Posts Tagged ‘herbal infusion recipe’

Herbal Infusion Recipe

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

herbal oilHerbal Infusion Recipe

This is the basic recipe for making patchouli infused oil to be used in the creation of various bath and body products.  For this recipe we are going to be using the double boiler method.  There are various methods to choose from when making an herbal oil infusion.  To view other processes of infusing herbs for bath and body products please click on this linkPlease note:  Depending on the herb/herbs that you are selecting to infuse, will determine whether you go with a hot method or a cold method route of infusion.  Some herbs are very heat sensitive.  Therefore, if heat is introduced for the infusion, some of the medicinal benefits may be lost.

With oil infusion, a key to remember is the longer that the herbs are allowed to set in the oil, the stronger the herbal infusion will be.  Our herbal infusion sat undisturbed for 4 weeks (after the double boiler method) before we strained the herbs out and introduced the infusion to a recipe.

We selected sweet almond oil because it readily absorbs into the skin and has a non-greasy feel to it.  There are however other oils you can choose from.  For the selection of your solvent (liquid you are infusing the herbs into), you will want to pick an oil that has a low rancidity rate.  Some other great solvents that can be used are: vegetable glycerin, apricot kernel oil, and olive oil.  Each oil has various skin loving attributes to them, so it is very easy to cater the oil infusion you want to make to the specific need you are looking for.

Although there are other herbs you can select for oil infusion; for this recipe, we wanted to make an oil infusion that was great for dry skin and promoted a healthy and radiant glow.  Besides being an astringent, patchouli is also known for its antimicrobial, anti inflammatory and antiseptic properties.  Plus, since Valentine’s Day is coming, and patchouli is known for its possible APHRODISIAC properties, we found patchouli to be a good herb of choice.

For this infusion, you will need:

patchouli oil infusionPatchouli c/s
Sweet Almond Oil
a pint sized canning jar with lid
2 pots (one smaller with lid, and one larger)
Water
Stove top
Scale

Here are the steps for making patchouli infused oil (double boiler method):

Using a scale, weigh out 45 grams of patchouli c/s.  Place the herb into the smaller pot.  Next, weigh out 392 grams of Sweet Almond Oil.  Pour this over the herbs in the smaller pot, set aside.  Next, place some water into the larger pot.  You want to have at least 3-4 inches of water.  Next, place the large pot onto the stove top on the lowest setting of heat possible.

making patchouli oil infusion

Then, place the lid on the smaller pot and then place the smaller pot into the larger one.  Although it is essential to keep the small pot lidded the entire time it is heated, you will want to monitor the oil infusion and stir it occasionally.  You will want to let the oil infusion simmer slowly for 30 minutes to an hour.  Do not allow water to get into your infusion.

double boiler herbal oil infusion

Once this time period has passed, remove the smaller pot from the larger one.  Allow the oil infusion to reach room temperature and then place the oil infusion into a pint sized canning jar and lid.

herb in oil

Although technically, once the herbs have simmered, you may strain them out and use the oil infusion once it reaches room temperature.  We however wanted a very strong patchouli oil infusion so we let the oil infusion set and steep for an additional 4 weeks after double boiling.  While the herbs were steeping, we took advantage of the sun and placed the jar in the window sill during the daytime.

Once four weeks had passed, the patchouli herb was strained out of the oil using cheesecloth.  Please note:  When you are ready to strain out the herbs, do not forget to apply pressure to the drenched herbs to get out as much oil as you can.  Finally, after tons of anticipation our oil infusion was ready to be put to use.

In the End
The patchouli oil infusion smelled amazing!  Not only was this recipe super easy to make, but it was fun too.  The addition of the oil infusion to our formulation allowed our end product that extra boost in the moisturizing category, and our skin was soft and supple after use too.

Happy Homemade!

Shea Butter Recipes

Tuesday, January 14th, 2014

Shea butter cold process soap Great Shea Butter Recipes

Shea Butter has amazing benefits for your skin.  The addition of this ingredient in your products will give your merchandise often sought out advantages.  Rich in vitamins a and e, Shea butter is great for reviving and moisturizing skin, hair, and nails.  Plus, Shea butter is readily absorbed into the skin without leaving a greasy feel behind.  Shea butter also does not clog pores, and is gentle enough to use for skin irritations on babies.

Key Points of Shea Butter

Shea butter can help in the removal of age spots, scars, and stretch marks.  It also helps to invigorate collagen production from our bodies, keeping our skin looking healthy, radiant, and supple; therefore reducing sagging skin.

Shea butter is anti inflammatory.  This makes it a perfect ingredient for body products that help to alleviate pain associated with arthritis, sore and achy muscles, and wind/sun/minor heat burns.

Shea butter is a natural moisturizing agent.  This is a great ingredient to use for people that suffer from skin irritations such as psoriasis, eczema, and dermatitis.  However, Shea butter is gentle enough to use on babies for diaper rashes.  Also, Shea butter is a superb additive to combat those rougher areas of your body; such as the heels, knees, and elbows.

For hair products, Shea butter is a winner.  Not only does Shea butter help thinning and damaged hair, but it will also promote growth of hair as well.  A perfect bonus to this butter is that it fights dandruff and can even be used as a natural hair conditioner.

Shea butter will also help cracked cuticles and promote healthy nail beds.

A great massage oil, Shea butter allows for penetrating, deep tissues massages and can be scented for aromatherapy reasons.

Here are some phenomenal Shea butter themed recipes for homemade bath and body products:

Rose Violet Bath MeltsBath Recipes
Berry Bewitching Bath Brew Recipe
Gourmet Chocolate Bath Melts Recipe
Lemon Lavender Bath Melts Recipe
Rose Petal Bath Melts Recipe
Rose Violet Bath Melts Recipe

black raspberry vanilla body butter recipeBody Balms/Butters
Black Raspberry Vanilla Body Butter Recipe
Hydrating Hand Sticks Recipe
Sugar Cookie Whipped Body Butter Recipe
Rejuvenating Foot Balm Recipe
Winter Body Butter Recipe

Massage
Massage Candle Recipe

shea lotion with herbal infusionLotions
Shea Lotion with Herbal Infusion Recipe
Solid Lotion Bar Recipe

Melt and Pour Soaps
7 Up Bundt Cake Soap Recipe
Zebra Print Soap Recipe

Blueberry Cheesecake Cold Process Soap Cold Process Soaps
Peppermint Cold Process Foot Soap Recipe
Apricotie Hottie Soap Recipe
Beer Cold Process Soap Recipe
Blueberry Cheesecake Cold Process Soap Recipe
Calendula Sunshine Cold Process Soap Recipe
Caramel Custard Cold Process Soap Recipe
Carrot Cold Process Soap Recipe
Cleopatra Heavy Cream Cold Process Soap Recipe
Cold Fashioned Lemonade Soap Recipe
Cold Process Shaving Soap Recipe
Gentle Avocado Cold Process Soap Recipe
Lavender Luxury Cold Process Soap Recipe
Mango Cold Process Soap Recipe
Pineapple Paprika Cold Process Soap Recipe
Royal Honey Bee Cold Process Soap Recipe
Shampoo Bar Cold Process Soap Recipe
Shea Butter Cold Process Soap Recipe
Hot Process Soap Recipe

Lip Balms/Glosses
Crazy for Coconuts Lip Balm Recipe
Natural Beet Root Lip Gloss Recipe
Strawberry Cheesecake Lip Balm Recipe

cotton candy emulsified sugar scrub Scrubs
Cotton Candy Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe
Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe
Fruity Rings Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe
Neapolitan Ice Cream Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe
Strawberry Milkshake Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe
Watermelon Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe