Posts Tagged ‘soap fragrance oils’

Soap Making is My Addiction

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

autumn burgess

1.  What’s your name & Your Company Name:  My name is Autumn Burgess and my business name is Skin Sweets & Body Treats.

2.  Why did you decide to go into business?  What was your motivation?  How long have you been in business? When I first started my business I started with making jewelry.  From there I started to add bath and body items, starting with lip balms and sugar scrubs.  My motivation for starting these projects was because I wanted to make my own items in order to save some money!  I started out selling my items in 2010.  Just this year though have I really gotten into the cold process method of soaping making and this has been a total addiction.

3.  What products do you make and sell?  I make lotions, lip balms, sugar scrubs, body perfumes, soap, soap and more soap!

4.  What are your business goals?  Right now I am an online retailer as well as person to person sales (craft fairs).  I suppose it’s every soapmaker’s dream to have a store front, and yes that would be totally awesome, but right now I like my balance of having a day job and then having that creative outlet which is soapmaking.

5.  What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?  Just this year have I discovered Natures Garden and now it is my go to for fragrance oils!  Love the amazing selection; I will spend countless hours looking through fragrances and still don’t feel like I’ve even scratched the surface with all NG offers.  My next purchase will be some essential oils as I’m trying to expand my comfort zone.  I also love the recipes that NG provides.

Your Website:  www.etsy.com/shop/skinsweetsbodytreats

Facebook page:  Skin Sweets & Body Treats

Natural Bath Products Interview

Sunday, March 3rd, 2013


I’m TUBBI, aka( Jacqueline); my customers cursed me with that name! LOL! I run a small business called TUBBILICIOUS! We make the Best organic & natural tub treats! I’m SUPER new to your company! I recently made my first purchase about 2 weeks ago, and since that point haven’t stopped! We have incorporated many of your products into our recipes, including using your molds. We have only been open about 7 months, and are about to hit our 900th  sale! Whoo hoo! I intend on growing in many new ways with the new found opportunity of having such a wide variety of products from your company at my fingertips! PLUS I LOVE that you have sampler “teach me kits! ” That’s ALWAYS a nice touch!

I’ve always had a passion for anything that smelled good since I was a child. This all started about a year ago, lol, in my niece’s kitchen no less!  My biggest interest in making my own stuff came from finding alternative ways for people to wind down and relax from the daily stress that life can cause physically & emotionally. I’m a firm believer that a well made, quality  tub Treat can do wonders for the mind, body and attitude. Smells often can trigger memories for people; aromatherapy plays a big part in peoples’ lives, even if they are unaware!

What products do you make and sell?

We make everything! Bath bombs, bubble bars, body wash, scrubs, body sprays etc. We try our best to use all organic & natural products. HOWEVER, we do use Premium grade fragrance oils that have been deemed safe for bath & body use. But the product that seems to have been our #1 seller has been our MONKEY PITTS!  It has EXTREMELY great reviews.. We’ve sold hundreds of jars all over the world.

What are your business goals?

Just to keep it fun I suppose …I love what I do, so That would be MY personal goal.

What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?

I’m a new customer, and I’ve been using the molds, SOOO Adorable! Also been using a few fragrance oils. ( Its only been about 2 weeks, I need more shopping time! LOL ) You have SO many things I’d like to incorporated in my work! I have bought sea salts etc.. I have a great plan for the Black Hawaiian Sea salts! But I will get there, it takes time!!

Your Website: www.etsy.com/shop/tubbilicious

Facebook page: www.facebook.com/tubbilicious

Twitter: https://twitter.com/LuvTubbilicious

Blog: http://www.tubbilicious.com/blog.html

What is a Surfactant?

Friday, March 1st, 2013

Have you ever tried to wash dirty dishes equipped only with a sponge and water?  This can be quite a feat.  You will notice that it takes a lot more time and elbow grease to get the job done.  Wondering why this is?  The answer as you will notice right away is that the dish soap is missing.

Did you know that the most eminent surfactant in existence is soap?

Surfactants seem to always get the bad rap.  Many people associate surfactants as bad ingredients to have in your recipes, but truth be told, this statement is not true!  Yes, SLS (Sodium Lauryl Sulfate) is a surfactant, and it can be more irritating to your skin than other surfactants, but is it as bad as what you read in the media lately?  It is an urban myth that Sodium Lauryl Sulfate causes cancer.  Read the truth for yourself.   In fact, many of the surfactants that will be listed in this class are derived from a natural source and they work to improve the integrity and performance of your cosmetic formulations.

Surfactants work with various liquids and substances; including oil and water.  Much like that of the role of the emulsifiers, surfactants have a hydrophilic (water-loving) head, and a lipophilic (oil-loving) tail.  In fact, emulsifiers are surfactants, and surfactants are vital to the industry of bath and body products too.  They comprise the largest category of cosmetic chemicals, and seem to have an endless list of cleansing capabilities.  So, needless to say, there is quite a variety to select from when seeking the perfect surfactant for your recipes.

The main qualifier in deciding which surfactant to use is all based upon the benefit that each surfactant provides.  Just like cold process soaping or any homemade bath and body products, the components that you choose to use in your recipes have a direct beneficial affect on the skin when the recipe is transformed into a finished product.  Therefore, when selecting which surfactant to use; it is just as equally important as to what you are looking to achieve in your finished product.  Each surfactant has key functions in which it will excel and equivocally each will also have other functions where it will be lacking.

The term surfactant is actually a combination of its meaning:  surface acting agent.  Let’s look at it again: surfactant = SURFace ACTing AgeNT.  But the term surfactant is not always the one that everyone sticks with.  It seems that surfactants have several names that all become applicable depending of the role of the surfactant in a specific recipe.  For example, in recipes where foam is the finished product, the surfactant used maybe referred to as foaming agents.  Surfactants used in body recipes, can even be termed as detergents or soaps.  Or, in the example of shaving creams, surfactants are considered lubricants because they protect the skin from irritation and the razor’s sharp edge while still allowing the removal of all of the unwanted hairs.

Everything that a surfactant does occurs at the surface levels of the liquids.  The biggest role that a surfactant has is the capability to lower the surface tension of a liquid.  The reaction which then occurs is the conversing of the liquid (with the lower surface tension) and the additional substance.  To break this down in simpler terms; a surfactant has the power to change the properties of a substance.  This process is known as adsorption.  The term adsorption means:  the gathering of gas or liquid in a condensed layer on the surface.  This condensed layer creates a film which is why the surface tension is lowered.  There are four different categories of classification for surfactants based on their interfaces and charges.  They are: Anionic, Nonionic, Cationic, and Amphoteric.

Education is always a powerful thing, and it is not necessary to completely know the ins and outs of everything surfactants.  But, you will want to have a general idea of each group of surfactants and how they play a role in your finished product.  This is especially true if you are looking to accomplish a “made from scratch” recipe.  It is also beneficial to know a few other things about surfactants too.  This would include information like why the surfactants are grouped or classified together or how/if surfactants work with additional groups of surfactants in a collaborate manner.  Spoiler alert:  Not all surfactants play nice with one another!

Anionic surfactants are considered to be the go to surfactant for many formulations.  This group of surfactants is also the most commonly used among foaming product productions, like shampoos or body washes.  The reasoning for this is because the anionic surfactant’s primary functions are creating high foam, high cleansing, and high washing capabilities in a finished product.

Anionic surfactants have a negatively charged water-loving head.  Anionic surfactants work very well in recipes which have a reaction between a chemical (like lye) and fatty acids or alcohols (like animal lard or vegetable based oils).  Hand processed soap, whether it is CP, CPOP, or HP, are all examples of anionic surfactants.  Other examples of anionic surfactants are Sodium sulfates, Ammonium sulfates, sulfosuccinates, sarcosines, sarcosinates, isethionates, and taurates.

One of the drawbacks of using an anionic surfactant relates to skin sensitivity.  Due the high foaming, cleansing, and washing capabilities, skin irritations can occur.  It is for this reason that if you are looking to create a handmade recipe it is best to choose another category of surfactants, or balance the anionic surfactants with amphoteric surfactants.

Amphoteric surfactants are the go with the flow surfactants.  They have the possibility to either have a positive or negative charge.  Their charge is all based on the pH or alkalinity of your finished product.  Hence the amphi prefix.

When an amphoteric surfactant is used in a recipe where the end result of a finished product has a lower pH, the amphoteric surfactant takes on a more conditioning and nourishing role.  On the other hand, when an amphoteric surfactant is used in a recipe where there is a higher pH in the end product, it resembles more of an anionic surfactant with high foaming and cleansing capabilities.  Neither option is necessarily bad; they are just on two different planes of the beneficial skin aspects.

Amphoteric surfactants are the most docile of the surfactants.  They are also the second most used surfactants in the industry.  This is because when used alone, they are able to provide a gentle aspect to the nature of your end product.  Adversely, when an amphoteric surfactant is coupled with an anionic surfactant, the amphoteric surfactant mellows the harshness of the anionic surfactants.  In fact, amphoteric surfactants can be used solo and in conjunction with any other of the surfactant groups.  There adaptability is just one of the reasons why they are so widely used.

Some examples of well know amphoteric surfactants are Coco Bentaine, Lauryl Bentaine, and Hydroxysultaines.

Cationic surfactants are the opposite of anionic surfactants.  They have a positively charged water-loving head.  It is because of this positive charge that cationic surfactants can offer many skin loving, nourishing benefits to the skin and body.  These surfactants are best used in recipes where foaming is not necessarily mandatory such as hair conditioners.  Cationic surfactants alone do not allow for ample foaming capabilities.

Cationic surfactants work well with 2 of the 3 remaining surfactant groups.  Both amphoteric and nonionic surfactants will be compatible with cationic surfactants with no problems.  However, because of the opposing charge cationic (positive) and anionic (negative) surfactants will not combine.

Some common cationic surfactants used in bath and body recipes are your chlorides (Benzalkonium, Stearalkonium, and Centrimonium), Trimethyl Ammoniums, and Methyl Sulfates.

Nonionic surfactants have no foaming capabilities which is why this group of surfactants are rarely used as a recipe’s main surfactant.  Evident by the prefix non, these surfactants do not have a charge in their water-loving heads.  The end result of using a nonionic surfactant will allow for a finished product that has a very gentle cleansing ability.   But, just because it doesn’t foam, it doesn’t mean it does cleanse.

Psychologically speaking, there is a direct mental correlation between foaming and cleansing.  We as a race have somehow inherently made this connection.  Whether it is a physical view of suds equating to cleanliness, or simply urban myths that have taken on a life of their own, the reality is; it could not be further from the truth.

Nonionic surfactants, or at least some of them, are ethoxylated.  What this means is that the nonionic surfactants have had some reaction to the addition of ethylene oxide.  With this reaction comes an even more water-loving head, almost as if it has been supercharged.  This then makes nonionic surfactants (like Polysorbate 20) perfect solubilizers.

But, don’t just disregard this category of surfactants yet.  Nonionic surfactants can also be used in formulations to reduce irritants, due to their gentle cleansing ability.  They also have the capability to be used as an emollient, softening or soothing skin.  Not to mention, these surfactants can be used to stabilize foam in recipes.  Hold on to your seats though folks, because it gets a little better!  Due to its lack of a charge, nonionic surfactants love every other category of surfactants; you can consider them the peacemakers!

Some common nonionic surfactants used in bath and body recipes are your Polysorbates, Emulsifying Wax NF, E-wax, Glyceryl Oleate, Glyceryl Stearate, ingredients with the prefix PEG, Ceteareths, Oleths, Sorbitans, Lauryl Glucoside, and Polyglycose.

In summary, surfactants are amazing little compounds found in many items we use every day like adhesives, bath gels, creams, lotions, frozen foods, chewing gum, inks, and fabric softeners; just to name a few!  There are four main applications of surfactants particularly in just bath and body recipes.  They include: cleansing, solubility, emulsifying, and conditioning.

Some other additional aspects of surfactants to bath and body recipes include:  the potential to increase stability of a product; certain surfactants can be used as thickening agents; due to the composition of a surfactant, some maintain anti-microbial elements and therefore can be used as preservatives; there are even some that have the capability to reduce irritation allowing for a milder product on the skin.

Interested in adding some surfactants to your recipes?  Below is a list of some commonly added surfactants to bath and body recipes:

sodium lauryl sulfate (can be derived from coconuts)  Produces High Foam; easy to thicken. Strong Anionic Surfactant; can cause irritation
ammonium laureth sulfate (derived from coconuts) Produces High Foam; easy to thicken.  Strong Anionic Surfactant; can cause irritation
disodium lauryl sulfosuccinate (derived from coconuts)  Foaming agent, Mild Anionic Surfactant; gentle on the skin
Cocoamphocarboxyglycinate  (derived from coconuts)  Mild, Amphoteric Surfactant
decyl Polyglucoside (vegetable derived, used in baby shampoos for its gentleness)
cetearyl alcohol
stearyl alcohol
Cocamidopropyl Betaine (derived from coconut oil) Amphoteric Surfactant
Decyl Glucoside (derived from sugar)
Glyceryl Cocoate (derived from vegetables)
Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate (derived from coconuts)
Almond Glycerides (derived from vegetables)
Sodium Lauryl Sulphoacetate (much milder surfactant than SLS)
Sodium Lauroyl Sarcosinate (derived from vegetables and is a natural substitution for SLS) 
sodium methyl cocoyl taurate
(derived from coconut)
Sucrose Cocoate (derived from sugar)
polysorbate 20 (vegetable derived)
polysorbate 80 (vegetable derived)

If you formulate your own cosmetics, please visit our customer suggestion page and let us know which surfactants you would like to see Natures Garden carry.  We will be increasing our line of natural cosmetic supplies.

Soap Company Interview

Monday, January 9th, 2012

Plott Hollow Farm Interview

Hi, the name of my company is Plott Hollow Farm, named after our 3 faithful Plott Hounds that patrol and protect our stock at night, and who are a never ending source of entertainment and sometimes aggravation.

When we bought our farm our goal was to preserve rare and endangered livestock and poultry. We also wanted a few pet goats. We got Nigerian Dwarf, which are also excellent milkers. I needed an outlet for all the milk so I started experimenting with soap. Then I found the soap guild and started to learn all kinds of wonderful things I could do with soap. I have been at it about a year now and I absolutely love it. I would rather make soap than do anything else. So that is how my soap company, Farm Girl Soap came about. Since I am a farm girl again, (I grew up on a farm) it seem like a good name for the soap. I also run a grooming shop from the farm, but I love the soap and all the soapers. I have never met a soaper yet who was not willing to share information and help in anyway they could, and, I love that about this industry. Everyone is so helpful.

I love the videos and recipes that Natures Garden post and I also love that they post all their test videos on youtube and list the results on their product descriptions. Once again just another example of how helpful a soaper are. Since I hooked up with all the facebook soaps I feel like I have an extended family. If I ever have a question I can get the answer in minutes just by posting it. I do have to admit, I love making soap much more than I like selling it! Selling my soaps and other products has enable us to move our farm forward with our goals. We now have 5 different breeds of chickens with are listed as critically endangered and one breed that is listed as threatened with the American Livestock Conservatory.

We also have just purchase a breeding pair critically endangered French Poitou Donkeys, it is believed that there are less than 400 of these donkeys world wide. Our female is expecting in June. So we are super excited about them. As I move into the new year I hope to see my soap business flourish and develop a larger regular clientele base. I have a plan to have a really nice covered wagon that I hitch my male donkey to and drive to local farmers markets and have the inside of the wagon set up so people can step inside to shop for soap and other bath goodies, of course Mr. donkey will get a lot of publicity and carrots! We love our goats and I love making the soap but it would be super cool to incorporate the donkeys into the soap biz as well. Plus it will give people, especially children a chance to interact with animals they probably would never see other wise and it gives a not of nostalgia to the soap buying process. Thanks for taking the time to read my story!

our web page is http://www.plotthollowfarm.com
Face book http://www.facebook.com/pages/Plott-Hollow-Farm/213677488648748

Success with Aromatherapy

Saturday, January 7th, 2012

Interview with Jolene From Southern Roots Natural Healing Store & Aromatherapy Shoppe

What’s your name & Your Company Name (Why Did you choose that name?):

Jolene Hull, Owner/Operator of Southern Roots Natural Healing Store & Aromatherapy Shoppe here! I chose this name based on the concept that natural products should really be naturally (many mass marketed products claim to be “natural”, but are not) made – my goal was to go back to my “roots” with my store and it’s products. All Natural and All Handmade with the highest quality ingredients.

 

How did you get into this business?

One of those light bulb moments in 2009 – I have always loved the idea of owning my own business. I started making soaps for gifts around the holidays for my dance team and I soon realized I wanted to make it more than a hobby.

 

What is your favorite part of this business?

Creating new and exciting items and experimenting with new ingredients.

 

What’s the most difficult part?

Labels! Trying to get that “look” to reflect the product you have made – it can be challenging at times.

What’s your favorite product or aspect of Natures Garden?

They have a great range of products at great prices. My favorite thing is that they are family owned.

What are your goals for the coming year for your business?

New and improved product lines for hair care and more variation of spa inspired items. We’re also going to start offering classes in our shop as well.

 

 

Website: www.southernrootshealing.com

Facebook: Southern Roots Natural Healing Store

Soap Company Success Story

Wednesday, December 14th, 2011

Bonnie Garrity from Good Earth Spa

My name is Bonnie Garrity and my soap company is called Good Earth Spa because I love using natural and organic ingredients from our earth. I also believe in doing good. My soap company donates one bar of soap to charity for each retail bar sold. I specifically chose the word spa because it perfectly describes the type of work that I do. I work with natural botanicals, skin foods, exotic butters and other awesome good earth ingredients to pamper and nourish the skin. Your bath tub should feel like a spa treatment every day because you deserve it.

I’ve always been a crafty girl. When I was a child I met a soap maker. I thought what she did was amazing. I couldn’t believe she made her own soap! Fast forward a few years, I was in the workplace and discovered I was expecting twins. Due to complications with my pregnancy I decided to leave the work world and stay home. I began making candles in my small apartment for
supplemental income. Then it progressed to soap and other bath items. I really wanted to be able to stay home with my children so I put all my focus on my home business. I became an ebay powerseller 90 days after my first sale and networked locally. Fast forward another few years and now I have my own website and live on a beautiful small farm in Washington State where I can now produce a portion of my raw materials including beeswax, herbs and essential oils.

My favorite thing about my business is being able to combine two of my life’s passions: Science and Nature. I love learning about each ingredient and combining them together to make a brand new product. I’ve always been interested in art and science equally. In high school I focused on art and in college I focused on science. I always wanted to work in a field that allowed me to express myself creatively and scientifically. Soap making is both science and art. It is chemistry and art blended carefully with a touch of love.

In December 2010 I restructured my soap company and began using a charitable business model inspired by Toms Shoes Company. For every retail bar of soap that I sell, I donate one bar of soap to a charity or charity fund raiser. When I went into
labor prematurely with my twins, I had to take an emergency flight to another city that was equipped with the resources to care for two premature infants. During that time I stayed at the Ronald McDonald House and used donated soaps. I knew then that I wanted to find a way to give back to people and I am glad that my business in is a position to do this. Thanks to my awesome customers I have been able to make donations to various shelters and organizations and raise money for Tsunami relief, Tornado relief and other good causes.

The most difficult part of my job is time management. I often feel as if I don’t have the time to do all the things I want to do. I have a lot of big ideas so prioritizing my work load is my greatest challenge. I cannot afford to be stressed or frustrated. I absolutely love what I do and I remind myself of that on a regular basis. I try to stay focused on one task until it is complete instead of trying to accomplish 100 things at once. Time management never came natural to me so I work on it daily.

 

I love using Nature’s Garden fragrances in my fragrance items. I’ve shopped around and have not seen any other fragrance supplier that offers such high quality for the price. I really appreciate that as a small business. I also trust their fragrances. Each fragrance description includes usage rates for various applications and even includes cold process soap results. I’ve never had a Nature’s Garden fragrance that didn’t do exactly what I expected it to.

 

In the past I have been very limited on the number of craft shows I could attend with my children being so young. Now that they are getting a little older I hope to attend more craft shows and local markets. I love getting out there and meeting people. I’d like to put a lot more focus on my local markets this upcoming year.

 

Website: http://www.goodearthspa.com/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Good-Earth-Spa/235357973148329

Blog: http://goodearthbonnie.com/

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/EdentiaFarms

Thinking Outside the Box

Tuesday, November 29th, 2011

Let’s think outside of the box with gift baskets for the any occasion.

Gift baskets, especially ones filled with candle goodies are hot commodities particularly around the holiday season.  What is really intriguing about this is the fact that now candles are being sold in stores that typically would not highlight homemade items.  Places like hardware stores, gas stations, diners, and even doctor’s offices now have special stands set up to promote these items.  So, let’s work on extending our customer base and maybe even finding new retailers for your products.

I can already fill the excitement of embarking on a brand new journey, so now, I am going to challenge you once again to start thinking outside of the box and explore some new aspects of candles and candle like items to put together in a gift basket.  By embracing change, you are opening yourself up to new surroundings.  The changes can be very little things, and anything counts.  Maybe it is as simple as changing up the color scheme of your candles, or it could be offering a new and different shape of candle.  Maybe you want to explore the world of new fragrances, and try a few that you normally would not carry.

In a quick little breakdown, here are some new “hot” ideas that you can use:

  • Get well baskets using uplifting scents, or aromatherapy scents.   These are great for hospitals and Doctor Offices.
  • Try a flameless route.  Do a gift basket that allows for clients who may not be able to have an open flame due to small children, pets, or living arrangements ex. Dorm rooms.
  • Gel candles are a great way to really get creative on a new transparent candle spin, especially when you can explore the
    fun avenue of embeds.
  • If you are a pillar crafter- octagons are different and hot, as are square shaped ones.  On top of offering the new pillar shape, you may also want to include a festive plate to burn the pillar on.
  • Layered candles can be made with complementary scents, a different scent for each color.  This is also a great way to promote some of your top selling fragrances as a combo candle.
  • Find some funky shape containers for your candles.  Different shapes are alluring visually.   Try some “funky” weird fragrances!  Natures Garden has an entire section of “weird fragrances“.  How do scents like Monkey Farts, Elf Sweat, Snowman Balls, and Easter Bunny Burps sound to you?  Have fun with it!!
  • Tart warmers are really on the rise.  So, have some fun and do embed tarts of holiday shapes.   You can even stick with the traditional colors of the holiday.
  • Votives and tea lights are the perfect size to sample out new fragrances.  You can create a basket of just these items are call it a “smorgasbord of scent”.
  • Find the interest of the community.  It is very easy to type cast your baskets to the likes of the public.  Maybe there is
    a big game at the high school… you can create some really cool candles using the school colors.
  • Let’s not forget our love birds.  Engagement and Honeymoon baskets are great gifts.  These do very well at bridal
    stores and tuxedo rental businesses.

Any or all of these hot ideas can be used to create an amazing gift basket.  One final suggestion that I can give is to print off business cards to include with the baskets, as well as some business cards to place by your items.  This allows for potential clients to contact you if they have any questions or would like to special order items.

 

I do want to remind everyone that when trying new ventures, it is always important to test first before jumping in.

 

Finally, remember, changing it up not only adds a little spice and variety to your life, but it also provides for inspiration.

 

Fragrance &
Fun for Everyone

Inspire, Create,
and Dominate!

Sparkles!!! Nicole

(Corporate Manager of Natures Garden Candle Supplies)

www.naturesgardencandles.com

www.istockphoto.com

Soap Company Interview

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

Pocket Full of Sunshine Boutique Interview

My name is Nancy Krainz. I live in Pittsburgh, PA. I have been making soap since 2004. I became interested after seeing a show about soap making on TV. I starting out with traditional Cold Process and worked my way through Hot Process, Rebatch, Whipped and Liquid Soap making but always made my way back to the traditional method. I felt creativity was limited in Cold Process, so, I got into Melt and Pour soap making and discovered that creativity is limited only by ones imagination.

I started my home based company in 2005 and added many products to my line. I named the business LydiaMarie’s Bath and Body Boutique and began selling on consignment through local craft stores. I was able to get a wholesale account with a local, private owned bath and body shop and over the past 7 years have been their sole supplier for lotions, foot cream and lip balm.

I was working towards opening  a brick and mortar store when the economy went on the down swing, and, at the same time, I was diagnosed with cancer. My business was placed on hold for about a year as I obtained treatment for my illness, and, thankfully, today I am healthy and moving forward in life.

 

About a year ago I decided to get into jewelry making, so, to better portray my extended product line, changed the name of my business to Pocket Full of Sunshine Boutique. It is a happy sounding name and makes me smile. I love the sunshine.

The thing I like best about owning this business is  I very much enjoy creating things. The biggest downfall is being a perfectionist. I seldom make something that I am 100% happy with. I always see room for improvement and constantly strive for perfection.

I like Nature’s Garden Candle & Soap Supplies because I very much appreciate nature and all things natural.

My goals for the coming year are to move forward in fulfilling my dream of having a brick and mortar store. 

 

Website: www.pocketfullofsunshineboutique.weebly.com

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Pocket-Full-of-Sunshine-Boutique/147865018613996

Blog: www.lydiamaries.blogspot.com

Soap Oil Properties

Friday, November 4th, 2011

Properties of Oils In Cold Process Soap

Many of Natures Garden’s customers make homemade cold process soap, and we are the wholesale supplier of fragrance oil for many of these soap companies.  Although we do not yet sell the soap oils mentioned in this article, we asked Kimberly Sanchez of Natures Art if she could explain the properties of soap oils to customers who desire to expand their line into cold process soap.  Some of these soap oils can be found at your local grocery store.  We hope that this information is as enlightening to you as it was to us.

This is not a complete list, Just the most commonly used oils

Apricot Kernel Oil: Apricot kernel oil is a light oil. It absorbs nicely into the skin and is a good luxury conditioning oil in soap – at about 5% -10%.

 

Almond Oil, Sweet:  A moisturizing oil that is very light and absorbs well. In soap it produces a low, stable lather, but is recommended to not use it more than about 5% – 10% in soap – as it’s not a hard oil.

 

Avocado Oil: Avocado oil is a heavy, green, rich, moisturizing oil that has a high percentage of unsaponifiables. It’s often used in soap recipes for people with sensitive skin. It’s high in vitamins A, D & E. You can use it in your recipes from 5% – 30%.

 

Babassu Oil:  Babassu oil comes from the kernels of the babassu palm. Its fatty acid makeup is very similar to palm kernel and to coconut oil. It’s high in lauric and myristic acid, which contribute to a nice, fluffy lather.

 

Canola Oil: Canola, a kind of rapeseed, is a good economical oil for soap making – you can substitute a portion of your olive for canola, or use it as part of your batch at 10-15%. It gives a nice, low, creamy lather and is moisturizing. It will slow down the rate at which your soap will get to trace, so it’s a good oil to add if you’re doing complicated swirls or colors.

 

Castor Oil:  Castor oil is a thick, clear oil that helps increase the lather in soap – a rich, creamy lather. It’s also a humectant (attracts moisture to your skin) oil. Just a little will do…5% – 8% in your recipe will work great.

 

Cocoa Butter: As it is very hard saturated fat, use with other more unsaturated oils like olive or castor. Use in conjunction with more sticky ingredients such as shea butter or lanolin. Using too much cocoa butter will result in a dry, exceptionally hard bar of soap.

 

Coconut Oil:  Coconut oil is one of the primary oils soapmakers use in their soap. Most of the coconut oil sold and used has a melt point of 76°, but there is a hydrogenated type that melts at 92°. Some soapmakers prefer this one because it’s easier to scoop – but either version works the same to give tremendous, bubbly lather to your soap. It also makes for a very hard, white bar of soap. The collective opinion is that using more than 20% coconut oil in your recipe will be drying to the skin.

 

Corn Oil: It acts like most of the other vegetable liquid oils like soybean or canola. It can be used as part of your recipe (10-15%) and will help give a moisturizing, stable lather.

 

Grape seed Oil: Grape seed oil is a lightweight, moisturizing oil that is a good additive to soap in small quantities. It doesn’t have a long shelf life, so unless you treat it with rosemary oleoresin extract, or have a very low superfat percentage, don’t use it more than about 5% in your recipe.

 

Hazelnut Oil: Hazelnut oil has a short shelf life (3-4 months). If you want to add it to soap, I wouldn’t recommend using more than about 5-10% in your recipe because of the short shelf life. A  lovely oil, but very fragile.

 

Hemp Seed Oil: Hemp seed oil is a deep, green color with a light, nutty smell. It gives a light, creamy/silky lather. Because of its fatty acid makeup, it has a very short shelf life…less than six months…so it should be refrigerated or even kept in the freezer. It can be used as a luxury healing/moisturizing oil in soap up to 10%-15%.

 

Jojoba Oil: Jojoba is actually a liquid wax. It contributes a nice stable lather, has remarkable absorption and moisturizing qualities and unlike some of the other luxury moisturizing oils, has a very long shelf life – 1-2 years. Use it at 5-10% maximum.

 

Lard: Lard makes a super-hard, very white bar of soap with a low, creamy, stable lather that is, believe it or not, nicely moisturizing. Before vegetable oils were commonly available, it was one of the main fats (along with beef tallow) that folks used to make soap. If you use animal oils in your soap, then combining lard with some of the other liquid oils like coconut and olive makes a wonderful, well balanced bar of soap – and is really economical. Make sure your lard is fresh and of high quality. Use it at any
percentage in your recipe, but I recommend not much more than 30-40% or so. Cold process laundry soap can be made with 100% lard with a 0% superfat percentage.

 

 

Olive Oil: Extra virgin and virgin olive oils come from the very first gentle pressing of the olives. The refined, or Grade A oil comes from the second pressing, and is lightly refined/filtered.  100% olive oil makes the famous “Castille soap” and “Marseille soap” must contain at least 72% olive oil. Olive oil is generally the #1 oil in most soap makers’ recipes. Olive oil soaps are very moisturizing, make hard, white bars of soap and are exceptionally mild. But the lather from Castille soap is low and a bit slimy. Most soap makers combine olive oil with other oils to improve the lather. Pomace grade olive oil is a thick, rich, green grade of olive oil that is obtained by solvent extraction of the fruit and pits of the olives – what’s left over after the first several pressings that give the
virgin and Grade A oils. It has a very high level of unsaponifiables (the portions of the oil that don’t react with the lye to form soap.) This will make your trace time quicker.

 

Macadamia Nut Oil: Macadamia nut oil is a light oil with a mild nutty odor. It is unique in its fatty acid makeup in that it contains palmitoleic acid – which makes it really easily absorbed into the skin – and is reported to be really great for older skin.

 

 

Palm Oil: Palm oil, along with olive and coconut, is one of the top oils used by soap makers today. Because of the qualities it gives soap – a hard bar with a rich creamy lather.

 

Palm Kernel Oil: Though it comes from the same plant/nut as palm oil does, palm kernel oil is almost identical in its soap making properties to coconut oil – giving a nice hard white bar of soap…with lots of luscious lather. Palm kernel oil is often available partially hydrogenated, in easy to handle/measure flakes…or just as a standard liquid oil. You can use it up to about 30% or 35% in your recipes. However, like palm oil, palm kernel oil is surrounded by the same environmental and human concerns.

 

Rice Bran Oil: Expressed from the husks of rice, most soap makers found that rice bran oil imparted nearly the same creamy, moisturizing qualities that olive oil did to their soaps. It does have a lot of the same antioxidants and vitamins that olive has, and a similar fatty acid make up. The only disadvantage of rice bran oil is its short shelf life – (6 months or so.)

 

Safflower Oil: Its fairly short shelf life. You can certainly use it in your recipes like you would soybean, canola or sunflower – at 5-15% or so. In soap, it is mild and moisturizing.

 

Shea Butter: Moisturizing and nourishing. Fairly inexpensive and easy to find. Shea butter for soap making will add a wonderful creamy lather, great conditioning properties and some hardness to your soap.

 

Soybean Oil: Soybean oil, like canola, safflower and sunflower, is often used as a portion of a soap making recipe in combination with other “core” oils like coconut, olive and palm. Use it 5-15% of your soap recipe. It is mild, moisturizing and gives a low, creamy lather.

 

Shortening: Soybean oil, in its hydrogenated form is generally called vegetable shortening & sold under generic names, or the brand Crisco. Shortening is usually a blend of soybean & cottonseed oil, and makes nice soap. Like all soap making oils, except olive, it’s not a great oil to use alone, but combining it with olive & coconut makes a good, stable, bubbly, moisturizing bar of soap. I recommend not using over 15% as it can go rancid in higher amounts.

 

Sunflower Oil: It works well with palm and olive oils to give a nice, rich, creamy lather that’s very moisturizing. Depending on the type you get, it may have a short shelf life due to its fatty acid makeup. In soap, it does well up to about 25% .

 

Tallow, Beef: Like lard, beef tallow gives you a super-hard, white bar of soap with low, creamy, stable lather that is very moisturizing. Before vegetable oils were commonly available, it was one of the main fats that folks used to make soap – and remains one of the most common oils in soap. (Check your label for sodium tallowate. That’s beef tallow.) If you are o.k. using animal oils in your soap, then combining beef tallow with some of the other liquid oils like coconut & olive makes a wonderful, well balanced bar of soap. While you can use it at any percentage in your recipe, I wouldn’t recommend much more than 40% before it starts creating a brittle bar of soap.

 

Written by:
Kimberly Sanchez of Natures Art.

www.naturesgardencandles.com

 

Soap Maker Success News

Saturday, October 29th, 2011

Meet Jolene From Southern Roots Natural Healing Store & Aromatherapy Shoppe

Hi! I am Jolene Hull, Owner/Operator of Southern Roots Natural Healing Store & Aromatherapy Shoppe

I chose this name based on the concept that natural products should really be naturally (many mass marketed products claim to be
“natural”, but are not) made – my goal was to go back to my “roots” with my store and it’s products. All Natural and All Handmade
with the highest quality ingredients.

How did you get into this business?

One of those light bulb moments in 2009 – I have always loved the idea of owning my own business. I started making soaps for gifts around the holidays for my dance team and I soon realized I wanted to make it more than a hobby. Another inspiration for starting my business is that my dad has been struggling with “sqaumos cell carcinoma” – a type of skin cancer; one that if left untreated, can be fatal. Helping people and their skin condition and health is one of main focuses at Southern Roots. It would be great to get to the point where I could be an effective alternative to expensive prescriptions and traditional medicine.

What is your favorite part of this business?

Creating new and exciting items and experimenting with new ingredients.

What’s the most difficult part?

Labels! Trying to get that “look” to reflect the product you have made – it can be challenging at times.

What’s your aspect of Natures Garden?

They have a great range of products at great prices.  My favorite thing is that they are family owned.

What are your goals for the coming year for your business?

New and improved product lines for hair care and more variation of spa inspired items. We’re also going to start offering classes in our shop as well.

Website: www.southernrootshealing.com 

Facebook: Southern Roots Natural Healing Store