Category Archives: emulsifier

May
25

Types of Emulsifying Wax


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Types of Emulsifying WaxTypes of Emulsifying Wax

There are many different Types of Emulsifying Wax that you can use in your homemade cosmetic recipes. Each of these emulsifying agents are very important for creating products that combine luxurious oils with water. This is exactly what happens when the oils and water separate in a bottle of Italian Salad Dressing. While you can shake these ingredients together, they will separate again without an emulsifying agent. Although this works fine for salad dressings, nobody wants to blend their cosmetic products everything they use them! So, it is important to use one of the emulsifying agents to perfectly blend your oil and water together in your homemade products. If you would like to learn more about the emulsifying agents available at Natures Garden and what recipes you can create with them, then this is the blog for you!

Types of Emulsifying Wax: BTMS 25 EmulsifierTypes of Emulsifying Wax: BTMS 25 Emulsifier

The BTMS 25 Emulsifier, or Behentrimonium Methosulfate (and) Cetearyl Alcohol, is a natural emulsifying ingredient that is great for your homemade cosmetics. Not only is this product naturally derived from Colza Oil, but it is very conditioning and gentle for the skin, as well. So, this cosmetic product is perfect for creating creams, lotions, and conditioners that with provide a soft, moisturized feeling to the skin.

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Cucumber Wasabi Cilantro Hair Conditioner RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Cucumber Wasabi Cilantro Hair Conditioner Recipe

One of the many recipes that perfectly incorporates BTMS 25 Emulsifier is the Cucumber Wasabi Cilantro Hair Conditioner Recipe. You will love this hair recipe, as it conditions and strengthens your hair! Also, this lotion recipe has a refreshing spa-like scent that is strong and amazingly clean due to the Cucumber Wassabi Cilantro Fragrance Oil with notes of grapefruit and lime, with middle notes of fresh cucumber, guava, and passionfruit, and base notes of wasabi, cilantro, and fern.

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Chamomile Light Lotion RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Chamomile Light Lotion Recipe

Another recipe that the BTMS 25 Emulsifier is perfect for is our Chamomile Light Lotion Recipe. This light, moisturizing recipe allows you to create homemade lotion that is skin loving and moisturizing. Not only does this recipe use ingredients that are wonderful for the skin, but it is scented with the fresh, herbal aroma of our Chamomile Fragrance Oil. 

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Tropical Lotion RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Tropical Lotion Recipe

Also, you can use our BTMS 25 to create this fun Tropical Lotion Recipe. This lotion recipe uses oils and butters that will perfectly care for your skin. Plus, this recipe will include Papaya Dragon Fruit Fragrance Oil, which is a tropical fruitopia of juicy peaches, papaya, exotic dragon fruit and fresh island pineapple tweaked with nutty notes of almond. So, this recipe is delightfully tropical and perfectly nourishing!

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Traditional Emulsifying WaxTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Traditional Emulsifying Wax

Also, you can use the Traditional Emulsifying Wax to create some fantastic creations. This emulsifying wax is low odor, highly stable, and highly compatible, so this is sure to make some wonderful products. Plus, this cosmetic ingredient is perfect for creating emulsions in creams, body butters, conditioners, sunscreens, salves, and much more! This emulsifying agent is perfect for creating thick, luscious creams.

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Wine Sugar Scrub RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Wine Sugar Scrub Recipe

One great recipe that you can create with the Traditional Emulsifying Wax is the lovely Wine Sugar Scrub Recipe. This cosmetic recipe takes luxurious butters and oils and emulsifies them with real red wine to create a scrub that is unique and cares for your skin! Plus, this recipe includes the scent of the Christmas Cabernet Fragrance Oil, which blends beautifully with the scent of the wine.

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Cocoa Dream Cream RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Cocoa Dream Cream Recipe

Further, this Cocoa Dream Cream Recipe is another great recipe that perfectly includes the Silky Emulsifying Wax. This recipe blends thick, skin loving butters and oils with the scrumptious vanilla scent of Butter Brickle Fragrance Oil with notes of buttery, creamy vanilla. Together, this creates a truly fantastic body butter recipe that you are sure to adore!

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Silky Emulsifying Wax Types of Emulsifying Wax: Silky Emulsifying Wax

Another great ingredient for many homemade cosmetic recipes is the Silky Emulsifying Wax. This wonderful ingredient will perfectly emulsify your luscious ingredients to create cosmetics that are silky smooth and great for skin care. If you are looking for emulsifying wax for lip balm, then this is the perfect cosmetic ingredient for you! This emulsifying agent is great for creating all kinds of homemade makeup, lip balm, lotions, and hair care, and lotions.

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Foaming Hibiscus Scrub RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Foaming Hibiscus Scrub Recipe

One luxurious cosmetic recipe that you can create with this ingredient is the Foaming Hibiscus Scrub Recipe. This homemade scrub recipe is a wonderful product that moisturizes with the lovely butters and oils. Also, this diy scrub will care for your skin with the skin loving hibiscus flower herb. Furthermore, this wonderful scrub recipe use the delicious aroma of the Hawaiian Sea Mist Fragrance Oil with fruity notes of orange, pineapple, peach and strawberry combined with floral nuances of hibiscus, jasmine and lavender that creates a perfect tropical blend that you will adore!

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Shea Lotion with Herbal Infusion RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Shea Lotion with Herbal Infusion Recipe

Next, we have a lotion recipe that is basically high-end and spa quality. Plus, this lotion perfectly incorporates the Silky Emulsifying Wax. Our Shea Lotion with Herbal Infusion Recipe has a blend of skin loving oils and herbs that are perfect for skin care products. Plus, this recipe includes the succulent aroma of Lemon, Grapefruit, Peach Nectar, Raspberry, Pink Tulip, Soft Jasmine, Magnolia, Wild Honeysuckle,  and Sheer Musk. This free homemade recipe will nourish your skin as well as leave it feeling soft and smelling absolutely scrumptious.

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Pampered Foot Scrub RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Pampered Foot Scrub Recipe

Plus, you can use this emulsifying agent to create the Pampered Foot Scrub Recipe! This diy scrub recipe uses thick and luscious oils that are perfect for nourishing dry, cracked feet. Plus, this recipe includes the bright citrus aroma of our Tangerine Dreams Fragrance Oil. You feet are going to love this amazing foot scrub recipe.

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Polysorbate 80Types of Emulsifying Wax: Polysorbate 80

Another emulsifying agent that you may want to include in your homemade cosmetics is the Polysorbate 80. This cosmetic ingredient is perfect for mixing even more oils into your recipes. One option is mixing in heavier oils, like olive oil or castor oil. But, this could be including a higher percentage of oils into your cosmetic recipe. This cosmetic ingredient would be very useful for creating body washes, hair creams, scrubs, and even more cosmetic oil rich recipes!

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Green Tea Blooming Bath Oil RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Green Tea Blooming Bath Oil Recipe

The Green Tea Blooming Bath Oil Recipe is a recipe that perfectly incorporates the oils of this cosmetic recipe. Not only does this emulsifier mix the skin loving oils into the recipe, but this ingredient blends the fragrance oil into the recipe. So, this bath oil will nourish your skin and the provide the true herbal scent of our warm Green Tea Fragrance Oil.

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Chamomile Light Lotion RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Chamomile Light Lotion Recipe

Another great cosmetic recipe that uses this emulsifying ingredient is the Chamomile Light Lotion Recipe. This lovely lotion recipe uses both Polysorbate 80 and BTMS to create the perfect blend of skin loving ingredients and the delightful notes of the Chamomile Fragrance Oil.

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Polysorbate 20Types of Emulsifying Wax: Polysorbate 20

If you are looking to create a cosmetic product with a smaller amount of oils, then the Polysorbate 20 emulsifier will be perfect for you! This lovely cosmetic emulsifier is derived from natural vegetable sources and is able to blend something light, like a fragrance oil, into the rest of your product. So, every bit of your recipe will include the fantastic aroma of your favorite fragrance oils or light oils. This would be perfect for creating light lotions, body sprays, bath oils, bath bombs, and so much more!

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Sexy Body Spray RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Sexy Body Spray Recipe

So, you can use this emulsifying agent to create the beautifully scented Sexy Body Spray Recipe. This emulsifying agent perfectly blends the vibrant aroma of our Extremely Sexy for WOMEN Fragrance Oil into this feminine body spray. So, you will have a sexy diy perfume with gorgeous notes of cactus flower and clementine, blackberry, and vanilla orchid along with base notes of white amber and pimento to create.

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Manly Body Spray RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Manly Body Spray Recipe

Also, you can include the Polysorbate 20 in our Manly Body Spray Recipe. This is perfect for making sure that the body spray smells fantastic all the way through. This recipe includes the Light Blue MEN Type Fragrance Oil, which has a refreshing blend of citrus notes which are combined with middle notes of bergamot, balsam, and anise with base notes of patchouli and vanilla. Any strong, confident man will love this sexy, refreshing diy cologne!

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Beeswax White PastillesTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Beeswax White Pastilles

Another option you have for adding emulsifying agents to your cosmetic recipes is our Beeswax White Pastilles combined with borax. This is a great way to create some diy cosmetic recipes. Plus, this beeswax is made from the wax of a real honeycomb made by bees. Then, this beeswax is naturally bleached by exposing the wax to sunlight and air. These cosmetic ingredients is perfect for making lotions, lip balm, conditioner, and so much more!  

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Chocolate Covered Strawberries Lip Balm RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Chocolate Covered Strawberries Lip Balm Recipe

One great way that you can use our beeswax in your cosmetic recipes is the scrumptious Chocolate Covered Strawberries Lip Balm Recipe. This cosmetic product includes luscious butters and oils along with the delicious Strawberry Sorbet Flavoring. So, you will be sure to fall head over heals for both the taste of sweet strawberry sorbet and the silky, smooth feel of this homemade lip care product.

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Margarita Salt Scrub RecipeTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Margarita Salt Scrub Recipe

Another great use of the beeswax white pastilles is our Margarita Salt Scrub Recipe, which is perfect for exfoliating and moisturizing the skin. The skin loving oils and butters are perfectly blended with the rest of this recipe. Further, this recipe uses the Margarita Fragrance Oil, which has notes of lemon rinds, fresh greenery, and the true scent of lime essential oil. This bright, true scent combined with the nourishing oils creates an amazing scrub recipe that you will truly enjoy!

Types of Emulsifying Wax: How Does It Work?

On a molecular level, oil and water are completely different and won’t mix together on their own accord. The water is polar, which means that the negatively charged electrons are unevenly shared in the molecule. This results in water molecules having a more positive end and a more negative end. However, oils are very nonpolar. This means that oils share their negative electrons evenly. So, oil molecules don’t have any charge. While these molecules can mix with others of the same kind, they don’t like to mix with the molecules other kind.

This is where the emulsifiers come in to save the recipe! Emulsifying agents are molecules that have both a polar part on one side and a nonpolar part on another side. So, this molecule is able to mix with both the water and the oil to create a perfect blend that won’t separate! If you would like to learn even more about cosmetic emulsifiers, then click here to check out Emulsions: Making Oil and Water Mix by AOCS.

Types of Emulsifying Wax: Reach Out to UsTypes of Emulsifying Wax: Reach Out to Us

We hope that you have enjoyed this blog on the importance of emulsifying agents for many cosmetic recipes. While you can use all of these emulsifying ingredients to homogenize your homemade cosmetics, each kind of emulsifier has some unique properties that may be best for certain recipes. So, we thought it could be useful to share their purpose as well as their slight differences. If you have any more questions about any of our emulsifying agents, then feel free to reach out to us on any of our social media pages. You can finds us to ask questions on the Natures Garden Facebook page. Also, we are available on both Instagram and Twitter where you can find us with @ngscents. We hope to hear from you soon! We always love to see our customers’ creations and we would be happy to answer any questions you may have!

May
15

Addicted to Creative Soap Making


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, creative, emulsifier, Fragrance Oils, homemade, Natures Garden, soap, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Fragrance Oils1.      What’s your name & Your Company Name:  Liz Holding, L.H. Soaps & Sundries

2.      Why did you decide to go into business?  What was your motivation?  How long have you been in business?  I decided to go into business for a silly and simple reason… I love to make soap, and I am really addicted to it.  If I didn’t share what I make, I would probably drown under bars and bars of soap!  I also love the spectrum of fragrances, playing around with different things, and seeing what I can come up with.  Motivation?  Well, I have always loved to make things with my hands.  As long as I can remember, I have fiddled with various things… I have always had a right-brained curiosity for art, design, and creations, yet as I got older, I developed a very left-brained analytical mind as well.  One year, I channeled this energy into mischievously cross-breeding my mom’s favorite rose bushes into an odd new breed.  From there, I knew I had a love for science.  I got a degree in chemistry and got my first job as a formulation chemist.  I learned how to make soap in my college chemistry class, and I learned all about emulsion science in my formulation job.  Since then, I have honed my soap making skills, and because of my knowledge of emulsions, have been able to create an incredible set of lotion formulas.  Soap making is the perfect craft for a right-left brainer, because it allows me to stay artistic while using science and analysis.  I actually learned how to make soap back in 2002 during chemistry class.  I have made batch after batch since then, and decided that I have sufficient knowledge of the craft to begin selling.  10 years after beginning, I began to seriously sell, so I have really only been in business for maybe a little less than a year.

3.      What products do you make and sell?  My shop has a few staple items in it, such as soap, lotions and creams, lip balm, shower gel, etc.  However, I am always experimenting and have been known to pull out some custom creations including sugar soaps, bath syrup, face masks, and more.

4.      What are your business goals?  Ultimately my goal is to be able to quit my day job and focus on L.H. Soaps full time.  I would like to procure several wholesale accounts and attend many more craft fairs and events than I already do.  I love custom creations for special occasions as well, which is another aspect of my business that I would like to develop more. 

5.      What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?  I have actually only ever gotten Nature’s Garden fragrance oils, because I have heard so many wonderful things about them.  The extensive reviews and testing for each fragrance is so incredibly helpful.  Currently, I am loving the Vanilla Pear and Vanilla Bean fragrances, although every single one I received is amazing.

Your Website:  http://lhsoaps.weebly.com

Facebook page:  http://www.facebook.com/lhsoaps

Blog:  http://lhsoaps.weebly.com/blog.html

Mar
01

What is a Surfactant?


This entry was posted in adsorption, bath and body, cleansing, cosmetic ingredients, cosmetic recipe, emulsifier, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, recipes, soap, Soap making supplies, surfactant and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Have you ever tried to wash dirty dishes equipped only with a sponge and water?  This can be quite a feat.  You will notice that it takes a lot more time and elbow grease to get the job done.  Wondering why this is?  The answer as you will notice right away is that the dish soap is missing.

Did you know that the most eminent surfactant in existence is soap?

Surfactants seem to always get the bad rap.  Many people associate surfactants as bad ingredients to have in your recipes, but truth be told, this statement is not true!  Yes, SLS (Sodium Lauryl Sulfate) is a surfactant, and it can be more irritating to your skin than other surfactants, but is it as bad as what you read in the media lately?  It is an urban myth that Sodium Lauryl Sulfate causes cancer.  Read the truth for yourself.   In fact, many of the surfactants that will be listed in this class are derived from a natural source and they work to improve the integrity and performance of your cosmetic formulations.

Surfactants work with various liquids and substances; including oil and water.  Much like that of the role of the emulsifiers, surfactants have a hydrophilic (water-loving) head, and a lipophilic (oil-loving) tail.  In fact, emulsifiers are surfactants, and surfactants are vital to the industry of bath and body products too.  They comprise the largest category of cosmetic chemicals, and seem to have an endless list of cleansing capabilities.  So, needless to say, there is quite a variety to select from when seeking the perfect surfactant for your recipes.

The main qualifier in deciding which surfactant to use is all based upon the benefit that each surfactant provides.  Just like cold process soaping or any homemade bath and body products, the components that you choose to use in your recipes have a direct beneficial affect on the skin when the recipe is transformed into a finished product.  Therefore, when selecting which surfactant to use; it is just as equally important as to what you are looking to achieve in your finished product.  Each surfactant has key functions in which it will excel and equivocally each will also have other functions where it will be lacking.

The term surfactant is actually a combination of its meaning:  surface acting agent.  Let’s look at it again: surfactant = SURFace ACTing AgeNT.  But the term surfactant is not always the one that everyone sticks with.  It seems that surfactants have several names that all become applicable depending of the role of the surfactant in a specific recipe.  For example, in recipes where foam is the finished product, the surfactant used maybe referred to as foaming agents.  Surfactants used in body recipes, can even be termed as detergents or soaps.  Or, in the example of shaving creams, surfactants are considered lubricants because they protect the skin from irritation and the razor’s sharp edge while still allowing the removal of all of the unwanted hairs.

Everything that a surfactant does occurs at the surface levels of the liquids.  The biggest role that a surfactant has is the capability to lower the surface tension of a liquid.  The reaction which then occurs is the conversing of the liquid (with the lower surface tension) and the additional substance.  To break this down in simpler terms; a surfactant has the power to change the properties of a substance.  This process is known as adsorption.  The term adsorption means:  the gathering of gas or liquid in a condensed layer on the surface.  This condensed layer creates a film which is why the surface tension is lowered.  There are four different categories of classification for surfactants based on their interfaces and charges.  They are: Anionic, Nonionic, Cationic, and Amphoteric.

Education is always a powerful thing, and it is not necessary to completely know the ins and outs of everything surfactants.  But, you will want to have a general idea of each group of surfactants and how they play a role in your finished product.  This is especially true if you are looking to accomplish a “made from scratch” recipe.  It is also beneficial to know a few other things about surfactants too.  This would include information like why the surfactants are grouped or classified together or how/if surfactants work with additional groups of surfactants in a collaborate manner.  Spoiler alert:  Not all surfactants play nice with one another!

Anionic surfactants are considered to be the go to surfactant for many formulations.  This group of surfactants is also the most commonly used among foaming product productions, like shampoos or body washes.  The reasoning for this is because the anionic surfactant’s primary functions are creating high foam, high cleansing, and high washing capabilities in a finished product.

Anionic surfactants have a negatively charged water-loving head.  Anionic surfactants work very well in recipes which have a reaction between a chemical (like lye) and fatty acids or alcohols (like animal lard or vegetable based oils).  Hand processed soap, whether it is CP, CPOP, or HP, are all examples of anionic surfactants.  Other examples of anionic surfactants are Sodium sulfates, Ammonium sulfates, sulfosuccinates, sarcosines, sarcosinates, isethionates, and taurates.

One of the drawbacks of using an anionic surfactant relates to skin sensitivity.  Due the high foaming, cleansing, and washing capabilities, skin irritations can occur.  It is for this reason that if you are looking to create a handmade recipe it is best to choose another category of surfactants, or balance the anionic surfactants with amphoteric surfactants.

Amphoteric surfactants are the go with the flow surfactants.  They have the possibility to either have a positive or negative charge.  Their charge is all based on the pH or alkalinity of your finished product.  Hence the amphi prefix.

When an amphoteric surfactant is used in a recipe where the end result of a finished product has a lower pH, the amphoteric surfactant takes on a more conditioning and nourishing role.  On the other hand, when an amphoteric surfactant is used in a recipe where there is a higher pH in the end product, it resembles more of an anionic surfactant with high foaming and cleansing capabilities.  Neither option is necessarily bad; they are just on two different planes of the beneficial skin aspects.

Amphoteric surfactants are the most docile of the surfactants.  They are also the second most used surfactants in the industry.  This is because when used alone, they are able to provide a gentle aspect to the nature of your end product.  Adversely, when an amphoteric surfactant is coupled with an anionic surfactant, the amphoteric surfactant mellows the harshness of the anionic surfactants.  In fact, amphoteric surfactants can be used solo and in conjunction with any other of the surfactant groups.  There adaptability is just one of the reasons why they are so widely used.

Some examples of well know amphoteric surfactants are Coco Bentaine, Lauryl Bentaine, and Hydroxysultaines.

Cationic surfactants are the opposite of anionic surfactants.  They have a positively charged water-loving head.  It is because of this positive charge that cationic surfactants can offer many skin loving, nourishing benefits to the skin and body.  These surfactants are best used in recipes where foaming is not necessarily mandatory such as hair conditioners.  Cationic surfactants alone do not allow for ample foaming capabilities.

Cationic surfactants work well with 2 of the 3 remaining surfactant groups.  Both amphoteric and nonionic surfactants will be compatible with cationic surfactants with no problems.  However, because of the opposing charge cationic (positive) and anionic (negative) surfactants will not combine.

Some common cationic surfactants used in bath and body recipes are your chlorides (Benzalkonium, Stearalkonium, and Centrimonium), Trimethyl Ammoniums, and Methyl Sulfates.

Nonionic surfactants have no foaming capabilities which is why this group of surfactants are rarely used as a recipe’s main surfactant.  Evident by the prefix non, these surfactants do not have a charge in their water-loving heads.  The end result of using a nonionic surfactant will allow for a finished product that has a very gentle cleansing ability.   But, just because it doesn’t foam, it doesn’t mean it does cleanse.

Psychologically speaking, there is a direct mental correlation between foaming and cleansing.  We as a race have somehow inherently made this connection.  Whether it is a physical view of suds equating to cleanliness, or simply urban myths that have taken on a life of their own, the reality is; it could not be further from the truth.

Nonionic surfactants, or at least some of them, are ethoxylated.  What this means is that the nonionic surfactants have had some reaction to the addition of ethylene oxide.  With this reaction comes an even more water-loving head, almost as if it has been supercharged.  This then makes nonionic surfactants (like Polysorbate 20) perfect solubilizers.

But, don’t just disregard this category of surfactants yet.  Nonionic surfactants can also be used in formulations to reduce irritants, due to their gentle cleansing ability.  They also have the capability to be used as an emollient, softening or soothing skin.  Not to mention, these surfactants can be used to stabilize foam in recipes.  Hold on to your seats though folks, because it gets a little better!  Due to its lack of a charge, nonionic surfactants love every other category of surfactants; you can consider them the peacemakers!

Some common nonionic surfactants used in bath and body recipes are your Polysorbates, Emulsifying Wax NF, E-wax, Glyceryl Oleate, Glyceryl Stearate, ingredients with the prefix PEG, Ceteareths, Oleths, Sorbitans, Lauryl Glucoside, and Polyglycose.

In summary, surfactants are amazing little compounds found in many items we use every day like adhesives, bath gels, creams, lotions, frozen foods, chewing gum, inks, and fabric softeners; just to name a few!  There are four main applications of surfactants particularly in just bath and body recipes.  They include: cleansing, solubility, emulsifying, and conditioning.

Some other additional aspects of surfactants to bath and body recipes include:  the potential to increase stability of a product; certain surfactants can be used as thickening agents; due to the composition of a surfactant, some maintain anti-microbial elements and therefore can be used as preservatives; there are even some that have the capability to reduce irritation allowing for a milder product on the skin.

Interested in adding some surfactants to your recipes?  Below is a list of some commonly added surfactants to bath and body recipes:

sodium lauryl sulfate (can be derived from coconuts)  Produces High Foam; easy to thicken. Strong Anionic Surfactant; can cause irritation
ammonium laureth sulfate (derived from coconuts) Produces High Foam; easy to thicken.  Strong Anionic Surfactant; can cause irritation
disodium lauryl sulfosuccinate (derived from coconuts)  Foaming agent, Mild Anionic Surfactant; gentle on the skin
Cocoamphocarboxyglycinate  (derived from coconuts)  Mild, Amphoteric Surfactant
decyl Polyglucoside (vegetable derived, used in baby shampoos for its gentleness)
cetearyl alcohol
stearyl alcohol
Cocamidopropyl Betaine (derived from coconut oil) Amphoteric Surfactant
Decyl Glucoside (derived from sugar)
Glyceryl Cocoate (derived from vegetables)
Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate (derived from coconuts)
Almond Glycerides (derived from vegetables)
Sodium Lauryl Sulphoacetate (much milder surfactant than SLS)
Sodium Lauroyl Sarcosinate (derived from vegetables and is a natural substitution for SLS) 
sodium methyl cocoyl taurate
(derived from coconut)
Sucrose Cocoate (derived from sugar)
polysorbate 20 (vegetable derived)
polysorbate 80 (vegetable derived)

If you formulate your own cosmetics, please visit our customer suggestion page and let us know which surfactants you would like to see Natures Garden carry.  We will be increasing our line of natural cosmetic supplies.