Tag Archives: how to infuse herbs

May
01

Homemade Herbal Shampoo

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Homemade-Herbal-ShampooHomemade Herbal Shampoo 

You can do a lot of good with DIY home recipes if you know what you’re doing in advance, but it will take a good bit of knowledge and work to make them happen. One such recipe is what we will point out ahead, making a homemade herbal shampoo. Before you begin you will need the following materials:

  • Roughly 2 ounces of unscented castile soap
  • 5 ounces of water infused with your choice of herbs
  • Quarter spoon of carrier oil or more if you have dry hair
  • 20-40 drops of essential oil of your choice

The herbal infusion should be the first step on your list, using a teaspoon or a pinch of each herb you want to place in the shampoo and placing it in a heatproof glass or jar. Pour a cup of simmering hot water over them and cap it off, letting it steep like that for a few hours. You can then strain it and take about 5 ounces of it. You can use the rest for bathwater or you can combine it with vinegar to make a refreshing hair rinse.

Using your castile soap, essential oil and carrier oil, mix them into the water you just set aside. You then need to stir it until they are mixed together. Make sure you avoid making bubbles if possible, as they will only make the job harder. You will then need to pour it all into a container you can use for bathing. An old shampoo bottle will do the trick just fine.

You can work with small batches of this shampoo at a time, storing the rest inside your fridge if you need to. You can have a shelf life of a few weeks at least, but you would still do well to check for problems regardless, since this is a homemade product without the chemicals present in commercial brands. You need to work by swirling or shaking the shampoo before each use, as it will have settled before you take a bath. You may want to follow that up with a bit of water and a bit of vinegar as well.

There can be a combination of fresh and dry herbs used for your purposes, but each and every one of them will be a different scent in the overall combination. Some of them are better for certain types of hair, while others not so much. Here are some examples to get you started:

  • Chamomile is often used for lighter hair, while rosemary can be used for darker hair, but you can mix things if you feel like it. You can also make a great floral shampoo by using lavender, violets and roses as well as other flowers that pretty much match the essential oils you plan on using. You can also use thyme, tea tree oil and rosemary to make that happen as well.
  • Calendula and comfrey are also quite useful if you have scalp issues, as well as rosemary. Lavender can help heal a dry and itchy scalp, so it makes a great choice for herbal shampoos.

You should take great care when you work, since you may make a mess that requires careful cleaning. Although this is still soap, you don’t want to have it spill all over. Carpet cleaning, floor cleaning and even more cleaning will be necessary if you make a mess, so try to work in a location that allows you to deal with it without it.

Read more tips at: http://www.cleanerscleaning.org.uk/westminster-carpet-cleaners-W1/clean-carpet-westminster.html

We hope that you enjoy this Homemade Herbal Shampoo.  Please visit our recipe box for even more free recipes!

Jan
16

Herbal Infusion Recipe

This entry was posted in all natural, aromatherapy, bath and body, bath products, cosmetic ingredients, cosmetic recipe, herb, herbal oil infusion, herbs, homemade, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

herbal oilHerbal Infusion Recipe

This is the basic recipe for making patchouli infused oil to be used in the creation of various bath and body products.  For this recipe we are going to be using the double boiler method.  There are various methods to choose from when making an herbal oil infusion.  To view other processes of infusing herbs for bath and body products please click on this linkPlease note:  Depending on the herb/herbs that you are selecting to infuse, will determine whether you go with a hot method or a cold method route of infusion.  Some herbs are very heat sensitive.  Therefore, if heat is introduced for the infusion, some of the medicinal benefits may be lost.

With oil infusion, a key to remember is the longer that the herbs are allowed to set in the oil, the stronger the herbal infusion will be.  Our herbal infusion sat undisturbed for 4 weeks (after the double boiler method) before we strained the herbs out and introduced the infusion to a recipe.

We selected sweet almond oil because it readily absorbs into the skin and has a non-greasy feel to it.  There are however other oils you can choose from.  For the selection of your solvent (liquid you are infusing the herbs into), you will want to pick an oil that has a low rancidity rate.  Some other great solvents that can be used are: vegetable glycerin, apricot kernel oil, and olive oil.  Each oil has various skin loving attributes to them, so it is very easy to cater the oil infusion you want to make to the specific need you are looking for.

Although there are other herbs you can select for oil infusion; for this recipe, we wanted to make an oil infusion that was great for dry skin and promoted a healthy and radiant glow.  Besides being an astringent, patchouli is also known for its antimicrobial, anti inflammatory and antiseptic properties.  Plus, since Valentine’s Day is coming, and patchouli is known for its possible APHRODISIAC properties, we found patchouli to be a good herb of choice.

For this infusion, you will need:

patchouli oil infusionPatchouli c/s
Sweet Almond Oil
a pint sized canning jar with lid
2 pots (one smaller with lid, and one larger)
Water
Stove top
Scale

Here are the steps for making patchouli infused oil (double boiler method):

Using a scale, weigh out 45 grams of patchouli c/s.  Place the herb into the smaller pot.  Next, weigh out 392 grams of Sweet Almond Oil.  Pour this over the herbs in the smaller pot, set aside.  Next, place some water into the larger pot.  You want to have at least 3-4 inches of water.  Next, place the large pot onto the stove top on the lowest setting of heat possible.

making patchouli oil infusion

Then, place the lid on the smaller pot and then place the smaller pot into the larger one.  Although it is essential to keep the small pot lidded the entire time it is heated, you will want to monitor the oil infusion and stir it occasionally.  You will want to let the oil infusion simmer slowly for 30 minutes to an hour.  Do not allow water to get into your infusion.

double boiler herbal oil infusion

Once this time period has passed, remove the smaller pot from the larger one.  Allow the oil infusion to reach room temperature and then place the oil infusion into a pint sized canning jar and lid.

herb in oil

Although technically, once the herbs have simmered, you may strain them out and use the oil infusion once it reaches room temperature.  We however wanted a very strong patchouli oil infusion so we let the oil infusion set and steep for an additional 4 weeks after double boiling.  While the herbs were steeping, we took advantage of the sun and placed the jar in the window sill during the daytime.

Once four weeks had passed, the patchouli herb was strained out of the oil using cheesecloth.  Please note:  When you are ready to strain out the herbs, do not forget to apply pressure to the drenched herbs to get out as much oil as you can.  Finally, after tons of anticipation our oil infusion was ready to be put to use.

In the End
The patchouli oil infusion smelled amazing!  Not only was this recipe super easy to make, but it was fun too.  The addition of the oil infusion to our formulation allowed our end product that extra boost in the moisturizing category, and our skin was soft and supple after use too.

Happy Homemade!