Posts Tagged ‘natures garden wellington ohio’

Making Soaps with Fragrance Oils

Friday, April 5th, 2013

fragrance oils1.  What’s your name & Your Company Name  Heidi Hart,   Pure Hart Soap

2.  Why did you decide to go into business?  What was your motivation?  How long have you been in business?  I started making soap as a hobby and for my own family, because my oldest daughter had problems with commercial soaps when she was young.  I gave it away as presents and soon had people coming back for more.  I have been making soap for over 12 years, but have only seriously been selling it for around 7.

3.  What products do you make and sell?  Goat milk soaps, lotions, body butters, salves.

4.  What are your business goals?  To have the soap pay for itself.

5.  What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?  So far I have only purchased 3 products, all fragrance oils.  I really like getting the wooden roses with scents added, it is a great way to get a feel for new scents.

Your Website: www.purehartsoap.com

Facebook page:  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Pure-Hart-Soap/147693821956664?ref=hl

Soy Candles with Fragrance Oils

Monday, April 1st, 2013

Lance1.  What’s your name & Your Company Name?  Lance Smith-Lantzwicks

2.  Why did you decide to go into business?  What was your motivation?  How long have you been in business?  To be able to make creations with my own standards.  Seeing some possibility the more I was creating.  1 Year.

3.  What products do you make and sell?  Scented soy candles at the moment.  Looking forward to trying some Pillar of Bliss sometime!

4.  What are your business goals?  To make a great product that people love!  Also have a real shop sometime!

5.  What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?  The 6.5 oz. hex jars I’ve used, and Fragrance Oils.  Burning an “English Ivy” soy candle right now! :) I think 7-8 oils I’ve used and cant say I have favorite one.

Your Website: http://www.etsy.com/shop/LantzWicks

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/LantzWicks

Soy Candles 150 Fragrance Oil Choices

Friday, March 29th, 2013

soy candle connection

1.  What’s your name & Your Company Name: Kristi Varner and Payton Varner.  The Soy Candle Connection

2.  Why did you decide to go into business?  What was your motivation?  How long have you been in business?  I started making candles for myself and took one to work with me and the next thing I knew co-workers were wanting to buy them and customers started wanting to order them. My motivation was to be able to not have to rely on my job. I never know from year to year if it will be there. My daughter has joined me this year making candles for her SAE (Supervised Agricultural Experience) for FFA. I am very proud of her as she is going into the agricultural field after graduation. I have been making candles for over six years.

3.  What products do you make and sell?  We make candles, melts, and soaps. We offer over 150 scents.

4.  What are your business goals?  My business goal for this year is to be able to not have to rely on my job.

5.  What are some products you use from Natures Garden?  I buy all my products from Natures Garden. My favorite fragrance oils are Blueberry Muffin, Eucalyptus, and Bite Me. They are amazing!

Your Website: www.thesoycandleconnection.com

Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Soy-Candle-Connection/480675635310896

Purple Candles to Raise Awareness

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

73What’s your name & Your Company Name:  Hi my name is Amy Kocher at A & W Candles

Why did you decide to go into business?  What was your motivation?  How long have you been in business?  I have been in business for 3 years now.  It all started after I moved back to this area and I had my electric shut off and was begging for help.  It sure was not a good time. But my daughter and I decided to do this to make a little extra money out of my apt to help with bills and to buy food.  So that was my motivation to make sure I was providing for my daughter who at the time was a junior in high school, now she is a thriving college student at Kent State University and I could not be any more proud of her.  Now in 2013 my motivation is to bring awareness to a charity who I hold dear to my heart Alzheimer  Association  of Ohio, my mom who recently passed away a few weeks ago had Dementia a form of Alzheimer Disease she was my rock, stood by me when no one else did, I decided I needed to be her voice in the fight of her life to let everyone know this is a disease that is heartbreaking to those who take care of them and those who have it, it is no fun watching a love one not remember who you are. So I now use my business for my fundraising efforts and make Purple candles to represent Alzheimer Awareness a hope for a cure one day.

What products do you make? I make two sizes of container candles 16oz and 8oz.  I also make melts in the clamshells and 1 and 2 oz containers which you can pop out and be put in any warmer, I also make Air freshener bags called sachet bags.

What are your business goals?   My business goals are not huge as I just work out of my Apt. but one day I hope to be retired from my full time job and do this on a regular basis, I would love to do craft shows and markets but most of them around here are only in fall and with a job its hard to do them all.

What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?  I use just about everything from Natures Garden….Joy Wax, Fragrance Oils, cotton wicks, clamshell containers.  My favorite product from Natures Garden is their fragrances there is so many to choose from and I do not have to order from anyone else to get them.

Facebook page:www.facebook.com/AWCandles

Signature Candles Using Fragrance Oils

Thursday, March 28th, 2013

photo (3)
1.  What’s your name & Your Company Name: 
Vintage Hills Smoking Barrel & Candle Co. LLC owned and operated by Jason & Shannon Hancock

2.  Why did you decide to go into business?  What was your motivation?  How long have you been in business?  Jason is a craftsman and exhibit designer/builder. He decided to start making functional art and meat smokers out of wine barrels.  I enjoy making candles and we decided to merge the two ideas and create structures to hold candles and the make several types of candles and art pieces.  We love vintage creations and unique designs. Our business address is on Vintage Hills Dr so the idea to bring the two together was very natural and was the motivation for our business name and idea.  Our Motto: Wine Barrel, Culinary, and Candle creations that represent the rich heritage of the South ~ Custom Oak Wine Barrel Meat and Veggie Smokers, Gourmet Servers, Wall Decor, Candle Holder Staves, Glass Candles, Votives, and melts.  We both have full-time careers so we started it off as a hobby and experiment and opened our business as an LLC on September 13, 2012.

3.  What products do you make and sell?  Each wine barrel product from Vintage Hills Smoking Barrel & Candle Co. is handcrafted by Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana native, Jason Hancock, on Hancock Ranch surrounded by the vineyards and forest of the Brazos Valley, Texas.  All of our environmentally friendly up-cycled wood pieces are made completely out of beautiful American and French oak wine barrels, and, when available cognac barrels. Jason’s goal is to build distinctive, unique, high quality wood products for the wine, candle, and culinary enthusiast.  Every craft will be a unique topic of conversation in your home, your ranch, your business, or in a winery.

Vintage Hills Smoking Barrel & Candle Co. products are sold finely finished and are 100% made from the parts of each barrel.  Each piece is made from quality materials with the highest standards.  Every wood product goes through a variance of stages of sanding, top quality stain application, protective finishes, glues, and hardware.

Our very functional oak wine barrel smokers will cook meat and vegetables.  We also create gourmet culinary server barrel head board and stave trays, sacoche de selles (pannier baskets), milieu ambiance stave candle holders for tea light, double stave Libbey candle bowl sets, and stave crosses.

Jason also does custom counter tops and cabinetry, exhibits and air brush design, and vintage auto restoration.

Candles are hand-poured by Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi native Shannon Hancock on Hancock Ranch; and all of our wax blends are 100% top-quality soy and soy blends with the finest of soy wicks and treated wood wicks.  All of our premium custom fragrance oils we use are phthalate-free, manufactured in the USA, not tested on animals, and comply with the strictest global RIFM and IFRA standards.

The historical three state series line of Culture Eternal Candles by the Vintage Hills Smoking Barrel & Candle Co. is a tribute to the long standing testament of our southern states of the Deep South and Southwest and the mysterious and enriching journey and legacy of our ancestors to where we are today.  Our candles are for anywhere in the home and feature a signature, kitchen, wine, and healing spa collection.

We feature a baby shower series, a wedding and bridal shower series, and can whip up some pristine custom candle and stave beauty for your special occasion party/event with bulk pricing. We also have wholesale pricing for vendors.

4.  What are your business goals?  New Product Development: We will be and introducing clay pottery containers and creating a French Providence and Navajo inspired Rustic Pillar Series that will adhere to a mobile double stave candle holder, more spa pieces with essential oils and Bachelorette Party spa lotion candles partnering with a bath and body vendor in Mississippi.  We also attend several design/ jewelry expos and markets annually and what sets our candles apart are the gems, crystals, and stones we put on each candle container/pillar and incorporating states with the good memories familiar to the people that live in them.  We will also be expanding the Tree of Life and the Culture Eternal States Series candles selection by demand.  We will continue to attend these diverse expos and market places to bring the finest quality products home to the client.  We really look forward to opening our own gallery with a multimedia showcase of several types of art and tons of candle options.  Also, who wouldn’t love to attend classes at the World Congress Supplies Trade Show…a little start-up can dream haha.

5.  What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?  We have whole signature candle collections from Natures Garden Fragrance Oils and wicking supplies; especially fragrances like Kudzu.  The supplies are wonderful, but as important as quality materials are– the camaraderie, epic list of resources and opportunity to be able to advertise, meet other vendors, and see other amazing creations coupled with actually being able to put a face to the name are what really set Natures Garden apart from other suppliers.

YourWebsite: www.smokingbarrelcandles.com

Facebook page: www.facebook.com/VHSBCC

Twitter: in the works

Blog: We have a blog on the fifth tab of our site, we update it with videos, how to’s/a little R&D and cool artifacts and info pertaining to the wine and candle industry.

YouTube Channel: YT videos on the blog, VHSBCC account and videos in the works

Thanks for this wonderful opportunity, we are most grateful. We hope we have made you proud J

~Jason & Shannon Hancock

Scented Homemade Candles

Wednesday, March 27th, 2013

peake

1. My name is Jennifer Peake, and my business is Scented Sensations.

2. I decided to turn my hobby into a business because I needed to make some extra money on the side to pay for a few things that had come up. I realized I might be able to take it further than just making candles and selling them on eBay so I had a friend help me make a website and set it up so people could purchase from my site. I have been in business for one year.

3. I make and sell candles. I make votives (round and square), pillar candles, glass jar candles (heart and star shaped glass and also Mason jars) and tart melts in fun shapes, such as puppy paw prints, hearts, roses and flip flop sandals.

4. My business goals are to expand a little bit more than I have so far. I have a full time job and I make candles as my “second job.” But I would love for it to become a steady income. I also would like to start selling accessories for candles, such as candleholders, plates, sconces, etc. But I need to find a source of getting those products, either through a vendor or wholesale. heart and star candles

5. The products I have used from Nature’s Garden have been mainly the fragrance oils and candle wicks for my candles, but I have also purchased and used candle molds as well. I really enjoy the fragrances you have and so do my customers!

My website is www.scentedsensationsplus.com

Natural Skincare Products

Sunday, March 24th, 2013

nutberry

1.  What’s your name & Your Company Name NICOLE SMALLS HOLISTICNUTBERRY

What is Holistic Nutberry? I became introduced to holistic healing as a child watching my Great Grandmother make her mixtures from things on her farm. She would have me mix and grind things she needed; and so Holistic Nutberry was born. I use only natural and organic ingredients for my facials, bath soaks etc. My items are custom made to the individuals needs or condition e.g. eczema, blemished skin, cause no one product works for everyone. I am a certified Health Coach & a licensed drugless practitoner and a recent graduate of Intergrative Nutrition. I am currently furthering my education in the realm of Chinese Herbal Medicine. I am constantly researching various natural healing ingredients, there is a world of wealth out there and I intend to use it.

2.  Why did you decide to go into business?  What was your motivation?  How long have you been in business? To help people learn to take care of their skin naturally. I was helping my Mom who used medication that dried her hair and skin. I have been in business for 2 ½ years

3.  What products do you make and sell?  I make natural pain linaments and body ointments (good for eczema and dry skin) body and hair oils.

4.  What are your business goals?  To be able to make a career doing what I love making natural products

5.  What are some products you use from Natures Garden?  Natures Garden scents & melt and pour soaps

Your Website: www.holisticnutberry.com

Facebook page: holisticnutberry

Twitter:holistinutberry

Handmade Soaps

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

newhaircut 1.  What’s your name & Your Company Name:  My name is Dana Huff, and my company is New England Handmade Artisan Soaps.

2.  Why did you decide to go into business?  What was your motivation?  How long have you been in business?  I really decided to go into business after friends told me I needed to sell my soaps. I love to make soap, and I was starting to rack up quite a collection. I thought selling might be one way to move some of the soap out of my house so I could make more.

3.  What products do you make and sell?  I make soap and dabble in sugar scrubs and body butters, but I haven’t sold any of my body butters yet.

4.  What are your business goals?  Eventually, I would love to be a resource for people who want to learn more about handmade soap and to use quality handmade soap. After I started using handmade, I never went back. I think we owe it to our skin to take care of it. It’s the largest organ in our body. Soap is also an affordable luxury. It is a small thing you can do to feel good about yourself, and I want to help others find their way to handmade soaps because their skin deserves it.

5.  What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?  I use a lot of your fragrance oils, which I find are high quality and smell great, but also a great value. I don’t think it’s possible for me to pick a favorite. I also love your sweet almond oil and avocado oil. I have found Nature’s Garden to have great value for these products. I have also ordered French green clay, which I used in my Marseille-style soap called Provence, a great facial soap. I use something from Nature’s Garden in everything I make! Barely a week goes by that we don’t receive a package from Nature’s Garden at my house. My husband jokes that the UPS man knows him and waves at him when they see each other out on the street (which is true!).

Your Website:www.etsy.com/shop/NESoaps/

Facebook page:www.facebook.com/NESoaps/

Twitter:www.twitter.com/NESoaps/

Blog:www.newenglandsoaps.com/

YouTube Channel:www.youtube.com/user/danahuff/

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Diane’s House of Candles Interview

Saturday, March 9th, 2013

1. What’s your name & Your Company Name:
Diana Jablonski – Diane’s House of Candles

2. Why did you decide to go into business? I started making candles almost 15 years ago. It started off as a hobby. I would give them to friends and family because I just enjoyed making them. Pretty soon people started asking for so many that I couldn’t keep up. People were asking to buy them left and right. So I decided to experiment for awhile trying to find the best wax, best scents and best methods. Word just kept spreading and people kept asking for more so I decided to start my own small business out of my home. Now my candles are carried by a variety of local businesses, including many well known wineries in the northeast. My wine glass candles and wine scents are a big seller at the wineries. The football candles are always selling out also.

What was your motivation? How long have you been in business? The feedback I was getting about how much people loved my candles. They aren’t too strong and overpowering like most candles. Yet their scent fills the whole room. Even people that are sensitive to smells, love my candles. They are very true to their scent name and just the right strength. I have been in business for over 15 years.

3. What products do you make and sell? I make votive candles, jelly jar candles, pint jar candles, tart candles, football candles in a football shaped glass, and wine glass candles.

4. What are your business goals? My business goals right now are to expand my online presence. My website is currently undergoing an upgrade and redesign.

5. What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden? I use your scent oils for my candles. Asking which one is my favorite is like asking which child is my favorite! They are all so wonderful, I would never even think of using any other scent oil in my candles!

Your Website: www.DianesHouse.com

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/DianesHouseOfCandles

What is a Surfactant?

Friday, March 1st, 2013

Have you ever tried to wash dirty dishes equipped only with a sponge and water?  This can be quite a feat.  You will notice that it takes a lot more time and elbow grease to get the job done.  Wondering why this is?  The answer as you will notice right away is that the dish soap is missing.

Did you know that the most eminent surfactant in existence is soap?

Surfactants seem to always get the bad rap.  Many people associate surfactants as bad ingredients to have in your recipes, but truth be told, this statement is not true!  Yes, SLS (Sodium Lauryl Sulfate) is a surfactant, and it can be more irritating to your skin than other surfactants, but is it as bad as what you read in the media lately?  It is an urban myth that Sodium Lauryl Sulfate causes cancer.  Read the truth for yourself.   In fact, many of the surfactants that will be listed in this class are derived from a natural source and they work to improve the integrity and performance of your cosmetic formulations.

Surfactants work with various liquids and substances; including oil and water.  Much like that of the role of the emulsifiers, surfactants have a hydrophilic (water-loving) head, and a lipophilic (oil-loving) tail.  In fact, emulsifiers are surfactants, and surfactants are vital to the industry of bath and body products too.  They comprise the largest category of cosmetic chemicals, and seem to have an endless list of cleansing capabilities.  So, needless to say, there is quite a variety to select from when seeking the perfect surfactant for your recipes.

The main qualifier in deciding which surfactant to use is all based upon the benefit that each surfactant provides.  Just like cold process soaping or any homemade bath and body products, the components that you choose to use in your recipes have a direct beneficial affect on the skin when the recipe is transformed into a finished product.  Therefore, when selecting which surfactant to use; it is just as equally important as to what you are looking to achieve in your finished product.  Each surfactant has key functions in which it will excel and equivocally each will also have other functions where it will be lacking.

The term surfactant is actually a combination of its meaning:  surface acting agent.  Let’s look at it again: surfactant = SURFace ACTing AgeNT.  But the term surfactant is not always the one that everyone sticks with.  It seems that surfactants have several names that all become applicable depending of the role of the surfactant in a specific recipe.  For example, in recipes where foam is the finished product, the surfactant used maybe referred to as foaming agents.  Surfactants used in body recipes, can even be termed as detergents or soaps.  Or, in the example of shaving creams, surfactants are considered lubricants because they protect the skin from irritation and the razor’s sharp edge while still allowing the removal of all of the unwanted hairs.

Everything that a surfactant does occurs at the surface levels of the liquids.  The biggest role that a surfactant has is the capability to lower the surface tension of a liquid.  The reaction which then occurs is the conversing of the liquid (with the lower surface tension) and the additional substance.  To break this down in simpler terms; a surfactant has the power to change the properties of a substance.  This process is known as adsorption.  The term adsorption means:  the gathering of gas or liquid in a condensed layer on the surface.  This condensed layer creates a film which is why the surface tension is lowered.  There are four different categories of classification for surfactants based on their interfaces and charges.  They are: Anionic, Nonionic, Cationic, and Amphoteric.

Education is always a powerful thing, and it is not necessary to completely know the ins and outs of everything surfactants.  But, you will want to have a general idea of each group of surfactants and how they play a role in your finished product.  This is especially true if you are looking to accomplish a “made from scratch” recipe.  It is also beneficial to know a few other things about surfactants too.  This would include information like why the surfactants are grouped or classified together or how/if surfactants work with additional groups of surfactants in a collaborate manner.  Spoiler alert:  Not all surfactants play nice with one another!

Anionic surfactants are considered to be the go to surfactant for many formulations.  This group of surfactants is also the most commonly used among foaming product productions, like shampoos or body washes.  The reasoning for this is because the anionic surfactant’s primary functions are creating high foam, high cleansing, and high washing capabilities in a finished product.

Anionic surfactants have a negatively charged water-loving head.  Anionic surfactants work very well in recipes which have a reaction between a chemical (like lye) and fatty acids or alcohols (like animal lard or vegetable based oils).  Hand processed soap, whether it is CP, CPOP, or HP, are all examples of anionic surfactants.  Other examples of anionic surfactants are Sodium sulfates, Ammonium sulfates, sulfosuccinates, sarcosines, sarcosinates, isethionates, and taurates.

One of the drawbacks of using an anionic surfactant relates to skin sensitivity.  Due the high foaming, cleansing, and washing capabilities, skin irritations can occur.  It is for this reason that if you are looking to create a handmade recipe it is best to choose another category of surfactants, or balance the anionic surfactants with amphoteric surfactants.

Amphoteric surfactants are the go with the flow surfactants.  They have the possibility to either have a positive or negative charge.  Their charge is all based on the pH or alkalinity of your finished product.  Hence the amphi prefix.

When an amphoteric surfactant is used in a recipe where the end result of a finished product has a lower pH, the amphoteric surfactant takes on a more conditioning and nourishing role.  On the other hand, when an amphoteric surfactant is used in a recipe where there is a higher pH in the end product, it resembles more of an anionic surfactant with high foaming and cleansing capabilities.  Neither option is necessarily bad; they are just on two different planes of the beneficial skin aspects.

Amphoteric surfactants are the most docile of the surfactants.  They are also the second most used surfactants in the industry.  This is because when used alone, they are able to provide a gentle aspect to the nature of your end product.  Adversely, when an amphoteric surfactant is coupled with an anionic surfactant, the amphoteric surfactant mellows the harshness of the anionic surfactants.  In fact, amphoteric surfactants can be used solo and in conjunction with any other of the surfactant groups.  There adaptability is just one of the reasons why they are so widely used.

Some examples of well know amphoteric surfactants are Coco Bentaine, Lauryl Bentaine, and Hydroxysultaines.

Cationic surfactants are the opposite of anionic surfactants.  They have a positively charged water-loving head.  It is because of this positive charge that cationic surfactants can offer many skin loving, nourishing benefits to the skin and body.  These surfactants are best used in recipes where foaming is not necessarily mandatory such as hair conditioners.  Cationic surfactants alone do not allow for ample foaming capabilities.

Cationic surfactants work well with 2 of the 3 remaining surfactant groups.  Both amphoteric and nonionic surfactants will be compatible with cationic surfactants with no problems.  However, because of the opposing charge cationic (positive) and anionic (negative) surfactants will not combine.

Some common cationic surfactants used in bath and body recipes are your chlorides (Benzalkonium, Stearalkonium, and Centrimonium), Trimethyl Ammoniums, and Methyl Sulfates.

Nonionic surfactants have no foaming capabilities which is why this group of surfactants are rarely used as a recipe’s main surfactant.  Evident by the prefix non, these surfactants do not have a charge in their water-loving heads.  The end result of using a nonionic surfactant will allow for a finished product that has a very gentle cleansing ability.   But, just because it doesn’t foam, it doesn’t mean it does cleanse.

Psychologically speaking, there is a direct mental correlation between foaming and cleansing.  We as a race have somehow inherently made this connection.  Whether it is a physical view of suds equating to cleanliness, or simply urban myths that have taken on a life of their own, the reality is; it could not be further from the truth.

Nonionic surfactants, or at least some of them, are ethoxylated.  What this means is that the nonionic surfactants have had some reaction to the addition of ethylene oxide.  With this reaction comes an even more water-loving head, almost as if it has been supercharged.  This then makes nonionic surfactants (like Polysorbate 20) perfect solubilizers.

But, don’t just disregard this category of surfactants yet.  Nonionic surfactants can also be used in formulations to reduce irritants, due to their gentle cleansing ability.  They also have the capability to be used as an emollient, softening or soothing skin.  Not to mention, these surfactants can be used to stabilize foam in recipes.  Hold on to your seats though folks, because it gets a little better!  Due to its lack of a charge, nonionic surfactants love every other category of surfactants; you can consider them the peacemakers!

Some common nonionic surfactants used in bath and body recipes are your Polysorbates, Emulsifying Wax NF, E-wax, Glyceryl Oleate, Glyceryl Stearate, ingredients with the prefix PEG, Ceteareths, Oleths, Sorbitans, Lauryl Glucoside, and Polyglycose.

In summary, surfactants are amazing little compounds found in many items we use every day like adhesives, bath gels, creams, lotions, frozen foods, chewing gum, inks, and fabric softeners; just to name a few!  There are four main applications of surfactants particularly in just bath and body recipes.  They include: cleansing, solubility, emulsifying, and conditioning.

Some other additional aspects of surfactants to bath and body recipes include:  the potential to increase stability of a product; certain surfactants can be used as thickening agents; due to the composition of a surfactant, some maintain anti-microbial elements and therefore can be used as preservatives; there are even some that have the capability to reduce irritation allowing for a milder product on the skin.

Interested in adding some surfactants to your recipes?  Below is a list of some commonly added surfactants to bath and body recipes:

sodium lauryl sulfate (can be derived from coconuts)  Produces High Foam; easy to thicken. Strong Anionic Surfactant; can cause irritation
ammonium laureth sulfate (derived from coconuts) Produces High Foam; easy to thicken.  Strong Anionic Surfactant; can cause irritation
disodium lauryl sulfosuccinate (derived from coconuts)  Foaming agent, Mild Anionic Surfactant; gentle on the skin
Cocoamphocarboxyglycinate  (derived from coconuts)  Mild, Amphoteric Surfactant
decyl Polyglucoside (vegetable derived, used in baby shampoos for its gentleness)
cetearyl alcohol
stearyl alcohol
Cocamidopropyl Betaine (derived from coconut oil) Amphoteric Surfactant
Decyl Glucoside (derived from sugar)
Glyceryl Cocoate (derived from vegetables)
Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate (derived from coconuts)
Almond Glycerides (derived from vegetables)
Sodium Lauryl Sulphoacetate (much milder surfactant than SLS)
Sodium Lauroyl Sarcosinate (derived from vegetables and is a natural substitution for SLS) 
sodium methyl cocoyl taurate
(derived from coconut)
Sucrose Cocoate (derived from sugar)
polysorbate 20 (vegetable derived)
polysorbate 80 (vegetable derived)

If you formulate your own cosmetics, please visit our customer suggestion page and let us know which surfactants you would like to see Natures Garden carry.  We will be increasing our line of natural cosmetic supplies.