Category Archives: candle colorants

Mar
15

New Candle Colorants


This entry was posted in candle additives, candle colorants, Candle Making Recipes, candle making supplies, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

New Candle ColorantsNew Candle Colorants

Recently, Natures Garden Candle Making Supplies has added new candle colorants.  These candle colorants will allow you to color your candles with new and exciting colors!  So, what exactly are these colorants?  Well, we now carry color blocks in 25 shades!  So, for those that use liquid candle dyes, you might be wondering, “What is a color block?”.  Well, a color block is a solid candle colorant use in candle making.  What are the advantages of color blocks?  Solid candle dyes are less messy than liquids.  To use them, simply place a small amount of the candle colorant into your melted candle wax.  Now, I should add, these should only be used in candles or wax melts, not body products.  However, one color block dye will color about 15 pounds of candle wax in a medium shade.  Below, you will see pictures each color block used in handcrafted wax tarts.

Avocado Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Avocado Color Blocks Dye

First, we have avocado!  This is the perfect shade for handmade candles.  It is a unique color that will truly sent your handmade candles apart from all the others!

 

Bayberry Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Bayberry Color Blocks Dye

Next, we have Bayberry Color Blocks.  This dye is the perfect color for pine scented candles, but can also be used to achieve a lighter shade of green that would be perfect for cucumber scented candles.

 

Black Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Black Color Blocks Dye

Our next new color block is a black color block.  This is a color that many of our clients have requested.  Well, the wait is over!  Natures Garden now carries a black color block for all of your handcrafted candles and wax melts.  As, you can see this color block can also be used to create grey candles in a variety of shades.

Burgundy Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Burgundy Color Blocks Dye

Now, we have the burgundy color block.  This one is not one of new color blocks.  However, it does create a gorgeous color in candles.  This burgundy color block is staple in my candle colorants collection.  It has long been my personal favorite candle color.

 

Burnt Orange Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Burnt Orange Color Blocks Dye

Okay, now, how cool is this burnt orange color?!?!  The burnt orange color block is perfect for your pumpkin scented candles.  However, it is versatile enough that it could be used for melon or even mango scented candles when just a small amount is used.

 

Caramel Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants:  Caramel Color Blocks Dye

Next, we have a new caramel color block!  This is an absolute must have for those making dessert candles!  I personally have used it with my Cafe Caramel scented candles.  Not only did the candle smell delicious but it also looked delicious with the perfect caramel drizzle!

Chocolate Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Chocolate Color Blocks Dye

The chocolate color block is another must have for those dessert candle makers.  This solid color block will give you the truest chocolate shade.  Again, this one will help you create delectable looking handmade candles and wax melts.

 

Cream Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Cream Color Blocks Dye

The next solid color block on our list is the cream candle dye.  As you can see in the picture, you can you create cream colored candles. In fact, you can even achieve darker shades of beige.

 

 Dark Brown Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Dark Brown Color Blocks Dye

The dark brown color block is a true brown candle colorant.  This solid color block is can color your candles in a light tan shade, a dark brown, and many shades in between.  I think this one is the perfect colorant for scents like Fresh Brewed Coffee Fragrance Oil.

 Grass Green Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Grass Green Color Blocks Dye

With Spring right around the corner, many of you are adding Fresh Cut Grass Fragrance Oil to your candle line.  Well, the grass green color block happens to be the perfect color to create fresh cut grass scented candles.  In addition, it is a great colorant for many summer scents like cucumber and honeydew melon.

 Ivory Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Ivory Color Blocks Dye

Next, we have the ivory color block.  As soon as I saw this one I just knew that I had to make a White Peach and Silk Blossoms scented candle.  Now, there isn’t as much of a range with this color block.  However, this ivory solid dye is unique and perfect in scented candles.

 Jade Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants:  Jade Color Blocks Dye

So, the new jade color block is one of my absolute favorite new candle dyes.  It is absolutely stunning in handmade candles.  I also used this one in wax melts scented with our Jade Fragrance Oil, of course.  It doesn’t matter how you use it, it look absolutely stunning in candle wax.

 Mauve Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants:  Mauve Color Blocks Dye

In addition to the jade color block, the mauve color block is on my list of must have colors.  It allows you to create a variety of mauve shades and is a favorite among many on the Natures Garden staff!  Mauve is such a pretty pink shade that you really candle go wrong.  It is feminine and gorgeous.

 Olive Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorant: Olive Color Blocks Dye

Next, we have the olive color block.  This particular green candle dye will have you needing the OMG Olive Fragrance Oil or Gin Martini Fragrance Oil from Natures Garden.  In fact, these are the first two fragrance oils that came to mind when I saw this solid color block.

 

 Orange Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Orange Color Blocks Dye

Now, we have the orange color blocks.  These new candle color blocks are a true orange color.  It is perfect for scents like fresh squeezed orange and even at Halloween time.

 

 Peach Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Peach Color Blocks Dye

What would be better this Spring and Summer than a Peach Perfection scented handmade candle.  It is the perfect peach scent for this brand new Natures Garden color block.  I also happen to think this scent is pretty perfect too if you are looking for a fabulous peach aroma to add to your line of candles.

 Pink Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Pink Color Blocks Dye

Of course, we had to add a pink color block to our collection!  Who doesn’t love pink?  It happens to be my favorite color in general.  Also, it beautiful in handmade candles.  It is the perfect color for scents like Petals of Spring or Pink Sugar.

 

 Red Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Red Color Blocks Dye

Now, let’s talk about the red color block.  While this is not a new color block, it is still a must have color block for candle making.  As one of your primary colors, it will create a perfect red color or can be used to mix other colors.

 

 Royal Blue Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Royal Blue Color Blocks Dye

Next on our list of new candle colorants is the royal blue solid dye.  A true blue candle color that is vibrant and fun.  It is perfect for fresh scents.  As you can see you can get a wide range blue shades for your handcrafted wax tarts as well as candles.

 

 Scarlet Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Scarlet Color Blocks Dye

Of course, our color blocks line would not be complete without scarlet.  Since we are from Ohio, we LOVE our Ohio State Buckeye!  The good old scarlet and gray!  This is a beautiful shade of red.  However, you can also get shades of pink.

 

 Spruce Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Spruce Color Blocks Dye

Additionally, you can use the spruce color block to dye your candles.  This particular color reminded us a blue spruce.  This is the perfect color for not only those candles, but also many other scents.  I think this colorant would be perfect for scents like Ocean Mist, for example.

 Turquoise Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Turquoise Color Blocks Dye

Another fabulous blue colorant is the turquoise color block.  This dye will even allow you to create darker shades of blue.  Why not use this candle colorant for fragrance oils like Natures Garden’s Denim scent?

 

 Violet Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Violet Color Blocks Dye

Next, we have the violet color block.  This purple candle dye is wonderful in lavender candles and many other floral scents.  This feminine candle colorant is GORGEOUS is both candles and wax tarts!

 

White Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: White Color Blocks Dye

Now, we have the white color block.  This is another candle dye that has been highly requested.  Many times, fragrance oils can give your candles an off white color.  Well, this color block will allow you to create handmade white candles.  This is another candle colorant that many of our customers feel is a must have dye.

 Yellow Color Blocks DyeNew Candle Colorants: Yellow Color Blocks Dye

Finally, we have the yellow candle colorant.  This is another primary color that is a staple in every candle maker’s line.  This isn’t a new color block, but is still perfect for many candles.  Whether you use it with banana scents or even lemon scents, your handmade yellow candles will look amazing!

Are you ready to make some candles?  Are you trying to decide which fragrance oil to use with your favorite color block listed above?  Check out our fragrance oils by color.  This section of our website breaks down each color and gives fragrance oil suggestions for each color.  In addition, you can check the description of each scent.  In the description, we give coloring suggestions for every scent.

Jun
29

Common Candle Making Questions


This entry was posted in candle additives, candle colorants, candle company advice, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making questions, candle making supplies, candle scents, candle wicks, candles and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Common Candle Making QuestionsCommon Candle Making Questions

All of us at Natures Garden understand that it can be difficult to create perfect candles. Especially if you have serious scent throw issues popping up, it can be frustrating to put time and money into candles that don’t work that way you want. So, we want to answer some common candle making questions to prevent confusion and save you from all that extra troubleshooting. So, let’s talk about common problems so we can get back to creating gorgeous homemade candles!

Common Candle Making Questions About Candle Wax

First, we are going to talk about questions that often come up in relation to candle wax.

Common Candle Making Questions: How Do You Melt Candle Wax at Home?Common Candle Making Questions: How Do You Melt Candle Wax at Home?

You can use a pouring pot and a stove top to melt your wax at home. Also, we recommend using a double boiler method where you have a larger pot with water in it and set your pouring pot full of wax inside. Turn the stove on to medium and allow the water in your pot to boil. This will safely heat your wax without letting it get too hot.

Common Candle Making Questions: Which is the Best Wax for Candle Making?

Choosing the best wax all depends on preference of what you prefer in a finished candle. First, we have soy waxes that are vegan, gluten free, and natural candle waxes. This is the least expensive wax, has a fantastic cold throw, and has a cleaner burn, but it is tricky to get a great hot throw with some fragrances. Also, Soy Wax often has frosting and a rougher finish.

Next, we have paraffin wax, which has the best scent throw, and is in both the Wow Wax and Joy Wax. The Joy wax uses a mixture of paraffin and soy, so it has a cleaner burn due to the soy wax and a really good hot scent throw due to the paraffin wax. Also, it clings to the candle containers better and has less frosting. An option for creating a translucent candle is gel wax, but it isn’t compatible with all fragrances.

Additionally, you can use palm wax, which comes from sustainable sources, has a beautiful crystal finish, and has a great scent throw. Natures Garden carries sustainable palm container and pillar wax. Lastly, Pillar of Bliss Wax and Palm Pillar wax are great options for creating pillars or wax tarts.

Common Candle Making Questions For Making Soy Candles

Since soy wax is so popular among our customers, we wanted to answer some of the most common questions asked about making soy candles.

Common Candle Making Questions: What is the Best Temperature to Pour Soy Wax?Common Candle Making Questions: What is the Best Temperature to Pour Soy Wax?

This temperature depends on the type of soy wax being used. We recommend pouring our 100% soy wax at 110 degrees Fahrenheit. For the Golden Brands 444 or Golden Brands 464, we suggest pouring at 135 degrees Fahrenheit

Common Candle Making Questions: What is the Best Temperature to Add Fragrance to Soy Wax?

For heavier fragrance oils with high flash points, we recommend adding the scented oil at 185 degrees Fahrenheit. However, lighter fragrances with lower flash points, Ike citrus scents, would be added around 160 degrees Fahrenheit

Common Candle Making Questions: Which Wick is Best for Soy Candles?

Many customers perfer to use a cotton wick for their soy candles. We have two types of cotton wicks available, which are HTP and CD candle wicks.

Common Candle Making Questions: How Do You Make Soy Wax Melts?

Although we don’t carry soy wax in a pillar form for melts, you can still create soy wax melts with container wax. Often, customers will use individual portion cups to package wax melts like these, which can be used to squeeze the wax into the wax burner. This is because it is softer than pillar wax and is difficult to get out of clamshells. However, this wax will not hold the shape from a mold. In fact, it will get stuck in your mold and be difficult to clean.  Another option when making wax melts with a container wax is to add stearic acid to the wax to harden it.

Common Candle Making Questions About Candle Fragrance

Fragrance is important for creating great scented candles, so its important to know how to get your scented candle oil to work for you!

Common Candle Making Questions: Why Don’t My Candles Have a Good Scent Throw?

This issue could have a few different possible causes. First, you may not have added enough fragrance, which should be 1 oz. per pound on average. However, Natures Garden waxes will allow you to add up to 10% in most cases.  Also, your candle may have a clogged wick. This could be due to adding too much fragrance, vybar, or another additive. Also, additives like mica and crayons will clog your wick.

Another possibility is the type of wax you are using. A wax like paraffin will have a better scent throw than soy waxes. Finally, it is possible that you have the wrong size wick. If you wick is too small, then the flame will not be hot enough to get the aroma into the air. On the other hand, a wick that is too large will burn the scent oil before it can be released into the air.

Common Candle Making Questions: What is Vybar Used for in Candle Making?Common Candle Making Questions: What is Vybar Used for in Candle Making?

If you have a poor scent throw and you have tried trouble shooting, then you may want to use vybar. The vybar can be used to increase scent throw by adding some amount between a fourth and a half teaspoon per pound of wax. Just be cautious not to add too much or it can clog your wick and reduce your scent throw. We suggest using Vybar 103 for pillar candles and Vybar 206 for container candles.

Common Candle Making Questions: Why Is Fragrance Oil Settling to the Bottom of the Candle?

If you notice that fragrance is settling at either the top or bottom of your candle, then there could be a few reasons to explain it. First, you’ve added too much fragrance oil. Another option is that the wax you are using isn’t porous enough and you may need a more porous wax. Along with this idea, waxes that have been burned or heated too much may reduce in their ability to hold fragrance.  Finally, you may have not stirred enough to fully incorporate the fragrance oil.

Common Candle Making Questions: Can You Use Essential Oils in a Wax Warmer?Common Candle Making Questions: Can You Use Essential Oils in a Wax Warmer?

While some essential oils can be used in wax warmers, it can be a bit tricky. You need to make sure that they are diluted with either a carrier oil or DPG. Additionally, some essential oils have flashpoints that are too low for a wax warmer. So, you will want to do some testing with the essential oils that you choose.

Common Candle Making Questions About Candle Wicks

Choosing the right wick is another important part of candle making. Otherwise, your candle might not be as effective as it could be.

Common Candle Making Questions: Why is My Candle Wick Drowning Out?Common Candle Making Questions: Why is My Candle Wick Drowning Out?

This could be due to either a small wick or a high candle. First, the wick you used may be too small for a candle of this diameter, which you can use our Candle Wick Chart for reference. Also, your wick could be drowning if you poured your candle wax up too high. You should stop pouring before the wax passes the part of the candle jar that changes shape and begins to curve for the lip.

Common Candle Making Questions: Why Isn’t My Candle Wax Not Burning Evenly All of the Way Down?

Uneven burning could be due to either the wax or the wick. First, the wick may be too small for your candle’s size. Also, the wax that you chose could be too hard. While you could use a softer wax instead, you could also switch to a hotter wick.

Common Candle Making Questions About General Candle Making

Lastly, we have some general questions about making candles that could be useful for crafting perfect candles.

Common Candle Making Questions: Sometimes I Follow All Recommendations and I Still Can’t Seem to Get it Right. Why is That?

There are many factors that can influence the outcome of your homemade candles. First, fragrance oils can impact a candle, as thicker scented oils require you to wick up to get a hotter burn. Also, the room temperature can effect your candles. If the room is too cold, then you can have more issues with glass adhesion and frosting because your candle will setup very quickly.

Additionally, you could have an issue where the scent doesn’t smell as strong because you are used to it. When you are around a scent for too long, your nose will adjust and you won’t notice it as much. If this happens to you, then don’t worry too much just take a break from the scent for awhile and your nose will recognize it again after a long enough break.

Common Candle Making Questions: Why are My Layers Bleeding in my Candle?

This color issue could have one of a few different causes. First, the layers were too hot. If you don’t wait long enough or pour your wax too soon, then the layers can melt one another and start to run into one another. Also, it could be due to over saturating your candle with fragrance, as the extra scented oil will blend with colorant and bring the color with it as it seeps out of the candle.

Common Candle Making Questions: Can I Use Mica in Candles?Common Candle Making Questions: Can I Use Mica in Candles?

We recommend that you don’t mix mica into the candle itself, because it will clog the wick. But, you can use mica to decorate the outside of pillar candles! After your pillar is created you can then, use the mica on the outer portion of your candle. This shimmery mixture can be used to provide a beautiful sparkle on the outside of your candles.

Common Candle Making Questions: Can Mica be used in Wax Melts?

Sure! Since we don’t have to worry about clogging the wick, you can mix it straight into the candle wax.

 

Common Candle Making Questions: How Do I Get Rid of the Air Bubbles in My Candles?

There are a few reasons why air bubbles could get trapped in your candles, which include water exposure and pouring at a cooler temperature. So, how do you prevent air bubble in a homemade candle? First, keep water away from your work station. Also, you can try pouring your wax at a hotter temperature. Further, pour your candle wax slowly and make sure to stop before you hit pour point where your jar begins to change shape. 

Common Candle Making Questions: Can You Melt Old Candles to Make New Ones?Common Candle Making Questions: Can You Melt Old Candles to Make New Ones?

We don’t recommend re-purposing old candles to make new ones. While this may seem like a create idea to take all you half used candles and make a new one, the scent is a big concern in this case. If these candles are scented, then they will already contain fragrance oil. Once you melt your old candles, the scent may fade, but many of the wax particles are still holding on to some of the scent oil. This means that you won’t be able to add enough fragrance oil without over saturating your candle. Since the candle already is holding scent, this extra fragrance will seep out and sit on the top of your candle, which is dangerous and can result in a flame that is too large.

Common Candle Making Questions: Reach Out to UsCommon Candle Making Questions: Reach Out to Us

Hopefully, we were able to get some of your more pressing questions answered. If you have any more questions or concerns about making your own candles, then please reach out to us. We are always happy to help! You can stop by the store, give us a call, or talk to us on social media. If you want to find us online, we have a Natures Garden Facebook page, Twitter (@ngscents), and Instagram (@ngscents). Good luck and have fun with candle making!

Jul
24

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes


This entry was posted in candle colorants, candle making, candle supplies, candles, cheap candle supplies, Free Candle Recipe, homemade candles, how to make candles, layered candles, make candles, palm wax candles, scented candles, soy candles and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Granulated Candle Wax RecipesGranulated Candle Wax Recipes

Granulated candle wax recipes are a perfect way to make candle making simple! These Natures Garden recipes require no melting, so it is easier and safer to create. This means that you don’t need to pay attention to the temperatures at which to pour. Also, you can allow kids to help create these candles because there is no heat involved! You get to skip all these more complicated aspects and move straight to the creative part of candle making. So, the majority of your focus will be on scent, color, and scooping it the wax. Further, the granulated wax is easier to manipulate than the melted wax. While the melted wax can’t really be moved after its poured without ruining the appearance, granulated wax can be manipulated to look exactly how you want. It is similar to creating those layered sand crafts. So, kids may enjoy these candles more for that reason. But, this doesn’t mean that granulated candles are just for kiddos. Adults can get creative with this method, too. Check out our recipes to see exactly what you could be making through this style of candles making.

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes Pillar of BlissGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Pillar of Bliss Wax

First, we have the lovely Pillar of Bliss Wax by Natures Garden. This wax is a blend of mostly soy wax and a bit of paraffin wax to create a lovely candle wax. You can either melt the wax for candles or leave the wax whole. Either way, you can perfectly scent and color your wax for making amazing candles.  The wax looks like small beads initially, which can be fun for homemade candles. So, this granulated wax is perfect for making textured candles that look amazing! 

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes Day at the Beach Candle RecipeGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Day at the Beach Candle Recipe

One perfect way to use this granulated wax is to create the Day at the Beach Candle Recipe. This wax is perfect for creating a fun beach themed candle! We wanted to create this beach candle to match the aroma of our NG Copper Hue Suntan Lotion Fragrance Oil. So, we needed to dye the pillar of bliss wax to look just like soft, white sand. Further, the small wax beads add to the granulated sand texture that is perfect for creating sand. All we had to do was color the granulated Pillar of Bliss Wax. Then, melt the wax, like normal, to create the water and there you have it!

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes Bacon Candle RecipeGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Bacon Candle Recipe

Also, you can use this awesome wax to create unique designs in your homemade candles. Our Bacon Candle Recipe used three different portions of colored Pillar of Bliss Wax. This was used to create an appearance of real bacon along the sides of the jar! All we had to do was color, scent, and scoop in the wax. Plus, the scent of our Bacon Fragrance Oil really added to this fun candle! While creating a candle like this can be a bit more time consuming, this type of candle making gives you the opportunity to make more unique types of candles.

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes Democratic Candle RecipeGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Democratic Candle Recipe

The Democratic Candle Recipe is another great example of what you can create with this wax! One issue that comes up with candle embeds is the possibility of your embed melting once you pour in the rest of the candle. But, granulated completely changes the game. Instead, you just need to scoop in your gorgeous red and white striped layers. So, between the granulated wax, simple embed, and the scent of Democrat Fragrance Oil this is a perfect candle!

 

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes Pink Camouflage Candle RecipeGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Pink Camouflage Candle Recipe

Next, we have the pretty Pink Camouflage Candle Recipe! This candle idea uses the amazing NG CanCan Type Fragrance Oil with Pillar of Bliss Wax to create a cool design. Similarly to the bacon candle, this candle allows you to scoop in your wax to create a design. So, just grab a spoon and start making your candle. This candle uses various shades of pink to create an awesome pink camo candle!

 

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes Green Camouflage Candle RecipeGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Green Camouflage Candle Recipe

Also, you can create the Green Camouflage Candle Recipe. Obviously, you can create this candle basically the same way that the pink camouflage candle is made. The only difference between these candles is the colors are green and the scent is the Fresh Outdoors Fragrance Oil. Just mix up your granulated wax colors and start scooping up the wax with a spoon.

Autumn Leaves Potpourri RecipeGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Autumn Leaves Potpourri Recipe

Further, Pillar of Bliss Wax is perfect for making scoopable wax for your wax warmers! Granulated wax is perfect for making DIY scoopable wax for your oil burners. All you really have to do is color and scent to wax, then it’s all done! Plus, this recipe is cute and smells delicious with the cute wax leaves and the amazing Autumn Woods Fragrance Oil. After you mix in your little leaves, your wax is ready to scoop straight into your warmer!

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes Glistening Snowflakes Potpourri RecipeGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Glistening Snowflakes Potpourri Recipe

The Glistening Snowflakes Potpourri Recipe is another great idea for creating a scoopable wax melt recipe. Of course, this recipe uses the amazing Pillar of Bliss Wax! Plus, some of the wax is melted to create small, blue snowflakes that stand out against the snow white base. This pretty appearance combined with the scent of Jack Frost Fragrance Oil is perfect for winter time! This winter season you won’t want anything else in your wax warmer!

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes Independence Day Candle RecipeGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Independence Day Candle Recipe

Next, check out the Independence Day Candle Recipe! This recipe is for another fun embed candle. The embed is a cut out of a star shape and you can see the red and white stripes straight through your blue star cut out. The only thing that could’ve made this candle more patriotic is the Apple Pie Fragrance Oil (Our Old Version). Luckily, we added that, too!

 

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes Hydrangea Candle RecipeGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Hydrangea Candle Recipe

Also, we have the pretty Hydrangea Candle Recipe! This candle recipe uses beautiful shades of blue and purple to create the gorgeous candle that was inspired by real Hydrangea flowers! Furthermore, this candle is topped with butterfly wax embeds, which is perfect for this candle. Apparently, butterflies love our Hydrangea Heaven Fragrance Oil as much as the real flower!

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes More Pillar of Bliss Wax Ideas

Not only can you use this wax to make fun designs, but this wax is perfect for kids to create layered sand candles that they can use! Just mix up the colors in bottles, set the wick, and let your kids create their own candle! It’s a super cute and a craft idea for kids that wouldn’t take too much work to set up. There is no need to melt the wax and all your kids need you do is pour in the layers! Plus, it is just as fun as creating layered sand bottles.

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes Palm Container Candle WaxGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Palm Container Candle Wax

Palm Container Candle Wax is another great idea for creating some homemade granulated candles. This wax looks almost identical to the granulated wax of Pillar of Bliss. Plus, this environmentally conscious product is a natural wax that is perfect for candle making. You will love this wax in your homemade candles! The scent throw is lovely and the appearance is perfect for textured candles.

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes  Palm Pillar Candle WaxGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Palm Pillar Candle Wax

Also, you can use Palm Pillar Candle Wax to create more unique granulated candles. While it is unlikely that you will create granulated pillar candles, with a container of some sort, this wax is wonderful for making these candles. It has the same lovely granulated appearance as both of the other two waxes and has a scent throw as strong as the Palm Container Candle Wax. So, this wax is another great choice for granulated candle making.

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes What About the Rainforest?Granulated Candle Wax Recipes What About the Rainforest?

Well, there is no need to worry because our palm waxes are safe! Our palm waxes come from palm trees which are cultivated on private plantations. Thus, our palm wax is no threat to rainforests or the orangutan ecosystems. Our palm wax is eco-friendly and is provided from a sustainable tree crop which helps to sequester carbon. We are pleased to affirm that the palm oil used by our company originates from reputable plantation companies who are members of the Malaysian Palm Oil Association (MPOA). MPOA, together with many other stakeholders, has pioneered the establishment of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO). Besides plantation companies, foreign companies and Associations such as Unilever, Sainsbury (in the United Kingdom), Migros (in Switzerland) and the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) are also active participants in RSPO. These members have pledged to support all activities to promote and implement sustainable palm oil production.

Our Companies have recognized that the Roundtable process is a secure and neutral environment in which to build trust, share ideas and develop understanding about the practicalities in the palm oil supply chain involving producers, traders, processors, consumer goods manufacturers, retailers, investors and NGOs. Our Companies through all the Members of MPOA, takes pride in being part of this RSPO process.

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes How to Color Granulated WaxGranulated Candle Wax Recipes How to Color Granulated Wax

While you can melt your granulated wax to create solid candles, it perfectly possible to create a granulated candle at home. Since there is no need to melt wax, you may be confused as to how you would add colorants or fragrance oil, but it is super easy to do! When I create my own granulated candles, I prefer to use a Ziploc bag. First, just add in the measured proportion of the granulated wax. Then, you are going to add in some of your colorant. But, the colorant will need to be a liquid candle dye. Since you are not melting the wax, a color block will not work the same way. So, add your chosen liquid candle color. Then, shut the bag and mix! You can add more colorant, if so desired, until you get the color you need for your candle.

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes How to Scent Granulated WaxGranulated Candle Wax Recipes How to Scent Granulated Wax

Similarly to coloring your granulated wax, adding your fragrance oil is super easy! After you determine the perfect color, all you need to do is mix in your fragrance oil. Just add in the product safe percentage of your fragrance oil, which is usually 10%. Many allow the 10%, but every fragrance oil is different. Now, all you need to do is mix in the scent! After, you are ready to begin scooping the wax mixture into your jars.

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes Where to Buy Granulated Candle WaxGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Where to Buy Granulated Candle Wax

Natures Garden, of course! We have a selection of granulated waxes that are perfect for candle making! These quality candle waxes can be used to create perfect granulated candles. The Pillar of Bliss Wax has a great scent throw and a wonderful appearance in homemade candles. Plus, our Palm Wax is pretty great! First, this granulated wax is created from renewable sources that won’t negatively impact the rainforest. Additionally, this wax is perfect for making homemade candles without melting your wax! So, check out these great waxes on our Candle Wax page.

Granulated Candle Wax Recipes Share and CreateGranulated Candle Wax Recipes Share and Create

We hope that you share your own candle creations with us after you finish crafting! Whether you create one of our recipes or make one of your own, we would love to see your results. Since each candle is hand scooped with a spoon, each will have a slightly unique design. On the other hand, we are always excited to see new ideas and would love to see your granulated wax creations. You can share your stories and pictures on the Natures Garden Facebook page. Also, we’d like to invite you to share your pictures with us on Instagram by tagging @ngscents. We hope that you enjoy creating your granulated candles and can wait to see the final results!

Mar
14

Easy Soy Candle


This entry was posted in candle colorants, candle dye, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle scents, candle wax, candle wicks, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, soy candles, soy wax and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

first soy candleHello everyone! My name is Cindy and I am the new Marketing Rep for Natures Garden.

Although I am not new to the candle scene; I used to sell paraffin candles for Deborah back in 1997, I am new to the making homemade products world.  After working for Natures Garden a few days, I quickly realized that one of the most important aspects of my position is that I know all of these products in and out.  Since I am a hands on learner, the best way for me to understand these products is to put myself in your shoes and become a candle and soap artisan.  And, today I did just that.

Since I already have some knowledge in the candle market, I decided to start my venture with soy wax.  Now, I want to shout it from the roof tops, “I made my first candle….ever….in my whole life”.  It was super easy too!

Although secretly, I do have to admit I was a little concerned at first.  I actually thought I might burn down the test kitchen, a common fear that I assume many new crafters have.

Realizing it is now or never, I stood up straight and pulled myself together.  You will never learn if you never try, right?  So, I gathered all of my ingredients and supplies, and went to work.  The step by step instruction I used to make my candle came from the How To Make A Pure Soy Wax Candle Recipe.   This recipe as well as hundreds of others are offered in the free recipes and classes section of Natures Gardens website.    I now understand that every recipe created by Natures Garden came from the trial and error process.  A process that is done to put forth the BEST end product.  Natures Gardens creative team makes all the mistakes so you don’t have to (I think I hear a commercial in there).

Anyway, I worked through the easy to follow steps and before I knew it (about 30 minutes later), I was standing before my first candle creation.  A beautiful purple colored, Lavender Sage scented candle.  I could not believe my eyes.  I actually thought to myself….well, that was easy.  Who knew?  I then realized I could have been doing this for years, guaranteeing the candles I burned in my home had the best scent throw and longest burn time.

Now that I know just how easy it is to make candles, the possibilities are endless.  Guess what kind of gifts I’ll be giving this year…lol?  Overall I really enjoyed my experience; that is after I got over the initial fear.  A word of advice for anyone that wants to give candle making a try… I strongly encourage you to do it!  Candle making is easy, fun, and the accomplishment of your creation is inspiring.

Well kids, until my next adventure, have a FABULOUS day!
Cindy

Mar
13

Soy Candle Recipe


This entry was posted in candle colorants, candle dye, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle recipe, candle scents, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, candles, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

how to make a soy candle Soy candles always seem to be the craze.  The soy wax 415 that Natures Garden carries is a 100% all natural vegetable wax.  This also means that this soy wax is biodegradable, and is made from a renewable resource.  When used to make candles; soy wax provides a nice, clean and long burn.

For this recipe, we have figured everything out for you (measurements, temperatures, color, and scent).  We are also presenting it to you in an easy to follow step by step form (with photos).  This recipe will make (1) 16oz apothecary jar candle.

Your finished soy candle will be colored in a light red hue, and scented in with a matching apple orchard fragrance.

We will be double wicking our apothecary jar with (2) CD-10 wicks.  This wicking will provide the candle with a nice hot burn, and allow the scent to travel nicely through the wick; guaranteeing a wonderful hot scent throw.

Besides the ingredients hyper linked above, you will also need some other candle making equipment.  This includes: Thermometer, POURING POT, Warning Labels, Glass Apothecary Jar (16oz), Hot Glue Gun with Gun, Scale, Pot, A cookie sheet, and a Stirring Spoon.

Now, normally prior to making a soy wax candle, you must first check the flashpoint of the scent.  This is important because the flashpoint will indicate the temperature at which you will add the fragrance oil.  However, for this recipe, we have already figured out this information.  Apple Orchard has a flashpoint of 155 degrees Fahrenheit.  What this means is that the temperature at which we will be adding the fragrance oil to the soy wax is 155 degrees Fahrenheit.  Our rule of thumb is:  If a fragrance flash point is below 130F, then add it to wax at 130F.  If the fragrance oil flash point is between 130-185F, then add the fragrance to the wax at its flash point.  If a fragrance oil has a flash point above 185F, then add the fragrance to the wax at 185F.

So now, before we get started making our soy candle; it is important to get all of the supplies and equipment ready that we will be using.  Most of these supplies can be purchased at Natures Garden.  Once you have all of this ready to go; lets get started!

supplies for making a soy candle

Step 1:  Get your pot.  Into the pot, place several inches of tap water.  Next you are going to put the pot on to the stove top and set the heat setting on medium.

prepping for double boiler method

Step 2:  Now get your pouring pot.  Inside the pot, weigh out 440 grams of the 100% soy wax flakes.  Once you have the amount, place the pouring pot into the water pot.  This will be how we melt the soy flakes.  This process is known as the double boiler method.

the double boiler process

Step 3:  Set your oven to 170 degrees Fahrenheit.  Next, place your apothecary jar on your cookie sheet.  Then, place the cookie sheet inside the oven.  Allow the jar to warm for 10-15 minutes, then remove.  Also, plug in your hot glue gun now.

warming your apothecary jar

Step 4:  Now, place your thermometer into the wax.  This is important because you will want to monitor the temperature of the wax while it is melting.  Never let the temperature go higher than 200 degrees Fahrenheit.  This will burn and discolor the wax.  As the wax melts, stir it occasionally.  Also, keeping melting until all the wax is in a liquid state.

melting soy wax

Step 5:  Once the wax is all melted, remove it from heat.  When the temperature reaches 185 degrees Fahrenheit, add the 4 drops of Spectrum Red Candle Dye.  Stir.

coloring soy wax

Step 6:  After the wax has been colored, check your temperature again.  When the temperature reaches 155 degrees Fahrenheit, add your 35 grams of Apple Orchard fragrance oil.  Stir again for a full 2 minutes.  This thorough stir will help the wax, fragrance, and color adhere.  Then, place your thermometer back into the wax.

scenting the soy wax

Step 7:  Next, grab your hot glue gun and place a small amount of glue on the bottom of your wick tabs.  Then, center and secure your candle wicks.

center and secure your wicks

Step 8:  Now, stick your warning label to the bottom of your jar.

applying your warning label

Step 9:  Check the temperature of the wax, you will be looking for it to reach 110 degrees Fahrenheit.  Once it does, give your wax one final stir.

checking for the pour temp
Step 10:  Then, slowly start to pour your candle.  You will want to stop your pour once the wax reaches where the jar changes shape.  Then, straighten your wicks.

pouring your soy candle
Step 11: 
Now, allow your candle to fully set up undisturbed.

allowing your candle to set up

Step 12:  Once the candle has hardened, trim your wicks, and lid your jar.  Allow your candle to cure for 24-48 hours.

Congratulations, you just made a soy candle.  Your 100% Soy Wax Candle is now finished and ready to burn.  Enjoy the sweet apple scent that will fill your home and make your house smell good!

Feb
07

Homemade Zebra Candle


This entry was posted in candle colorants, candle dye, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle recipe, candle scents, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, creative, Fragrance Oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

make your own zebra candleHow to make your very own homemade Zebra Candle!

This easy to make project is even fun to create.  Besides the standard candle making supplies such as: soy wax, wicks, scent, color, and jars; you will also need beeswax.  We will be using the beeswax to make the zebra stripes in the candle.  Because of the pliability of beeswax, it has the capability of being shaped easily into stripes.  Plus, due to the high melt point it has, beeswax can withstand a pour of another wax (soy), as long as the temperature isn’t too extreme.

Although for this project, the scent that was selected was Hot Pink Pomegranate Fragrance Oil, when you make your own zebra candle you can scent it to your pleasing.  The same is true for the candle color.  Since our fragrance oil has the name hot pink in it, the decision was made to make the zebra candle stripes pink on a white (or uncolored) background.

To see the full list of possible candle scents, please click on this link.  There are over 800 different fragrances to choose from!

Here are your total recipe weights to make (2) 16oz. Zebra Candles:
190 grams beeswax
2 drops candle dye (if making the candle like pictured)
About 4 oz.  of candle scent
1100 grams of soy wax (Golden Foods 444 soy wax)

Other items that you will need for this recipe are:
wax paper
pencil
knife
9×13 cake pan
2- 16 oz candle jars
4 wicks (we used 2- cd10 wicks per candle)
scale
2 pots (for double boiler method)
stirring spoon
cutting board
thermometer

Below are the steps to make your very own zebra candle (pictures included):

Step 1:  Using the double boiler method, weigh out and melt 190 grams of beeswax.  You will want to set the temperature of your stove top between medium and low heat while melting.  Stir the beeswax occasionally as it melts.

steps to make a zebra candle

Step 2:   This step is the colorant of your zebra stripes:  Once the beeswax is melted, now you will add 2 drops of your candle colorant, and stir.  Once you are done, place your pouring pot back into the heat source.

color for the zebra candle

Step 3:  To make the zebra stripes, you will need to concentrate your beeswax in a portion of the area in your cake pan.  To do this, lay out your cake pan on a flat surface.  Next, roughly measure out at least 9 inches in length.  Hold this place by setting your knife across the pan.  Finally, lay the wax paper over the cake pan and knife.  Carefully, tuck the corners of the wax paper down.

how to make zebra stripes

Step 4:  Now it is time to scent your beeswax:  Remove your beeswax from the heat source.  Weigh out about 19 grams of your candle fragrance oil.  Then, add the fragrance and stir to incorporate it throughout the wax.

zebra candle scent

Step 5:  Now, take your beeswax and slowly start to pour it over the flat portion of the wax paper.  Allow this to fully set up.  Do not try to rush this step.  Cooling beeswax too quickly, may cause it to crack!

making the zebra candle stripes

Step 6:  Once the beeswax has hardened, and is cool to the touch; gently remove it from the cake pan.  Carefully stand the square on one end and starting in one corner, peel away the wax paper.  Then, place the beeswax on your cutting board.  Finally, cut off any jagged edges using your knife.

zebra candle recipe

Step 7:  For the background of your zebra candle, you will be using soy wax.  In order to have enough wax for 2 candles, weigh out and melt 1100 grams of soy wax.  Melt this wax using the double boiler method.  While the wax is melting, stir occasionally.

soy wax zebra candle

Step 8:  You will create the zebra stripe pattern using the tip of a pencil.  Trace this lightly into the beeswax.  The shape that you will want to draw will be various sized long and irregular lines similar to tree branches.  When you are finished, cut these lines out.

making zebra stripes in beeswax

Step 9:  Once you have a few of your stripes cut out, carefully begin to place them individually against the inside wall of your candle jar.  It is best to start at the bottom of your jar and work in an angular direction.  Apply slight and even pressure until the stripes stick.  Repeat this step until you have the zebra design you are looking for.  Then, do it again for your second candle.

zebra candle pattern

Step 10:  Center and secure your wicks to the bottom of your candle jars.  Then, set aside.

centering your wicks

Step 11:  When your soy wax is in a completely liquid state, remove it from the heat source.  If you are adding color to the background of the zebra candle, do this now.  Then, add 110 grams of fragrance Oil.  Stir again.

Step 12:  Using your thermometer, wait until the soy wax reaches 115 degrees Fahrenheit; this temperature will not melt your zebra stripes.  Pour the soy wax into your candle jars.  Don’t forget to straighten your wicks. Allow the candles to fully set up undisturbed.

pouring a zebra candle

Now it is time to celebrate, your Zebra candles are now ready to use.  Simply trim your wick, light, and enjoy your new awesome candle.

Feb
06

Realistic Gel Candle


This entry was posted in beeswax, candle colorants, candle dye, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle recipe, Fragrance Oils, gel wax, gel wax scents and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

honeycomb candleGel wax is a great candle wax for embedding items in candles.  This translucent wax also provides the opportunity to make realistic gel candles.  Sea or ocean themed gel candles are perfect examples of this, right down to the air bubbles.

We at Natures Garden however, wanted to take the realistic gel candle concept and kick it up a notch.  Using the fragrance oil Honey, which is gel safe; we arrived at a notion of somehow adding the look of an embedded honeycomb.  Trying to stick with items we already had in house, we creatively used bubble wrap and beeswax (because of it’s high melting point); to make our very own spin on embeds.  Through several trails and errors, we found the perfect look, scent, and color for this Honeycomb Candle Recipe.

Here is a List of the Items You Will Need:
Gel Waxto emulate the look of delicious honey
Beeswax
White Pastilles– to make the embed of a honeycomb
Honey Fragrance Oil– a gel safe scent to match the realistic gel candle theme
Zinc Core Wicking– to make your candle more than just a decoration (4)  51-32-18z wicks  (2 in each candle)
Spectrum Candle Dye- Yellow– the color of the honeycomb
Spectrum Candle Dye- Orange– this color lightly added to the yellow makes the perfect golden honey hue
Thermometer– to monitor the temperature of the gel wax

Other Items and Supplies Needed: 
Stirring Spoon- to fully incorporate the color and scent to the wax
Stove- for the double boiler method
Scale- to be dead on for your measurements
Knife- to cut the beeswax
Toothpick- to add a touch of orange to the gel wax
9 x 13 cake pan- to make the honeycomb
bubble wrap- to make the honeycomb shape
(2) Pots- for double boiler method
Apothecary Jars- this recipe below will make a total of (2) 16oz jars.  Any shape or size jar will work, you will just need to adjust the measurements accordingly

And finally, here are the steps with pictures included:

Step 1:  Using the double boiler method, set the temperature of your stove top between medium and low heat.  Next, weigh out and melt 230 grams of beeswax.  You will want to stir this occasionally as it melts.

Step 2:   When the beeswax is in a liquid state, place 2 drops of Spectrum Yellow Candle Dye in it and stir. After the color is incorporated, place the pot back into the heat source.

coloring beeswax
Step 3:
  Next, lay your cake pan on a flat surface, this will ensure that your honeycomb has an even thickness.  Measure out 7 inches of length in your pan.  Mark this length by placing your knife across the pan.  If your knife is not long enough, you can use any kitchen utensil that will lay across the pan.  Next, with the bubble side up, place the bubble wrap over your knife and cake pan.

how to get honeycomb look

Step 4: Now, weigh out 23 grams of Honey Fragrance Oil.  Remove your beeswax from the heat source, add the fragrance.  Stir.

Step 5:  Slowly pour the beeswax over the bubble wrap.  Allow this to fully set up. Please Note:  Do not rush the set up of beeswax or it may crack.

making beeswax look like honeycomb

Step 6:  When the beeswax has cooled, gently remove it from the cake pan. Now, taking your time, carefully peel away the bubble wrap.

honeycomb beeswax

Step 7:  Next, weigh out 1000 grams of gel wax.  Place this into the double boiler and allow it to melt, stirring occasionally.  This will resemble to a thick syrup.

Step 8:  Now, lay your beeswax on a flat surface.  Place one of your candle jars on its side.  Using your knife, mark the width of the jar (before it changes shape).  Next, subtract 1/2″ from your marking.  Finally, make a line and cut it with your knife.

honeycomb candle

Step 9:  Gently roll your beeswax into a loose circle.  Place one roll in each of your jars.  Make sure the beeswax roll is at least 1/2 inch away from the walls of the jar.  Then, set aside.

how to make a honeycomb candle

Step 10:  Now, secure your wicks to the bottom of your candle jars.  Make sure they are centered.

Step 11:  Once the gel wax is melted, place 4 drops of Spectrum Yellow Candle Dye into the gel wax.  Next, add 1 toothpick tip of Spectrum Orange Dye.  Stir.  Finally, add 100 grams of Honey Fragrance Oil.  Stir again.

how to make a honey color

Step 12:  Place your thermometer into the gel wax.  Then, begin to slowly stir the gel wax.  Do not stir to quickly or you will have an excess of air bubbles.  Keep stirring and scrapping the sides until the gel wax temperature hits 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step 13:  Now, slowly pour the gel wax into the containers until your honeycomb is covered.  Then, straighten your wicks.  Finally, allow the candles to fully set up.

pouring honeycomb candle

Your honeycomb candles are now ready.  Simply trim your wick, light, and enjoy!

With this realistic gel candle, there are two crucial steps that come into play.  The first is the thickness of the beeswax.  You want your beeswax to be nice and thick so it can withstand the temperature of the melted gel wax.  However, making the beeswax too thick may make it more difficult to curl, therefore complicating the honeycomb shape that can be achieved.  Lastly, the temperature of the melted gel wax is everything for this recipe.  Pouring over the 165 degree Fahrenheit point, will melt and warp your honeycomb.

Happy Crafting!

Dec
09

Colorants and Candle Making


This entry was posted in candle colorants, candle making supplies, color blocks, colorants, Fragrance Oils, liquid candle dye, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Spectrum Liquid Candle DyeThere are a variety of different colorants available to candle makers.  Each different colorant form has its own positives and negatives.  Finding the correct candle colorant for you is up to a little research and testing in your candle wax.

Color Blocks–  Color blocks contribute to a rich color in candle wax, especially if you are trying to achieve a dark color in your candles.  Of the different colorants available, color blocks are the most cost effective with one block coloring as much as 15 pounds of candle wax.  However, because color blocks arrive in block form, it is very hard to reproduce the exact same color every time.  If color accuracy is important to your candles, color blocks may not be your answer unless you purchase a gram scale for candle making.  In order to use color blocks in candle wax, the blocks have to be shaved down into smaller amounts.  These smaller amounts would then be weighed out and documented in your testing notebook before adding them to the melted candle wax.

Liquid Dye– Liquid candle dye is the answer to your colorant selection if candle coloring accuracy is important to your candles.  Because liquid candle dye is easy to administer and record (since it is in liquid form), color accuracy time and time again is no longer an issue.  The negative to liquid candle dye is the slight chemical smell it has to it.  Through our testing, we have found that anything over 10 drops of liquid dye in 4 pounds of candle wax will present a slight chemical smell in your finished candle.  Make 10 drops of liquid candle dye your cut off for using this colorant.

Color Chips-  Color Chips are color blocks that have already been broken up for you.  The negative to this colorant is the cost.  The other problem that color chips present is that fact they are not broken up in a fine enough matter to be readily used for some color hues.  And, once again we have an issue if color accuracy is important unless you are weighing and documenting.

Crayons-  No matter what the brand of the crayon is, crayons never make a good candle colorant.  Although it is tempting with the amazing color spread that crayons provide, do not give into temptation.  Using crayons as your candle wax colorant will clog your wick and prevent your candle from burning properly.  Candles that have been colored with crayons also have a tendency to smoke.  You are better off not even acknowledging crayons as a wax colorant.

Dec
06

Candle Making Equipment Continued


This entry was posted in candle additives, candle colorants, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle molds, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

candle making equipmentThis is a list of candle making equipment.  Whether you are just making a few candles as gifts for loved ones, or possibly venturing into the candle making industry; this is the equipment you will need to get started.  Please note:  Once this equipment has been used to make fragranced candles, it cannot be used again for food purposes.

Other Equipment

Pouring Pots- Coffee cans used to be perfect pouring pots when they were made of metal.  By simply bending the lip on one side of the coffee can, you could make a perfect spout to pour candles.  Metal coffee cans still exist, they are just harder to come by now.  If you do choose to use metal coffee cans as pouring pots, remember to have plenty of heat resistant safety gloves or pot holders available to assist you in holding the hot can.  This only works for metal coffee cans; most companies that sell coffee use plastic cans now.  Unfortunately, these types of cans cannot handle the heat from the melted wax and they will melt; compromising your candle wax and making a big mess to clean up.

Pouring pots, however, are great for candle making.  Not only can they hold up to 4 pounds of melted wax, but they also have a plastic handle on them so there is less chance of burning your hand.

In an ideal situation, you will have a pouring pot for each fragrance that you use to make candles.  For example, if you carry Apple Cinnamon (red), Blueberry Muffin (blue), Fresh Bamboo (green), and Vanilla Silk (no color), that would equate to 4 total pouring pots.  This works because you would never have to worry about jeopardizing your color accuracy or fragrance aromas in finished candles.  But, this is only ideally.  If you are just starting out, one pouring pot will work.  You just have to make sure you thoroughly clean your pouring pot after each use.  You also want to make sure you clean the outside and underneath portion of the pouring pot.  Having debris or wax on the bottom of your pouring pot could result in splatter when the pouring pot is placed in the water to maintain wax temperature.  The hot splatter can be painful.  This splatter is also a reason why wearing safety glasses while making candles is a very good idea.

Candy Thermometer- Wax temperature is everything when making candles.  Usually, if there are problems with your finished candles, temperature has something to do with what went wrong.  Using a thermometer to monitor your temperature in wax is one way to prevent these problems from occurring.  For best results in candle making, pour any single pour waxes at 145-150 degrees Fahrenheit, and any votive or pillar wax at 160-165 degrees Fahrenheit.

Votive and Candle Molds- After purchasing multiple votive molds, you will notice when you receive them, they will be stacked together.  Make sure when you try to pull them apart you are wearing heavy duty gloves.  The edges of stainless steel votives are extremely sharp.  Attempting to pull them apart without gloves will cause cuts on your fingers.

When working with candle molds or votive molds, you always want to make sure that before you pour the hot candle wax into the mold that they are at room temperature.  Completing this one little step will save you the headache of trying to release the candle later.

As for the cleaning process for these types of molds, rub a small amount of shortening in the inside and outside of the molds.  Then, place the molds on a cookie sheet upside down.  Once the cookie sheet has been carefully placed inside the oven, bake at 150 degrees Fahrenheit for 10-15 minutes.  Once the time has elapsed, simply remove the cookie sheet and wipe the individual molds clean.  Caution:  The molds will be hot when taken out of the oven, so you may want to use pot holders.  Please Note:  Never use water with your metal molds.

Work Environment-  Having a favorable work environment for candle making is a must.  Once again, it is all about temperature, and having a room that is 70 degrees Fahrenheit is optimal for the best candle making situation.  Proper ventilation in the room is necessary, but you also have to remember rooms that have drafts will not work for the natural cooling stages of your candles.  Candles that cool too quickly will give you problems with your finished candles aesthetic look or functionality.

Work Clothes– These items may sound silly, but you never want to risk wearing one of your favorite outfits while making candles.  No matter how neat and careful you are, candle dye is permanent, and getting wax, even the smallest amount, on your clothing will ruin them.

Floor Protection-  When making candles, a small spill can have detrimental affects to your work area.  Besides the facts that candle dyes are permanent, wax messes are not the easiest to clean up, and spilled fragrance oil on a floor is super slippery, you do not want to take any chances especially if your work environment is your kitchen.  By purchasing floor mats, or simply placing cardboard on the floor in your work area, you can prevent havoc from occurring.  For you own personal safety, this is one perfect work environment step you do not want to skip.

Stainless Steel Measuring Cups and Spoons- When it comes to measurements for colorants, additives, and fragrance oils, you will want to have your very own candle making stainless steel tools for this portion of the job.  Fragrance oils will dissolve certain plastics, stainless steel measurers will not dissolve and can be cleaned time and time again without staining or scent memory.

Dec
06

Candle Making Equipment


This entry was posted in candle additives, candle colorants, candle dye, candle making, candle making supplies, candle supplies, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

candle making equipmentWhen it comes to candle making there are a few tried and true items that you are going to need in order to create beautiful hand poured candles.  This blog will focus on possible heat sources you will want to use.

Heat Sources

Turkey Roasters- Turkey roasters work great for melting slabs of candle wax.  On average, turkey roasters can hold 20-25 pounds of candle wax at a time, so this is a great solution if you are making big batches of candles.  The average cost of a turkey roaster is anywhere from $40-$100. But, keep in mind that these turkey roasters do go on sale around the holidays, so you might be able to find a bargain.  When melting wax in a turkey roaster you will want to keep the temperature set at 175 degrees Fahrenheit.  You will also want to make sure that you have the bottom portion of the pan filled with about ¼” water.  If you do not fill this area with water, you will notice that the wax will not melt properly.  Also, you will risk burning up your turkey roaster and rearing it useless.  But, remember ¼” is the magic amount.  Using more than this amount will result in having water bubble up and entering your work space.  Try not to let any water enter the melting wax.  Water is waxes worst enemy, and water in your melted wax will result with holes in your finished candles.

If you do get water in your wax, or you notice water in wax; put your turkey roaster on the low setting and keep it uncovered.  This will allow the water to evaporate out.  When wax is made into slabs, the manufacturer uses water to cool the wax.  Sometimes, water can get trapped in the wax as it cools, and this creates water pockets.   The water will evaporate; just keep an eye on the wax.

Besides working with a single pour wax, if you choose to also make votives and or pillars, you will want to have a second turkey roaster for this wax.  It is very important that you keep the waxes separated.  If you do not, chances are your single wax will require a second pour.  But, do not stress too much if a small amount of votive/pillar wax gets into your single pour wax.  A little bit of the waxes mixing should not give you any major issues.

Stove/Hot Plate- Besides the turkey roaster, you will also need a secondary heat source.  This is because you will need to maintain your melted wax temperature (or pouring temperature) as you add colorants, additives, or fragrance oils.  A stove or hot plate are great secondary heat sources.

By using a 13” x 9” cake pan you can create the same double boiler situation like you have in your turkey roaster.  This time fill the bottom of the cake pan ½” with water.  Then, set the stove or hot plate to a low to medium heat setting.  Place the cake pan with water on top of the burner and allow the water to heat.

Ideally, a stove works best for this situation, especially if you also warm your candle containers before pouring the hot candle wax into them.  Warming your containers will help to prevent jump lines from occurring in your candles.  Jump lines occur when the melted wax cools too quickly in your jars.  Warming your candle jars levels the “temperature playing field” if you will, allowing the wax to cool in its own natural time by decreasing the gap in temperature between the hot wax and warmed jars.