Tag Archives: patchouli

Apr
14

Champaka Fragrance Oil

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Champaka Fragrance OilChampaka Fragrance Oil – Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Champaka Fragrance Oil from Nature’s Garden is a classy, floral fragrance reminiscent of hippie culture.  Champaka is also one of the key notes found in the famous “JOY” perfume. The Champaka is a flowering bud of the Magnolia Champaca tree and is known for being impressively aromatic.  In India, Champaka is known as Champa, which is where the famous Nag Champa incense gets it’s name.  The magnolia champaca tree is also known to provide a fine wood for woodworking.  Champaka Fragrance Oil is complex and versatile, much like the plant from which it is derived.

What Does Champaka Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

Champaka Fragrance Oil is a floral arrangement accented perfectly by incense base notes.  This fragrance oil is a unique aroma that combines the floral notes of jasmine, lavender, lilac, and fresh greenery with the earthy notes of patchouli and sandalwood.  This attention-getting combination is sure to stand out among your scented products!

How Do Our Customers Use Champaka Fragrance Oil?

This hippie-esque aroma is added to many types of products. You can create prominent room scenting products with this fragrance oil.  Room scenters can incorporate up to 50% of Champaka fragrance oil in their projects.  You can use this woodsy fragrance oil in reed diffusers, potpourri, or incense recipes.  This fragrance oil was also found to create strongly scented aroma beads.  Candles and wax tarts can be made using Champaka Fragrance Oil up to 10% with vegetable waxes and paraffin wax.  Our Champaka scent will perform perfectly in candle waxes as well.  It does wonderfully in Joy Wax, Wow Wax, and soy waxes.  If you color your candles, we would recommend one drop of burgundy liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax.  You can also color your melted wax with a small amount of burgundy color blocks.  Crayons are never recommended to color your candles as they will clog your wick.

Champaka Fragrance Oil can also be added into your homemade bath and body products.  Bath gels and oils will perform perfectly when the recommended maximum of 5% fragrance oil is used.  Those that are soap makers can use 5% fragrance oil in cold process soap recipes and melt and pour soap recipes.  Our Cold Process Soap Testing Results show that this fragrance oil had a good scent retention in cured soap and did not discolor.  The soap experienced no ricing and no acceleration.  There was no separation. If you wish to color your bath and body products, we would recommend using burgundy soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you.  As always, do not to use candle dyes in your bath and body products as they will dye your skin.

Customers also incorporate Champaka Fragrance Oil into a variety of other products.  One such product is homemade perfume.  Handmade perfumes perform well with this floral fragrance when a maximum of 5% fragrance oil is used.  Homemade lotions can be created using Champaka Fragrance Oil.  We recommend lotion recipes adhere to a 5% fragrance oil maximum.  Homemade cleaning supplies can also be created using a maximum fragrance usage of 5%.

Apr
08

Flower Child Fragrance Oil

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Flower Child Fragrance OilFlower Child Fragrance Oil – Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Flower Child Fragrance Oil from Nature’s Garden is a truly herbal blend, showcasing the incense aromas of patchouli and sandalwood.  Take it back to the Hippie days with Flower Child Fragrance Oil.  The origin of the term “Flower Child” as a synonym for hippie has its roots in the mid-1960’s after the film version of H. G. Wells’s The Time Machine. The film was characterized by anti-war themes and featured a futuristic society bestowing flowers as a symbol of piece.  This concept was taken by the mainstream media and used to describe the idealistic young individuals who gathered in San Francisco.  These young Hippies were gathered for the Summer of Love in 1967.  Flower children went around, passing on the belief that the world needed to embrace peace, bestowing flowers on those with whom they talked.  Embrace peace and patchouli with Flower Child Fragrance Oil!

What Does Flower Child Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

Flower Child Fragrance Oil is the aroma of the incenses frequently burned by “hippies.”  Earthy wisps of herbal patchouli and sandalwood billow up from this fragrance oil like freshly lit incense.

How Do Our Customers Use Flower Child Fragrance Oil?

Flower Child Fragrance Oil can also be incorporated into your bath and body products.  Bath gels and oils were found to perform well when the recommended maximum of 5% fragrance oil is incorporated.  Soap makers can use 5% fragrance oil in cold process and melt and pour soap recipes.  We even have our FUN Swirl Soap Recipe using our Flower Child Fragrance Oil and melt and pour soap!  Our Cold Process Soap Testing Results show that this fragrance oil had a good scent retention in cured soap and did not discolor.  The soap experienced no ricing and no separation.  There was no acceleration. If you wish to color your bath and body products, we would recommend using purple and blue soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you.  Remember not to use candle dye in any of your bath and body products as they are not body safe.

Enjoy this incense aroma with a wide variety of products. Our customers create prominent room scenting products with this fragrance oil.  Room scenters can utilize up to 50% of this fragrance oil in projects like incense and potpourri recipes.  This fragrance oil is also nice and strong in aroma beads.  Homemade candle crafters can use Flower Child Fragrance Oil up to 10% with vegetable waxes and paraffin wax.  This earthy scent will smell amazing in Joy Wax, Wow Wax, and is very strong in soy waxes.  If you would like to color your candles, we would recommend three drops of purple and three drops of blue liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax.  Alternatively, you can also color your melted wax with a small amount of purple and blue color blocks.  We never recommend using crayons to color your candles as they will clog your wick.

Customers also incorporate Flower Child Fragrance Oil into many other products.  One such product is homemade perfume.  Homemade perfumes perform well with this earthy fragrance oil when a maximum of 5% fragrance oil is used.  Homemade lotions perform very well.  We recommend homemade lotions adhere to a 5% fragrance oil maximum.  Homemade cleaning supplies also perform well with a maximum fragrance usage of 5%.

Jan
28

Cannabis Rose Fragrance

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Cannabis Rose Fragrance Cannabis Rose Fragrance Oil – Fragrance Spotlight

Natures Garden’s Cannabis Rose Fragrance Oil has been reviewed by our customers and the reviews are in!  One customer stated “If you’re looking for a nice grownup rose scent with a touch of a little something extra then this would suit you just fine”.  Did you know?  The plant name cannabis actually came from the Greek Kannabis.  So in staying with the Greek theme, there are several myths that tell the legend of the rose.  The rose was created by Chloris, the Greek goddess of flowers.  She used the body of a lifeless nymph to house the flowers.  She then asked Aphrodite to give the flower beauty and a name, Dionysus to add nectar, giving the flower a sweet scent, and the three Graces to give it charm, brightness, and joy.  Finally, Apollo was asked to shine on the flower, allowing a beautiful bloom.  As for a rose having those pesky thorns, thank Cupid for that.  It is said that one day, busy cupid stopped to smell a rose.  Unknown to him however, a bee was hidden inside.  The agitated bee flew out of the rose and stung cupid.  In a fit of anger, he pulled out his arrow, and shot the rose.  Ever since, thorns have appeared on roses.

What Does Cannabis Rose Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

Cannabis Rose Fragrance Oil by Natures Garden is quite possibly the most unique blend of uncommon fragrance notes ever found in a fragrance blend.  Unique, and absolutely fascinating!  The blend of Bulgarian rose, pomegranate flower, bergamot, cannabis accord, sheer jasmine, dark chocolate, white musk, patchouli, and oolong tea.

How Do Our Customers Use Cannabis Rose Fragrance Oil?

Let’s start our homemade soap makers/homemade bath and body products such as bath oils, bath gels, lotions, and perfumes.  The maximum recommended usage rate for all homemade bath and body products is 5%.  Our Cold process soap testing results shows no ricing, no acceleration, and no separation with good scent retention.  There was also no discoloration. The vanillin content of Cannabis Rose Fragrance Oil is 0%.  This percentage includes all forms of vanillin.  In other homemade products such as perfumes it performs perfectly and in bath and body products it performed well.  You can use pink soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you.  Just a friendly reminder, never use candle dye in any bath and body products.

Next up, our homemade candle crafters.  The maximum usage rate is 10%.  Cannabis Rose Fragrance Oil is nice and strong in soy wax and performs perfectly in joy wax, wow wax, and for candle wax tarts using pillar of bliss wax.  Some color suggestions for this fragrance oil are to use 2 drops of red liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax or shred an ample amount of an red color block into your melted wax.  Never use crayons to color your candles as they will clog your wick.

When making home room scents, such as reed diffusers, incense, and potpourri, the maximum usage is 50%.  When making homemade cleaning products the maximum usage is 5%.

Looking to try a new recipe from Natures Garden, check out Natures Garden’s  Perfectly Pampered Shaving Soap Recipe which uses melt and pour soap, rose clay, and dried roses.

Jan
04

Blue Sugar Type Fragrance

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Blue Sugar Type FragranceBlue Sugar Type Fragrance Oil – Fragrance Spotlight

Blue Sugar Type Fragrance Oil by Natures Garden is a must have fragrance.  This exotic fragrance oil has me intrigued as some have described it as being the perfect scent for men, while others are in agreement that it does definitely work as unisex fragrance.  Overall, this fragrance is a scent that can be enjoyed by women and men of all ages.  A direct quote from one of our customers, “This fragrance oil is wonderful, and does work as a unisex scent, but the bath gel scent on a man is quite an enticing scent.  My husband knows first hand.”

What Does Blue Sugar Type Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

The fresh citrus aroma creates a shimmering lift for this sensual vanilla based scent.  It’s a romantic floral bouquet with the heart of the fragrance intertwining with fresh green tones and rich patchouli.  The vanilla signature at the base of the scent is balanced with soft musk and warmed by exotic woody tones for lingering sensuality.  Compare this fragrance oil by Natures Garden to the popular Aquolina Blue Sugar.  We are in no way affiliated with Aquolina.

How Do Our Customers Use Blue Sugar Type Fragrance Oil? 

Let’s start with our candle crafters and home scenters!  For homemade candles, the maximum usage is 10% for this unisex fragrance oil.  The maximum use for home scents such as reed diffusers, potpourri, and incense is 50%, and for cleaning products the maximum usage 5%.   In candles, Blue Sugar Type Fragrance Oil performs perfectly in joy wax, wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax.  For room scenting, this exotic scent is nice and strong in aroma beads as well.  Color suggestions for your beautiful homemade candles are to use 2 drops of blue liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax or shred a small amount of blue color block into your melted wax.  As a friendly reminder, never use crayons to color your candles as they will clog your wick.

And for our homemade soapers, the maximum usage is 5% and that goes for your bath and body products such as bath oils, bath gels, lotions, and perfumes.  The cold process soap testing results shows no ricing, acceleration, or separation.  It discolors to a brown with very strong scent retention.  The vanillin content of Blue Sugar Type Fragrance Oil is 7%.  Vanilla White Color stabilizer may help prevent discoloration due to vanilla.  However, there are more than 40 ingredients used in fragrance manufacturing that may contribute to discoloration of products. The color suggestion for your homemade soap is to use as much blue soap colorant until you are satisfied.  Never use candle dye in any body products.  In other homemade bath and body products, it performed well and in perfumes it performs perfectly.

If you’re ready to get started with Blue Sugar Type Fragrance Oil, which is sure to be a big hit with both men and women, please type in “blue sugar fragrance oil” into Natures Garden’s search bar and place your order today!

Are you interested in a unique, but yet fun Natures Garden recipe using this enticing scent, please try our Scented Markers Recipe.

Nov
11

Black Linen and Amber Fragrance

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Black Linen and Amber Fragrance OilBlack Linen and Amber Fragrance Oil – Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Black Linen and Amber Fragrance Oil is not only a Natures Garden original fragrance, but it is also A Best Seller!  Truth be told this fragrance has me intrigued.  The words “black linen” alone sort of make me blush!  As a quilter, I mainly stick to cotton and flannel fabrics.  With a little research, I discovered that linen is very labor-intensive to manufacture.  It’s fibers are very absorbent and garments made of linen are appreciated for their extraordinary coolness and freshness in hot weather.  A wide variety of products are made with linen such as aprons, napkins, towels, table clothes, runners, chair covers, bed linen, and men’s and women’s wear.  “Linens” also refers to lightweight undergarments such as chemises, shirts, and lingerie – note that the root word, linen!  Most of us associate the color black with formality, death, and maybe even evil.  But, what if we flipped the coin and looked at the color black for the other things that it has been known to represent such as strength, power, authority and the unknown; we can add excitement to our lives.  Let’s face it, there’s a hidden mystery to the color black.  Black linen combined with amber has limitless possibilities for creating the desired ambiance; embrace the unknown!

What Does Black Linen and Amber Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

This fragrance oil by Natures Garden is a very unique, very sexy scent!  Black linen and amber is a unisex (meaning it is designed to be suitable to both sexes) fragrance that begins with top notes of fresh cotton and crisp ozonic (aquatic scent) notes; followed by middle notes of white blossoms;  well rounded with base notes of cashmere, amber, musk, and patchouli.

Top Notes:  fresh cotton, ozone
Mid Notes:  white blossoms
Base Notes:  cashmere, amber, musk, patchouli

How Do Our Customers Use Black Linen and Amber Fragrance Oil?

Coloring Suggestions:  Black Linen Amber Fragrance Oil

Let’s take a look at color suggestions for both homemade candles and homemade bath and body products.  For homemade candles, it’s suggested that you use 8 drops of black liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax.  Never use crayons to color your candles as they will clog your wick. For homemade soaps and other bath and body products, use black soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you.  Never use candle dye in any body products.

For homemade soaps, bath oils, bath gels, lotions and perfumes, the maximum usage for this unisex scent is 5%.  Cold process soap testing results show that Black Linen and Amber Fragrance Oil poured perfectly with no ricing, no acceleration, no separation, and no discoloration.  The soap scent is very nice and has good scent retention.  It also performed perfectly in perfumes and as for other bath and body products, it performed well.

As for homemade candles, the maximum usage is 10%.  This exotic fragrance performs perfectly in wow wax, joy wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax.

For household purposes like potpourri and incense the recommended maximum usage is 50% and for homemade cleaning products, the maximum usage is 5%.

Black Linen and Amber Fragrance Oil has limitless possibilities.  To order this sexy scent, just go to the search bar on Natures Garden site and type in “black linen and amber”.  It will take you directly to the page to order this linen scent!

Sep
28

Bay Rum Fragrance

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Bay Rum FragranceBay Rum Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Ahoy, mateys! Rum is commonly thought of as the drink of choice of pirates. And why wouldn’t it be? They made careers off of rum-running: transporting alcohol overseas to colonies where drinking was prohibited. Pirates often consumed rum as bumbo- a drink made from rum, water, sugar, and nutmeg or cinnamon.

Bay Rum, more specifically, is a product with high-alcohol content made in the Caribbean using rum and the leaves or berries of the appropriately named bay rum tree. It’s often used in aftershave, cologne, and lotions (hint, hint, nudge, nudge, you can use this fragrance oil to make your own). Not as pirate-y, but I already wrote most of this post with pirates in mind, so I’m gonna leave it as is. And surely, pirates had to shave their faces, too? (Unless their pirate name had the word “beard” in it.) Why not with bay rum-scented products?

What Does Bay Rum Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

It be a spicy, cultural blend of crushed cloves, cinnamon sticks, patchouli, and crisp pine needles, with a sweet orange freshness.

Top Notes:  orange, apple
Mid Notes:  cinnamon, clove, cool mint
Base Notes:  pine, cedarwood, vanilla, musk, patchouli

How Do Our Customers Use Bay Rum Fragrance Oil?

Candles, o’ course! This swashbucklin’ scent performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax and is nice and strong in soy wax. ‘Tis not gel wax compatible. . The maximum recommended usage percentage in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax be 10%. Our coloring suggestion for candles arrr to use 3 drops of blue plus a small amount of black liquid candle dye (dip the tip of a toothpick in it) per 4 pounds of wax, or shred a small amount of blue color block into your melted wax. Black candle colorant only comes in liquid dye form. Don’t color your candles with crayons unless ye be lookin’ fer trouble–it’ll clog the wick!

Robust room scents! This seafaring scent comes across nice and strong in arrroma beads and the maximum recommended usage percentage in incense and potpourri is 50%.

Soaps! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this complex accord in bath oils, bath gels, and soaps is 5%. Our cold process soap testing found that this fragrance caused slight acceleration of trace, but no ricing, no separation, and discolored to a light butterscotch. Scent retention was wonderful. This fragrance has a 0.3% vanillin content, so it may slightly discolor your bath and body products. If ye’d like to defend against this, try our Vanilla White Color Stabilizer. Our coloring suggestions for bath and body products are to use black and blue soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you. You can also try activated charrrcoal as a natural black soap colorant. Never color ye bath and body products with candle dye- ye’ll color yerself!

Check out arrr Jolly Roger and doubloon molds for shapin’ up yer soap!

Body products! This spicy scent performed perfectly in perfumes and the maximum recommended usage percentage in lotions and body sprays is 5%.

Swabbin’ the deck! The maximum recommended usage percentage fer this hardy aroma in cleaning products is 5%.

~Nature’s GARRRden!

Sep
18

Autumn Woods Fragrance

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Autumn Woods FragranceAutumn Woods Fragrance Oil Spotlight

It’s almost Autumn and I am elated! Fall is by far my favorite season. One of the best things about this (soon-to-be) time of year is the changing colors and falling of the leaves. And what’s better than taking a walk through the woods on a brisk autumn day? I love the crunch, crunch, crunch of the leaves underneath my feet. It’s also easier to breath. Take a deep breath of that cool, crisp autumn air and you basically have this fantastic fall fragrance!

What Does Autumn Woods Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

This fragrance is a walk in the woods with the smell of crisp leaves under foot and fresh pine with berries falling off the trees.

Top Notes:  Lemon, Orange, Lime, Blackberries
Mid Notes:  Carnation, Rose, Muguet
Base Notes: Pine, Cedarwood, Patchouli, Eucalyptus leaves

How Do Our Customers Use Autumn Woods Fragrance Oil?

All kinds of creative ways! Firstly, they make delightful decorative candles. This earthy aura performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. It is not gel wax compatible. The maximum recommended usage percentage for this fall fragrance in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. Our coloring suggestions for candles are to use 4 drops of yellow plus 1 drop of brown liquid candle dye per four pounds of wax, or shred a small amount of yellow and brown color block into your melted wax. As cool and creative as it may sound, do NOT color your candles with crayons–it will clog the wick!

Secondly, they make some super room scents. The maximum recommended usage percentage for this full-bodied fragrance in incense and potpourri is 50%. This autumn aroma comes across nice and strong in aroma beads. We’ve also got an awesome Autumn Leaves Potpourri Recipe made with Autumn Woods Fragrance Oil, cute little leaf molds, and shiny gold mica pigment! A beautiful fall decoration that exudes a wonderful scent.

If you’d like to do some autumn-cleaning, the maximum recommended usage percentage for this seasonal scent in cleaning products is 5%.

Thirdly, bath and body products! The maximum recommended usage percentage in soaps, bath oils, and bath gels is 5%. Our cold process soap testing found that this complex accord results in no acceleration, no ricing, no separation, and nice, strong scent retention. It discolors CP soap to a tan color. This is possibly due to the 1.84% vanillin content of the fragrance. Vanillin has the tendency to discolor bath and body products. If you’d prefer, you can try to combat this with Vanilla White Color Stabilizer, but please remember you are responsible for the results in your finished products. Our coloring suggestions for bath and body products are to use yellow and brown soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you. You can also try natural soap colorants for some truly earthy tones, but pay close attention to the information on the page- some soapmaking processes can alter the desired color of your final soap. Experimenting is always okay! But never color your bath and body products with candle colorants- that is one experiment to avoid.

And finally, body products outside of the bath! This fragrance performs perfectly in perfumes and its maximum recommended usage percentage in lotions and body-sprays it 3.95%.

Wear this fragrance on your body or use it to fill rooms with scent- you will certainly feel all the fragrant fun of fall!

Aug
26

Angel Love Fragrance

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Angel Love FragranceAngel Love Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Angel was an American television series that aired from 1999-2004 starring David Boreanaz, and was a spin-off of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.  I don’t think that’s what we’re talking about here, but I love me some David Boreanaz (that’s my Angel Love). Actual angels, the kind we find in religious stories and myths, are said to be messengers from God, serving as intermediaries between Heaven and Earth. Angels are also charged with guiding and protecting human beings. They are generally depicted with bird-like wings, wearing white, and exuding some form of light. It is safe to assume that they smell absolutely heavenly.

What Does Angel Love Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

Angel Love Fragrance Oil by Natures Garden is a feminine, gourmand aroma with luscious rich top notes of lemon, raspberry, honeydew melon, black currants; with middle notes of jasmine, gardenia, and nutmeg; bottom notes of white chocolate, musk, sandalwood, and patchouli. Very complex!

Top Notes:  lemon, mandarin, cassis, raspberry, melon, black currants
Mid Notes:  apple blossoms, jasmine, honeysuckle, gardenia, nutmeg
Base Notes:  patchouli, vanilla, musk, white chocolate, sandalwood

How Do Our Customers Use Angel Love Fragrance Oil?

Candles: this fruity, floral fragrance performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. The maximum recommended usage percentage in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. Joy of joys, this angelic aroma is gel wax compatible. Our coloring recommendations for candles are none. Pure, white candles. This little light of mine, I’m gonna let it shine.

Soaps: the maximum recommended usage percentage for this sweet scent in soaps, bath oils, bath gels, and cleaning products is 5%. The vanillin content is 1%, so it may slightly discolor your bath and body products. Our cold process soap testing results for Angel Love fragrance found that this scent had a perfect pour, causing no acceleration, no ricing, no separation, and maintaining good scent retention. It did, however, discolor to beige. If you wish to combat discoloration in your bath and body products, we recommend trying our vanilla white color stabilizer. This is not a guarantee and you are responsible for testing the color stabilizer in your finished products. Other than that, our coloring recommendations are none.

Lotions and perfumes: the maximum recommended usage percentage in these applications is 5%. Angel Love fragrance performed perfectly in perfumes.

Room scenting: the maximum recommended usage percentage in incense and potpourri is 50%. This delightful aura comes across nice and strong in aroma beads.

Valentine's Day Bouquet RecipeWe’ve got this adorable Valentine’s Day Bouquet recipe in which Angel Love fragrance is used to make heart-shaped aroma bead ornaments on a stick. You combine these with Fresh Cut Roses-scented aroma buds, and Dare-to-be-Sexy-scented heart-shaped soaps on a stick to make a beautiful bouquet of fragrant flowers. Sure to catch the attention of your sweetie, or at the very least the attention of their nose. But I say if you’re the one who put all the work into creating this angelic arrangement- keep it for yourself! Brighten up your Valentine’s Day with this wonderful bouquet!

Jan
10

Patchouli Uses

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patchouli herb cut and siftedPatchouli Uses

Traditionally, patchouli has always been a valuable element to the eastern Asia and India incense industry.  However, it was not until the 1960’s that both patchouli oil and patchouli incense rose in popularity in Europe and the United States.  This climb in demand was majorly contributed to the hippie movement of that time.

Because the hippie movement focused on a more natural and simpler way of living, many hippies wore the scent of patchouli because it signified nature.  Although it may be argued patchouli was worn to cover up the smell of weed.  This pungent yet unique aroma has a heavy musty and earthy odor that was easily distinguished.   Hippies wore this scent to stand up to the conservative environment of that time.  They saw this scent as a way of marking themselves as new age thinkers; a then outside of the box notion.  Not only did the aroma embrace the new age thinking, but also the sought after change for the world.  Patchouli however, is more than just the time capsule scent of the hippie era.

Patchouli has an array of versatile uses. It is used in the medical, skincare, perfume, home scenting, dietary, and even cleaning industries.  Depending on how you plan to use patchouli, the form differs in the type of patchouli you need.

Patchouli is available in many different forms.  You can use patchouli as an herb.  The herb is readily available in whole leaf form or in the c/s form which means cut and sifted.  Patchouli is also available as an absolute and an essential oil.  Synthetically, patchouli is accessible as fragrance oil as well, and you will be able to also find varieties of the fragrance too like Sweet Patchouli fragrance oil for example.

A vital component to the perfume industry, patchouli is considered a chypre.  A chypre is regarded as a group of related fragrances with specific top notes, middle notes, and bases notes denoting them.  This group is distinguished as a contradiction of a citrus accord (typical the top note- first one smelled) and the woody base (the anchor for the fragrance).  A very popular fragrance group for both feminine and masculine smells, patchouli is considered fundamental in various scents.

Perfumery/ Scent Industry:

This widely used scent is a foundation for many perfumes and fragrance oils.  It is considered a base note from which many different fragrances are layered and formulated.  Because of the fact that patchouli oil actually improves with aging, many perfumeries favor working with the eldest oils to ensure a full bodied, longer lasting scent in their end aromas.

One of the best attributes of the scent of patchouli is that it easily blends with a variety of other fragrance notes.  These other scents are basil, geranium, vetiver, cedarwood, clove, rose, lavender, myrrh, sandalwood, bergamot, juniper, and pine; just to name a few.

In India, authentic Indian shawls carried the prevalent scent as well as Indian ink.  Some examples of items in the United States that have been scented with patchouli are:  paper towels, laundry detergents, herbal sachets (in oil form and herb form), candles, incense, bath and body products, cosmetics, and even toys.  A little fun fact about patchouli: Mattel, a large toy company, once used patchouli oil in their product line to scent an action figure character named Stinkor.

Medicinal/Healing:

The amazing medical advantages of patchouli have been used by the people of the Orient for millennia.  Patchouli has long been used as an insect repellant (insecticide), aid in digestive conditions (digestive aid for nausea, constipation, diarrhea, vomiting, hemorrhoids), combat infections (anti-infectious, natural anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antimicrobial, antiseptic), and is even used for snake bites (antitoxic).  Patchouli can even help to speed up the time it takes to heal a wound, or insect bite.

Patchouli can be used as an excellent diuretic.  Not only does it help the body to release excess fluid and water retention, but it can also be used to assist in weight loss.  It is believed that the aroma of patchouli even helps to reduce appetite.

It is also believed that by simply inhaling the aroma of patchouli, it can help to reduce hypertension.  This method works by sending the brain messages through the limbic system which can directly control the nervous system.  Through means of aromatherapy, patchouli can help to control heart rate, blood pressure, and can moderate breathing.

Patchouli also works as a feel good tonic.  Affecting the overall health and well being of a person, patchouli assists in the feel good mood of a person.  But, patchouli powers don’t stop there, it also assimilates toxins as well and helps to remove them from the body with it diuretic ability.

The scent of patchouli is also documented and believed to help fight anxiety and depression.  This is because the aroma supposedly helps to relax the mind and keep it in the present.  Patchouli is considered to clarify thought and release mental anguish of the uncontrollable while balancing the emotions.

Skincare/ Body Care

Patchouli is quite popular in skincare products because of its versatility.  Patchouli helps to inhibit wrinkles and sagging in the skin.  This is because patchouli oil is actually a very effective tissue regenerator.  The use of the oil on your skin encourages the growth of new skin cells, which then replace the damaged ones; keeping your skin looking healthy and youthful.  It is due to these same benefits that patchouli oil can even assist in the fading of scars, and can even help with the reduction of cellulite.

A powerful astringent that even tones the skin, patchouli works to eliminate any surplus of fluids from the body’s tissues.  Plus, with patchouli’s antiseptic powers, it is able to find the source of inflammation, and cool it down.  This is why patchouli is a compelling substance in fighting and preventing mild acne occurrences, even lessening the changes for a return breakout.  The same can be said for other skin conditions like dermatitis, eczema, rosacea, and psoriasis.

Becoming ever so popular in the 1960’s as a deodorant, patchouli works great at masking body odors.  Patchouli essential oil can even be to eliminate scalp disorders like dandruff.

Natures Garden provides this information about patchouli for educational purposes only.  Nothing we mention should be construed as medical advice or for medical treatment purposes.   Please consult your doctor before using any herbs for treatment or other medicinal purposes.

Jan
10

Patchouli

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patchouli essential oil Facts about Patchouli

In America, when most people hear the word patchouli, they immediately think of hippies, universal love for one another, and tie dyed peace signs. But patchouli is so much more than that and has quite an interesting history.

Deriving its name from the Tamil language (the official dialect of Singapore and Sri Lanka), patchouli means “green leaf”.  A robust and extremely fragrant plant; especially when rubbed, patchouli’s scent has been used for centuries in perfumes.

Belonging to the genus Pogostemon, patchouli is a green, leafy herb that is in the mint family.  Growing best in hot, tropical climates; patchouli thrives when it is not in direct sunlight and has the potential of reaching a height of 2-3 ft.  Contrary to common belief, patchouli is more than just leaves; the plant also has flowers that bloom in late fall.  These flowers produce seeds that can be harvested to produce even more patchouli plants.

There are two ways to grow patchouli.  The first is to attain cuttings from the mother plant.  These cuttings are then rooted in water and will cultivate additional patchouli plants.  The second way to grow patchouli is to plant the seeds of the flowers.  The only hesitance with this way is that patchouli seeds are very small and have to be handled with great care.  These seeds are extremely fragile and can be easily crushed, deeming them useless.

When it comes to harvesting patchouli, the leaves of the plant can be collected several times in one year.  However, the strongest scent/oil comes from the top 3-4 pairs of leaves in the patchouli plant.  In order to attain the extraction of patchouli essential oil from these leaves, the leaves must go through a steam distillation process.  This is typically achieved with dried patchouli leaves.  However, there are some claims that to achieve the highest quality of patchouli essential oil, fresh leaves should be distilled.  Ideally, close to where the leaves are harvested, ensuring true freshness.

There are other ways to obtain patchouli essential oil.  One is through a fermentation process.  This process involves bundling the dry patchouli leaves and allowing them to ferment for a long period of time.

The essential oil of patchouli is a rich, earthy aroma with a woody yet minty undertone.  One of the most notable characteristics of this essential oil is that it actually improves over time.  The two most sought out components of patchouli essential oil are patchoulol and norpatchoulenol.

Although, it is true that patchouli essential oil is vital to the perfume industry, patchouli also had another massive worth in history.  Patchouli is believed to be an insect repellent.  It was common place for silk traders of the oriental to pack the valuable silk that they were trading with dried patchouli leaves.  Not only did the leaves prevent the mating of moths on the traders’ silk, but also hindered the moth from laying eggs on the precious silk as well.

This practice, which had started as a means of protection for the silk, ended with patchouli being considered an affluent scent.  Historians now hypothesize that due to the fragrant nature of patchouli; much of the traded silk acquired the aroma during the long travel.  Before long the distinguished scent of patchouli marked authenticity in traded fabric goods although the vast majority did not know what it was called.

One of the possible explanations as to why patchouli was considered an upscale scent to Europeans of that time is due to a notable historical conqueror.  The infamous Napoleon Bonaparte attained some of these patchouli scented cashmeres, through his vast travels to Egypt.  He then brought them back to France.  This mysterious scent of patchouli and its origin were kept secret, and it was not until the year 1837, that the smell and the source were identified to the remainder of the western world.