hot water.

A Few More Preparations for This Candle Recipe

After creating the double boiler, there are a few more preparations for this candle recipe. Of course, you are going to want to clean and sanitize your work space for the Pearamel Candle Recipe. Also, you will want to gather all the needed candle making supplies for this diy candle recipe. Further, you want to make sure that all of the candle making equipment is clean. Once your supplies are clean and your work area is clear, you can get started!

Melt Wax for the First Pearamel Candle LayerMelt Wax for the First Pearamel Candle Layer

Now you are going to want to melt wax for the first Pearamel Candle layer. So, you will want to weigh out 100 grams of the 464 soy wax. Add this candle wax to the pouring pot. Then, you will need to add your pouring pot to the water in your stove top pot. You will want to stir occasionally until all of your soy wax has melted.

Adding Candle Colorant to the First Candle LayerAdding Candle Colorant to the First Candle Layer

Also, you are going to be adding the candle colorant to the first candle layer. As the 464 soy wax is melting, you will want to add the colorant to the wax. So, you will want to add a small amount of the caramel color block to your candle wax. You will need to add less than a gram of this candle dye block.

Prepare the Candle Jars for the Pearamel Candle RecipePrepare the Candle Jars for the Pearamel Candle Recipe

While you are waiting for the candle wax to melt, you are going to prepare the candle jar for the Pearamel Candle Recipe. So, you will want to take one of your candle making jars and two of the CD 12 wicks. You are going to be using your hot glue gun to adhere these candle wicks. Be sure that your wicks are evenly spaced in the apothecary jar.

Finishing the First Pearamel Candle LayerFinishing the First Pearamel Candle Layer

Now you are going to be finishing the first Pearamel Candle layer for this candle recipe. Once your melted wax has the color fully incorporated, you will be adding the fragrance oil for this candle. So, weigh out 20 grams of the Pearamel Fragrance Oil. Now, stir to incorporate the scent.

After you have thoroughly mixed in your fragrance oil, you are ready to pour the first layer for this candle. So, place the candle jar in a place where it will not be disturbed. This is important because bumping the jar can mess up the layers. Then, you will want to slowly pour your melted wax into the jar. Since this is a layered candle recipe, you will want to be extra careful to pour in the center of the jar. This will prevent you from splashing the sides of the container, which would be seen over other layers.

Create the First White Layer of the Pearamel Candle RecipeCreate the First White Layer of the Pearamel Candle Recipe

Once your first layer has completely set up, you can begin to create the first white layer of the Pearamel Candle Recipe. So, you will need to weigh out 50 grams of the soy wax flakes. You will want to add this to a clean pouring pot. Then, you will need to heat the wax using the double boiler.

Add the Color Block for the First White LayerAdd the Color Block for the First White Layer

While your candle wax is melting, you are going to need to add the color block for the first white layer. You will need to use less than a gram of a white color block to the wax. Then, stir to incorporate the candle colorant as the wax melts.

Finishing Up the First White LayerFinishing Up the First White Layer

Now, you are going to be finishing up the first white layer for this candle recipe. You will need to weigh out 5 grams of fragrance and add it to your candles. After stirring to incorporate the scent, you will pour this wax into the candle jar. Again, pour slowly to avoid splashing on the sides of the container.

Creating the Green Layer for the Pearamel Candle RecipeCreating the Green Layer for the Pearamel Candle Recipe

Once the previous layer has completely set up, you can move on to creating the green layer for the Pearamel Candle Recipe. So, you will need to add 100 grams of soy candle wax to the clean pouring pot. Then, you will begin to heat the candle wax with your double boiler.

Add the Green Colorant for the Pearamel CandleAdd the Green Colorant for the Pearamel Candle

Also, you are going to want to add the green colorant to the Pearamel Candle. You will need to use less than a gram of the Olive Green Color Block Dye. Be sure to mix this color into the candle wax as everything melts.

 

Finishing the Green Layer for the Pearamel Candle RecipeFinishing the Green Layer for the Pearamel Candle Recipe

Now you are going to be finishing the green layer for the Pearamel Candle Recipe. First, you will need to add 10 grams of the Pearamel Fragrance Oil. You need to stir to incorporate. Then, you will slowly pour the candle wax into your candle jar. Be sure to pour towards the center to avoid splashes the walls of the container.

Creating the Second White Layer for the Candle RecipeCreating the Second White Layer for the Candle Recipe

Next, you are going to be creating the second white layer for the candle recipe. So, you are going to be using 50 grams of the wholesale soy wax to your clean pouring pot. You will need to use your double boiler device to melt this wax.

Color the Second White Layer of the Pearamel Candle

Now, you are going to color the second white layer of the Pearamel Candle. Just like with the previous white layer, you are going to add a small amount of a white color block. So, take less of a gram of the White Color Blocks Dye and mix it into the melting wax.

Finishing the Second White Layer of the Pearamel Candle Finishing the Second White Layer of the Pearamel Candle

Then, you are going to be finishing the second white layer of the Pearamel Candle. First, you will need to incorporate 5 grams of the candle fragrance. After mixing in the scented oil, you are ready to carefully pour this layer into the candle jar.

Create the Second Caramel for the Pearamel Candle RecipeCreate the Second Caramel for the Pearamel Candle Recipe

You are going to create the second caramel for the Pearamel Candle Recipe. For this layer you are going to need to weigh out 100 grams of the wax. Then, melt the 464 soy wax in your clean pouring pot using the double boiler method.

Adding the Colorant to the Second Caramel Layer

Then, you are going to be adding the colorant to the second caramel layer. So, you will want to add a small amount of the caramel candle colorant block. You will need less than a gram. Also, you will want to try to get the same shade of caramel as you had for the previous layer.

Finishing the Last Layer for the Pearamel Candle RecipeFinishing the Last Layer for the Pearamel Candle Recipe

Next, you are going to be finishing the last layer for the Pearamel Candle Recipe. Once your wholesale wax has melted, you will want to add 10 grams of the Pearamel Fragrance Oil. Then, you will need to stir to completely incorporate the candle colorant. After everything is mixed, you will need to pour the melted wax into the candle jar.

Create the Whipped Soy WaxCreate the Whipped Soy Wax

After the last layer has completely set up, you can begin to create the whipped soy wax. You are going to weigh out 200 grams of soy wax and add it to the pouring pot in the double boiler. Once the wax has melted, you can add in 20 grams of the fragrance oil. Then, mix in the scent thoroughly.

Topping the Pearamel Candle RecipeTopping the Pearamel Candle Recipe

You are going to be topping the Pearamel Candle Recipe with your whipped candle wax. Before you can add the wax to your candle you are going to need the wax to thicken slightly. Once your wax is a slushy consistency, you are ready to add it to your candle. So, you will use a spoon to whip the wax until it is fluffy like frosting. After, you can begin to add the whipped wax on top of the previous layer of your candle.

Making the Caramel Drizzle for the Pearamel Candle Making the Caramel Drizzle for the Pearamel Candle

Next, you are going to be making the caramel drizzle for the Pearamel Candle Recipe. You will want to melt 10 grams of the soy wax in your pouring pot. Also, add a very small amount of the caramel candle colorant. After you have a nice caramel color, you can drizzle the wax on top of your candle.

Finish the Pearamel Candle Recipe

Finally, you are going to be able to finish the Pearamel Candle Recipe. First, you are going to need to let your homemade candle cure. After, you can trim your candle wicks to the proper size. Once the wicks are trimmed, you are ready to use your finished diy candle!

Create Your Own Real Pearamel

If you found the aroma of our Pearamel Frgarance Oil to be absolutely scrumptious, then we have the perfect dessert idea for you to try! You can use the recipe for Sweet Pear Caramel from Mrs. Wages to create a fantastic topping for your sweet treats. This fruit-based caramel recipe uses simple ingredients that you can use to create a delicious topping for ice cream, pear dessert recipes, and so much more!

Questions About the Pearamel Scrub RecipeQuestions About the Pearamel Candle Recipe

We hope that you have enjoyed learning how to make candles that are layered with this fun candle recipe! Feel free to ask us any more questions about the Pearamel Candle Recipe. You can reach out to us on the telephone H.U.G. line, at the NG store, and online. The easiest way to talk to us online is through our social media. First, you can reach us on the Natures Garden Facebook page. Also, you can use @ngscents to find us on both Instagram and Twitter. Not only can you use these social media platforms to ask us about this candle recipe, but you can ask candle making 101 and soy candle making problems and solutions, too. Plus, you can engage in the community on our social media platforms, too. So, you can share your own room scent recipe ideas, ask for crafting suggestions, and so much more!

Jul
23

Star Fruit Mango Candle Recipe


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Star Fruit Mango Candle RecipeStar Fruit Mango Candle Recipe

If you are looking for some fun, unique homemade candle ideas, then this candle making blog recipe is a perfect one for you to check out! The Star Fruit Mango Candle Recipe from Natures Garden wholesale soap and candle supplier uses our star shaped candle molds to create cute layered pillar candles with a unique shape! So, take a look at the candle recipe in the candle recipe blog below to learn how to make candles at home step by step.

Star Fruit Mango Candle Recipe Ingredients Found at Natures Garden

Pillar of Bliss Wax
Scarlet Red Color Block
Yellow Color Block
Peach Color Blocks
Burnt Orange Color Blocks
Star Fruit Mango Fragrance Oil
Silicone Soap Mold- 6 Cavity Star
CD Candle Wicks (100 wicks)
Pouring Pot
Thermometer
Votive Candle Wick Pin

Star Fruit Mango Candle Recipe: Other Needed Candle Making Supplies

Scale
Mixing Spoons
Pot (For Double Boiler)

Star Fruit Mango Candle Recipe: Weights and Amounts

9 ounces of the Pillar of Bliss Wax
Scarlet Color Block (less than a gram)
Yellow Color Block (less than a gram)
Peach Color Block (less than a gram)
Burnt Orange Color Block (less than a gram)
0.9 ounces of the Star Fruit Mango Fragrance Oil

Make Preparations and Sanitize Your Work Space

Before you can begin creating your homemade candle recipe you will want to make sure that you are ready to make your scented candle recipe. First, you will need to gather your candle making supplies for this diy candle recipe. Also, you will want to clean your candle making equipment for this recipe. Finally, you will need to clean up your work space to give yourself some room to make this candle recipe.

Prepare the Double Boiler for Melting Candle Wax

One more preparation that you are going to want to do is create a double boiler for melting the candle wax. So, you will need a pouring pot and a regular pot. You fill the pot with a few inches of water. Once you fill the pot with water, you will need to place it on the burner. You are going to need to heat the water. When you are ready to melt the candle wax for this recipe, you will put the Pillar of Bliss Candle Wax from Nature Garden in the pouring pot.

Weighing Out the Candle Wax

When you are ready to start this recipe, you are going to need to measure out the candle wax for this stacked candle recipe. You will need to weigh out 3 ounces of the Pillar of Bliss Candle Wax. This will be used to create the yellow colored stars for this pillar candle recipe. Once you have your candle wax weighed out, you are going to add the wax to your pouring pot to melt. You will want to occasionally stir the candle wax until everything is completely melted.

Weighing Out the Candle WaxAdding the Colorants for the First Portion

Once all of your candle wax is melted, you are ready to move on to the next step in the process. So, you are going to need the yellow Color Block and the burnt orange Color Block. You are going to use less than a gram of the yellow candle colorant in your wax. Then, you will want to add a small amount of the burnt orange colorant to the melted wax. This will provide you with the perfect yellowish orange color for your stars. Once the color blocks have completely melted, you will want to stir to incorporate the color before moving on to the next step in the process.

Adding the Fragrance Oil to the Yellow WaxAdding the Fragrance Oil to the Yellow Wax

Now that your color block is incorporated in the melted wax, you are ready to add the fragrance oil! So, remove the pouring pot from the double boiler. Then, you will need to weigh out 0.3 ounces of the Star Fruit Mango Fragrance Oil. Of course, you are going to add this tropical scent to your melted wax and stir to fully incorporate the aroma.

Creating the Yellow StarsCreating the Yellow Stars

Now you are ready to pour your candle wax into the star shaped silicone molds. You are only going to fill each star cavity about halfway full. In total, you will have enough melted wax to fill three of the cavities. Since each of these three cavities is going to need candle wax, you will need to be careful not to fill up one of your star cavities too high.

Removing Yellow Stars From the MoldRemoving Yellow Stars From the Mold

Once your stars have completely set up, you are ready to remove them from the mold. Once each of your yellow stars has been removed from the mold, you are ready to move on to the next step in the process.

Finishing the Yellow StarsFinishing the Yellow Stars

Before you can move on to creating the other stars, you are going to need to create a hole in the center of each star for the candle wick. So, you are going to need a votive wick pin. Now, try to line up the pin with the center of the star and piece through the candle wax. You will want to remove the star from the pin and repeat this part of the process with your two other stars. Now, you will need to set these yellow stars aside for the moment.

Melting Wax for the Peach Stars

Now, you are ready to begin to prepare the peach stars for this scented candle recipe. So, you are going to need to weigh out 3 ounces of the Pillar of Bliss Wax. Then, you will add this candle wax to your clean pouring pot in the double boiler. Once the wax has entirely melted, you can move on to the next step in the process.

Making the Peach Color

Once your candle wax has been completely melted, you are ready to create the color for your recipe. So, you are going to need the peach color block and the scarlet red color block. In order for you to create the peach color, you will need to use half as much red color as you do peach candle color. You are going to need a very small amount, less than a gram of the peach color block for your candle. Then, use about half as much of the red color block as you did the peach color block. You will want to mix the color in thoroughly as the color block melts in your wax.

Making the Peach Color  Scenting the Peach Colored Wax

After you have an even peach color, you are ready to remove the pouring pot from the double boiler. Then, you can add the Star Fruit Mango Fragrance Oil to your melted candle wax. You will need 0.3 ounces of this scent. After mixing the scent into your wax, you are ready for the next step.

Creating the Peach Candle Wax StarsCreating the Peach Candle Wax Stars

Now you are ready to add the melted candle wax to your silicone candle mold. Again, you are going to create three wax stars with the peach colored wax. So, you will need to make sure that you only fill each of the three cavities only about halfway. Once you have your stars poured, you need to let the wax set up completely. Then, you can remove your candle wax stars from the mold. After, you are going to need to use the wick pin to create a hole for the candle wicking. After all three of your peach stars have a hole in the center, you can set these aside and move on to create the last set of stars for your stacked candle recipe.

Melting the Candle Wax for the Red Stars

Now you are going to melt the wholesale candle wax for your last set of stars for this candle recipe. So, you are going to need to weigh out 3 ounces of the wax. Then, add this candle wax to your cleaned pouring pot. You will need to use your double boiler to melt this wholesale wax.

Adding the Candle Colorant for the Red Stars

After the Pillar of Bliss Wax has entirely melted you are ready to create the red color for this candle recipe. You are going to need the peach color block and the scarlet red color block. In order to create the red color for your star, you will need to use more of the red candle colorant than the peach. We used less than a gram of the red color block. Further, we used half of much of the peach color block. You will want to stir until the color has melted and is incorporated. Then, you can remove the pouring pot from the double boiler. 

Adding the Star Fruit Mango Scent to the Red Candle WaxAdding the Star Fruit Mango Scent to the Red Candle Wax

Now, you are ready to add the Natures Garden Star Fruit Mango Fragrance Oil to your wax. So, you will need 0.3 ounces of the Star Fruit Mango Fragrance Oil. After adding this scrumptious scented oil to your wax, you will need to stir to incorporate the fragrance fully.

Pouring the Red Star Fruit Mango Candle WaxPouring the Red Star Fruit Mango Candle Wax

Now, you are ready to pour the candle wax into the silicone mold. Again, you will need to create three stars. So, you will be filling each of these three cavities to about the halfway mark. Then, you will need to wait for the candle wax to set up.

 Finish Creating the Red Stars

Once your candle wax stars have set up completely, you are ready to remove the wax from the mold. Then, you are going to need to use the votive wick pin to create a hole for the wick in the center. Once you have repeated this with all of your red stars, you are ready for the last step.

Putting the Star Fruit Mango Candle Together Putting the Star Fruit Mango Candle Together

Finally, you are ready to begin stacking your candle wax stars! In this example, we will create a candle with three of the stars. So, you will want to thread the wick through the first star to begin creating the candle. Then, place a second star and a third star on top of that one using a different color each time. Finally, you can trim the wick down to size.

Choosing Your Candle Height

While you can create three candles with your candle wax stars, this isn’t your only option with these stacked candles. If you would like you could stack up to six stars with one of our 7 inch wicks. So, you can decide on the height of your candles. We chose to create one candle with three stars and one candle with six stars.

Star Fruit and Mango Tart Recipe

If you love the aroma of this homemade scented candle, then you will love this scrumptious food recipe! The Star Fruit and Kiwi Tart with Mango recipe from Woodland Foods is a delicious recipe that is a unique and exotic dessert recipe that you will be sure to enjoy. The exotic and unique flavor of the star fruit perfectly complements the sweet mango and apricot flavors along with the flavor of tart kiwi. Further, this tasty treat has a layer of delicious cream cheese on a pleasing tart crust.

Reach Out to UsReach Out to Us

We hope that you have enjoyed creating our diy pillar candles recipe. If you have any more questions about how to make this candle making recipe, then feel free to reach out to us for help. You can reach out to us on the phone H.U.G. line, in the NG store, and online. An easy way to reach out to us online is through our social media platforms. First, we are available on the Natures Garden Facebook page. Also, you can use the handle @ngscents to find us on Instagram and Twitter. Not only can you use these social media platforms to ask us any candle making questions that you may have, but you can share your own ideas for homemade room scents and making candles at home, too. So, we hope that we will hear from you sometime very soon!

Jun
14

Candle Making Terminology


This entry was posted in candle colorant, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle molds, candle recipe, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, candles and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Candle Making TerminologyCandle Making Terminology

We at Natures Garden know that there is a lot of candle making terminology and techniques that you need to know to make great homemade candles. So, we are going to answer some common candle making questions and problems to make your experience more fun. So, set aside your candle making equipment and let’s figure out how to make gorgeous scented candles!

Candle Making Terminology: Types of Candles

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Pillar Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Pillar Candle?

Pillar candles are free-standing candles that don’t require a container. These often use a harder type of candle wax that is made for creating pillar candles, like Pillar of Bliss Wax or Palm Pillar Wax.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Votive Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Votive Candle?

Votive Candles are a smaller kind of candle. The average size is 1.5 ounces and they are about two inches tall and one and a half inches wide. These are often made with a Votive Mold.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Tealight Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Tealight Candle?

Tea Lights are very small candles that are about an inch and a half wide and a half inch tall. They can be made in Tea Light Cups .

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Fragrances

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Fragrance Load Mean?

In candle making, fragrance load refers to the amount of fragrance oil that you are using in your homemade candle recipe.

Candle Making Terminology: My Candle Wax Will Hold a 10% Fragrance Load. How Do I Know How Much to Add?Candle Making Terminology: My Candle Wax Will Hold a 10% Fragrance Load. How Do I Know How Much to Add?

All you need to do is some simple math that we will walk you through! First, weigh the amount of candle wax you are using. Then, multiply this amount by 0.10, which is 10% to determine the amount of fragrance oil that you can use.

  • Formula: Candle Wax Weight X Fragrance Percentage = Amount of Fragrance That Can Be Added
  • Example: 20 (ounces of candle wax) X 0.10 = 2 ounces of fragrance oil So, since your candle wax is in ounces, the fragrance amount that can be added to the candle wax will also be in ounces.
Candle Making Terminology: What Does Scent Throw Mean?

The scent throw is the strength of fragrance that the candle releases into the air. Cold throw is the strength of scent when the candle is not lit yet. Hot throw is the strength of the scent throw when the candle is lit and burning.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Waxes

Candle Making Terminology: What Kind of Wax Should I Use for Candles?Candle Making Terminology: What Kind of Wax Should I Use for Candles?

Choosing a candle wax type depends on the type of candle that you want to create. So, the isn’t a universal answer to the question, “Which is the best wax for candle making?” For example, pillar candles would require a pillar wax, which includes Pillar of Bliss Candle Wax and Palm Pillar Wax. The Pillar of Bliss Wax is a blend of soy and paraffin that has a great scent throw and a creamy finish. The Palm Pillar Wax has a crystal finish, has a wonderful scent throw, and comes form sustainable sources.

However, container candles would be best with a container wax, which includes soy wax, Joy wax, WOW Wax, palm wax, and gel wax. Soy wax would make a great, inexpensive addition to your natural candle making supplies. It has a clean burn and and excellent cold throw, but it can be tricky to get a good hot throw from certain fragrances. Wow wax is mostly paraffin and has an amazing hot throw, but has a less clean burn. Joy wax is a perfect blend of paraffin wax and soy wax, as well as veggie wax and proprietary ingredients, that provides a cleaner burn with an amazing scent throw. Gel wax has a neat translucent look, but is not compatible with all fragrance oils. Our palm wax comes from sustainable sources that aren’t harming the rainforest, has a beautiful crystal appearance, and a great scent throw.

Candle Making Terminology: What is Granulated Wax?Candle Making Terminology: What is Granulated Wax?

Simply, this is wax that is grainy and looks kind of like sand. This wax can be scented and colored without melting, so it is a easy and fun way to create candles with kids. We have made candle recipes like the Bacon Candle Recipe and the Hydrangea Candle Recipe with this type of wax.

Candle Making Terminology: Crucial Temperatures

Candle Making Terminology: Do I Need to Worry About the Temperatures When Making Candles?Candle Making Terminology: Do I Need to Worry About the Temperatures When Making Candles?

Yes, this is very important for creating quality homemade candles! There are a few key moments where you will need a thermometer to be aware of the temperature of your wax. First, you need to make sure that your fragrance oil isn’t added at a temperature that is too hot. If your fragrance is added at a temperature that is too high, then some of the notes may burn off and leave you with a less satisfying scent. Another issue is pouring your wax into the container too soon. If you pour at a temperature that is too cool, you could have improper adhesion, wet spots, sinking, and other issues. So, be sure to check your wax’s description to see the temperature that is should be poured.

Candle Making Terminology: What does sinkhole mean?

Sinkhole is a hole or cavity that appears on your candle as it is setting up. Often, this occurs when the candle wax is poured at too low of a temperature.

Candle Making Terminology: Can You Cool a Candle in the Fridge?Candle Making Terminology: Can You Cool a Candle in the Fridge?

No, candles should cool as slowly as possible on their own. If you place a candle in the fridge to cool, they may not adhere to the glass properly, which can lead to wet spots.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Wicks

Candle Making Terminology: Choosing the Right WickCandle Making Terminology: Choosing the Right Wick

The size of your wick depends on the diameter of your container. You can see the radius for each wick under it’s description. However, you will still need to test because there are many variable between wax type and fragrance oil. A fragrance with a high flash point and high specific gravity, like vanilla, requires a hotter burn. But, low flash point scents with low specific gravity, like citrus, need a smaller wick. Also, you may hear the terms “wick up’ and “wick down” when talking about find the right wick size. Wick down means that you should use a wick that is smaller than what you have been using and wick up means that you should use a wick that is larger than what you use for candles this size.

Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Stop a Candle From Tunneling?Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Stop a Candle From Tunneling?

If you don’t know, tunneling is often the answer for the question, “Why isn’t my candle wax not burning evenly all of the way down?” Tunneling can happen for a few reasons, which includes issues with wick size. If your wick is too small for the diameter of your candle, then it will not burn all the way to the outside edge. So, you may either need a larger wick, multiple wicks, or a different type of wick that will burn hotter.

However, there are a few other issues that could cause tunneling. If you think your wick is the right size, then look into some of these potential issues, First, you may have a clogged wick, which can cause uneven burning. Also, it could be that you didn’t do a memory burn for the candle’s first use to ensure a proper burn. Finally, you may need to use a wax that has a lower melt point that is easier for you chosen wick to handle.

Candle Making Terminology: Why Are My Candle Jars Black After I Burn My Candles?

Often, this occurs when you wick is too big for your jar or your wick is too long. If your wick is trimmed down to 1/4 inch, then the length is fine. You can check the suggested radius for your wick to see if you need to get a smaller size. Also, using too much fragrance can clog the wick and cause more soot than normal.

Candle Making Terminology: Do Candle Wicks Contain Lead?

No, candle wicks in the Unites States, like ours, do not contain lead. In fact, lead core wicks were banned in the US in 2003.

Candle Making Terminology: Proper Burning

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Memory Burn?

This is the first burn of your candles and is the most important. This burn will set the boundary of your melt pool and will determines whether the edges of your candle will be reached. A guide is to burn an hour for every inch your candle is wide to ensure that it will burn properly as it is used in future burns. Also, you will want to make sure that you wick isn’t too low and isn’t longer than 1/4 inch high.

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Melt Pool Mean?

Melt Pool is the candle wax that has melted on the top of the candle. Ideally, you will want this to be all the way across the top of your candle to ensure an even burn.

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Mushrooming Mean in Candle Making?

When I notice black clumps on top of my wick, I know that it is mushrooming. While all wick produce this carbon as they burn, some are worse than others. Also, factors that clog the wick can increase the mushrooming effect. The CD wicks produce the least amount of mushrooming, but there isn’t a way to completely stop it due to it being a product of burning the wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Coloring

Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Color a Candle?Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Color a Candle?

There are a few different candle colorant options for your home made candles. First, you can use our Liquid Candle Dyes, which are extremely concentrated and will last a long time. Also, you can use a color block, which is made with paraffin, vegan, and can color up to 15 pounds of wax. Lastly, you can use a bit of powder dye. Just be careful not to use too much because it can clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Can You Use Crayons to Make Candles?

We do not suggest using crayons to color candles. They don’t burn properly and are likely to clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a UV Light Inhibitor?Candle Making Terminology: What is a UV Light Inhibitor?

Since UV light from the sun can bleach the color out of candles, the UV light inhibitor is used to protect the color of your candles. This candle ingredient is most useful for preventing fading in burgundy, blue, and violet candle colors due to direct sunlight.

Candle Making Terminology: How Do I Color My Candles White?

While titanium dioxide can be used to create white pillar candles, you don’t want to add it straight to your container candles as it can clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Apearance

Candle Making Terminology: How Do I Get Rid of Wet Spots on My Candles?

Wet spots are air pockets that are formed when your candle didn’t adhere properly to your candle jar. You can take a few steps to prevent this if you are having problems. First, try warming your candle jars to give you wax more time to cool. Also, you can try pouring your wax at a hotter temperature. Another good tip is to make sure the room your are making your candles in a room that is warm.

Candle Making Terminology: What Is Frosting In Candle Making?

Frosting is the white stuff that appears on waxes that contain soy wax. You can use a heat gun or blow dryer to re-melt the surface and give it a smoother finish. While you can lessen the effect of frosting, you can’t eliminate it completely.

Candle Making Terminology: What Are Jump Lines?

These are the line that you can see on the side of either a container candle or a pillar candle.

Candle Making Terminology: Progression of Candles

As you can tell, there is a lot that goes into candle making. But, it is a process that has been developed overtime and takes time to master. If you are interested in learning a bit about the evolution of candles, then check out The History of Candles from Prehistoric Times Until Now by Pioneer Thinking.

Candle Making Terminology: Talk to UsCandle Making Terminology: Talk to Us

If you have any more questions about candle making, you can look at our candle making classes or just ask us! We are on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter (@ngscents).

Sep
06

Breaking Into the Candle Making Business


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joy wax kit

Breaking Into the Candle Making Business

Hello again everyone! For all you new crafters out there, are you looking for an easy way to get yourself into the candle business? Or maybe you’re a recent college graduate looking to get into candle making on the side as a way to help pay off those hefty loans? Well here at Nature’s Garden, we are always trying our best to make everything as easy as possible for our customers! We want all of you to be able to let your creativity shine, not just sitting at your computer wondering how in the world to get started.

First, let me explain a little bit about how our website works to make it all the more easier for you. On the top left corner of our homepage, it says Candle Supplies. Go to Candle Supplies and that will show you the categories for all of our candle making supplies. One of the easiest ways for beginners to break into the business is by purchasing our candle making kits. Candle Making Kits is one of the categories included in Candle Supplies. Almost if not all of the products you will need and a complete set of instructions are included in each kit. How awesome is that?! Our goal is to do whatever it takes to help you succeed in your business, and it doesn’t get any easier than complete kits! You also have the option to go through all of the categories in Candle Supplies and purchase all of the items separately from each other.

Now it’s time to get down to business and start making those candles, people! If you scroll down a little bit on our Homepage, you will see a section that is titled Free Support. There we offer FREE candle making classes as well as a free candle making manual that Debbie wrote herself! If you did not purchase a kit and bought your products separately, we offer free candle making recipes as well! There is plenty of variety there, from Christmas candle recipes to animal print candle recipes. We want you to be successful at any and everything! On top of all that awesomeness, we also offer free marketing help! While you are starting your business, you should definitely take the time to check that out!

When you feel you are ready to begin selling your candles, please don’t hesitate to come to us with any questions you may have! I hope that everything on our site has made it easy as pie to help you start your own business! Or if you’re that recent grad I talked about earlier, it is such an easy and fun way to help you make extra cash to start paying off those loans! We feel you are a huge part of our family, which is why at Nature’s Garden we specifically sell ingredients only because we want our customers to be successful in selling their finished product. See how easy it is to break into the candle making business? Easy as 1, 2, 3! If you want to get started right this moment, make sure to check out those candle making kits first! And don’t forget to keep checking the blog for more Enlightened by Layla postings!

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Jan
03

Candle Burning


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candle burn Candle Burning

Regardless of whether you are making candles for personal use, gifts, or to earn extra income; candles are flammable.  You always want to make sure that you have taken all the right measures to ensure the safest candle possible.  Not only is candle safety important to the crafter, but it is also just as important to the person that burns the candle.

Here are some great tips for burning candles, the best way to extinguish a candle, and what to do if your candle wax is on fire.

Candle Burning and Maintenance:

Always before lighting your candle; trim the wick!  You never want your wick to be longer than ¼ inch.  Also, when lighting your candle, do not throw the wick trimming into the candle.  You want to keep your candle free of any and all debris such as:  dust, wick trimmings, matches, ect.  You want your candle pool to be scented wax only.

Keep your wick straight.  Once your wick has been trimmed, you will want to pull it straight.  If your wick is bent, your wick will burn hotter than regular.  This will result in a quicker burn time of your candle.

When it is time to extinguish your candle, always use a snuffer.  A candle snuffer is the easiest and safest way to put out a flame.  Using a snuffer will prevent hot wax splatter.  Candle wax is hot, you never want to touch it, or get wax splatter on you or surfaces in your home.

Never put a candle flame out with water.  Water can cause the hot wax in your candles to splatter.  There is also a chance that the glass container of your candle may also break.

If after lighting your candle, you notice the wick flickering, smoking, or the flame of your candle becomes too large; the candle is not functioning properly.  Extinguish the flame, let the candle cool, trim your wick to ¼ inch, check the rooms for drafts, and then re-light.

After a candle has been burned to the point where there is only 1/2 inch of wax left in the bottom of the container, stop burning.  The candle is now finished.  Never burn a candle all the way down.

For Candle Making Purposes: 

For your candle making area, it is wise to purchase a dry chemical fire extinguisher in case of any fires.  If you do have a wax fire, the dry chemical extinguisher or baking soda should be used to suffocate the flames.  Never use water to put out a wax fire.

Jan
02

Oil in Candle


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candle making questionsCandle Making Questions:

Why is there excess oil in candle?  Sometimes when making candles, your finished product may have excess oil in it.   This oil slick may be along the edges, on the top, or at the bottom of your candle.  This oil is actually fragrance oil.  Excess fragrance oil in the candle containers is a tell tale sign that too much fragrance oil was used in the candle making process.

How to Solve It!  Sticking to the recommended usage suggestion for fragrance oil per type of wax is the smartest move, especially if you are new to candle making.  Another early warning sign to prevent oil in your finished candle happens during the pour steps.  When pouring the wax into the containers, if you notice an “oil slick” in the bottom of your pouring pot, stop the pour before the oil comes out.  If there is any leftover fragrance oil that the wax did not absorb initially, the wax will not absorb it in your container either.

To view other candle making questions and common troubleshooting tips for candle making, please click on this link to see the full Natures Garden’s Common Candle Making Mistakes Guide.

Dec
29

Soy Candles


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Soy wax Candles Anyone who works with soy wax knows that candles produced with this wax will have great cold throw.  Cold throw is the scent of the candle when it is not lit.  Typically with soy wax, this throw will always be strong.  However, when it comes to hot throw with soy wax you may be left desiring more.

Why does my candle not have hot throw?

When using soy wax to craft your candles, a lack of hot throw is just the nature of the wax.  However, it could be possible that there was not enough fragrance or scent added to the melted wax.  When it comes to adding the scent to the wax, temperature is everything; and be careful not to add the fragrance when the temperature is too high.  Finally, the last thing to consider is the wick.  This will also have a direct effect on the hot throw in your candle.

How to Solve It

If you are just not satisfied with the hot throw of your soy candles and have carefully examined all of the possible problems that may have inhibited your hot scent throw; you may want to consider changing your wax.   Paraffin based waxes have very strong hot throw.  You can also switch your wax to a blend of both soy and paraffin.  Natures Garden’s Joy Wax is a great example of this blend; providing candles with excellent hot and cold throw.

With soy wax, you are able to add up to 1.5 ounces of fragrance oil per pound of soy wax.  This fragrance load will provide the best possible scent for soy wax candles.  Also, if you are interested in seeing if a fragrance oil performs in soy wax, check out the fragrance oil’s customer reviews.  People often post what medium they used the fragrance oil in, especially if it works in soy wax.

Also, when making candles, waxes vary in the degree in which you can add the fragrance.  If you are noticing that your candles are not producing a strong enough hot throw, you may want to lower the temperature at which you add the fragrance oil.  It can be possible that some of the fragrance is burning off simply by the heat of the melted wax.  Adding your fragrance at too high of a temperature will do this.

Selecting a hotter burning wick for your candles will also help with a candle’s hot throw.  Some great hotter burning wicks to select from are Hemp or CD wicks.  But as always, testing is key.

Aug
22

What should I charge for my candles?


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candle price

Customers frequently ask us this question:  What should I charge my customers for my candles? 

This is a question that many candle makers often ask.  Knowing what to charge for your candles is a pivotal point in your business.  You want your price of the candles that you sell to be competitive.  You also want to remember that the candle price should also reflect not only your cost but the time that you put into your candle making procedure as well.

What to charge for my candles?  When I made and sold finished candles, I had an easy equation that I used to figure out the price I would charge my customers for my candles.  First, I added up all of my expenses.  This told me how much it cost me to make the candle I was going to sell.  When I sold my candles at wholesale prices to stores, I charged the customer double what I paid to make the candle.  When I sold directly to retail customers myself (without sales reps involved), I charged the customer triple what I paid to make the candle.

After I was in business a while, I realized that in order to sell more products, I would need to get help from other people.  That is where Independent Sales Reps were introduced in my candle company.  When a candle sale was made by a sales rep, the sales rep received 1/3 of every sale, 1/3 went to cover the cost of making the candle, and 1/3 was my profit.

Fundraisers were conducted the very same way:  1/3 of the sale went to the non-profit organization, 1/3 went to cover the cost of making the products, and 1/3 went to me as profit.

To view how hiring an independent sales rep for your business can help to increase your sales, please click on this link.

I hope this helps you when you price out your candles.

Happy Candle Making!

Deborah of Natures Garden

Aug
21

How much candle wax do I need to fill my jars?


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candle wax

 

How much candle wax do I need to fill my jars? 

One of the most frequent questions we are asked by new candle makers is:  How much candle wax will I need to fill my jars?  And, the solution is really simple to find out with this equation.

Basically, you will find that 1 pound (by weight) of candle wax will equal 20 ounces (in volume) when pouring into containers or molds.  With this knowledge, you can use simple math to figure out how much candle wax you will need to fill your containers or molds.

Take for example that you are making 6 oz. hexagon container candles for a wedding.  For this order, you have to make a total of 200 wedding candles.  The question you are asking yourself is, “how much candle wax will you need to fill all 200- 6oz. jars”?  Here is the equation to figure it out:  Take 200 x 6 to come up with your total weighted ounces.  For this example, the answer is equal to 1200 ounces.  Now, you must divide your total weighted ounces (1200 ounces) by 20 (volume ounces) to find out the total pounds of wax you will need for your wedding (60 pounds of wax).

Let’s try one more example since the 16oz. jar size is one of the most popular sized jars that candle makers sell.  Now, you want to make 24 candles, all of which will be poured into 16 oz. jars.  This equation would compute to:  24 (the amount you have to make) x 16 (the ounce size of the jar)= 384 (the total number of ounces).  Now take 384 and divide this by 20 (the volume) and the answer you get is 19.2 pounds of wax (thus you should likely get 20 pounds of wax to cover yourself.

Remember the equation:  Number of Candles you want to make  (multiplied by)  Volume of your containers  (divided by)  20 = Total number of pounds of wax you will need to do your project.

We hope that this simple equation will help you figure out how much wax you will need in the future.

Happy Candle Making!

Deborah of Natures Garden