Tag Archives: soapmaking

Oct
18

Rose Hips

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, herbal oil infusion, herbs, lotion, Natures Garden, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

rose hips Rose Hips

For all the crafters out there, do you like to experiment with different flowers and herbs? Have you ever tried rose hips? If you haven’t, you should definitely get on that! Rose hips can be used for many different products and many different industries as well! There are many foods and even some beverages that include rose hips, and other industries it can be used in are hair care, skin care, soaps, bath and body products and even medicinal. This plant is something you should put on your list of projects to try, because once you finish reading this blog I’m sure you won’t be able to resist!

Rose hips, which is also known as rose hep or rose haw, is the fruit that grows on rose plants. It is in the family Rosaceae, and is a part of the Rosa genus. It is native to Europe, North Africa, North America, and certain parts of Asia. The rose is actually America’s National Floral Emblem, as well as the state flower of Iowa, Georgia, New York, North Dakota and the District of Columbia. There are over 100 species of rose plants, and each species has a different look. Some can grow up to 20 feet, while some only grow up to 3 feet high. George Washington, America’s first president, was actually a rose breeder!

There are many medicinal benefits to using rose hips. It contains many antioxidants like flavinoids, catechins, carotenoids, leucoanthocyanins, and polyphenols that help to prevent heart disease and even cancer. Rose hips can also help to fight off infections in the body and strengthen the immune system as well as treating many different skin problems such as burns and acne. Other skin ailments include helping wounds to heal faster, regenerating skin cells, slowing the aging process, giving the skin a beautiful healthy glow, and keeping the skin moist and hydrated. Rose hips also contain Vitamin C which is a necessity for pregnant women to help them build collagen for themselves and their baby. Even an itching powder can be made from this wonderful fruit! But please don’t take this blog as medical advice! Always consult a doctor before using any product in place of medical treatment!

Many bath and body products can be made with this amazing ingredient as well! If you’re a soap maker, ground up rose hips powder is an awesome addition to your soaps and even bath teas. Do you have brittle nails? Try rose hips oil! Rubbing it on your nails actually helps to hydrate and nourish them! Are you looking to add more bounce to your hair? Adding rose hips to your hair care will help to add the bounciness and even make your hair silkier! Are you officially intrigued with this fantastic product? Wondering how to get your hands on some as soon as possible? Have no fear, we have Rose Hips Powder! And it gets even better! We also offer many free recipes, including our Herbal Infused Shea Lotion! However, we sell rose hips for external use only!

The easiest way to find both of these products on our site is just by typing “rose hips” into the search bar. That will take your directly to our “Rose Hips Powder” page. On the top of the picture, there is a little green link that says “Recipe.” Just click that and it will take you right to a picture and link for our herbal infused lotion recipe. Be sure to try out some rose hips as soon as possible! And watch out for more Enlightened by Layla!

rose hips pageNote: Natures Garden sells our herbs for external use only. We do not sell them as food items. (The information we provide is for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration). Keep all herbs out of reach of children and pets. Special care should be taken by pregnant and/or lactating women when handling herbs. Natures Garden accepts no responsibility (written or implied) for any products you make with our herbs. All testing is the responsibility of the customer.

 

 

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Oct
13

Butterfly Flower Scent

This entry was posted in bath and body, candle making supplies, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, Soap making supplies, wholesale fragrance oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

butterfly flower scentButterfly Flower Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Butterfly Flower is a beautiful scent designed to remind you of all the loveliness of spring and summer time. Your mind will wander to thoughts of fresh new plants and trees sprouting and growing in the spring and then the beautiful greens of the summer. Childhood memories will come flooding back of years past spent chasing butterflies with your family and friends. You friends, family and customers are sure to love this special scent. They will love the feeling of happiness that comes along with it and will smile at their childhood memories as well.

 

What Does Butterfly Flower Smell Like?

Butterfly Flower Fragrance Oil by Nature’s Garden is a unique scent with notes of fresh ozone leading into a green floral bouquet. A twist of shimmering greens mixed with a blend of sage and lily as the floralcy is bright accented by tangy cassis tones. At the base of the scent, musk is blended with sweet amber and crisp orange flowers.

 

How Do Our Customers Use Butterfly Flower?

If you are in the mood for a unique and spring-like scent, then Butterfly Flower is the perfect scent for you. This fragrance performs perfectly in soy way, wow wax and joy wax. Would you love to fill your house with this beautiful spring scent? You can have exactly what you want by using it in aroma beads!

For bath and body products, our Butterfly Flower scent has a usage rate of 5%. This delightful fragrance can be used in many different personal care products such as soaps, bath gels, bath oils, perfumes and lotions. If you would like to use this scent for incense or potpourri, it has a usage rate of 50%. This scent is also amazing for cold process soaping. Our CP findings are: it is a perfect pour with no ricing or acceleration. There is no discoloration and gives a very nice floral scent. However, it should be used at cool temperatures.

 

This is such a delightful scent, but guess what? It doesn’t stop there! We also offer a hilariously adorable recipe made with this fragrance! Our free Muddy Pigs Bath Bomb Recipe is a treat that you and your kiddos will definitely love!

Muddy Pig Bath Bomb

Your kids will absolutely adore making these fun bath treats with you. If you are in need of a project for a rainy day, or just want a fun way to spend time with them, these bath bombs will be a definite hit!

Wondering how to easily find all this awesomeness on our site? In our search bar, just type in “butterfly flower.” That will take you directly to our Butterfly Flower fragrance oil. On the top of the fragrance picture, there is a little link in a green box that says “Recipe.” When you click on that, it will show you a picture and link for our Muddy Pigs Bath Bomb Recipe. Click on it and you will go straight to the recipe for the kid loving treat! Please contact us with any problems, thoughts, or concerns you may have and watch out for more Enlightened by Layla!

butterfly flower fragrance page

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Apr
29

Insulating Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath and body fragrances, cold process soap, cold process soap scents, homemade soap, Natures Garden, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies, soap mold and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

insulating soap In an earlier blog post, we discussed how insulating soap to promote gel phase was a matter of personal choice. Whether you insulate or choose not to, your soap will still be soap.

When it comes to whether you choose to insulate or not, really there are only two factors that will change. The first is the amount of cure time. Due to the fact that the saponification process is slowed down by the prevention of gel phase, your soap may need extra cure time before use. On the other hand, promoting a full gel phase for your soap means an accelerated saponification process with a normal cure time. And, the second difference is an aesthetic one.

The finished look of your soap will differ slightly based upon whether you choose to prevent gel phase or encourage it. By preventing gel phase (sticking your molded soap in the fridge or freezer), your finished soap will have a matte look to it. By promoting gel phase, your finished soap will have a slight translucent, shiny look to it. Again, however, please remember regardless of which method you choose either method results with finished soap.

When making soap, it is important to remember that the gel phase occurs during the saponification process. While your soap is in the mold, the various soaping ingredients react with the lye mixture, and heat is used to help the acceleration of the whole saponification process. When choosing to promote gel phase during saponification, it can be accomplished through means of insulation.

Insulating your soap means wrapping the soap with various layers in an attempt to keep the heat within the soap. Because the saponification process is endothermic (meaning the process pulls heat from its surroundings), keeping the soap insulated is the best means to successfully promoting gel phase throughout your whole soap. It will also help to prevent a partial gel. If you remember, a partial gel is where the center of your soap achieves gel phase, but the outside areas do not. This typically occurs because the outside of the soap looses heat in a quicker fashion therefore inhibiting the ideal environment for a full gel phase to occur.

Through the means of insulation, you can provide your soap with its ideal environment (heat wise).  And, when it comes to insulation for your soap, there are many different items you can use.  These items would include: newspaper, cardboard, blankets, towels, etc.  Practically, you can use any layer type material that will keep the heat in the soap (but never aluminum foil).

Many soapers will use various items in combination such as: wrapping the soap with saran wrap (especially if the soap has a decorated top), then covering it with newspaper, surrounded by towels, and finally placed under a box. There really is no limit for insulation. And, many believe that over insulating can never be done. Remember the key to insulating, if you are choosing to promote the gel phase; is to keep as much heat in the soap as possible.

However, please note: If you are soaping a recipe that does contain sugar or dairy products, you may want to go a little on the lighter side of insulating due to the fact that these items in your recipe will increase heat during the saponification process. Extreme insulating in these examples may cause the ingredients to “burn”, possibly resulting in discoloration and an off smell in your finished soaps.  It can also cause your soap batter to begin to bubble out of your mold.  You do however have the choice of preventing the gel phase for these types of recipes, and sticking your molded soap in the fridge or freezer.

Apr
26

Gel Phase

This entry was posted in all natural, bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, essential oil, fragrance and color, Fragrance Oils, homemade soap, Natures Garden, soap fragrances, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies, soap mold, soaping terms and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

inhibited gel phase soap In an earlier blog post, we briefly discussed insulation of cold process soap. Through insulating your soap, you are encouraging the best environment for the gel phase to occur during saponification. Keeping the soap evenly heated using insulation will prevent a partial gel from occurring. But, still there are no guarantees. Even with the best insulation, you may still end up with bars of soap that have partial gel evident.

So, what if you prevented the gel phase in your soap?

Although this is possible, it is still not guaranteed. It can be very tough to prevent the gel phase. But, there are some factors that need to be noted to help you in your quest to stop the gel phase. These factors are: the size of your mold, and the various ingredients in your recipe. The saponification process involves heat; it is the nature of the soaping beast. Choosing to eliminate the gel phase will change some elements to your soap and soaping process.

But, before we get to that information, let’s look at some specific reasons to prohibit the gel phase.

First, since you are decreasing the amount of heat that is in your soap, this will allow you to introduce certain soaping ingredients that normally would be finicky. Examples of these heat sensitive ingredients would be: dairy products, heat sensitive colorants; prone to morphing, and fragrances or essential oils with a low flashpoint.

Dairy Products
Soaping with ingredients such as creams, milks, and butters for example will provide your finished bars with rich, extra moisturizing elements. However, soaping with dairy products can be tricky. With the heat that is involved with the saponification process, there is a chance that dairy products will burn. This results in both discoloration and an off smell in your soap. By preventing the gel phase from occurring, you allow these ingredients a fighting chance in soap. And, you can even produce a creamier bar of finished soap.

Colorants
Whether you are deciding to go the natural route with herbs, or using colorants that you worry may morph; preventing gel phase allows the window of opportunity to stay open. Certain herbs discolor or darker from the saponification process. The same is true for some colorants that completely alter like deep purple to brown.

Now, for the colorants in the finished soap when the gel phase is eliminated: the bar colors are bolder and more vivid. Even if you choose not to color your soap batter, the elimination of the gel phase stops the darkening of the fats and oils in your recipe, allowing for a “whiter” finished bar.

Scenting Options
If you do not want to rebatch your soap recipe, preventing the gel phase in your cold process soap may allow you to scent your soap with low flashpoint oils without worrying that the saponification process will eliminate the scent. It is also possible for fragrance or essential oil scents to come through stronger in the soap because of the reduction of heat.

As for what preventing the gel phase means for your soaps, there are key points you should know. First, you must keep your molded soap chilled for the full 24 hours. Depending on your recipe, you may have to keep the soap chilled for an additional 24 hours as well.

Now, when you are ready to unmold your soap, it is crucial to let your molded soap reach room temperature before trying to slice it. Not allowing your soap to be at room temperature before cutting may result with your bars being brittle, and breaking apart as you slice them.

As for the saponification process, since you inhibit the gel phase, it will take your soaps longer to complete the saponification process. What this means is that the soap will need additional cure time before it will be ready to use.

So, whether you choose to insulate or prevent the gel phase, it is really up to personal discretion. Regardless of the method, the result is the same; a finished bar of soap. The only variables that change are the molding environment and the cure time.

Apr
24

Insulate Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, homemade soap, make your own soap, Natures Garden, soap, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies, soap mold, wholesale supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

insulate soap As soap crafters, there are hundreds of variances allotted to us that allow our soaps to be special. Maybe it is the combination of oils in your recipe, the process to which you soap, your unique scents, your particular decorating method, or really any number of things that makes your soap exclusive. Well, in this blog post, we are going to throw a new option into the mix.

To insulate or not to insulate that is the question.

As with many aspects of soap making; when it comes to insulation, it is really a personal preference.

Being new to soap making, a lot of research is involved. You read, read, and read some more in order to learn everything you can about soap making. Well, as many of us found, insulating is always advised.

The insulating step involves taking your freshly poured, molded soap, and surrounding it with layers. These layers help to keep the soap at an even heat while the batter goes through the saponification process. During the saponification process, as the lye reacts with the various soap making ingredients, soap (and glycerin) is produced. The process itself is an endothermic reaction, meaning that it absorbs heat from the surroundings.

This “heat stage” of soap making is commonly called the gel phase. During the gel phase, saponification works at an accelerated rate, hardening the fats of your recipe. This phase will also be the time where any discoloration of ingredients or colorants will occur from the heat.

Keeping the soap uniformly heated will prevent a partial gel from occurring. Not keeping the soap uniformly heated allows for the soap that is in the center of the mold to stay hot, while the soap on the outside loses heat rapidly. And, since the saponification process is endothermic, it needs to be able to draw heat from its surroundings. What this results in is an off colored look in the center of your soap, usually in an oval like shape. This shows that the center of the soap gelled, and the outside of the soap never reached gel phase.

Speaking in terms of soap, gel phase or not reaching gel phase does not harm the soap itself. The soap will still function after cure; it is only an aesthetic issue. So, it is for this reason that it is often believed that insulation is vital to an amazing looking bar of cold process soap. But, there is an alternative.

Lets look at the flip side.  If you do not want to insulate the heat in the soap, what would happen if you chilled the soap instead?

Chilling your molded soap would prevent the gel phase from occurring. This would be a handy trick of the trade for a few reasons. It should however, be noted though that in order for the gel phase prevention to occur, you need to be able to control the area. Operating out of a loaf mold for example, still allows enough soap in the middle for a partial gel to occur. You want to keep the size of the soap easily manageable for temperature reasons. Remember, because saponification deals with heat, while the lye and fats are reacting, heat will be present. To completely increase your chances of preventing the gel phase, you must minimize the area that needs chilled, aka use smaller molds.

Not insulating your soap, and instead placing your freshly molded soap into the fridge or freezer for 24 hours will help to prevent the gel phase from occurring. But, please note the size of your soap will directly determine whether the gel phase will occur or not.   This also rings true for the soaping ingredients that are in your recipe. Chilling your soap is not a guarantee, partial gelling can still transpire.

In closing, there is another option if you choose not to insulate your soap. There are benefits and drawbacks to chilling your soap. Stay tuned for a future blog posts discussing preventing gel phase and what the outcome will be.

 

Apr
14

Brittle Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, handmade soap, homemade soap, how to make cold process soap, make your own soap, natural colorants, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies, soap mold, soap recipe, soap supplies, sodium lactate and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

soap that has too much sodium lactate
Warning, the following pictures may disturb some soapers!

Here was the scenario:  Using a Hot Process Recipe, we made a soap batch that we thought would work.  However, we got a little too sodium lactate happy.  As a result, our soap bars were not functional.  And, to be completely honest, some of our soap could not even be classified as a bar.

Can you feel the soaping life lesson coming on?

Our hot process soap was molded and ready to be removed and sliced.  The end was trimmed off, and we went in for our first cut… that was when the slice fell, and broke into two pieces.

brittle slice of soap

Again we tried, but to no avail…

crumbly soap

That was when we thought to slice the bars thicker.  Still the same result, a broken bar of soap.

high amount of sodium lactate

Heart broken, we came to the conclusion that there was too much sodium lactate in our recipe.

Yes, sad but true; we have brittle soap.  And, a 4 pound batch at that!  Even though the soap was brittle, we still wanted to find out how it performed.  So, we washed our hands with the bar pieces.  This action made the finished bars completely crumble as we rubbed them together under the running water.

testing the processed soap

The original recipe was a failure, but not a complete one.  We were able to see first hand what happens to soap when too much sodium lactate is added.

soap that needs a rebatch

In one of the earlier Natures Gardens blog posts, we wrote that using too much sodium lactate in your soap recipe will produce finished bars that crumble or are brittle.  This soap is the perfect example of exactly how this worked.

The recipe that we used contained 1 ounce of sodium lactate per pound of soaping oils in our recipe.  We thought that this would help harden the bar, especially since the soap was made from very soft oils.

Well, we were wrong.  This is why testing is highly suggested when dealing with soaping additives like sodium lactate.

Mar
06

Tie Dye Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, colorants, creative, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

cup column swirl soapWatching all of the cool Youtube videos on making column swirl soap, we had to give it a try.  We thought that the column concept would make a great tie dye soap.  This soap recipe was our attempt at doing a column swirl soap.  Since we did not have wooden columns at our disposal, we thought we would improvise and try disposable cups.

To make this recipe, the majority of the ingredients and supplies can be found at Natures Garden.  You will however have to have water, lye, and your disposable cups- these items can not be purchased there.

For this soap, the scent that was selected was cannabis flower.  Now, since this scent has a vanillin content of .2%, we also included vanilla white color stabilizer in the recipe.  This decision was made after checking the cold process soap results for discoloration in this fragrance.  We saw that naturally without this additive the bar would discolor to a very light beige.  Considering we did not want our tie dye soap colors affected by this, it was a smart choice.  Also, since the mold that we are using is the 18 bar rectangle grid tray, we also decided to add sodium lactate to our recipe.  Not only will this allow the soap to be removed more easily from the mold, but it will also provide our finished bars with additional moisturizing aspects.

As for the colors in this soap, you can add as many or as few as you want.  Any of Natures Garden FUN Soap colorants will work!

So, lets get started in making tie dye soap.

Here is the recipe:
582 grams of water
215 grams of lye

413 grams of Shea Butter
306 grams of Coconut Oil 76
153 grams of Safflower Oil
107 grams of Rice Bran Oil
245 grams of Olive Oil pomace
184 grams of Meadowfoam Seed Oil
122 grams of Fractionated Coconut Oil
96 grams of Cannabis Flower Fragrance Oil
48 grams of Vanilla White Color Stabilizer
63 grams of Sodium Lactate

Now, if you would like to use the same colors shown in the steps, below are the weights.

Tie Dye Soap Colors:
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Red
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Yellow
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Orange
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Green
8 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Blue
12 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Ultramarine Violet

If this is your first time making cold process soap, please Click Here For Basic CP Soap Making Class. Also, before attempting to make any cold process soap, please become familiar with Soap Making Safety Class.

Step 1:  Put on your safety gear:  This would include your safety gloves,  apron, safety mask, and safety glasses.

cp soap making safety gear

Step 2:  In your mold, space your 6 disposable cups equally apart from one another.

prepping your mold

Step 3:  In a small bowl, weigh out your lye.  In a separate bowl, weigh out your water.  In a well ventilated area, slowly pour the lye into the water.  Use a spatula to stir slowly.  Avoid breathing in any of the lye water fumes.  Keep stirring the lye water until there are no lye granules are left in the water.    Allow this to cool to 90-100 degrees F.

stirring the lye water

Step 4:  According to the recipe listed above: in a pot weigh out the Shea Butter and coconut oil 76.  Melt these two ingredients down on low heat until each one is in a liquid state.  Stir.  Then, add the safflower oil, rice bran oil, olive oil, meadowfoam seed oil, and fractionated coconut oil.  Stir again.  Remove from heat.  Then, transfer all of this into a large mixing bowl.

mixing your oils

Step 5:  Next, get your 6 mixing bowls.  Assign each bowl a color.  Then, weigh out the appropriate color amount for each bowl.

colorants in bowls

Step 6:  Using your thermometer, check the temperature of the lye water.  When it has cooled to 90 degrees Fahrenheit, add your Sodium Lactate.  Stir carefully.  Now, once the temperatures of the lye water and the soaping oils and butters are within 5-10 degrees of one another, it is time to move on to the next step.

adding sodium lactate to the recipe
Step 7:   Now, slowly pour the lye water/sodium lactate into your oils and butters bowl.  Use a spatula to get all of this out and into the other bowl.

adding lye water to the soaping oils

Step 8:  Using your stick blender, carefully mix everything together.  You will notice your batter will begin to look creamy and thicken slightly.  Now, stop blending.

blending the soap batter

Step 9:  Next, add the fragrance oil.

scenting the column swirl

Step 10:  Then, add the Vanilla White Color Stabilizer.  Once added, stick blend to incorporate.

adding vanilla white color stabilizer
Step 11:
  Now, place 405 grams of the soap batter into each bowl.  Stir each bowl with a spoon.  This will help slow down trace.

spoon stirred colored soap
Step 12: 
Starting with any one of your colors, begin to pour about half of the batter over 3 cups.  Repeat with a second and third color.  Then, using a new color, pour about half of the batter over the 3 cups that do not have soap over them yet.  Repeat this with your two remaining colors.  Then, with the remaining batter, keep covering different cups.  While you are doing this step, if any cups move, use your spatula to put them back into place.  When all of the pourable batter is out of your bowls, use your spatula to scrape the soap from the cups.  Then remove them.

column swirl pour
Step 13:  Now, using your spatula, scrape the colored bowls.  Then, splatter this soap over the mold.

splattering the soap
Step 14:  When all the soap is in the mold, insulate it and allow it to harden for 24 hours.

insulating your soap
Step 15:  After 24 hours, remove your soap from the mold.  Carefully, using a knife or a mitre cutter, slice the soap bars.  Once all of the soap is sliced, allow it to fully cure.

cutting your soap

After the cure time has elapsed, enjoy your Tie Dye Soap!

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.