Tag Archives: candle coloring

Jun
14

Candle Making Terminology


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Candle Making TerminologyCandle Making Terminology

We at Natures Garden know that there is a lot of candle making terminology and techniques that you need to know to make great homemade candles. So, we are going to answer some common candle making questions and problems to make your experience more fun. So, set aside your candle making equipment and let’s figure out how to make gorgeous scented candles!

Candle Making Terminology: Types of Candles

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Pillar Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Pillar Candle?

Pillar candles are free-standing candles that don’t require a container. These often use a harder type of candle wax that is made for creating pillar candles, like Pillar of Bliss Wax or Palm Pillar Wax.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Votive Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Votive Candle?

Votive Candles are a smaller kind of candle. The average size is 1.5 ounces and they are about two inches tall and one and a half inches wide. These are often made with a Votive Mold.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Tealight Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Tealight Candle?

Tea Lights are very small candles that are about an inch and a half wide and a half inch tall. They can be made in Tea Light Cups .

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Fragrances

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Fragrance Load Mean?

In candle making, fragrance load refers to the amount of fragrance oil that you are using in your homemade candle recipe.

Candle Making Terminology: My Candle Wax Will Hold a 10% Fragrance Load. How Do I Know How Much to Add?Candle Making Terminology: My Candle Wax Will Hold a 10% Fragrance Load. How Do I Know How Much to Add?

All you need to do is some simple math that we will walk you through! First, weigh the amount of candle wax you are using. Then, multiply this amount by 0.10, which is 10% to determine the amount of fragrance oil that you can use.

  • Formula: Candle Wax Weight X Fragrance Percentage = Amount of Fragrance That Can Be Added
  • Example: 20 (ounces of candle wax) X 0.10 = 2 ounces of fragrance oil So, since your candle wax is in ounces, the fragrance amount that can be added to the candle wax will also be in ounces.
Candle Making Terminology: What Does Scent Throw Mean?

The scent throw is the strength of fragrance that the candle releases into the air. Cold throw is the strength of scent when the candle is not lit yet. Hot throw is the strength of the scent throw when the candle is lit and burning.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Waxes

Candle Making Terminology: What Kind of Wax Should I Use for Candles?Candle Making Terminology: What Kind of Wax Should I Use for Candles?

Choosing a candle wax type depends on the type of candle that you want to create. So, the isn’t a universal answer to the question, “Which is the best wax for candle making?” For example, pillar candles would require a pillar wax, which includes Pillar of Bliss Candle Wax and Palm Pillar Wax. The Pillar of Bliss Wax is a blend of soy and paraffin that has a great scent throw and a creamy finish. The Palm Pillar Wax has a crystal finish, has a wonderful scent throw, and comes form sustainable sources.

However, container candles would be best with a container wax, which includes soy wax, Joy wax, WOW Wax, palm wax, and gel wax. Soy wax would make a great, inexpensive addition to your natural candle making supplies. It has a clean burn and and excellent cold throw, but it can be tricky to get a good hot throw from certain fragrances. Wow wax is mostly paraffin and has an amazing hot throw, but has a less clean burn. Joy wax is a perfect blend of paraffin wax and soy wax, as well as veggie wax and proprietary ingredients, that provides a cleaner burn with an amazing scent throw. Gel wax has a neat translucent look, but is not compatible with all fragrance oils. Our palm wax comes from sustainable sources that aren’t harming the rainforest, has a beautiful crystal appearance, and a great scent throw.

Candle Making Terminology: What is Granulated Wax?Candle Making Terminology: What is Granulated Wax?

Simply, this is wax that is grainy and looks kind of like sand. This wax can be scented and colored without melting, so it is a easy and fun way to create candles with kids. We have made candle recipes like the Bacon Candle Recipe and the Hydrangea Candle Recipe with this type of wax.

Candle Making Terminology: Crucial Temperatures

Candle Making Terminology: Do I Need to Worry About the Temperatures When Making Candles?Candle Making Terminology: Do I Need to Worry About the Temperatures When Making Candles?

Yes, this is very important for creating quality homemade candles! There are a few key moments where you will need a thermometer to be aware of the temperature of your wax. First, you need to make sure that your fragrance oil isn’t added at a temperature that is too hot. If your fragrance is added at a temperature that is too high, then some of the notes may burn off and leave you with a less satisfying scent. Another issue is pouring your wax into the container too soon. If you pour at a temperature that is too cool, you could have improper adhesion, wet spots, sinking, and other issues. So, be sure to check your wax’s description to see the temperature that is should be poured.

Candle Making Terminology: What does sinkhole mean?

Sinkhole is a hole or cavity that appears on your candle as it is setting up. Often, this occurs when the candle wax is poured at too low of a temperature.

Candle Making Terminology: Can You Cool a Candle in the Fridge?Candle Making Terminology: Can You Cool a Candle in the Fridge?

No, candles should cool as slowly as possible on their own. If you place a candle in the fridge to cool, they may not adhere to the glass properly, which can lead to wet spots.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Wicks

Candle Making Terminology: Choosing the Right WickCandle Making Terminology: Choosing the Right Wick

The size of your wick depends on the diameter of your container. You can see the radius for each wick under it’s description. However, you will still need to test because there are many variable between wax type and fragrance oil. A fragrance with a high flash point and high specific gravity, like vanilla, requires a hotter burn. But, low flash point scents with low specific gravity, like citrus, need a smaller wick. Also, you may hear the terms “wick up’ and “wick down” when talking about find the right wick size. Wick down means that you should use a wick that is smaller than what you have been using and wick up means that you should use a wick that is larger than what you use for candles this size.

Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Stop a Candle From Tunneling?Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Stop a Candle From Tunneling?

If you don’t know, tunneling is often the answer for the question, “Why isn’t my candle wax not burning evenly all of the way down?” Tunneling can happen for a few reasons, which includes issues with wick size. If your wick is too small for the diameter of your candle, then it will not burn all the way to the outside edge. So, you may either need a larger wick, multiple wicks, or a different type of wick that will burn hotter.

However, there are a few other issues that could cause tunneling. If you think your wick is the right size, then look into some of these potential issues, First, you may have a clogged wick, which can cause uneven burning. Also, it could be that you didn’t do a memory burn for the candle’s first use to ensure a proper burn. Finally, you may need to use a wax that has a lower melt point that is easier for you chosen wick to handle.

Candle Making Terminology: Why Are My Candle Jars Black After I Burn My Candles?

Often, this occurs when you wick is too big for your jar or your wick is too long. If your wick is trimmed down to 1/4 inch, then the length is fine. You can check the suggested radius for your wick to see if you need to get a smaller size. Also, using too much fragrance can clog the wick and cause more soot than normal.

Candle Making Terminology: Do Candle Wicks Contain Lead?

No, candle wicks in the Unites States, like ours, do not contain lead. In fact, lead core wicks were banned in the US in 2003.

Candle Making Terminology: Proper Burning

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Memory Burn?

This is the first burn of your candles and is the most important. This burn will set the boundary of your melt pool and will determines whether the edges of your candle will be reached. A guide is to burn an hour for every inch your candle is wide to ensure that it will burn properly as it is used in future burns. Also, you will want to make sure that you wick isn’t too low and isn’t longer than 1/4 inch high.

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Melt Pool Mean?

Melt Pool is the candle wax that has melted on the top of the candle. Ideally, you will want this to be all the way across the top of your candle to ensure an even burn.

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Mushrooming Mean in Candle Making?

When I notice black clumps on top of my wick, I know that it is mushrooming. While all wick produce this carbon as they burn, some are worse than others. Also, factors that clog the wick can increase the mushrooming effect. The CD wicks produce the least amount of mushrooming, but there isn’t a way to completely stop it due to it being a product of burning the wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Coloring

Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Color a Candle?Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Color a Candle?

There are a few different candle colorant options for your home made candles. First, you can use our Liquid Candle Dyes, which are extremely concentrated and will last a long time. Also, you can use a color block, which is made with paraffin, vegan, and can color up to 15 pounds of wax. Lastly, you can use a bit of powder dye. Just be careful not to use too much because it can clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Can You Use Crayons to Make Candles?

We do not suggest using crayons to color candles. They don’t burn properly and are likely to clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a UV Light Inhibitor?Candle Making Terminology: What is a UV Light Inhibitor?

Since UV light from the sun can bleach the color out of candles, the UV light inhibitor is used to protect the color of your candles. This candle ingredient is most useful for preventing fading in burgundy, blue, and violet candle colors due to direct sunlight.

Candle Making Terminology: How Do I Color My Candles White?

While titanium dioxide can be used to create white pillar candles, you don’t want to add it straight to your container candles as it can clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Apearance

Candle Making Terminology: How Do I Get Rid of Wet Spots on My Candles?

Wet spots are air pockets that are formed when your candle didn’t adhere properly to your candle jar. You can take a few steps to prevent this if you are having problems. First, try warming your candle jars to give you wax more time to cool. Also, you can try pouring your wax at a hotter temperature. Another good tip is to make sure the room your are making your candles in a room that is warm.

Candle Making Terminology: What Is Frosting In Candle Making?

Frosting is the white stuff that appears on waxes that contain soy wax. You can use a heat gun or blow dryer to re-melt the surface and give it a smoother finish. While you can lessen the effect of frosting, you can’t eliminate it completely.

Candle Making Terminology: What Are Jump Lines?

These are the line that you can see on the side of either a container candle or a pillar candle.

Candle Making Terminology: Progression of Candles

As you can tell, there is a lot that goes into candle making. But, it is a process that has been developed overtime and takes time to master. If you are interested in learning a bit about the evolution of candles, then check out The History of Candles from Prehistoric Times Until Now by Pioneer Thinking.

Candle Making Terminology: Talk to UsCandle Making Terminology: Talk to Us

If you have any more questions about candle making, you can look at our candle making classes or just ask us! We are on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter (@ngscents).

Sep
17

Aspen Winter Fragrance


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Aspen Winter FragranceAspen Winter Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Aspen, Colorado is the ideal location for a destination vacation — for your nose! (Probably the rest of you, too, but it’s about a five hour flight from Cleveland, Ohio to Aspen, so I’m gonna stay put and just smell the scent.) A beautiful town located in the Rocky Mountains, Aspen is a popular ski resort, and it seems that the only times it doesn’t snow there are the summer months July and August. It’s even been home to the Winter X Games since 2002 (extreme sports – ESPN in Aspen). Aspen is ideal for winter sports because there’s so much snow! This scent will evoke the feeling of standing on a snowy mountain top, overlooking the beautiful Colorado landscape, without having to bundle up!

What Does Aspen Winter Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

The aroma of crisp citrus notes of orange and lemon and sweet cherry, intertwining with an abundance of warm winter spices of clove and cinnamon, sitting on a dry down of sweet vanilla and musk.
Top notes: Orange, lemon, and cherry
Mid notes:  Clove, cinnamon, and spice
Base notes:  vanilla and musk

How Do Our Customers Use Aspen Winter Fragrance Oil?

They surround themselves with this sweet, spicy scent by making darling decorative candles. Aspen Winter performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax and is nice and strong in soy wax. Unfortunately, it is not gel wax compatible. The maximum recommended usage percentage in vegetable and paraffin waxes is 10%. Our coloring suggestions for candles are to use 3 drops of blue liquid candle dye per four pounds of wax or shred a small about of blue color block into your melted wax. Remember to never use crayons to color your candles- they’ll clog your wick!

They also scent rooms in simpler ways (sans wax). The maximum recommended usage percentage for this crisp accord in incense & potpourri is 50%. This fragrance comes across nice and strong in aroma beads and would make a nice filler for any reed diffuser kit.

You can clean with it, too! The maximum recommended usage percentage in cleaning products is 5%.

Customers use this scent to create beautiful bath and body products. Aspen Winter performed well in bath and body products. The maximum recommended usage percentage for this full-bodied fragrance in soaps, bath oils, and bath gels is 5%. Our cold process soap testing results found that Aspen Winter has perfect pour: no acceleration, no ricing, and no separation. The scent stays nice and strong after cure. It does, however, discolor soap to a dark chocolate color. This is likely due to the 12% vanillin content of the fragrance. High vanillin content increases the likelihood of discoloration in bath and body products. One way to combat discoloration is to try Vanilla White Color Stabilizer, but you are responsible for the results in your finished products. Otherwise, our coloring suggestions for bath and body products are to use blue soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you. Never color your bath and body products with candle dye; don’t do it!

As for the shape of your soap, you’re welcome to make it in any shape you like- but how cute would little Aspen-Winter-scented snowflake soaps be? We’ve got a medium-sized snowflake soap mold perfect for melt-and-pour soap, and we also have a mini-snowflake mold for mini-snowflake soaps (or even mini-snowflake candle tarts)!

Customers also use this scent in body applications outside of the bath. The maximum recommended usage percentage for this spicy scent in lotions and perfumes is 5%. This fragrance performed perfectly in perfumes.

Aug
31

Apple Happy Camper Candy Fragrance


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Apple Happy Camper Candy FragranceApple Happy Camper Candy Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Try saying that three times fast; it’s a mouthful! Apple Happy Camper Candy is fun to say, delicious to eat, and makes a great fragrance oil for use in all of your homemade products! You probably already know, but remember to never eat fragrance oil, and keep this away from your kids in case they mistake it for actual candy. It does smell just like the real thing- so that could be an easy mistake to make. But now you can take this sweet scent and use it in your home decor and fantastic bath and body products. Feel the joy of eating delicious green apple candy whenever you light a candle or use homemade soap!

What Does Apple Happy Camper Candy Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

Tempt your taste buds with the aroma of tangy yet sweet green apple goodness that will remind you of the sour green apple candy you enjoyed during childhood.

Top Notes: Tart Green Apple, Pineapple, Peach
Middle Notes: Juicy Pear, Nectarine, Strawberry
Base Notes: Banana, Apple Blossoms, Vanilla Bean

Best of all- it’s a Nature’s Garden original scent!

How Do Our Customers Use Apple Happy Camper Candy Fragrance Oil?

Candles, of course! This appetizing apple aroma performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. Unfortunately, this fun fragrance is not gel wax compatible. The maximum recommended usage percentage in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. Our coloring recommendations for candles are to use one drop of green liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax or to shred an ample amount of green color block into your melted wax. The childlike wonder that this scent inspires may ignite the desire to color your candles with crayons- but don’t! Coloring with crayons will clog the wick- for best results use dye or color block.

Soaps, silly! This energetic essence performs well in bath and body products. Use them in the shower to awaken that inner sugar rush without the tummy ache! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this overjoyed odor in soaps, bath oils, bath gels, and cleaning products is 5%. Our cold process soap testing results found no acceleration, no ricing, no separation, very strong scent retention, and slight discoloration to a light tan. To see exactly what I mean- check out the fragrance oil page or watch our CP soap testing video– results included! The vanillin content of this fragrance is 0.4%, so it may have a tendency to discolor your bath and body products. Vanilla White Color Stabilizer may help combat this problem, but you are ultimately responsible for the results. Our coloring recommendations for soaps are to use green soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you.

Lovely lotions and pretty perfumes! This fun fragrance performs perfectly in perfumes. The maximum recommended usage percentage in lotions and perfumes is 5%.

And finally, refreshing room scents! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this amazing apple aura in incense and potpourri is 50%. The sweet scent comes across nice and strong in aroma beads.

Aug
27

Apple Cinnamon – Body Safe Fragrance


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Apple Cinnamon - Body Safe FragranceApple Cinnamon – Body Safe Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Finally done with almond scents, we move onto apple fragrances. Trust me, there are plenty more apple fragrance blogs to come. But why wouldn’t there be? Apples smell absolutely delicious. Not to mention the taste, but no matter how good fragrance oil smells, we never eat it. Apple Cinnamon – Body Safe is a perfect autumn aroma. As fall approaches, it’s heartwarming to smell the sweet, spicy scent of apples and cinnamon, reminiscent of a nice, hot cup of apple cider.

What Does Apple Cinnamon – Body Safe Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

If you’re looking for a wonderful blend of apples and cinnamon without an overkill of bakery base notes, then our apple cinnamon fragrance oil is just for you!  The aroma of a red juicy McIntosh apple, sprinkled with freshly ground cinnamon sticks.  Best of all, this fragrance is body safe!  It is both an NG Original Scent and a best seller!

How Do Our Customers Use Apple Cinnamon – Body Safe Fragrance Oil?

Candles, of course. This apple cinnamon aroma is ideal for creating succulently-scented decorative candles. Apple Cinnamon fragrance oil performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. The maximum recommended usage percentage in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. Apple Cinnamon – Body Safe is not gel wax compatible (but it is body safe- and we’ll get to that). Our coloring recommendations for candles are to use two drops of red liquid candle dye and two drops of brown liquid candle dye per four pounds of wax or shred a small amount of cinnamon color block into your melted wax.

Surely they make sweetly, spicy-scented soaps, and other bath and body products. This is where the “body safe” part is important. The maximum recommended usage percentage for this fruity fall fragrance in soaps, bath oils, bath gels, and cleaning products is 5%. We’ve found that Apple Cinnamon – Body Safe performed well in bath and body products. Our cold process soap testing results found that in CP soap, Apple Cinnamon – Body Safe caused slight acceleration, no ricing, no separation, and discolors to a light beige, with good scent retention. Our coloring recommendations for soap are: use red soap dye in the amount that satisfies you (of our four red soap colorants, I would recommend Tomato Red or Red Oxide- but it’s ultimately your decision, so do whatever you’d like!)

We’ve got this awesome 3D Apple Mold (that I’m going to be pushing a lot with all of the upcoming apple aromas) that you can use to make life-sized apple soaps! You could even get crafty and use this mold to make an apple-shaped candle. Simply use wick pins in the mold while pouring your wax (I’m not sure how simple it is, I just thought it was a neat idea, maybe someday I will have time to test it out! I’ll get back to you on that.)

This amazing autumn aroma is also perfect for perfumes and lotions. It performed perfectly in perfume and the maximum recommended usage percentage for lotions and perfumes is 5%.

Why not fill your whole house with this sweet cinnamon scent? The maximum recommended usage percentage for Apple Cinnamon – Body Safe fragrance oil in incense and potpourri is 50%. It comes across nice and strong in aroma beads.

Aug
19

Antique Lace Fragrance


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Antique Lace FragranceAntique Lace Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Lace itself is already quite delicate, but antique lace, made by intricate handiwork, is even more fragile. There are two main types of handmade lace: bobbin lace and needle lace. In bobbin lace, threads wound around bobbins are twisted and braided and then the pattern is set by pinning the weaving to a pillow. Needle lace, as the name implies, is made using a needle and thread. This is another scent inspired by something that takes an abundance of time and painstaking effort to make, but only seconds to smell! This fragrance captures the exquisite beauty of lace and softly ages it with a down of musk. The aroma alone will make you feel absolutely elegant.

What Does Antique Lace Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

Antique Lace is the romantic scent of jasmine and fresh vanilla beans, with a base note of musk.  It’s even an NG Original Fragrance!

How Do Our Customers Use Antique Lace Fragrance Oil?

They make beautiful candles with a floral, musky aroma. Antique Lace scent performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. The maximum recommended usage percentage in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. Unfortunately, this scent is not gel wax compatible. Our coloring recommendations for candles are two drops of our Spectrum purple liquid candle dye per four pounds of wax, or shred a small amount of purple color block into your melted wax. I’m not entirely sure why we recommend purple- it’s pretty? It’s noble? I recommend no color. The lace is white, right? And jasmine flowers are white. And vanilla is.. almost white. I say give it that “antique white” tint with a very, very small amount of yellow or brown liquid candle dye or shredded yellow or brown color block. Remember never to use crayons to color candles- it’ll clog up your wick!

They also make sensuously-scented soaps. The maximum recommended usage percentage for this luscious Antique Lace scent in soaps, bath oils, bath gels, and cleaning products is 5%. Antique Lace fragrance oil has a vanillin content of 6%- so it will likely discolor your bath and body products. Our cold process soap testing results showed that Antique Lace caused acceleration and slight ricing in CP soap, but no separation and the finished soap was beautiful. The cured soap had discolored to a dark chocolate color and maintained good scent retention. To eliminate unwanted discoloration, we recommend trying out our Vanilla White Color Stabilizer. It is your responsibility to test it in your finished products. Our coloring recommendations for bath and body products are: use as much purple soap dye as you want!

They also use this idyllic aroma to create lotions and perfumes. Antique Lace fragrance performed perfectly in perfume and the maximum recommended usage percentage for lotions and perfumes is 5%.

This alluring aura is also ideal for scenting rooms. It is nice and strong in aroma beads and the maximum recommended usage percentage for Antique Lace in incense and potpourri is 50%.

 

Aug
13

Alyssum Fragrance


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Alyssum FragranceAlyssum Fragrance Oil – Spotlight

FLOWERS! There are well over 100 different species of this one genus of flower. The most popular type of Alyssum flower is ‘sweet alyssum’ or Lobularia maritima (formerly known as Alyssum maritimum– so no longer technically of the genus Alyssum. I’m sorry if you’re a stickler for the technicalities of plant biology- I’m sure we have another fragrance with a more appropriate name that you might enjoy- Hyacinth, maybe? But I’m sure if you’re a plant biologist you’ve got bigger things on your hands.) Anyway, flowers. They’re cute lil flowers and they smell good. They’re also tough, both heat- and drought-resistant. They can be white, pink, rose-red, or lilac. Caterpillars eat their leaves- it’s adorable, like a children’s book.

What Does Alyssum Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

The wonderful aroma of freshly picked alyssum flowers. Boom. That’s it. Done. Pure and simple.

How Do Our Customers Use Alyssum Fragrance Oil?

I’m glad you asked. They make candles: Alyssum fragrance oil performs perfectly in joy wax, wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax.  The recommended maximum usage percentage in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. Candle coloring recommendations: two drops of purple liquid candle dye per four pounds of wax or shred a small amount of purple color block into your wax. (I’m gonna go rogue here and suggest pink [the fragrance picture is pink for cornsake]- use a small amount of red liquid candle dye or shred a small amount of red color block into your melted wax. Pink is just light red. Err on the side of caution- you can always add more coloring, but you can’t take dye out of your wax.)

For soap makers: the maximum recommended usage percentage in bath gels, soaps, bath oils, and cleaning products is 5%! Alyssum fragrance does have a vanillin content of 6%- so keep an eye out for discoloration in these types of products. (You’re welcome to try our Vanilla White Color Stabilizer– but we can’t make any guarantees- you have to test it for yourself in your products!) This fragrance performed well in bath and body products. Our cold process soap testing found that Alyssum fragrance oil results in no ricing and no separation. It did however, cause the CP soap to accelerate slightly and discolored the soap to a yellow/orange color. But the scent stayed nice and strong. Our soap coloring recommendations are also purple: use all the purple soap dye you want (or whatever color- *ahem* pink- I’m not here to tell you how to live your life.. or.. dye your soap.) We’ve also got all kinds of cute flower-shaped soap molds! Big ones– like in our CP soap testing videos, little ones, and these ones. We’ve also got a daisy-shaped soap punch (again, apologies to the stickler plant biologists).

The maximum recommended usage percentage for Alyssum fragrance oil in lotions and perfumes is 5% and we have found that it performs perfectly.

Room scents? Oh yeah, for sure. Maximum recommended usage percentage in incense and potpourri: 50%. Alyssum fragrance is nice and strong in aroma beads.

Aug
12

Amish Quilt Fragrance


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Amish Quilt Fragrance OilAmish Quilt Fragrance – Spotlight

Here we are, talking about the Amish again. Well, here I am again, typing about this interesting group of people who will never see my blog posts. (Again- if you’re Amish and reading this, email me at [email protected] and please explain to me how that works.) Another throwback to a simpler time, Amish quilts are handmade and are usually a gift to mark a significant event- a marriage, the birth of a baby, etc. These were traditionally given within the community, but high demand from outsiders (apparently people started snatching Amish quilts right off of clotheslines in the 1970’s) created the need for production of Amish quilts to sell to the population at large. They are still very carefully crafted as if they were for a close personal relative, and the high quality of the materials makes them suitable for both daily use and passing down as family heirlooms. You can use that sucker every day and still give it to your kids, or their kids, or their kids’ kids- that’s how much time, effort, love, and quality is packed into these babies. True to form, individual Amish or Mennonite women only make one or two of these quilts a year (and people were STEALING them! HOW RUDE!) Wrap yourself in the warmth of a homey handmade quilt by using this fragrance in your favorite products.

What Does Amish Quilt Fragrance Smell Like?

This fragrance is the tender sun-kissed florals of heliotrope and jasmine, softly blended with woody violet and herbaceous anise to create a cozy scent of pure comfort.

How Do Our Customers Use Amish Quilt Fragrance Oil?

For candle making, Amish Quilt fragrance performs perfectly in joy wax, wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. The maximum recommended usage percentage in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. Amish Quilt fragrance IS gel wax compatible! For coloring your candles, we recommend using four drops of teal liquid candle dye or a small amount of shredded teal color block per four pounds of wax. Why teal? I dunno, man, don’t ask me- I just work here. But if I had to take a guess I would say it’s because teal is a calming color and this is a comfy, cozy scent. Amish quilts come in all kinds of crazy colors so I say use which ever colors you want! Make crazy patterns if you feel so inclined, as long as it’s made with love.

For soap making, the maximum recommended usage percentage in bath oils, soaps, bath gels, and cleaning products is 5%. Amish Quilt fragrance performed well in bath & products and our cold process soap testing results show no ricing, no separation, no acceleration and no discoloration. Coloring recommendations for soap are also teal. Use teal soap dye to your heart’s content.

Amish Quilt fragrance performed perfectly in perfumes, and the maximum recommended usage percentage for lotions and perfumes is 5%.

For room scenting, the maximum recommended usage percentage is 50% in incense and potpourri. Amish Quilt fragrance is nice and strong in aroma beads.

Aug
10

Amaretto Fragrance Oil


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Amaretto Fragrance OilAmaretto Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Okay, here we go. Remember when we talked about almonds being drupes? Amaretto is a liqueur made from a base of drupe seeds: apricot pits or almonds. ‘Amaro’ means ‘bitter’ and ‘etto’ is an Italian suffix for little. So Amaretto is a ‘little bitter’ liqueur. Little bitter liqueur, little bitter liqueur, little bitter liqueur! (Try saying it three times fast!) It is sweetened with either sweet almonds or other sweeteners.  A popular drink made with this little bitter liqueur is an Amaretto sour, a simple mix of Amaretto and sweet and sour drink mix, and garnished with a fresh maraschino cherry. I don’t know about you, but I could use a drink. Happy Monday! But remember to never ingest fragrance oil- no matter how good it smells.

What Does Amaretto Fragrance Smell Like?

This fragrance is the aroma of fresh, true almond with notes of ripe, juicy cherries. So we’ve got our true drupe base sweetened and garnished with cherries. Mmm.

How Do Our Customers Use Amaretto Fragrance Oil?

For candle makers, Amaretto fragrance performs perfectly in joy wax, wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. Maximum recommended usage percentage for vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. For coloring your candles, we recommend two drops of red liquid candle dye per four pounds of wax, or you can shred a small amount of red color block into your melted wax. But remember to never color your candles with crayons because this will clog your wick.

For soap makers, the maximum recommended usage percentage of Amaretto fragrance in bath oils, soaps, bath gels, and cleaning products is 4.7%. This fragrance has a vanillin content of .5%, so be wary of discoloration in bath and body products and soap. Amaretto fragrance performs well in bath and body products. Our cold process soap testing results found that Amaretto fragrance in CP soap produced no ricing and no separation, no acceleration,  and the soap discolored to a very light beige. Vanilla White Color Stabilizer might help prevent discoloration, but you must do your own testing to be sure. For coloring, we recommend using red soap dye to your heart’s content.

You could probably use a champagne bottle mold to make little embeds for your candles or small sample-sized soaps. Champagne bottle, Amaretto bottle- who can tell the difference? I won’t tell if you don’t. Actually.. it seems like most Amaretto bottles are in some way rectangular, so if you’re really going for authenticity, feel free to peruse our selection of soap molds and… good luck making it look like an Amaretto bottle. You’re creative; I believe in you.

Amaretto fragrance performed perfectly in perfumes, and the maximum recommended usage percentage in lotions and perfumes is .6%. That’s six tenths of a percent- only a little over half of one percent- be careful!

Finally- room scents. The maximum recommended usage percentage for Amaretto fragrance is 50% in potpourri and incense. This fragrance is nice and strong in aroma beads.

Jul
31

Amish Friendship Bread Fragrance


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amish friendship bread fragranceAmish Friendship Bread Fragrance Oil – Fragrance Oil Spotlight

What is Amish Friendship Bread? It’s a recipe for sweet, fruity bread passed from friend to friend that apparently takes 10 days to make. Some say this is a throwback to a simpler time before instant gratification spoiled us rotten and makes us appreciate waiting 10 days for bread. Better than waiting for a fruitcake to cure for at least a month, I guess. Color me confused because I don’t understand why a group of people who can raise a barn in a day need 10 days to make bread. I mean no offense to the Amish and if an Amish person is reading this, please email me at [email protected] and enlighten me on friendship bread and why you’re using the Internet. Maybe we could be friends and make each other bread.

What Does Amish Friendship Bread Fragrance Smell Like?

Believe it or not: bread. This scent has a freshly baked bread character and sweet notes of raisin and strawberries, with hints of nut. Just like yummy, tasty fruit-nut bread. (Banana Nut Bread represent! Not entirely relevant here, I just really like Banana Nut Bread. No bananas in Amish Friendship Bread.)

How Do Our Customers Use Amish Friendship Bread Fragrance Oil?

They make candles! Amish Friendship Bread Fragrance Oil performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. Recommended maximum usage percentage for vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. As for candle coloring, we recommend using 2 drops of brown liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax OR you can shred a small amount of a brown color block into your melted wax. Remember to never use a crayon to color your candle– it will clog your wick!

They also make soaps! Our maximum recommended usage percentage for Amish Friendship Bread is 5% in soaps. Our cold process soap testing results show that it performs well in CP soap with no acceleration, no ricing, and no separation, with good scent retention. It does, however, discolor to a chocolate color. Our coloring recommendations are.. none. We also have a square loaf mold if you want to make your soap look bread-shaped.

They also make bath and body products and perfumes! Recommended maximum usage for these products is 5%. Amish Friendship Bread performs perfectly in perfumes (try saying that ten times fast) and performs well in bath and body products. With a high Vanillin Content (6.7%) this fragrance oil may discolor your bath and body products as well. You can try some Vanilla White Color Stabilizer if you feel so inclined, but remember that it’s up to you to test how the color stabilizer works with this fragrance oil in your product.

And room scents.  Recommended maximum usage for this fragrance in potpourri and incense is 50%. Amish Friendship Bread Fragrance Oil is also nice and strong in aroma beads.

So there you have it- you can make all kinds of fun stuff with Amish Friendship Bread Fragrance Oil but it won’t take you ten days to do it! (Though you may need to wait a few weeks for your soap to cure, but you’re not going to eat it. Don’t eat it. Doesn’t matter how good it smells.) Goes great in gifts you’re making for friends! Friendship!