Posts Tagged ‘how to make cp soap’

Hot Soap

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

hot soap

Sweet Orange Chili Pepper CP Soap Recipe

This hot soap is just too good to pass up!

For this recipe, we wanted to really knock it out of the box.  And, in the end, the whole Hot Soap theme really tied together nicely with the scent and color.  We could not be happier with the total package of this awesome soap and recipe.  In fact, our testing and end results were so amazing, we couldn’t even wait to share the cold process soap recipe, so you to can recreateyour very own hot soap.  Since, this cold process soap recipe makes approximately 4.5 pounds of  beautiful, creamy and rich lathering bars; we used the Mold Market Square Loaf Mold and have enough soap batter to achieve a nice and full heaped top to the soap.  This made for very hearty sized slices.

To scent the soap, we selected Sweet Orange Chili Pepper.  This fragrance oil qualifies as a hot soap scent candidate because it is one of Natures Garden’s top selling cold process soap scents.  Not only does this fragrance oil have a kick, but it also behaves.  This means it is a Perfect Pour, and the scent retention is hands down amazing in the cured bar of soap.  If you have yet to try this scent in soap, you are really missing out!

Sticking with the hot soap theme, we went with the additions of a bold red and vibrant orange color.  This was accomplished using the FUN soap colorant tomato red, and neon orange.  However, for these colors to truly dazzle, we decided that the colors should be added as swirls to a white soap base.  Now, although Sweet Orange Chili Pepper fragrance oil does not discolor, we wanted a clean white.  We attained this by adding titanium dioxide.

The red and orange colored batter was introduced to the white soap batter using the in the pot swirl technique.  We personally love using this method to create beautiful and flowing swirls in our finished soap bars.  But, don’t get overwhelmed, this hot soap is really easy to make; and in this blog post we will go over each step with pictures of our process included.

Now, before we get started, if you have never made cold process soap before; please read these two classes to familiarize yourself with the soap making process.  They are Basic CP Soap Making Class and Soap Making Safety Class.

If you have already soaped before, lets move on to the recipe and ingredients!

For the Lye Solution
517 grams of water
189 grams of lye
For your soaping ingredients
340 grams of Shea Butter
408 grams of Coconut Oil 76
122 grams of Sunflower Oil
136 grams of Rice Bran Oil
272 grams of Olive Oil-pomace
82 grams of Castor Oil
85 grams of Sweet Orange Chili Pepper Fragrance Oil
50 grams of Sodium Lactate
7 grams of Titanium Dioxide
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant- Tomato Red
4 grams of FUN Soap Colorant- Neon Orange

As for other supplies that you will need in addition to the standard soaping supplies:  2 mixing bowls (1 for the red soap colorant, and 1 for the orange soap colorant) and a spatula (for the in the pot swirl technique).

So, now that you have everything that you need lets get our safety gear on and get started.

soap making safety gear

Next, make your lye solution.

making your lye solution

Then, weigh out and combine your soaping ingredients and melt.

melted soaping ingredients
Now, back to the lye solution.  Once it has cooled, add the sodium lactate.  Use your spatula to carefully stir this in.

adding sodium lactate

When your lye solution and soaping ingredients are within 5-10 degrees of each other, it is time to combine them together.

adding the lye solution to the soap ingredients
Then, stick blend for emulsion.

stick blending until emulsion
Now, get your two mixing bowls for the colorants.  To the first bowl, weigh out the tomato red soap colorant.  Then, to the second bowl, weigh out the neon orange soap colorant.

hot soap colorant
Next, add the fragrance oil to the soap batter and stick blend to incorporate.

scenting your hot soap

Then, get your soap batter, and place 400 grams into each soap colorant bowl.  To incorporate the orange soap colorant, stir this with a spoon.  To incorporate the red soap colorant, stick blend.  Once both colors are incorporated in their bowls, set them aside.

separating out soap batter for color
Moving quickly, to the remaining soap batter, add titanium dioxide.  Then, stick blend well to incorporate.

adding titanium dioxide to the soap batter

Now, bring the white soap batter over to your color soap bowls.  Then, drop some of the orange soap batter throughout the white soap.  Continue doing this until all of the orange soap is gone.  Repeat the same action with the red soap batter.

pouring the hot soap colors into the soap batter
Now, for the in the pot swirl:  Start by placing the spatula alongside the inside bottom edge of the bowl.  Then, come straight up the center.  When you reach the top, pick the spatula up.  Now, starting on one side, begin your swirls in a “s” pattern (using the spatula).  Repeat on the other side.

hot soap in the pot swirl

Next, carefully pour the soap batter into the mold.

pouring the hot soap
Once the mold has been filled, use the remaining batter to add a nice heaped topping.  You may need to wait a few minutes for the soap batter to thicken slightly before attempting this.  Then once all of the remaining soap has been heaped, insulate.  Please note:  You may want to insulate your soap using something that will not touch the top of the heaped soap.

one hot soap

After 24 hours, remove the soap from the mold.  Then, using your knife, slice the hot soap into bars.  Allow them to further cure before using.

That is it!  Your hot soap performs and smells fantastic.  Plus, you will have created the most beautiful swirls.  Enjoy!

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

Tie Dye Soap

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

cup column swirl soapWatching all of the cool Youtube videos on making column swirl soap, we had to give it a try.  We thought that the column concept would make a great tie dye soap.  This soap recipe was our attempt at doing a column swirl soap.  Since we did not have wooden columns at our disposal, we thought we would improvise and try disposable cups.

To make this recipe, the majority of the ingredients and supplies can be found at Natures Garden.  You will however have to have water, lye, and your disposable cups- these items can not be purchased there.

For this soap, the scent that was selected was cannabis flower.  Now, since this scent has a vanillin content of .2%, we also included vanilla white color stabilizer in the recipe.  This decision was made after checking the cold process soap results for discoloration in this fragrance.  We saw that naturally without this additive the bar would discolor to a very light beige.  Considering we did not want our tie dye soap colors affected by this, it was a smart choice.  Also, since the mold that we are using is the 18 bar rectangle grid tray, we also decided to add sodium lactate to our recipe.  Not only will this allow the soap to be removed more easily from the mold, but it will also provide our finished bars with additional moisturizing aspects.

As for the colors in this soap, you can add as many or as few as you want.  Any of Natures Garden FUN Soap colorants will work!

So, lets get started in making tie dye soap.

Here is the recipe:
582 grams of water
215 grams of lye

413 grams of Shea Butter
306 grams of Coconut Oil 76
153 grams of Safflower Oil
107 grams of Rice Bran Oil
245 grams of Olive Oil pomace
184 grams of Meadowfoam Seed Oil
122 grams of Fractionated Coconut Oil
96 grams of Cannabis Flower Fragrance Oil
48 grams of Vanilla White Color Stabilizer
63 grams of Sodium Lactate

Now, if you would like to use the same colors shown in the steps, below are the weights.

Tie Dye Soap Colors:
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Red
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Yellow
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Orange
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Green
8 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Blue
12 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Ultramarine Violet

If this is your first time making cold process soap, please Click Here For Basic CP Soap Making Class. Also, before attempting to make any cold process soap, please become familiar with Soap Making Safety Class.

Step 1:  Put on your safety gear:  This would include your safety gloves,  apron, safety mask, and safety glasses.

cp soap making safety gear

Step 2:  In your mold, space your 6 disposable cups equally apart from one another.

prepping your mold

Step 3:  In a small bowl, weigh out your lye.  In a separate bowl, weigh out your water.  In a well ventilated area, slowly pour the lye into the water.  Use a spatula to stir slowly.  Avoid breathing in any of the lye water fumes.  Keep stirring the lye water until there are no lye granules are left in the water.    Allow this to cool to 90-100 degrees F.

stirring the lye water

Step 4:  According to the recipe listed above: in a pot weigh out the Shea Butter and coconut oil 76.  Melt these two ingredients down on low heat until each one is in a liquid state.  Stir.  Then, add the safflower oil, rice bran oil, olive oil, meadowfoam seed oil, and fractionated coconut oil.  Stir again.  Remove from heat.  Then, transfer all of this into a large mixing bowl.

mixing your oils

Step 5:  Next, get your 6 mixing bowls.  Assign each bowl a color.  Then, weigh out the appropriate color amount for each bowl.

colorants in bowls

Step 6:  Using your thermometer, check the temperature of the lye water.  When it has cooled to 90 degrees Fahrenheit, add your Sodium Lactate.  Stir carefully.  Now, once the temperatures of the lye water and the soaping oils and butters are within 5-10 degrees of one another, it is time to move on to the next step.

adding sodium lactate to the recipe
Step 7:   Now, slowly pour the lye water/sodium lactate into your oils and butters bowl.  Use a spatula to get all of this out and into the other bowl.

adding lye water to the soaping oils

Step 8:  Using your stick blender, carefully mix everything together.  You will notice your batter will begin to look creamy and thicken slightly.  Now, stop blending.

blending the soap batter

Step 9:  Next, add the fragrance oil.

scenting the column swirl

Step 10:  Then, add the Vanilla White Color Stabilizer.  Once added, stick blend to incorporate.

adding vanilla white color stabilizer
Step 11:
  Now, place 405 grams of the soap batter into each bowl.  Stir each bowl with a spoon.  This will help slow down trace.

spoon stirred colored soap
Step 12: 
Starting with any one of your colors, begin to pour about half of the batter over 3 cups.  Repeat with a second and third color.  Then, using a new color, pour about half of the batter over the 3 cups that do not have soap over them yet.  Repeat this with your two remaining colors.  Then, with the remaining batter, keep covering different cups.  While you are doing this step, if any cups move, use your spatula to put them back into place.  When all of the pourable batter is out of your bowls, use your spatula to scrape the soap from the cups.  Then remove them.

column swirl pour
Step 13:  Now, using your spatula, scrape the colored bowls.  Then, splatter this soap over the mold.

splattering the soap
Step 14:  When all the soap is in the mold, insulate it and allow it to harden for 24 hours.

insulating your soap
Step 15:  After 24 hours, remove your soap from the mold.  Carefully, using a knife or a mitre cutter, slice the soap bars.  Once all of the soap is sliced, allow it to fully cure.

cutting your soap

After the cure time has elapsed, enjoy your Tie Dye Soap!

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

 

 

In the Pot Swirl Soap

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014

in the pot swirl soap Soaping with the cold process method allows you to create some really beautiful bars.  Not only are these bars creamy, bubbly, and cleansing, but they are also conditioning.  Plus, with the right recipe, bars can contain skin loving ingredients that nourish your skin too.

There are various ways to achieve beautiful designs in your cold process bars.  Some of the more popular designs include:  the peacock swirl, the mantra swirl, and the mica swirl. You can even try your hand at marbling your soap if you like.

When it comes to swirling, this is where you really get to let your creativity soar.  Through colors and varying design techniques, you can take your wonderful soap recipe and make the visual aspect just as appealing as the skin nourishing one!

The ideal scent when making cold process soap is one that is a Perfect Pour.  What this means is that the fragrance oil does not accelerate trace, rice, or discolor.  However, many times with floral scents, acceleration is a part of the package.  Although swirling is not impossible to achieve with an accelerator, it can be difficult if you do not move fast enough.  There is however, a swirling method that can be done when a fragrance oil accelerates trace.  This is known as the in the pot swirl.

Here is how to make an in the pot swirl soap.  The recipe, steps, and photos are included to help.  With the exemption of the lye and water, all of the ingredients for this soaping venture can be purchased at Natures Garden.  Although for this recipe, the Peace Sign Mold was used, any mold that is cold process soap safe will work.  To see the full list of soap molds available, please click on this link.

If you have never made cold process soap before, please click here for a  Basic CP Soap Making Class. Also, before attempting to make any cold process soap, please become familiar with Soap Making Safety Class first.

The Recipe:
108 grams of water
40 grams of lye
20 grams of Apricot Kernel Oil
11 grams of Castor Oil
85 grams of Coconut Oil 76
40 grams of Mango Butter
43 grams of Palm Oil
37 grams of Shea Butter
48 grams of Sunflower Oil
17 grams of Sodium Lactate
18 grams of Peace Fragrance Oil
18 grams of Vanilla White Color Stabilizer
FUN Soap Colorants: Neon Red, Neon Yellow, Neon Orange, Neon Blue, Ultramarine Violet

The Process:
Step 1: 
Put on your  safety gloves,  apron, safety mask, and safety glasses.

safety gear for soap making

Step 2:  Weigh out your lye and water.  In a well ventilated area, slowly pour the lye into the water.  Use a spatula to stir slowly.  Keep stirring until no lye granules are left in the water.  Do not breathe in any of the lye water fumes.  Allow this to cool to around 90-100 degrees F.

stirring the lye water

Step 3:  According to the recipe, in a pot weigh out the coconut oil 76, mango butter, palm oil, and shea butter.  Melt all of these ingredients down on low heat until each one is in a liquid state.  Stir.  Then add the apricot kernel oil, castor oil, and sunflower oil.  Stir again.  Remove from heat.  Transfer all of this into your mixing bowl.

melting your oils and butters

Step 4:  Now, get your 5 mixing bowls.  Assign each bowl a color.  Then, weigh out 2 grams of each neon colorant in its specific bowl.  The ultramarine violet bowl needs 4 grams weighed out.  A great tip:  Reuse the containers from the 1lb Whipped Soap Base.  They make perfect mixing bowls for colorant in cold process soaping!

weighing out the colorant for soap

Step 5:  Check the temperature of the lye water.  When it is cooled to around 90-100 degrees F, add your 17 grams of Sodium Lactate.  Stir carefully.  Now, once the temperatures of the lye water and the soaping oils and butters are within 5-10 degrees of one another, it is time to move on to the next step.

adding sodium lactate

Step 6:  Slowly pour the lye water/sodium lactate into your oils and butters bowl.  Use a spatula to get all of this out and into the other bowl.

mixing the oils, butters, and lye water

Step 7:  Using your stick blender, begin to mix everything together.  You will notice your batter will begin to look creamy and thicken slightly.  Now, stop blending.

stick blending cold process soap

Step 8:  Add your fragrance oil.

adding scent to in the pot swirl

Step 9:  Now add your Vanilla White Color Stabilizer.  Once added, stick blend to incorporate.  Do not forget to scrap the sides with a spatula.

preventing discoloration in soap

 

Step 10:  Now, place 90 grams of the soap batter into each bowl.  Stir well with a spoon.  This will help slow down trace.  Then, starting with the yellow soap, pour it back into the mixing bowl.  Try your best to keep it in one area.

multiple color in the pot swirl

 

Step 11:  Repeat with the orange.

second color in the pot swirl

Step 12:  Now, the red.

adding red in the pot swirl

Step 13:  Then the purple.

adding the purple batter
Step 14:  Finally, get your blue soap batter into the bowl.

all five colors in the pot swirl

Step 15:  Get your spatula, start by placing it alongside the inside bottom edge of the bowl.  Then, come straight up the center of the bowl.  When you reach the top, pick the spatula up.  Now, starring on one side, begin your swirls (using the spatula).  Repeat on the other side.  Do not over swirl.

step by step in the pot swirl
Step 16:
  Grab your mold.  Then begin to pour the soap batter into each mold opening.

molding the in the pot swirl

Step 17:  Once the mold is filled, cover it with plastic wrap.  When the soap has hardened enough to move, place the mold somewhere it will not be disturbed.

insulating your soap
Step 18: 
After your soap has set for 24 hours, place it in the freezer for about 10 minutes.  This step will help to release the soap from the mold.  Then, carefully remove the soaps from the mold.

unmolded soap

Step 19:  Now, allow your soap to finish curing before use.

Congratulations, you just completed an in the pot swirl technique!  Note:  You will notice as your soap cures that the neon colors will become more vivid.

After the cure, your in the pot swirl soap is now finished.  The ending bar will be nice and firm.  The lather will be creamy and filled with lots of bubbles.  These bars will cleanse, yet still provide your skin conditioning elements.  Enjoy!

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

Cold Process Soap with Fragrance Oils

Saturday, May 18th, 2013

Fragrance Oils1.  What’s your name & Your Company: Lanita Stallings   Five Sisters Soap Co.

2.  Why did you decide to go into business?  What was your motivation?  How long have you been in business?  I was buying handmade soaps and decided to try making them myself.  One of my daughters actually had eczema and I wanted to make soaps for her.  I have been making soaps for 13 years and I am addicted!

3.  What products do you make and sell?  I make CP soaps and whipped soaps.

4.  What are your business goals?  I want to have a successful internet business.  I have been working on that diligently for  the past year.  Before that I was mainly doing craft shows and selling in a few shops on consignment.

5.  What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?  I LOVE the fragrance oils.  I ordered my first ones right before Christmas last year.  I see why everybody raves about them now.

Your Website: http://www.fivesisterssoapco.com

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/www.fivesisterssoapco

YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/floridagirl7000?feature=mhee