Tag Archives: ways to melt soap

Apr
22

Rebatching Soap


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath and body fragrances, bath products, cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, homemade, Natures Garden, soap ingredients, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies, soap mold and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

rebatching soap Whether you view rebatching as an art, a doorway for the addition of gentle ingredients, or a second chance for your soap, this method of soap making offers opportunity.

The term rebatching for soap simply means remaking soap.  This method would be very similar to melt and pour soap in that you are melting down soap that has already gone through the saponification process.  Rebatching is more intricate than melt and pour soap though.  Rebatching involves cold processed or hot processed soap bars that are melted down for specific reasons.

A common technique used in soap making, rebatching allows many soap making handcrafters the chance to rework their soap recipes, introduce delicate scents and herbs, as well as add ingredients or colors they may have missed the opportunity to add the first time.

Since rebatched soap has already gone through the saponification process, the rebatching steps do not involve lye.  This is why rebatching allows the opportunity to add those delicate soaping ingredients; without fear.  With the rebatching method, these ingredients; which normally would not survive the saponification process, now have the chance to add wonderful benefits to your finished bars of soap.

Although time consuming, the rebatch process is fairly easy to do.  To put it briefly, the rebatching process is finely grating the soap, then heating (sometimes with the addition of a liquid like water to help prevent burning).  There are a few different ways to introduce heat to the shredded soap.  These ways would include:  double boiler, microwave, and crock pot.  But, please advise: you must monitor the soap while it is heating because you never want to scorch the soap.  This may be slightly more difficult using the microwave approach.

Now, as the soap is heated and starts to liquefy; it will have a very thick gel like density.  Once the soap hits this consistency, any additives or scents are added and stirred in.  Once the soap is stirred well, it is then scooped into a mold, left to harden, and finally cut into slices.

So, now that you have an understanding as to what the method of rebatching is, we will shortly post a blog as to the various reasons to rebatch.  This post will also cover the benefits as well as the drawbacks of rebatching your soap.

Apr
18

Why Rebatch


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, body safe fragrance oils, cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, essential oils, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, homemade soap, natural colorants, Natures Garden, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

rebatch soapRebatching your soap can literally be a “saving redo” for your soap recipe.

Sometimes your homemade soap bars are cracked, brittle, or just not performing like what you were hoping for. 

These are all perfect examples as to why you would rebatch your recipe.  But, it just doesn’t stop there. 

Soapers rebatch a soap recipe for a variety of reasons.  Below is a list of the benefits and key points you should know about rebatching a soap recipe.  Rebatching soap is essentially making the soap twice.  The first time you are completing the saponification process.  (Or, you may be using soap that has already been through the saponification process.)  Then, the second time you grate down the soap and melt it (for the reason you are rebatching). 

Benefits of a Rebatch
Rebatching a soap recipe for the addition of heat sensitive ingredients: 

Sometimes with homemade soap crafting, there are certain fragrances or essential oils that you really want to scent your soap bars; but worry that the scents cannot handle the high heat due to the saponification process.  Many times with low flash point fragrances or essential oils, there is scent burn off.  What results in your finished bars is soap that has little or no scent.  Rebatching soap will not only safely allow you to add these heat sensitive scents, but allow them to stay true to their scent (less burn off). 

Also, some fragrance oils may cause cold process soap to seize (turning your soap into a solid mass with no fluidity).  If you have your heart set on using one of these fragrances in your soap recipe, it can be done through the process of rebatching; without seizing your batch.  Usually fragrance oils that seize  your soap contain DPG.  None of the fragrance oils we carry at Natures Garden contain DPG. 

When it comes to coloring for cold process soap, it is very important to select ones that do not morph.  Through the process of rebatching, you do not need to worry about pH sensitive colorants.  And, sometimes this is just the answer to achieve that certain color.  With rebatch soap, the soap base that you are using has already completed the saponification process; therefore, the colorants that normally would discolor will not.   This is true for herbs that are used as natural soap colorants as well.  Although it should be stated that some herbs naturally discolor due to oxidation. 

Herbs not only offer color, but also wonderful and various benefits to your finished bars of soap.  The only problem is they can directly affect your soaping procedure.  Many herbs can speed up trace.  Even more so, some herbs cannot survive the saponification process and will discolor as a result.  With rebatching, this is not as big of an issue.  Herbs like lavender flowers, for example, can be added without worrying that those beautiful flowers will turn brown. 

Rebatch Opportunity
Rebatching allows for perfection:

Rebatching is also a wonderful method to use to correct a soap recipe.  Things can get a little chaotic when soaping, and it could be possible that you overlooked adding one of your soaping ingredients and did not realize it until after the soap was molded.  This resulted in your finished bars being too lye heavy.  A rebatch allows you the perfect opportunity to add that missing ingredient and balance out your soap.  This opportunity also allows for superfatting a recipe after saponification; or correcting soap bars that are too soft (made with too many fats or soft oils).

It is possible too that while making soap, your batter becomes too thick too quick for the addition of color or scent.  With rebatch, the soap can be scented and colored like you never missed a beat. 

Rebatch can also help correct a false trace recipe.
 
Rebatch, a Second Chance for Soaps
Sometimes, as a soaper, you will have pounds of soap scraps that you have on hand.  Rebatching the soap lets you make loaves (and bars) of them once more.  And will clear out all of that soaping space. 

Points to Know about Rebatch
Some soapers love to rebatch soap, others rebatch only when necessary, and some soapers just do not like to rebatch.  What ever your stance is on rebatch, it is a method that allows for many otherwise missed opportunities.   Here are some key points to know about rebatch. 

When making soap that is a rebatch, it will never completely liquefy.  Even after spending hours in the crock pot, or on the stove top (with the double boiler method), the best you will ever achieve is more of a thick gel like state.  Sometimes the soap may even be globby like.  This does not affect the soap being soap, but it will affect the finished look of your bars. 

When it comes to molding your rebatch soap, it is highly likely to get trapped air bubbles.  This is just the nature of the thick gel like globby beast.  It is extremely important to tap your mold as your fill it to prevent these pesky little buggers from being a problem in your finished soap bars.  You may also notice that it may be slightly more difficult to mold your soap while in this state.  This will be especially true if you are used to pouring it (like cold process soap batter).  With rebatch soap, you will need a ladle and scoop the rebatch soap into your mold. 

For the finished bars of rebatch soap, they will look very similar to hot process soap bars.  They have a very rustic look to them, and will not have the traditional smooth and creamy look that cold process has. 

On a final note, rebatching soap is truly a labor of love.  There will be lots of TLC (because of the time put in) and additional work to do this method.  But, if you are willing to put in the extra effort in (grating the soap), you will be able to rebatch your soap and have the end results that you are looking to achieve. 

Apr
17

How to Rebatch


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, body safe fragrance oils, cold process soap, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, homemade soap, how to rebatch, Natures Garden, soap ingredients, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies, soap safety and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

rebatched soap How to Rebatch

Sometimes it is a hard pill to swallow, but when it comes to soaping, mistakes will be made, tears will fall, and you learn from your errors!

This week, we had a slight oversight.

All of our soaping ingredients were weighed out and ready for the combination and melt down.  We had the lye and water ready to make the lye mixture.  Everything else was prepped and ready to go.

We put on our safety gear and started the soap making procedure.  Everything seemed to be going flawlessly.  Our scent was perfect, the color combination was the spot on, and the soap batter poured beautifully into the mold.  It was soaping bliss.

Then, we started cleaning up.  That was when we found the sunflower oil.  It was still in its dish, waiting to be added to the soap recipe.  And, it was about 5% of our total soaping oils no less.

Devastated, it was now time to play the waiting game.  We had to wait for our beautiful soap to mold for at least 24 hours before it would be sturdy enough to remove it.

What resulted, after unmolding, was a gorgeous shade of green soap that broke into pieces when sliced.  Our soap was too lye heavy.  And, we knew this was because of the forgotten and overlooked sunflower oil.

One way to correct this soaping error was through rebatching.  Rebatching is almost like a do over for soap.  Although there are various reasons as to why you would rebatch, one of them is the fact that you can add an oil to your soap.  Our soaping oversight would be a perfect example to rebatch.

So, in order to save the 4 pound soap batch we had, we decided that we would take this opportunity to learn about rebatching and write a blog post on how to rebatch.  Although it was the very first time we ever attempted a rebatch, here is the process we did to show how to rebatch soap (pictures included).

Step 1:  Grate the soap.  This was no small feat for us.  In total, 4 pounds of soap took us about 45 minutes to do.

grating soap for rebatch

Step 2:  Melt the soap back down.  For this we selected to use our crock pot.  Since we had missed the first opportunity to add the sunflower oil, we did this now to the grated soap.

superfatting the rebatch

Step 3:  Stir.  Actually, this step is more like trying to rotate the soap.  Since you never want to scorch your soap when using a crock pot, this stir was more like a rotation of the soap within the crock pot.

melting the grated soap

Step 4:  Wait about 25-30 minutes, then check the soap again and stir/rotate.  The longer the soap melts, you will notice more of it becoming very gel like.

soap is still melting down

Step 5:  At this point, we noticed that the soap looked a little dry.  If this occurs, add a little water.

adding water to rebatch
Step 6:  Stir to disperse the water among all of the soap.

stirring the water through all of the soap
Step 7:  Wait for another 20 minutes or so, then give the soap a good stir.

a final good stir before rescenting
Step 8:  Add fragrance and stir.  Although we did scent the original batch, we wanted to rescent the rebatch for any scent that may have been lost through the saponification process and the reheating process.

rescenting and stirring one final time
Step 9:  Get your mold, and start to fill it with the soap.  Remember to tap your mold as you fill to reduce any bubbles that may be trapped in your soap.

molding your rebatch soap
Step 10:  Continue filling your mold and tapping it until all of the soap is out of the crock pot and into your mold.

molded rebatch soap
Step 11:  Insulate and wait.  The soap will need about 12 hours or so in the mold.  Once the time elapses, remove the soap from the molds and slice.

Our rebatched soap bars are awesome now.  They have a creamy full lather, and even better they don’t crumble and are actual bars!  Although the finished rebatch bars do have a rustic appeal, it kind of suits them.  Overall, this was a great learning experience, and we were able to save the 4 pound batch of soap.  Learning how to rebatch really was not difficult, and was well worth the effort in the end.