Posts Tagged ‘wholesale candle making supplies’

What Are Wet Spots in Candles?

Monday, July 29th, 2013
soy464

Using a wax like Golden Foods Soy Wax 464, and a few preventative measures can help eliminate wet spots from your candles.

 

What are Wet Spots in Candles?

The term “wet spots” in candle making refers to the spots or patches in container candles that appear to have air, or a wet spot showing through the glass or transparent container and the candle wax.  Wet spots are extremely common and are one of the most common complaints among candle makers.   However, wet spots will not inhibit the functionality of your candle, just the aesthetic appeal.

What causes Wet Spots?

1.  Pouring hot candle wax into too cold of a container.
2.  Pouring your melted candle wax at a temperature much cooler than what is suggested.
3.  Using a pillar/votive wax for container candles instead of a container wax that is formulated for that purpose.
4.  Cooling your candles too fast; subjecting your candles to an environment which has drafts or is lower than 70-72 degrees.
5.  Pouring candle wax into dirty containers.

How to Avoid Wet Spots?

1.  Try to eliminate or prevent wet spots by thoroughly washing and drying your containers before using.  This will get any dust or debris out that may have fallen into your jars.

2.  Be sure to use a container wax so that your wax adheres properly to your container.  Votive/pillar waxes are not suggested for container candles.  Wax like Golden Foods Soy Wax 464, is a great start.  This type of soy wax has a wonderful adhesion to glass containers, therefore minimizing the chances of getting wet spots.

3.  Heat your jars/containers at the lowest setting on a cookie sheet in the oven for twenty minutes prior to filling them.  This also allows for the candle wax to cool slowly which allows for better adhesion to the container.

4.  Another thing that tends to reduce the occurrence of wet spots is pouring your candles inside the box the candle jars came in.  This helps to insulate your candles while they cool slowly.  Allow your candles to set up at room temperature, in a room that has no drafts.

5.  If you start to see the wet spots taking place as the candle is cooling, this means you should consider increasing your pour temperature.  Testing with a thermometer is key here.  Follow the manufacturer’s recommended pour temperature.

 

What are Jump Lines in Candles?

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013
jump-lines1

We tried numerous times to recreate jump lines, however because of our flaming awesomeness, every candle was jump-line-less. So, we had to find a stock photo that best represents jump lines.

What are Jump Lines in Candles

Jump lines are the visible horizontal rings that occur on the sides of your candles.  These lines look like ridges and prevent your candle from having a smooth finish.  Ideally, to have a perfect candle pour, your candle wax will still be in a complete liquid state once it has been poured into your container/pillar.  This is the best shot you can give your candle to completely and uniformly cool naturally, therefore decreasing your chances of getting jump lines.  All candle wax has to conform to the sides of the container/pillar mold at the same rate of time.  This provides for the smooth finish of a candle.

In candle making when you are pouring the hot wax, it will begin to cool as soon as it hits the jar.  As this happens, you will visibly be able to see wax layers materialize.  If you do not pour quickly enough, the wax will naturally start to harden and stick to the wall of the container/ pillar mold.  Since the temperature of the jar stays consistent, there is no heat source to re-melt the wall portion, therefore showing each line of cooled wax aka jump lines. 

How do you prevent jump lines from occurring?

Jump lines can occur for several reasons, the first of which is intentionally.  Jump lines can also be created on purpose to give candles a textured look.  Since jump lines are an aesthetic thing, they do not have any kind of effect on the candles burn or scent throw. 

One of the first things as a preventative measure that you can do is pour your wax at the correct temperature.  You can do this by using a candy thermometer.  You may have to increase your pouring temperature to adjust for jump lines.  This is where testing and note taking will come into play.  As always, it is of the utmost importance for candle making that your jars and/or pillars are room temperature.  The second measure you can take is to heat your jars at the lowest setting on a cookie sheet in the oven for twenty minutes prior to filling them.

Another important factor in combating jump lines is your pouring rate.  Obviously, you do not want to pour fast, this will result in wax splashing everywhere.  And, adversely, you do not want to pour so slowly that you can actually see the jump lines establishing themselves in the candle.  Find your pouring medium.  If you are seeking a fool proof way to prevent jump lines from the pouring stage, try counting seconds or singing a lyric of a song.  These tricks will help you stay uniform with your pour.

How to correct jump lines?

Although all of the steps mentioned earlier are great ways to prevent jump lines, once they have occurred in your candles you really only have a one option.  Using a heat gun or hair dryer to heat the outside of the candle will remelt the outside layer of the wax, this will mask the jump lines from visible view, but once again, jump lines have no direct effect on a candle.

Can You Use Crayons to Color Candles

Thursday, June 27th, 2013
fragrance oils

In order for your candles to achieve the most vibrant colors or pleasing pastels possible, a candle dye or candle colorant must be used. Using other forms of colorant may result in an nonfunctional candle.

Can you use crayons to color candles?

Although, staring at a beautiful stack of wonderfully vibrant crayons, we can understand why there would be an urge to use crayons as a colorant for candles.  I mean, let’s look at what a crayon is…a stick of colored wax, right?  Logically, they should work.  However, this is absolutely not the case.

You should never use crayons to color your candles.  The reasoning behind this is the actual colorant of the crayon.  These colors are achieved with the use of pigments, and pigments unfortunately are not soluble.  What this means is that when a crayon is melted, the color of the crayon breaks down into small pigment particles that exist in a dispersed manner among the melted wax.  These pigments appear as if they had changed the color of the wax; like candle dyes do because dyes dissolve into the candle wax, but remember the pigments are simply dispersed.

Now, due to the way that a wick works in candles, there must be a melt pool apparent to keep a candle flame going.  As the wick continues to burn, the melted wax from the wet pool is pulled through the wick.  This is how the fragrance (or hot scent throw) of the candle is released into the air.  The problem that coloring with crayons in candles presents is that since the pigments and the wax never combine, the pigments are also pulled up through the wick.  But, these pigments will not, unlike the melted wax, flow properly through the wick.  These pigments will in fact clog your wick.

The results of a clogged wick prevent your candles from burning properly, inhibit your candles hot scent throw, and will even cause your candles to smoke.

So, in summary no matter how tempting that box of 64 crayons look, never use crayons to color your candles. You will want to stick with dyes specifically formulated for candle making;  Natures Garden offers liquid candle dyes and color block dyes in an array of vibrant colors.

Candle Starter Kit Starts It All

Tuesday, May 28th, 2013

Fragrance OilsWhat’s your name & Your Company Name: Just my Scent Homemade Soy Candles, Tarts & More

In 2008 I needed Christmas gifts for my family members , so I ordered a starter candle kit. After giving them as gifts others around my candles enjoyed them so much they asked if I could make more. I now have my candles in 3 locations including the local farmers market. I have been asked to be the candle supplier for a new farmers market opening soon. I do local craft shows, fundraisers and have a yearly fall open house at my home.  I have been overwhelmed with the turn out of the open house. Everyone always looks forward to it in November. Next month I am having my very first Candle/Tart party where I will have cash & carry items, and will take orders. I will also be booking future parties with great gifts to the hostess. I sell Candles in jars, crocks and an apple shape jar, I live in apple country and our local high school’s mascot is an apple. The apple jar is only filled with apple scents to go with the theme. I also make tarts, I have them at a local hair salon and they are flying off the rack. I owe a lot of my success to Nature’s Garden for their wonderful products. I receive so many compliments on the scents that I use and they all come from Nature’s Garden. I recently visited my daughter who lives in another state and took her a starter kit and now she has her own business of Soy Melts using all Nature’s Garden supplies. Her first few weeks she sold over $400.00 in Soy Melts to neighbors and co workers, she is excited to do her first home party. Thank You Nature’s Garden for helping my daughter and me with our business, we love it!

Red Delicious Apple, Red Hot Cinnamon, Apple Cinnamon and Black Raspberry Vanilla

Your Website: justmyscent.com

Facebook page: www.facebook.com/JustmyScent

Twitter: https://twitter.com/JustmyScent

Scented Pillar Candles with Texture

Saturday, May 25th, 2013

Fragrance OilsWhat’s your name & Your Company Name: My name is Jennifer McGrath and my company is Burning Tears by Madame Jen.

Just about five years ago I started making candles. I originally started making candles for my own home using combinations of color and fragrances for luck, prosperity and spiritual guidance. As time went by I felt the need to share, so I handed some candles to my family, a few friends & my co-workers, even my loving husband started taking them to work at the tattoo shop. It took about two years later for me to build the confidence and start selling my candles.

The name Burning Tears by Madame Jen came from the candles flame. If you look at a candles flame, it’s in the form of a tear drop. My girlfriends call me “The Madame”, being dark by nature; the two magically came together “Burning Tears by Madame Jen”. I originally started off making candles using paraffin wax, and then I had customers asking if I offered soy. So I dropped the paraffin wax and strictly stuck with soy for a while. Early last year I felt like I needed something new to do. There’s only so much you can do with soy. I had actually considered making soap, but wasn’t sure that I wanted to learn something completely new. There was so much hard work that came with perfecting the perfect candle. I’m a full time paralegal with two children, so I stuck with what I knew. I picked up some slabs of paraffin wax and started to play again. This filled me with joy. I love creating pillar candles with different textures and color combinations. You just never know what is going to come out of the mold in the morning, each candle is so unique. So now I offer both soy and paraffin in my line, just about every shape or form i.e. pillars, tin containers, glass jars, warmers, votives and tea lights.

Now, just about every month I’m doing a new craft market/festival. I even have a baby shower and three weddings under my belt. My candles are also sold at a handful of boutiques here in Atlanta. I have always been a crafty person and love creating, but candle making is the one thing that really stuck to me. I not only love making candles for myself , but it makes me very happy and love to hear when my customers tell me how much they are enjoying them too.

I tried to combine a photograph of a handful of my candle creations using Natures Garden’s fragrance oils. Top left is Sweet Grass, 4×6 pillar I made using paraffin wax, very natural crisp and clean scent; Top right is Lily of the Valley using soy in a recycled salsa jar. I’ve never smelled Lily of the Valley before, I’m more of a earthy fragrance kinda gal and this is just a beautiful floral scent!; Bottom left is Lemon Grass using soy in a clamshell which is so clean and refreshing; Bottom right is Dragons Blood which is my ABSOLUTE favorite of my NG oils. Right along with my other top fave is Frankincense & Myrrh (not depicted  here, but totally worth the shout out).Fragrance Oils

Your Website: www.burningtearsbymadamejen.com

Facebook page: www.facebook.com/BurningTearsByMadameJen

Twitter: https://twitter.com/madame_jen

Pinterest Page: http://pinterest.com/themadamejen/

Products Customers Love

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

fragrance oilsWhat’s your name & Your Company Name:  My name: Kymberlee Ricke  Company Name: Wizard at Work

Why did you decide to go into business?  What was your motivation?  How long have you been in business?  I’ve been crafting my whole life and I had a brief flirtation with soap making for craft shows about ten years ago.  When the economy hit me and I became unemployed I discovered that I suddenly had both time and motivation to re-energize my crafting and I began making soaps, candles and bath bombs and listing them on Etsy.  My shop opened in 2010.

3.  What products do you make and sell?  I primarily sell soap, candles, bath bombs and solid lotion bars.  I also toss in a few papercrafts like cards and gift tags and some of my photography and jewelry.

4.  What are your business goals?  My first goal is to make a product my customers love.  I use the minimal number of ingredients and avoid chemicals everywhere possible to make skin-friendly, child-friendly, wallet-friendly products.   On the financial side, this year my winter holiday season was successful enough that I can afford to go on one of my ‘bucket list’ photography trips this summer.  If I can do that each year, I’ll be thrilled.

5.  What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?  Of course I go through a ton of fragrance oils in my business.  Pomegranate and Peach are huge favorites with my customers.  I also use the Dill Pickle for something a little off the beaten path. And of course there’s always the good old stand-bys like vanilla, lavender and coffee. I use the 415 Soy Wax in my candles as well as in my vegan-option lip balms and solid lotion bars (it replaces the beeswax).fragrance oils

Website:  https://www.etsy.com/shop/WizardAtWork

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Wizard-at-Work/247746611938951

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/wizardatwork/etsy/