Tag Archives: bubbly lather

Jan
13

Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate SLSA


This entry was posted in Alternative to SCI, Free Recipes, Natures Garden, SLSA, surfactant and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate- SLSASodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate- SLSA

We have an exciting new blog for everyone today! We will be introducing to you a new product that we recently added onto the Natures Garden website. There are a couple reasons for writing this blog. First, we want to give you information about this product to educate you about it. Second, we want to show you a different way to create your favorite and most loved bath and body products. New ways of doing things are constantly emerging. It can be very beneficial to try things out other ways than you are used to. You may find a new personal preference that you didn’t know you had! Plenty of methods are out there for making homemade recipes. Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate, is the product we are introducing today. We are excited to be talking about our new product and hope you get to enjoy it as much as we do!

All About SLSA

Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate is a surfactant that is derived 100% naturally. It comes from coconut oil and palm oil. It is also completely free of all sulfates. A surfactant is a surface acting agent, which basically means that it causes products to fizz and foam. There are a plethora of homemade cosmetic items that you can make with SLSA. Starting with bath bombs, the two most important ingredients to make them are baking soda and citric acid. The combination of these two is necessary in order to cause the fizzing reaction when the bath bomb hits the water. SLSA is going to contribute incredible foaming qualities to your bath bombs that will accompany the fizzy reaction. Another product that can be made using SLSA is bath bubble bars. This is the perfect surfactant to use to make these because of the foaming quality it contributes. Your bath water will be exploding with mounds of bubbles when these hit the bath water. You can also use SLSA to create many other cosmetic related products too, such as shampoo bars, liquid soap, and facial washes.

The Benefits of Using SLSA

Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate carries a lot of benefits along with it. SLSA brings to the table many elements that are very beneficial to the skin. What might just be the greatest quality of this surfactant is that it can be used on every type of skin and hair. We feel this characteristic is important, and products with SLSA work really nicely for people with dry and sensitive skin. There are so many different skin conditions out there such as eczema, rosacea, acne, and psoriasis. We want to be able to cater to our customers and provide them with products that will work for all types of skin. This is just one of the reasons we decided to add SLSA to our website. Personally, my skin tends to be more on the dry side. When I took a bath using a bubble bar made with SLSA, it left my skin feeling more hydrated. This is one of my favorite things about this product.

Another key benefit of using SLSA in your homemade bath product recipes is that it will provide a much thicker lather to them than other surfactants will. This quality contributes significantly to creating bubbles that are actually long lasting. SLSA readily dissolves in water because of its small particles, which is great for things like bath bombs. Other great things about it are the excellent flash foam that it has, the two year long shelf life, and the versatility of the product. Powder shampoos and bath salts are some of the other recipes SLSA can help create that we have not mentioned. There are many other cosmetic items this can make, which we will be mentioning later on. Next, we want to discuss how SLSA compares to other types of surfactants.

SLSA in Comparison to Other Surfactants

SLSA is a product that is extremely versatile in this industry. It can be the perfect alternative to other surfactants such as Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate (SCI) and Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS). SCI is a customer favorite that we sell at Natures Garden. Each of these also contribute plenty of versatility in cosmetic recipes, projects, and products. Similarly to SLSA and coconut oil, SCI derives from coconut. Some of the recipes that we have on our website that were made using SCI include the Pearamel Salt Scrub recipe, Lavender Mint Bath Bomb, and our Rainbow Bath Salts recipe. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate is another type of surfactant that commonly gets used for soap making. It is an inexpensive item that makes for a great foaming agent in different personal care products. As we mentioned, many of the same recipes can be created with any of these. However, your recipes will have individual elements added to them based on the one you use.

These three surfactants are great for making all kinds of homemade bath products. Some of the different ones include bath truffles, bubble scoops, and body scrubs. Although SLSA can be used as an alternative to both SCI and SLS, we wanted to share some of their differences. SCI has qualities in it that benefit the skin. Products that are made with SCI tend to have more moisturizing elements in them than those made with SLS or SLSA. One example of this is in bubble bars. Compared to other surfactants, a bubble bar made with SCI is going to make your skin feel more softened and silky smooth after taking a bath. However, a bubble bar made with SLSA is going to create a lot more lather and extra bubbles for your bath compared to the others. The surfactant you choose to use depends on what you are looking for. If you want more of a bubbly bath, SLSA will provide that.

Recipes That Can Be Made with SLSA

In order to give all of you a realistic idea of what to expect with this product, we created some new recipes to showcase it. We will be selling SLSA in two different size options, a 16 ounce package and a ten pound package. For this blog, we have prepared three recipes to share with you. There is the Sparkling Sangria Body Scrub, the Sangria Shimmer Bath Bombs, and the Sangria Scoopable Bubble Bars. Each one of these were made using the Natures Garden Sangria Punch Fragrance Oil, which is a perfect blend of fresh fruit and wine. This is one of our best selling fragrances. We are super excited to get to show you how you can create these recipes too!

Recipes That You Can Make with SLSA: Sparkling Sangria Body ScrubRecipes You Can Make with SLSA: Sparkling Sangria Body Scrub

The first recipe we are sharing with you is our Sparkling Sangria Body Scrub. This luxurious product is going to make your skin feel wonderfully moisturized and exfoliated. We used enriching ingredients such as mango butter, avocado oil, jojoba oil, palm oil, and coconut oil 76. The mango butter has properties that provide softness to the skin as well as moisturizing qualities. This is a popular product in many of our recipes such as lip balms, lip glosses, lotions, and scrubs for this reason.

The moisturizing quality of avocado oil makes it such a common ingredient in recipes for soap, lotions, massage oils, and scrubs. The jojoba oil contributes to lather and also contains moisturizing properties. The palm oil gives this scrub a nice creamy lather, while the coconut oil produces a nice bubbly lather. All of these ingredients mixed together make up this wonderfully exfoliating body scrub. Mixing up different oils, butters, fragrances, and more can create variety within your products, which is important. We tested out the SLSA in this product to add to the variety in our recipes. This surfactant makes this more of a foaming body scrub, as opposed to some of our other scrubs. Additionally, it adds significantly to the lather and application to the surfaces of the body. It can also help treat any patches of dry skin that you may have because of the SLSA it contains.

Recipes That You Can Make with SLSA: Sangria Shimmer Bath BombsRecipes That You Can Make with SLSA: Sangria Shimmer Bath Bombs

The second recipe that we made using Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate are these Sangria Shimmer Bath Bombs. Our new product is perfect for making bath bombs. Some of the other bath bombs on the Natures Garden website use SCI. As you know, we switched that up in this recipe. The purpose of using a bath bomb for most people is to watch the bath bomb fizz. When the SLSA is added into a bath bomb recipe, it will fizz AND foam. What could be better than that? These will let you experience a bubble bath in a brand new way and they are simple to make. We love them!

Recipes That You Can Make with SLSA: Sangria Sparkle Bubble BarsRecipes You Can Make with SLSA: Sangria Scoopable Bubble Bars

Our last recipe to share is these Sangria Scoopable Bubble Bars. Who does not love to take a nice, relaxing bath after having a long day? These bubble bars are the perfect product to help you to a night of relaxation. To use the sangria bubble bars, run a couple under warm bath water. They will start foaming immediately. We love these bubble bars because of the bubbles they provide. Unlike bath products made with SCI, these have much more lather to them! This is because SLSA is a surfactant that has more of a foaming quality to it. Therefore, the products made with it are also more foamy and bubbly. These will give you one of the most relaxing baths you have ever had!

More Fun with SLSA

We have covered some of the benefits of SLSA, but this page gives you the full run down. We also found a blog page that is super helpful when it comes to learning different ways you can make bath bombs. The website is actually called How to Make Bath Bombs! This specific recipe is written by a user named KCAT, who attempts to duplicate a very popular bath bomb recipe. In this step by step recipe, she used SLSA to create her bath bomb, just like we did!

We hope that you enjoyed learning all there is to know about SLSA with us and the different ways it can be used! If you try out any of the recipes that we mentioned today, we would love to hear how they turned out for you. Reach out to us on social media to share your results!

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Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is always the responsibility of our customers. If you plan to resell any of the recipes that we provide, it is also your responsibility to follow all FDA regulations. We, at Natures Garden, cannot offer any advice on where to buy the products and ingredients that are listed in our recipes if they are not sold by Natures Garden. When you use Natures Garden recipes and/or raw ingredients, you are agreeing to indemnify Natures Garden against any liability of performance, any lack of performance, or any problems that you encounter with the finished products.

Jul
02

Coconut Oil 76 in CP Soap


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, Soap making supplies, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Coconut-Oil-76-in-CP-SoapCoconut Oil 76 in CP Soap

You’ll go coco-nuts for coconut oil 76 in CP soap. What does the ’76’ mean? It simply denotes that this type of coconut oil has a melting point of 76 degrees Fahrenheit. Coconut oil has many beneficial properties for use in all sorts of products–it’s even edible!!–but for our purposes, we’re going to discuss coconut oil 76 in CP soap. (Please do NOT attempt to eat the soap.)

Coco Clean

Our cold process soap testing recipe features coconut oil as the second most abundant ingredient (by weight) after water. Rightfully so, for you see, coconut oil is comprised primarily of lauric and myristic fatty acids which are characterized in soap-making by providing cleansing properties, a bubbly lather, and hardness. Coco-o is a surfactant, meaning it reduces the surface tension of a liquid when it is dissolved, allowing the dirt and impurities to be rinsed off of the skin.

Coco Cream

In addition, the high content of saturated fat serves to give coconut oil a higher SAP value (the number of milligrams of lye that is needed to completely saponify, or turn into soap, one gram of a specific oil, butter, or fat. — Lye, while generally thought of as a bad guy, is a necessary evil for the saponification process. Always remember to follow safety procedures when handling lye. [Add lye to water, the mixture will get hotter; add water to lye, you’ll probably die]). Remember that rhyme to ensure safety.  While you will likely NOT actually DIE, you can certainly get hurt from the lye volcano you will create if you add water to lye.  SO… Don’t ever do that!  Always add your lye to your water.  The high SAP value of coco-o helps to superfat the soap (the amount of lye used is less than the given SAP value), giving it a nice, creamy texture and more lather ability. You can thank coconut oil for making your homemade CP soap clean and bubbly.

Coco – What the heck does that mean?

Furthermore, coconut oil serves as an emulsion stabilizer. What the heck does that mean? You may already know, but I just learned about this today, so I’m going to recap for myself and the benefit of anyone out there who’s not entirely sure. An emulsion is a mixture of two things that don’t really want to go together– for instance, oil and water. Water is the number one ingredient (by weight) in our CP soaps, and just about everything else is some type of oil (apricot kernel oil, castor oil, sunflower oil, palm oil, fragrance oil, and- of course- coconut oil 76). An emulsion stabilizer helps to keep this mixture from separating. This means, not only will it help hold your soap together, it will also help hold the fragrance. (Don’t worry, the coconut oil itself has been refined so it is odorless. Unless you ARE looking for a coconut fragrance in your soap. If so, we’ve got ten coconutrelated scents you may enjoy using!)

Coco No-no

Oh, wow, you’re thinking. Coconut oil 76 in CP soap is so great, I want to use as much of it as possible! And of course you do, but how much is too much?  A typical soap recipe calls for 20-30% coconut oil. It’s important not to use more than 30% coconut oil. Why? Is it possible to be TOO clean? The excess coconut oil 76 in CP soap will interact with the natural oils on your skin and dry it right out. But if you use the appropriate amount of coconut oil, it works in the soap to help clean skin and even reduce inflammation.

Cococonclusion

Coconut oil 76 in CP soap is awesome as long as you’re careful not to use too much in your recipe. So go ahead– what are you waiting for? Follow the links above to purchase coconut oil 76 and other ingredients for our CP soap testing recipe or one of our other fun CP soap recipes. Browse our wide array of fragrance oils to find a scent that you love. Thanks for reading and happy soaping!