Tag Archives: natures garden wellington ohio

Mar
20

Handmade Soaps

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, body butter, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, soap making interview, sugar scrubs and tagged , , , , , , , on by .

newhaircut 1.  What’s your name & Your Company Name:  My name is Dana Huff, and my company is New England Handmade Artisan Soaps.

2.  Why did you decide to go into business?  What was your motivation?  How long have you been in business?  I really decided to go into business after friends told me I needed to sell my soaps. I love to make soap, and I was starting to rack up quite a collection. I thought selling might be one way to move some of the soap out of my house so I could make more.

3.  What products do you make and sell?  I make soap and dabble in sugar scrubs and body butters, but I haven’t sold any of my body butters yet.

4.  What are your business goals?  Eventually, I would love to be a resource for people who want to learn more about handmade soap and to use quality handmade soap. After I started using handmade, I never went back. I think we owe it to our skin to take care of it. It’s the largest organ in our body. Soap is also an affordable luxury. It is a small thing you can do to feel good about yourself, and I want to help others find their way to handmade soaps because their skin deserves it.

5.  What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?  I use a lot of your fragrance oils, which I find are high quality and smell great, but also a great value. I don’t think it’s possible for me to pick a favorite. I also love your sweet almond oil and avocado oil. I have found Nature’s Garden to have great value for these products. I have also ordered French green clay, which I used in my Marseille-style soap called Provence, a great facial soap. I use something from Nature’s Garden in everything I make! Barely a week goes by that we don’t receive a package from Nature’s Garden at my house. My husband jokes that the UPS man knows him and waves at him when they see each other out on the street (which is true!).

Your Website:www.etsy.com/shop/NESoaps/

Facebook page:www.facebook.com/NESoaps/

Twitter:www.twitter.com/NESoaps/

Blog:www.newenglandsoaps.com/

YouTube Channel:www.youtube.com/user/danahuff/

NW3JABKE5X98

Mar
09

Diane’s House of Candles Interview

This entry was posted in candle company interview, candle company suceess, candle fragrance oils, candle scents, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils and tagged , , , , , , on by .

1. What’s your name & Your Company Name:
Diana Jablonski – Diane’s House of Candles

2. Why did you decide to go into business? I started making candles almost 15 years ago. It started off as a hobby. I would give them to friends and family because I just enjoyed making them. Pretty soon people started asking for so many that I couldn’t keep up. People were asking to buy them left and right. So I decided to experiment for awhile trying to find the best wax, best scents and best methods. Word just kept spreading and people kept asking for more so I decided to start my own small business out of my home. Now my candles are carried by a variety of local businesses, including many well known wineries in the northeast. My wine glass candles and wine scents are a big seller at the wineries. The football candles are always selling out also.

What was your motivation? How long have you been in business? The feedback I was getting about how much people loved my candles. They aren’t too strong and overpowering like most candles. Yet their scent fills the whole room. Even people that are sensitive to smells, love my candles. They are very true to their scent name and just the right strength. I have been in business for over 15 years.

3. What products do you make and sell? I make votive candles, jelly jar candles, pint jar candles, tart candles, football candles in a football shaped glass, and wine glass candles.

4. What are your business goals? My business goals right now are to expand my online presence. My website is currently undergoing an upgrade and redesign.

5. What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden? I use your scent oils for my candles. Asking which one is my favorite is like asking which child is my favorite! They are all so wonderful, I would never even think of using any other scent oil in my candles!

Your Website: www.DianesHouse.com

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/DianesHouseOfCandles

Mar
01

What is a Surfactant?

This entry was posted in adsorption, bath and body, cleansing, cosmetic ingredients, cosmetic recipe, emulsifier, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, recipes, soap, Soap making supplies, surfactant and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Have you ever tried to wash dirty dishes equipped only with a sponge and water?  This can be quite a feat.  You will notice that it takes a lot more time and elbow grease to get the job done.  Wondering why this is?  The answer as you will notice right away is that the dish soap is missing.

Did you know that the most eminent surfactant in existence is soap?

Surfactants seem to always get the bad rap.  Many people associate surfactants as bad ingredients to have in your recipes, but truth be told, this statement is not true!  Yes, SLS (Sodium Lauryl Sulfate) is a surfactant, and it can be more irritating to your skin than other surfactants, but is it as bad as what you read in the media lately?  It is an urban myth that Sodium Lauryl Sulfate causes cancer.  Read the truth for yourself.   In fact, many of the surfactants that will be listed in this class are derived from a natural source and they work to improve the integrity and performance of your cosmetic formulations.

Surfactants work with various liquids and substances; including oil and water.  Much like that of the role of the emulsifiers, surfactants have a hydrophilic (water-loving) head, and a lipophilic (oil-loving) tail.  In fact, emulsifiers are surfactants, and surfactants are vital to the industry of bath and body products too.  They comprise the largest category of cosmetic chemicals, and seem to have an endless list of cleansing capabilities.  So, needless to say, there is quite a variety to select from when seeking the perfect surfactant for your recipes.

The main qualifier in deciding which surfactant to use is all based upon the benefit that each surfactant provides.  Just like cold process soaping or any homemade bath and body products, the components that you choose to use in your recipes have a direct beneficial affect on the skin when the recipe is transformed into a finished product.  Therefore, when selecting which surfactant to use; it is just as equally important as to what you are looking to achieve in your finished product.  Each surfactant has key functions in which it will excel and equivocally each will also have other functions where it will be lacking.

The term surfactant is actually a combination of its meaning:  surface acting agent.  Let’s look at it again: surfactant = SURFace ACTing AgeNT.  But the term surfactant is not always the one that everyone sticks with.  It seems that surfactants have several names that all become applicable depending of the role of the surfactant in a specific recipe.  For example, in recipes where foam is the finished product, the surfactant used maybe referred to as foaming agents.  Surfactants used in body recipes, can even be termed as detergents or soaps.  Or, in the example of shaving creams, surfactants are considered lubricants because they protect the skin from irritation and the razor’s sharp edge while still allowing the removal of all of the unwanted hairs.

Everything that a surfactant does occurs at the surface levels of the liquids.  The biggest role that a surfactant has is the capability to lower the surface tension of a liquid.  The reaction which then occurs is the conversing of the liquid (with the lower surface tension) and the additional substance.  To break this down in simpler terms; a surfactant has the power to change the properties of a substance.  This process is known as adsorption.  The term adsorption means:  the gathering of gas or liquid in a condensed layer on the surface.  This condensed layer creates a film which is why the surface tension is lowered.  There are four different categories of classification for surfactants based on their interfaces and charges.  They are: Anionic, Nonionic, Cationic, and Amphoteric.

Education is always a powerful thing, and it is not necessary to completely know the ins and outs of everything surfactants.  But, you will want to have a general idea of each group of surfactants and how they play a role in your finished product.  This is especially true if you are looking to accomplish a “made from scratch” recipe.  It is also beneficial to know a few other things about surfactants too.  This would include information like why the surfactants are grouped or classified together or how/if surfactants work with additional groups of surfactants in a collaborate manner.  Spoiler alert:  Not all surfactants play nice with one another!

Anionic surfactants are considered to be the go to surfactant for many formulations.  This group of surfactants is also the most commonly used among foaming product productions, like shampoos or body washes.  The reasoning for this is because the anionic surfactant’s primary functions are creating high foam, high cleansing, and high washing capabilities in a finished product.

Anionic surfactants have a negatively charged water-loving head.  Anionic surfactants work very well in recipes which have a reaction between a chemical (like lye) and fatty acids or alcohols (like animal lard or vegetable based oils).  Hand processed soap, whether it is CP, CPOP, or HP, are all examples of anionic surfactants.  Other examples of anionic surfactants are Sodium sulfates, Ammonium sulfates, sulfosuccinates, sarcosines, sarcosinates, isethionates, and taurates.

One of the drawbacks of using an anionic surfactant relates to skin sensitivity.  Due the high foaming, cleansing, and washing capabilities, skin irritations can occur.  It is for this reason that if you are looking to create a handmade recipe it is best to choose another category of surfactants, or balance the anionic surfactants with amphoteric surfactants.

Amphoteric surfactants are the go with the flow surfactants.  They have the possibility to either have a positive or negative charge.  Their charge is all based on the pH or alkalinity of your finished product.  Hence the amphi prefix.

When an amphoteric surfactant is used in a recipe where the end result of a finished product has a lower pH, the amphoteric surfactant takes on a more conditioning and nourishing role.  On the other hand, when an amphoteric surfactant is used in a recipe where there is a higher pH in the end product, it resembles more of an anionic surfactant with high foaming and cleansing capabilities.  Neither option is necessarily bad; they are just on two different planes of the beneficial skin aspects.

Amphoteric surfactants are the most docile of the surfactants.  They are also the second most used surfactants in the industry.  This is because when used alone, they are able to provide a gentle aspect to the nature of your end product.  Adversely, when an amphoteric surfactant is coupled with an anionic surfactant, the amphoteric surfactant mellows the harshness of the anionic surfactants.  In fact, amphoteric surfactants can be used solo and in conjunction with any other of the surfactant groups.  There adaptability is just one of the reasons why they are so widely used.

Some examples of well know amphoteric surfactants are Coco Bentaine, Lauryl Bentaine, and Hydroxysultaines.

Cationic surfactants are the opposite of anionic surfactants.  They have a positively charged water-loving head.  It is because of this positive charge that cationic surfactants can offer many skin loving, nourishing benefits to the skin and body.  These surfactants are best used in recipes where foaming is not necessarily mandatory such as hair conditioners.  Cationic surfactants alone do not allow for ample foaming capabilities.

Cationic surfactants work well with 2 of the 3 remaining surfactant groups.  Both amphoteric and nonionic surfactants will be compatible with cationic surfactants with no problems.  However, because of the opposing charge cationic (positive) and anionic (negative) surfactants will not combine.

Some common cationic surfactants used in bath and body recipes are your chlorides (Benzalkonium, Stearalkonium, and Centrimonium), Trimethyl Ammoniums, and Methyl Sulfates.

Nonionic surfactants have no foaming capabilities which is why this group of surfactants are rarely used as a recipe’s main surfactant.  Evident by the prefix non, these surfactants do not have a charge in their water-loving heads.  The end result of using a nonionic surfactant will allow for a finished product that has a very gentle cleansing ability.   But, just because it doesn’t foam, it doesn’t mean it does cleanse.

Psychologically speaking, there is a direct mental correlation between foaming and cleansing.  We as a race have somehow inherently made this connection.  Whether it is a physical view of suds equating to cleanliness, or simply urban myths that have taken on a life of their own, the reality is; it could not be further from the truth.

Nonionic surfactants, or at least some of them, are ethoxylated.  What this means is that the nonionic surfactants have had some reaction to the addition of ethylene oxide.  With this reaction comes an even more water-loving head, almost as if it has been supercharged.  This then makes nonionic surfactants (like Polysorbate 20) perfect solubilizers.

But, don’t just disregard this category of surfactants yet.  Nonionic surfactants can also be used in formulations to reduce irritants, due to their gentle cleansing ability.  They also have the capability to be used as an emollient, softening or soothing skin.  Not to mention, these surfactants can be used to stabilize foam in recipes.  Hold on to your seats though folks, because it gets a little better!  Due to its lack of a charge, nonionic surfactants love every other category of surfactants; you can consider them the peacemakers!

Some common nonionic surfactants used in bath and body recipes are your Polysorbates, Emulsifying Wax NF, E-wax, Glyceryl Oleate, Glyceryl Stearate, ingredients with the prefix PEG, Ceteareths, Oleths, Sorbitans, Lauryl Glucoside, and Polyglycose.

In summary, surfactants are amazing little compounds found in many items we use every day like adhesives, bath gels, creams, lotions, frozen foods, chewing gum, inks, and fabric softeners; just to name a few!  There are four main applications of surfactants particularly in just bath and body recipes.  They include: cleansing, solubility, emulsifying, and conditioning.

Some other additional aspects of surfactants to bath and body recipes include:  the potential to increase stability of a product; certain surfactants can be used as thickening agents; due to the composition of a surfactant, some maintain anti-microbial elements and therefore can be used as preservatives; there are even some that have the capability to reduce irritation allowing for a milder product on the skin.

Interested in adding some surfactants to your recipes?  Below is a list of some commonly added surfactants to bath and body recipes:

sodium lauryl sulfate (can be derived from coconuts)  Produces High Foam; easy to thicken. Strong Anionic Surfactant; can cause irritation
ammonium laureth sulfate (derived from coconuts) Produces High Foam; easy to thicken.  Strong Anionic Surfactant; can cause irritation
disodium lauryl sulfosuccinate (derived from coconuts)  Foaming agent, Mild Anionic Surfactant; gentle on the skin
Cocoamphocarboxyglycinate  (derived from coconuts)  Mild, Amphoteric Surfactant
decyl Polyglucoside (vegetable derived, used in baby shampoos for its gentleness)
cetearyl alcohol
stearyl alcohol
Cocamidopropyl Betaine (derived from coconut oil) Amphoteric Surfactant
Decyl Glucoside (derived from sugar)
Glyceryl Cocoate (derived from vegetables)
Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate (derived from coconuts)
Almond Glycerides (derived from vegetables)
Sodium Lauryl Sulphoacetate (much milder surfactant than SLS)
Sodium Lauroyl Sarcosinate (derived from vegetables and is a natural substitution for SLS) 
sodium methyl cocoyl taurate
(derived from coconut)
Sucrose Cocoate (derived from sugar)
polysorbate 20 (vegetable derived)
polysorbate 80 (vegetable derived)

If you formulate your own cosmetics, please visit our customer suggestion page and let us know which surfactants you would like to see Natures Garden carry.  We will be increasing our line of natural cosmetic supplies.

Jan
25

What is an Emulsifier?

This entry was posted in bath and body, crafts as a hobby, emulsifing agent, Natures Garden, Uncategorized, what is an emulsifier in cosmetics and tagged , , , , , , on by .

emulsifier natures gardenIf you have ever seen an unshaken bottle of Italian Salad Dressing, then you have witnessed a product that could definitely use the help of an emulsifier!

In Elementary School, we all learned that oil and water just simply will not combine on their own accord.  They are just not compatible.  It is all about polarity.  Let’s magnify down to the molecular level of things and really get down to the nitty gritty.

Simply put polarity is the nature of a molecule or a compound to either be attracted to or repelled from another molecule.  The attraction or opposition is based on the charge of the nucleus, and the formation of the atoms that have bonded.  Based on this makeup, compounds are either polar or non-polar.

Polar molecules are not balanced in their chemical makeup.  Usually it is because one of the elements is pulling all of the electrons to one side of the atom.  Therefore, polar elements are constantly looking to bond with other polar elements in order to be a balanced compound.  On the flip side, if an atom is completely balanced, and has an equal charge on both sides, then it is classified as non-polar.

Now, when polar and non-polar elements are present in the same mixture what you get is separation.  Whether the mixture is stirred, heated, or shaken; eventually the polar and non-polar elements will isolate themselves from one another.  This is a physical trait, which you can literally see.  What is missing from the equation is an emulsifier.

Emulsifiers are most commonly used in the food industry.  They have a great impact on the texture and composition of food.  Another benefit of using emulsifiers in food is the extension of freshness.  Some common foods that use emulsifiers are:  salad dressings, candy, frozen desserts like ice cream and yogurts, cake mixes, and icings.  There are even foods that are natural emulsifiers such as milk, mustard, and eggs.

In the department of bath and body, or any product that is made to be put on the skin, emulsifiers will become your new best friend.  Since, in our industry, most of our scenting is accomplished with oils, it poses a problem when the product that we are creating is water based.  The reasoning- just like the Italian dressing, water and oil will not mix.  The chemistry concept to remember is like dissolves like.  This means that polar will always bind and dissolve in polar, and vice versa with non-polar.

When a mixture is water based; it is termed Aqueous.  This means that in order to mix other elements to this recipe, the additional ingredients need to be hydrophilic, or water loving (polar).  Fragrance and Essential oils are not water loving, therefore they are termed lipophilic (non-polar).

No matter how much you shake, mix, blend, or beat a mixture, if it contains both water and oils, there will be separation that occurs.  The only way to solve this is by adding an emulsifier to your recipe.  An emulsifier is quite an amazing little thing.  Let’s look at the molecular level again.  An emulsifier consists of a hydrophilic (water-loving) head, and a lipophilic (oil-loving) tail.  This is the perfect peace maker between water and oil.  This is because the emulsion allows for the lesser mass element to be “insulated” by the emulsifier to prevent it from joining the other elements with the same polarity.  What this allows for a dispersion of water and oil together and this referred to as a stable emulsion.

When an emulsifier is added to a recipe, it is drawn to the layer where binding is needed.  It is then able to position itself, by lessening the surface tension, between the oil and water.  Emulsifiers, besides being wonderful binders between polar and non-polar elements, also act as aerating agents, starch complexing agents, and even crystallization inhibitors.

Emulsifiers create emulsions.  There are two types of emulsions.  The first is an oil in water emulsion.  This is where the greater mass is water, and there are oil droplets which are dispersed into the water.  This is created by the emulsifier covering the oil particles and allowing the hydrophilic end to bind with the hydrophilic water.  Now, since both are water-loving elements, they will bind together.  The second emulsion is a water in oil emulsion.  This is where the greater mass is oil, and there are water droplets which are dispersed into the oil by the emulsifier covering the water particles.  This then allows for the lipophoic end to bind with the lipophilic oil.  With the addition of an emulsifier, both emulsions are now stable and evenly dispersed without separation.

These two different emulsions are important to know if for example you are trying to make a specific kind of cream or lotion.

In the case of water dispersed in oil, oil will encase the water so therefore the oils in the recipe will touch the skin first.  There will of course be some greasiness in the feel of the lotion when it is applied to the skin.  This is because of the oils, and will be absorbed into the skin.  These recipes are great for adding beneficial aspects of the oils directly to the skin.

In the case of oil dispersed in water, water will encase the oil so therefore the water in this recipe will touch the skin first.  These recipes have a less greasy feel to them.  These are also great emulsion recipes in situations where you are looking for moisture to be one of the benefits of the lotion or cream.

For bath and body crafters, common emulsifiers that are used are:  Borax with Beeswax, Beeswax, BTMS 25%, Carbomer, Cetaryl Alcohol, Emulsifying Wax-NF, Lecithin, PEG-20 Stearate, Propylene Glycol, Silky Emulsifying Wax, Stearyl Alcohol NF, and Polysorbate 80.

Natures Garden Fragrance Oils

Dec
07

How to Make a Santa Candle

This entry was posted in candle recipe, crafts as a hobby, creative, holiday candles, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils and tagged , , , , , on by .

With the holidays quickly approaching, these festive Santa Candles are sure to impress even the big guy himself!

Everyone knows that Santa loves his milk and cookies, I mean that is the whole reason why he has his belly that shakes like a bowl full of jelly.  The man just has a thing for sweet treats.  So, in homage to good ole Saint Nick and his fascination with holiday cookies, we at Natures Garden really wanted to creatively embrace and share a fantastic, decorative, and oh so cute candle idea that you can use as a gift or decoration for the season.

Here is what you will need:

Joy Wax
Pillar of Bliss Wax
Red Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye
Yellow Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye
Brown Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye
Santa’s Whiskers Fragrance Oil
16 oz. Glass Apothecary Jar
(2) 51-32-18z Zinc Core Wicks
Small Sugar Cookie Rubber Mold from FlexibleMolds.com
Pouring Pot
Black felt piece for belt
Gold Foam piece for belt buckle
Hot Glue Gun
Wire whisk

Here are the steps:

Step 1: Measure out 1/2 cup of Pillar of Bliss Wax.

Step 2: Place the wax into a pouring pot. Using the double boiler method as described in one
of our classes, melt wax on low on the stove until the wax is completely melted. Get small
sugar cookie mold from flexible molds ready.

Step 3: Using a toothpick, get a very small amount of brown liquid candle dye and yellow
liquid candle dye and add to the melted wax until it is the color of baked sugar cookies.

Step 4: Add 1/8 oz. of Santa’s Whiskers fragrance oil to melted wax and stir.

Step 5: Pour prepared, melted wax into sugar cookie molds. Allow to set up completely,
and pop out of the molds.

Step 6: Weigh out approximately 22 oz. of Joy Wax. (this is how much wax you will need for
the entire candle).

Step 7: Place 4 oz. of the joy wax into a pouring pot. Using the double boiler method as
described in one of our classes, melt wax on low on the stove until the wax is completely
melted.

Step 8: Add ¼ oz. of Santa’s Whiskers fragrance oil to melted wax and stir.

Step 9: Adhere (2) 51-32-18z zinc wicks to the bottom of your apothecary jar equally spaced
(using a hot glue gun).

Step 10: Pour melted wax carefully into the bottom of the jar (making sure that you do not
splash any wax on the sides of your jar). This layer of wax should be about 1” high. Allow
this layer of wax to completely set up at room temperature.

Step 11: Place 10 oz. of joy wax into a pouring pot. Using the double boiler method as
described in one of our classes, melt wax on low on the stove until the wax is completely
melted.

Step 12: Add 5 drops of red spectrum liquid candle dye to melted wax and stir.

Step 13: Add ½ oz. Santa’s Whiskers fragrance oil to melted wax and stir.

Step 14: Slowly pour melted, red candle wax into jar. Straighten your wicks. Allow to set
up.

Step 15: Melt the remaining joy wax, and add ½ oz. Santa’s Whiskers fragrance oil. Stir.

Step 16: Allow the wax to become slushy in appearance. Then, using a wire whisk or an
electric mixer, beat the wax until it is like thick, fluffy frosting.

Step 17: Spoon the frosting on top of the red layer of your candle, and using your spoon,
make the frosting look like spiked whiskers.

Step 18: Quickly adhere 2 of the sugar cookies you made to the top of the whiskers. Allow
to set up at room temperature.

Step 19: Cut a 1” wide x 12” long black piece of felt.

Step 20: Create a belt buckle with the gold foam piece, and attach to the belt.

Step 21: Attach Santa’s belt to the outside of the jar.

**Note: Remove belt when burning candle.

Fragrance & Fun for Everyone

Inspire, Create, and Dominate!

Sparkles!!! Nicole

(Corporate Manager of Natures Garden Candle Supplies)

www.naturesgardencandles.com

Nov
02

Making Your Own Soap Recipe

This entry was posted in cold process soap, make your own soap, soap making recipes, soap recipes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Making Your Own Soap Recipe

As a newbie, it may be difficult to figure out your soaping recipe, especially if you do not have a starting point.  Or, maybe you are a veteran that is just looking to expand your recipes, catering to new cliental with special skin needs.  Well, we at Natures Garden want to help you produce the best soap bars on the market.  Whether for personal use or for selling, let’s talk recipes!

After you have decided which method of soaping you are going to choose, the next step will be determining the purpose of your soap bars.  Soap bars have 5 distinct qualities that you are looking to have a nice range or balance in.  They are:  Hardness, Conditioning, Cleansing, Bubbly Lather, and Creamy Lather.  Additives such as fragrance (scent) and color (or appearance) of bars should also be considered when trying to determine a soap recipe.

After you have a good idea as to what type of soap bar you would like to achieve, it is time to configure a recipe.

There are various soaping calculators available on the internet; however, SoapCalc provides a FREE, comprehensive, easy to use soaping calculator.  Not only is it  known as one of the best, but this site is also improved and updated frequently.

For this post, we will be looking at how to use the SoapCalc.  Below is the link.  Feel free to go ahead and save it to your favorites:

http://www.soapcalc.net/calc/SoapCalcWP.asp

Note:  In order for the SoapCalc to work, your computer must have JavaScript enabled.

Now, remember that it is imperative that all the correct information is given to calculate the proper saponification totals needed.

Once you are on the SoapCalc website, you will enter various items.  Starting from left and proceeding to the right, the first information needed is the type of lye.  If you are making bar soaps, you will need to ensure that the NaOH button is selected.  If you are making liquid soaps, you will need to ensure that the KOH button is selected.  Yea, the first step is done.

The next step is to calculate the weight of oils.  These will be based on the weight solely of the oils; do not include water or lye into this total.  You will have to select the button in pounds, ounces, or grams.  Our suggestion is that it is easiest to use ounces for this category.  However, regardless of which weight unit you select all 3 (pounds, ounces, and grams) will be presented on your printable recipe.  As a rule of thumb, using 16oz of soaping oils will produce about 20 oz of soap.  This however, may vary.  It is completely dependent on the types of oils used, any additional additives, and the amount of water used.  We have found that 48 ounces of soaping oils typically create 4 pounds of finished bar soap; allowing you to fill all 4 loaf molds in our 4 Loaf Silicone Mold.

For the third section of the soaping calculator, you will be entering the water.  This can be a little confusing.  If you are a beginner, it is best if you select the water as % of oils button.  This automatically fills in a default of 38%.  This number can be changed, but if you are new, this is a standard suggested by the soap calculator.  Once you have accomplished making your first few batches of soap, you may want to start to decrease this percentage little by little until about 33%.  For the advanced soaper and those with soaping experience you also have the option of entering a lye concentration percentage or an option for entering a water to lye ratio.

The next section is the super fat and fragrance.  If you recall from the earlier soap making blogs, a super fat pertains to the amount of soaping oils that is unsaponified by the lye.  This could also be considered the surplus of oils.  Since the soaping calculator provides your calculated recipe, you may want to deliberately leave a certain percentage of your soaping oils in your bars of soap.  SoapCalc automatically has a default of 5%, but this can be changed.  Some soapers choose to do this to add certain skin benefits such as creaminess or conditioning to their finished products.   However, be careful not to over super fat your soaps.  While saponified  oils in soap typically do not become rancid, the extra oils in your soap that were not saponified can overtime become rancid; producing the Dreaded Orange Spots.

As for the fragrance per pound section, it is not mandatory to enter something here.  If you do not plan on adding any fragrance to your recipe, the soap calculator will still produce your recipe.  However, if you do plan on adding a body safe fragrance oil to your soap recipe, you will want to add the weight of the fragrance oil per pound of soap.  A general starting point is .8 oz per lb, or 50 gm per kg.  Also, before using a fragrance oil in soap, make sure that the fragrance oil  was formulated for soap making, and check its IFRA maximum safe usage percentage (category #9).  At Natures Garden, we like our soap very fragrant, so if IFRA allows for it, we use 1 oz. fragrance per pound of soap in our recipes.

For the next section of the soaping calculator you will be selecting your soaping oils.  There is a list provided of common soaping oils used.  By double clicking on the specific oil that you would like or by clicking the oil once (to where it is highlighted) and then clicking on the plus sign (to the right of the list of oils), you will notice two things.  First, the oil name will appear in the next section, Section 6; as well as numbers will appear under the soap qualities and fatty acids box.  Each time you select a new oil to your recipe, the soap quality and fatty acid numbers will change.   This is a great section to review the soaping qualities of certain oils, as well as explore possibly adding some new oils to your recipe.  A quick tip:  by placing your icon over the soaping qualities listed in section 5, a green box will appear with a general range guideline.  This is for reference only.  Once you feel comfortable with your soap making skills, you may want to go above or below the ranges.

Other important information that is provided with each oil that you select is the SAP value.  This is the amount of lye that is required to saponify that specific oil.  The values will be located directly below the list of commonly used soaping oils.  The Iodine value of each soaping oil selected will also appear.  It is located directly under the 5 soaping qualities.  This number is a general gauge for the hardness of the soap bar supplied by that oil.  Always remember:  the lower the Iodine number, the harder your bars will be.

The final number that you need to acknowledge is the INS value.  This value is decided based on the Iodine value and the SAP value.  The optimal number here is 160 for your total recipe oils value.  Although it is not yet concrete, studies have been conducted to show that reaching the ideal INS of 160 in soaping recipes, improves trace, gel phase, and total saponification time.

If at any time you accidently select the wrong soaping oil, or change your mind on which oils you will be using, there are plus and minus signs to the left of the listed oils in section 6.  By simply clicking the minus sign, the soaping oil that you had selected will now be removed.

Once you have all of the soaping oils you would like included in your recipe listed in section 6, the final step in this section is to add the amounts.  You can do this in two ways.  The first is by percentage.  You do this by clicking the circle above the symbol %.  Please note the total amount of weight for your soaping oils must equal 100%.  The actual weight based on the percent of the oil that you would like to use will be calculated for you once you view your recipe, but let’s not get too far ahead.  The other possible way to enter your amounts of oils is by clicking the weight button.  This will either say lb (pound), oz (ounce), or gm (gram), depending on which weight unit you selected in section 2- weight of oils.

In the seventh section of the soaping calculator, you will click the calculate recipe button.  Once this button is selected, the soaping calculator fills in information about your total recipe.  If there is anything off with the recipe, an alert will appear on your screen.  An example of one of these messages would be if your recipe contains a high lye to water percentage.  Usually, a percentage of 40 or higher is considered not safe, but the soaping calculator will still present your recipe.  The soaping calculator will also provide you with a solution and an explanation as to why there may be issues with your recipe.

Once any problems are acknowledged or solved, it is time to take a look at what characteristics your soap recipe provides.  There are 3 categories that you will want to review:  the soap bar qualities, the percentages of fatty acid, and the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fats.

If you are a newbie:  Remember, you may want to reference your ranges for qualities on a nice balanced bar of soap, making sure you have oils that accommodate nicely among all 5 of the distinct soaping qualities.

If you are unhappy with your recipes results, modifications can be made until you are.  It is as simple as correcting the area you are not happy with and selecting the calculate recipe button until your results are where you want them to be.  When you are ready to print your recipe, simply select the View/Print Recipe button.  This button will become active after the calculate button has been selected.  The recipe will be viewed in two ways.  You will either have a new window pop up, or a new tab appear.   This will show you the recipe with amounts, plus give you some other useful information where you can reference the total soaping qualities of the recipe.

If you would like to compare several recipes against one another, you will want to click the multiple tabs button next to the view/print recipe button.  This will allow you to either have multiple screens or tabs to compare with ease before you print.

Now let’s take a quick look at the information that the printable recipe page provides.

The top portion (blue boxes) of the page provides a quick look summary of your recipes parameters.  The next section (pink boxes) references the required amount of lye and water that is necessary for your recipe.  This section’s information is provided in pounds, ounces, and grams.  The soaping oils section (green boxes) also is provided in pounds, ounces, and grams.  The soaping qualities range is provided in the next section (yellow boxes).  Your recipes total is configured right next to the range, as is the fatty acid profile of your recipe.

When you are ready to print, select the print recipe button.  There is one button in the top right corner, and there is a second print button in the bottom right corner as well.

And, that it is.  Don’t be afraid to get out there and explore with all of your new found soaping information.

Visit Natures Garden’s website for soap making supplies!

Have fun!

Fragrance & Fun for Everyone

Inspire, Create, and Dominate!

Sparkles!!! Nicole

(Corporate Manager of Natures Garden Candle Supplies)

www.naturesgardencandles.com

Aug
10

Soap Making Safety

This entry was posted in crafts as a hobby, herb, homemade, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, soap oil properties, soap safety and tagged , , , , , , , , on by .

Natures Garden takes safety seriously.  When it comes to crafting soap, protective gear is mandatory.  It is also just as important to have a safe and clean work environment. 

Before even getting started making soap, ensure that you have all of your ingredients in your work area.  Being prepared is one key factor in successful crafting.   Once you get started, it is vital that you stay in your work area.  Leaving certain ingredients such as lye out in the open can lead to very serious and dangerous situations.  While you are prepping your area, it is also important to make sure that you have the proper soaping equipment, and it is in working order.  Be sure to check the batteries on your scales to be certain they do not need changed before beginning the soap making process.

During the soap making process it is very important that you do not rush.  Since soap making is a science, and you will want to ensure that everything is measured out exactly.  Soap recipes are measured by weight units, not volume units.  In other words, if a recipe calls for 8 oz. of coconut oil, you will need to weigh out 8 oz. of coconut oil on your scales.  Take your time and move methodically.  The best way to work is in an organized fashion.  It is also very important that while you are making soap you are able to concentrate and work uninterrupted.

Safety gear for you from head to toe:

  • Hair should be tied back and away from your face.
  • Protective eye gear or safety goggles should be worn at all times to prevent anything from getting into your eyes.
  • Shirts should be long sleeve.
  • Rubber Gloves should be worn during the whole soaping process.
  • Pants should also be worn.
  • Shoes must be worn.  Nothing that is open toed or leaves any portion of your feet exposed.
  • A facial mask is suggested for the mixing of the water and lye.
  • Always wear an apron.

Safety gear for your work environment:

  • Cover your work area with a protective layer ( like several layers of newspaper, or old towels/blankets)
  • Prepare a Spray bottle filled with vinegar

Equipment:

Once these tools have been designated as your soaping materials and used, they can never be used for anything but soap making.  We advise that you clearly mark everything and keep it separated from your other kitchen utensils.  As a suggestion:  If your work area is in your home, large storage containers with lids work wonderfully for storage.  Using a large storage tote provides you the benefit of having all of your items and equipment in one place, as well as, the capability of removing the storage tote and placing it in a lesser traveled area of your home such as the basement.

  • Proper containers for weighing out recipe (heavy duty plastic or stainless).  Fragrance oils can eat right through certain plastics.  PET and HDPE are the best plastics when working with fragrance and essential oils. NEVER use anything composed of aluminum!
  • Thermometer
  • Towels
  • Stick Blender
  • Mixing utensils (rubber or stainless steel). Wood will break down over time and can eventually leave splinters in your soap batter.
  • Scale
  • Notebook & pen
  • Paper Towels or old rags
  • Mold for soap
  • Freezer paper
  • Spatulas (rubber, silicone works the best)
  • Old blanket or towel for insulation purposes
  • Large containers for the blending of the oils and lye solution (heavy duty plastic or stainless steel).  Never use glass to mix your lye solution; it can crack and break.
  • A permanent black sharpie marker to mark every piece of equipment you use “CAUTION-LYE”.  After you use this equipment to make soap, you will never be able to use them for food-contact again.

Lye:

The most dangerous aspect in the soap making process is Lye; Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) is the lye used for bar soaps, and Potassium Hydroxide (KOH) is the lye used to make liquid soaps.  NaOH is also referred to as caustic soda; while KOH is referred to as Caustic potash. Essential to the saponification process, lye is used with distilled water to make your lye water solution.  It is extremely important that you are in a well ventilated area while working with lye.  If you have small children or pets, you may want to consider doing this portion outside or in a garage.  Regardless of where you choose to mix your lye water solution, it is advisable to remove all pets and children from the area where you will be working with lye.  It is estimated that 5,000 accidental lye ingestions occur each year by children under 5 years of age.

Lye can lead to death if ingested, so it is best not to take any chances.  In fact, ingestion of bases such as NaOH (lye) produce the most significant injuries to our bodies.

If ingested, seek medical help immediately.  Do not induce vomiting unless directed by medical personnel or poison control.  Milk or water may be given to the person unless informed otherwise by medical personnel.  Do not give the person milk or water if they are unconscious, vomiting, having convulsions, or if the person is showing a decreased level of alertness.  Loosen any restricting clothing such as ties, collars, belts, buckles.

The phone number for the National Poison Control Center is 1-800-222-1222 (US only).  The National Poison Control Center can also be contacted in non-emergency situations such as Poison Prevention.  The center is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

The lye solution is made up of lye and distilled water.  Because the solution is a chemical reaction, it has an exothermal reaction.  This means that heat is given off as the chemical breakdown occurs.  One tip that we learned is to divide the amount of grams of water you need for your recipe between water and ice cubes.  This will help reduce the lye solution temperature so that you are able to begin making soap faster.  The solution, even with ice water, will still be very hot.  Be cautious.

Before you begin the soap making process, be certain that you are wearing protective gear:  Protective safety glasses, a mask, gloves, an apron, shoes, a long sleeve shirt, pants, and shoes that cover your entire feet (nothing open toed).  Have your pets and children away from your soaping area.  Now, let’s get started.

Using two separate, heavy duty plastic containers, weigh out your lye according to your recipe in one of the containers, then weigh out your water in the other container.  Slowly pour the lye into the water.  Never ever pour the water into the lye!  You do not want to pour the entire lye amount directly into the water either.  It is best if you slowly sprinkle the lye into your water and constantly mix until the lye has dissolved in the water.  Your water solution will become cloudy at first, and then you should begin to see the lye dissolving into the water as you mix.  Be extremely careful with this step.  Adding too much lye too fast will cause a volcano/boiling effect, and anything that the mixture touches can be damaged.

Do not mix your lye solution in glass.  Glass can explode leaving your hazardous lye solution everywhere.  Absolutely never use aluminum containers or aluminum tools for lye solution.  Lye reacts with aluminum to produce a highly flammable hydrogen gas.  It is best if you use a stainless steel or a heavy duty plastic container for mixing your lye solution.   Note:  Certain plastics will breakdown after repeated usage.

Mixing these two elements together is crucial to your solution.  If you do not mix it completely, the lye will crystallize at the bottom of your container, and in the next step, your solution will not complete the saponification process of the oils.  As you stir, you will notice two things; the water will become cloudy and get very hot.  You can stop mixing once the lye solution becomes clear.  Note:  Sometimes, there will be pieces of white debris that is floating on top of your lye solution.  These are simply impurities, and can be strained or sieved out before pouring your lye solution into your soaping oils.  They will not hurt your soap.

Stand as far away from the mixture as possible, while still being able to mix it.  Lye can give off fumes during this reaction that are extremely hazardous and should not be inhaled.  Lye will do quite a number on your mucus membranes, irritating your throat and lungs.  It is also mandatory that you wear safety goggles for this step.  You do not want to get any lye or lye water solution in your eyes.  This can lead to serious and permanent damage.

If while mixing your lye solution, any portion spills or splashes in your eyes: Remove any contact lenses.  Start flushing your eyes with cold water immediately.  Repeat this for 15 minutes.  Do not rub your eyes.  Seek medical help.

If while mixing your lye solution, any portion spills or splashes on your skin, start flushing with cold water immediately.  Remove any clothing that may have the lye solution on it.  Keep flushing and rinsing affected skin for 15 minutes.  Spray your skin with vinegar to help neutralize any lye solution that is left on your skin. Seek medical help.  When lye comes in contact with your skin, it literally begins making soap from the natural oils found in your skin.  This is why you will notice that hands that have been exposed to lye solution will feel greasy when washing them.

If you have a serious interaction with the lye solution on your skin:  Wash the affected area of your body immediately with disinfectant soap and water.  Cover the area with anti-bacterial cream.  Seek medical help immediately.

While waiting for your lye solution to cool down, it is important that it is set in a safe place.  Do not put it near anything that is heat sensitive, since many times the temperature of the solution is over 200 degrees.  You will also want to keep a visual on it for several reasons such as accidental ingestion, outside particles coming into contact with it, referencing the degrees, crystallization of lye at the bottom, pets knocking it over, etc.

Having several vinegar spray bottles in your work area, while making soap, is a very smart idea.  If you only have one vinegar spray bottle, you will want to keep it close to you at all times.  Vinegar is one way to neutralize the caustic lye.  If a spill should happen, spray ample amounts of vinegar on contaminated area.  With hot, soapy water, wash area well.  Rinse and repeat.  Use paper towels to dry.

Rubber gloves as well as protective eye gear should be worn through the whole soap making process.  Even after the lye solution has been added to the oils, it is still a caustic mixture.  Spilling or splashing any portion of this on your skin can leave a serious burn.

Melting your oils:

Some of the oils that are used in soap making are hard and need to be melted down into a liquid form before they can be weighed out.  This can be done in various ways such as:  microwave, double boiler, hot water bath, the sun, etc.  It is very important that if you do use heat like the stovetop, that you never leave oils unattended.  If the oils became too hot, you risk burning the oils.  Burnt oils cannot be used for soap making.  Also, another stovetop safety tip:  Always make sure the handles of the pots are pointed away from the edge of the stove.  You do not want someone accidentally knocking your pots over, or even worse, children spilling hot oils on themselves.

The Clean Up:

It is important to keep your gloves, safety goggles, and apron on.  Until the area is completely neutralized and cleaned, you do not want to take any chances.

Since soap making is caustic you will want to ensure that your work area is properly cleaned when you are finished making your soaps.  We recommend that the first step in cleaning is to neutralize the area first with vinegar.  The next step will be to wipe the area down with hot soapy water, then rinse.

When washing your soaping utensils/equipment, you will also want to use hot soapy water.  Since the lye solution will still be caustic you will also want to add vinegar to your soapy water to neutralize this.  Rinse and dry your utensils and equipment.  Store all soaping supplies together and out of the reach of children and pets.

If you have designated rags specifically for soaping, you will want to wash them by hand.  Once you are finished with your soaping rags, place them in a vinegar and water solution to soak.  This will neutralize any active lye.  Once they have soaked for awhile, place the rags in hot soapy water and give them a good jostle, making sure that the soapy water is thoroughly getting all over the rag.  Then let the rags soak a little while longer.  Then, get rid of the soapy water, and rinse the rags out.  You know all of the soap is off once the bubbles stop forming and the water rinsing through the rag is clear.  Wring out any excess water, and hang dry.  Place with other soaping materials when finished.

Disposal of lye solution:

If your work area has a septic tank, you do not want to pour it down the drain or flush it down the toilet.  The best suggestion that we have is to use your lye solution in a “false batter”.  Mix your lye solution with vegetable oil.  You are looking for just the right amount to get trace when you stick blend it.  Once trace is established, simply take your spatula, and dump it right into a garbage bag.  Allow the soap batter to set up, then take it to your trash container and dispose of it.   Do not attempt to dispose of the soap batter while it is still fluid; the bag could break and spill the soap batter all over your garbage container.

Checking your soap for pH safety:

There are various ways to check your cured or curing bars for their safety of use.  You never want to use or sell a bar of soap that has not cured completely.  An uncured bar means that there is still active lye solution in your soap.  Washing with this soap could result in very serious skin irritation and even burns.

The first and best way to check whether your cp bars are cured is to pH strip them.  Using this method is concrete.  If the number that you get from the pH strip does not fall between the correct range, then, the soap still needs a little more cure time.

The pH scale ranges from 0-14.  The pH scale measures the amount of acidity or alkalinity a substance has.  If the number falls between 0-6, then your substance is an acid.  If the number falls between 8-14, then your substance is a base.  If the number is 7, then it is a neutralized substance.

Soap is a base, because of the lye solution used.  The range that you are seeking to see if your cp bars have cured is 8.5-10.5.  Please note that the 10.5 pH level is for that of industrial strength soap.  8.5 is the typical ph for homemade soap that is used on the body.

The second way to check your soap for active lye is to wash your hands with the soap.  We only advise this if you are sure that the majority of the cure process has already taken place.  If there is any active lye left, you will have a greasy feel on your hands that will seem to not want to wash away.  Even if you wash your hands with another bar of cured soap, the greasy feel will still be there.  Your hands will also tingle or burn.  This is because the active lye from the high pH bar is saponifying the natural oils in your skin.  This soap bar would still need more cure time.

The final way to check if your cp bars are cured is to do a “tongue test”, or a “zap test”.  This involves sticking your tongue on the bar of soap.  If it zaps your tongue (just like a 9V battery does), then your soap still has active lye and needs to complete the curing process.

Natures Garden does not advise the tongue test as a way to check a curing bar of soap.  Lye is extremely caustic and does serious damage to our bodies.   Why take the chance on active lye, when you can use a pH strip and get a safe result?

If you plan to resell your handcrafted soap (after testing for a long time), please follow the FDA guidelines on how to label your product.  We will discuss product labeling in a future class.  In the mean time…Happy Safe Soaping!

Jun
26

Homemade Facial Mask Recipe

This entry was posted in creative, Fragrance Oils, herb, homemade facial masks, New recipes and tagged , , , , , on by .

I have come to a grave realization lately.  An awkward awareness that I would rather keep locked up and to myself.   I am trying to embrace this change, and I feel that sharing this with you may be the first step in my acceptance.  Although, let the record state that there still is a fight left in this dog.  I have hit an unwritten milestone in my life.  It may not be a celebrated achievement, but part of me has always known that this was inevitable.   I am old!

I know, I know, some people may look at me (at age 31) and say… “No honey, you are still young…”, but I know that you are slightly stretching the truth.  But, thanks for trying to make me feel better!  The real truth is, for the first time in my life, I am no longer in the young crowd.

To get down to the nitty gritty, the signs have been evident for quite some time now.   I have lost my touch with understanding the generation below me.  I look at them, like what they are wearing specifically, and ask myself when did this become the hip thing.  See, right there, I used the word hip… is this yet another sign?

To give you a little more insight, one of my guilty pleasures is gossip magazines.  I thoroughly love reading  the buzz on celebrities, even though I know it may not be true.  I just enjoy being in the know of the rumor mill.  But, now I feel betrayed.  As I fervently flip through the pages, scanning each headline and photo, I am coming to grasp that I do not know these people.  They are not my regular celebrities.  In fact, who are these kids… and when did they start gracing the pages.  Did I fall off the face of the planet and someone forget to tell me?

More than feeling out of touch, I am lost in general when it comes down to it.  My youngest sister is 19.  She is currently living with me.   We have a blast together, just like the old days when we were all growing up in the same house.   Yet, there is an adult part of me that just does not understand her.  The music she listens to, the zany hairdo’s, and the vibrant colors embellishing her face and nails.  I am so out of the loop.

More than the outside world, I seemed to be obsessed with my own physical aging.  It is almost as if I am trying to win an uphill battle.  When did this all happen?  I see myself every day, and I never noticed any of this.  I see wrinkles on my face.   There are numerous, very evident gray hairs that daunt me.  Sometimes, when I walk past a mirror, I even see my mother’s face.  (I meant that nicely, love you mom.)  Just the other day, I noticed crumpled, puckered skin above my knees.  This all has to stop!

Visualize the famous oil painting The Scream of Nature by Edvard Munch, and you will see how I am feeling right now; out of place, unsure, lost, unrecognizable, scared.

So, I am calling myself to arms.  I am not going to sit back and watch myself grow old without a war.  This fight is about to get physical, and I am engaging the first round of battle myself.  I am smart, sophisticated, and ready to face the aging battle.  Here come the facial masks.

Skin care is super important, as I am sure you all know.  Youthfulness is wasted on the youth, boy if that ain’t the truth.  I can actually remember distinctly not listening to adults who told me to take care of myself when I was young… I always thought that I had more time.  But, isn’t that the story for everything.

So, now I am taking action.  And in true perfection, Natures Garden has just ventured into the realm of herbs.  How exciting is this.

I decided among the long list of things to youthfulize myself (yes, I did in fact make that word up), I would start with my face.  I figured this would be as good as any aspect to start on since my face is what everyone sees.

Making a facial mask is super easy, quick, and very rewarding.  It just so happens that Natures Garden carries all of these supplies too!

Here are the ingredients for a Refreshing Green Clay Mask:

24 grams French Green Clay powder

6 grams vegetable glycerin

2 grams peppermint leaf powder

2 grams of peppermint leaf cut and sifted

Step 1:  Weigh out and mixed the dry ingredients together and set aside (except for the peppermint leaves cut and sifted).

Step 2:  Make a strong peppermint tea infusion by pouring a small amount of hot water over the peppermint leaves cut and sifted and allow them to steep.

Step 3:  Strain the peppermint leaves infusion through a coffee filter to remove the leaves.

Step 4:  Using 18 grams of the peppermint tea, add 6 grams of vegetable glycerin to it and stir.

Step 5:  Now, pour this mixture over the dry ingredients and stir.

Step 6:  Apply generously to your face and allow to dry completely.

Now, I am not going to lie to you, this mask gets tight.  I couldn’t move a single muscle in my face once the mask hardened, but it was so worth the slight discomfort.  I left the mask on for about 20 minutes.  I waited until it was completely dry and hard.  Then I simply washed it off with warm water.  What was left was a rejuvenated, younger looking face; my new face.

My skin was baby butt soft.  My pores, especially the ones on and around my nose, were tiny again.  My T-zone area was not shiny at all.  It was face perfection for me.  I am now a huge fan of Natures Garden facials!

Fragrance & Fun for Everyone

Inspire, Create, and Dominate!

Sparkles!!! Nicole

(Corporate Manager of Natures Garden Candle Supplies)

www.naturesgardencandles.com

Jan
31

Lava Lamp Lip Gloss Recipe

This entry was posted in flavoring, FUN soap colorant, lip gloss, wholesale craft supplies and tagged , , , , , , on by .
LAVA LAMP LIP GLOSS
Recipe makes 10+ Lava Lamp Lip Gloss Tubes
Create some groovy lip gloss that looks like a lava lamp!
What You Need:
INGREDIENTS:
2 drops Tomato Red Liquid FUN Soap Colorant which is clearly specified to be used for lip applications
The reason you can create a lava look in this lip gloss, is because the glycerin portion (polar portion) of the lip gloss will not mix with the oil base portion (non polar portion). When you turn the lip gloss upside down, these layers will not mix. If you will be selling this product, please label your product according to FDA regulations.
Directions:
1. Prepare your lava portion of your lip gloss:
A. Measure out 1/8 cup of vegetable glycerin
B. Add 2 drops of Tomato Red Liquid Fun Soap Colorant.
C. Stir well until color is evenly dispersed.
D. Fill your roller ball bottles ¼ of the way full of this lava mixture.
2. Prepare your Clear Flavored Lip Gloss portion of your lip gloss:
A. Measure out ¼ cup of Fractionated Coconut Oil
B. Add 2 ml. of Strawberry Cheesecake Flavoring Oil
C. Pour this mixture into your roller ball bottles. Be careful not to overfill or the roller ball will not fit into the bottle.
NOTE: When using lip colorants, they need to be cosmetic safe, and approved for lip use. Only some of Our Fun Soap Colorants will work in this recipe; you must read the specifics of each colorant before using in this recipe. Our upcoming lip tints will not work in this recipe because they are castor oil based, and it will ruin the lava affect of this product. Our soap dyes are not approved for lip use, and cannot be used.
Jan
12

Love of Learning

This entry was posted in crafts as a hobby, natural melt and pour soap, Natures Garden News, wholesale craft supplies and tagged , , , , on by .

This Valentine’s Day show some love to your creative side.

That’s right folks, it is time to extend our boundaries and experiment with some new products.  I know all too well how exciting it is when Natures Garden carries new fragrance oils, bases, additives, colorants, etc.  Something new, anything new, I love it all!

What is it about change?  Change is good.  Change allows us to hit the refresh button and bask in the glory of new and all its possibilities.  The thought of expanding our knowledge and know how of homemade goodies seems to revitalize everything for the better.  So, as we settled into the New Year let’s welcome the newbies by giving them a try.

In case you missed it, here are some of our newest products at Natures Garden:

Lip Tints:  These are awesome.  With 6 different colors to choose from all things lip just got a whole lot sexier.

Activated Charcoal:  A great way to add a detoxifying agent to your homemade soap.  This additive has a dual purpose as a natural black colorant too.  That’s two, yes two things for the price of one.  I guess that makes it a deal and a steal.  HA!

Vegetable Glycerin:  This has been on my wish list for a long time.  Finally here, this amazing liquid has tons of uses in bath, body, and home.  Once you get your hands on this, you will definitely be coming back for more.

Fractionated Coconut Oil:  Talk about being a multi-purpose, there is almost too much to mention.  Whether you are using it as a carrier or a substitute, in toiletries or cosmetics; the capabilities are endless.  Bonus, this fractionated coconut oil stays a liquid in relatively low temperatures.

Cream of Tartar:  It’s not just for the kitchen anymore!  This is one ingredient needed if you are looking to make fabulous bubble bars.

Fun Soap Colorants:  Although these colorants are super Fun… I refer to them as blast in a bottle!  These non-bleeding vivid colors will make a bold statement in your M&P or CP soap line.   If you are looking to add a little wow factor to your soap products, this is an excellent item to start with.   PS… No color morphing!

Titanium Dioxide Oil Dispersible Powder:  This natural mineral is an excellent whitener; perfect for soaps, toiletries, and so much more.

White Beeswax Pastilles:  Straight from the honeycomb, this naturally bleached beeswax is a splendid addition for everyone’s line.

Cookie Cutters:  Whether you are looking to bake some cookies, make hanging air fresheners, or get cleverly creative, these cookie cutters are a must have.  They are just too cute to pass up!

Finally, I do have an honorable mention to the new products.

Welcome Back Mica Pigment:  Oh how I missed you while you were gone.  If there is one thing that is never going to go out of style, it is shimmer!  This product is a love it, gotta have it in both colors diamond and 24K gold!  Bling me up Scotty!

So everyone, let’s get a little messy, broaden our horizons, and test some new products.

I was given some wise advice when I was younger.  Although then, I didn’t quite understand it, now I find that it applies to almost everything I do.   I am now going to pass this wisdom onto you: “Don’t sit on the sidelines and let life pass you by.  Get out there, make mistakes, and take chances; for this is the process of learning.  With age comes wisdom, and what is the purpose of your life if you don’t live, laugh, and love.”

Fragrance & Fun for Everyone

 

Inspire, Create, and Dominate!

 

Sparkles!!! Nicole

 

(Corporate Manager of Natures Garden Candle Supplies)

 

www.naturesgardencandles.com