Tag Archives: how to use color blocks

Dec
09

Colorants and Candle Making

This entry was posted in candle colorants, candle making supplies, color blocks, colorants, Fragrance Oils, liquid candle dye, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Spectrum Liquid Candle DyeThere are a variety of different colorants available to candle makers.  Each different colorant form has its own positives and negatives.  Finding the correct candle colorant for you is up to a little research and testing in your candle wax.

Color Blocks-  Color blocks contribute to a rich color in candle wax, especially if you are trying to achieve a dark color in your candles.  Of the different colorants available, color blocks are the most cost effective with one block coloring as much as 15 pounds of candle wax.  However, because color blocks arrive in block form, it is very hard to reproduce the exact same color every time.  If color accuracy is important to your candles, color blocks may not be your answer unless you purchase a gram scale for candle making.  In order to use color blocks in candle wax, the blocks have to be shaved down into smaller amounts.  These smaller amounts would then be weighed out and documented in your testing notebook before adding them to the melted candle wax.

Liquid Dye- Liquid candle dye is the answer to your colorant selection if candle coloring accuracy is important to your candles.  Because liquid candle dye is easy to administer and record (since it is in liquid form), color accuracy time and time again is no longer an issue.  The negative to liquid candle dye is the slight chemical smell it has to it.  Through our testing, we have found that anything over 10 drops of liquid dye in 4 pounds of candle wax will present a slight chemical smell in your finished candle.  Make 10 drops of liquid candle dye your cut off for using this colorant.

Color Chips-  Color Chips are color blocks that have already been broken up for you.  The negative to this colorant is the cost.  The other problem that color chips present is that fact they are not broken up in a fine enough matter to be readily used for some color hues.  And, once again we have an issue if color accuracy is important unless you are weighing and documenting.

Crayons-  No matter what the brand of the crayon is, crayons never make a good candle colorant.  Although it is tempting with the amazing color spread that crayons provide, do not give into temptation.  Using crayons as your candle wax colorant will clog your wick and prevent your candle from burning properly.  Candles that have been colored with crayons also have a tendency to smoke.  You are better off not even acknowledging crayons as a wax colorant.