Posts Tagged ‘free soap making recipes and classes’

Lemon Meringue Pie Soap

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

lemon meringue pie soapIt is simply AMAZING what you can create using melt and pour soap bases!  In this project, we desired to make a soap that looked so realistic to lemon meringue pie that it would be difficult to tell the difference.  Nicole accomplished just that!  Achieving just the right color for the graham cracker crust took several attempts, but we finally got it right.  This is great news for YOU because you won’t have to waste your precious soap base figuring out the color, and you can use this graham cracker colored soap to make an array of different types of soap pies!  Just imagine:  Strawberry pie soap, coconut cream pie soap, chocolate cream pie soap, key lime pie soap…and the list goes on and on!  Aren’t you EXCITED!?!

Our FREE recipe also teaches you how to make FABULOUS whipped meringue soap for the tops of your pie soaps as well!  This meringue soap looks just like real meringue, it firms up nicely, and clings to the layer of soap underneath it nicely!  lemon-pie-whole1

So, are you ready to try your hand at making your own Pie Soap?  If you are, here is our FREE RECIPE for Lemon Meringue Pie Soap.  Be sure to post pics of what you make on our facebook page during show and tell (every Thursday night at 9:30 pm est)!  We would love to see what you create!

Deborah Ward

Natures Garden

Soap Making: Never Add Water to Lye

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

lye volcanoWhy You Never Add Water to Lye in Soap Making

Caustic Soda or lye is a necessary ingredient in the soap making process.  However, it is this same ingredient that prevents most people from attempting cold process soap making.  Most lye solutions consist of lye and distilled water.  When making the lye solution there are a few key tips you want to remember.  They are:

Wear your safety gear: safety goggles, mask, long sleeve shirts, pants, and gloves.

Always mix your lye solution in a well ventilated area (open windows, outside, garage, turn on the exhaust fan).

NEVER use glass or aluminum items for your soap making mixing containers or utensils.  Glass can break, and aluminum does not play nicely with lye.  It will cause a toxic, chemical reaction.

Lye is extremely caustic and can do severe damage.  When water and lye are mixed together this is known as a lye solution.  This mixing will also cause an exothermic reaction, this means that heat is given off as a byproduct of the chemical reaction occurring.  Once the lye and water are stirred to make the lye solution, lye solution will become very hot, sometimes reaching 200 degrees.

When you are ready to make the lye solution, ALWAYS pour the lye into the water.  One of the best tips that we have found to remember the order is to envision “a light snow falling into a pond.”

When incorporating the two ingredients together you want to do it in a slow manner.  You must sprinkle the lye in small doses into the water.  In between each sprinkle, you will want to stir, stir, and stir.  The lye mixture will become cloudy, and may give off fumes.  Do not inhale these fumes.  They are extremely hazardous.

NEVER POUR WATER INTO LYE!!!  And NEVER ADD TOO MUCH LYE TOO FAST!!!  Doing either one of these things will create a violent reaction known as a volcano effect.  This happens because the water starts to dissolve the lye, forming a crust.  This crust then seals in the chemical reaction occurring beneath it.  The reaction can only handle being restrained from its own crust before the build-up of pressure and heat creates a burst or eruption.  Hence the term- volcano effect.

If a volcano effect does occur, immediately spray your work area with vinegar.  Vinegar will neutralize the caustic lye.  Proceed by washing the area down with hot soapy water.  Rinse area, and wash again with hot soapy water.  Use paper towels to dry area.

So, to sum up this lesson in soap making:  NEVER POUR WATER ONTO LYE….YOU WILL CREATE A LYE VOLCANO!!!!  Create your lye solution by adding small amounts of lye to water and stir.