Tag Archives: color blocks

Jul
31

Amish Friendship Bread Fragrance

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, candle fragrance oils, candle making supplies, cold process soap, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, Soap making supplies, Uncategorized, wholesale fragrance oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

amish friendship bread fragranceAmish Friendship Bread Fragrance Oil – Fragrance Oil Spotlight

What is Amish Friendship Bread? It’s a recipe for sweet, fruity bread passed from friend to friend that apparently takes 10 days to make. Some say this is a throwback to a simpler time before instant gratification spoiled us rotten and makes us appreciate waiting 10 days for bread. Better than waiting for a fruitcake to cure for at least a month, I guess. Color me confused because I don’t understand why a group of people who can raise a barn in a day need 10 days to make bread. I mean no offense to the Amish and if an Amish person is reading this, please email me at kross.ngscents@gmail.com and enlighten me on friendship bread and why you’re using the Internet. Maybe we could be friends and make each other bread.

What Does Amish Friendship Bread Fragrance Smell Like?

Believe it or not: bread. This scent has a freshly baked bread character and sweet notes of raisin and strawberries, with hints of nut. Just like yummy, tasty fruit-nut bread. (Banana Nut Bread represent! Not entirely relevant here, I just really like Banana Nut Bread. No bananas in Amish Friendship Bread.)

How Do Our Customers Use Amish Friendship Bread Fragrance Oil?

They make candles! Amish Friendship Bread Fragrance Oil performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. Recommended maximum usage percentage for vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. As for candle coloring, we recommend using 2 drops of brown liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax OR you can shred a small amount of a brown color block into your melted wax. Remember to never use a crayon to color your candle– it will clog your wick!

They also make soaps! Our maximum recommended usage percentage for Amish Friendship Bread is 5% in soaps. Our cold process soap testing results show that it performs well in CP soap with no acceleration, no ricing, and no separation, with good scent retention. It does, however, discolor to a chocolate color. Our coloring recommendations are.. none. We also have a square loaf mold if you want to make your soap look bread-shaped.

They also make bath and body products and perfumes! Recommended maximum usage for these products is 5%. Amish Friendship Bread performs perfectly in perfumes (try saying that ten times fast) and performs well in bath and body products. With a high Vanillin Content (6.7%) this fragrance oil may discolor your bath and body products as well. You can try some Vanilla White Color Stabilizer if you feel so inclined, but remember that it’s up to you to test how the color stabilizer works with this fragrance oil in your product.

And room scents.  Recommended maximum usage for this fragrance in potpourri and incense is 50%. Amish Friendship Bread Fragrance Oil is also nice and strong in aroma beads.

So there you have it- you can make all kinds of fun stuff with Amish Friendship Bread Fragrance Oil but it won’t take you ten days to do it! (Though you may need to wait a few weeks for your soap to cure, but you’re not going to eat it. Don’t eat it. Doesn’t matter how good it smells.) Goes great in gifts you’re making for friends! Friendship!

Dec
23

How to Color Candles

This entry was posted in candle dye, candle making, candle making supplies, candle supplies, candles, color blocks, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

how to color candlesHow to Color Candles

Hi everyone! Are you just starting out making your own candles? Wondering how to color candles? Here at Nature’s Garden, we actually have many wonderful products that are used specifically for the candle coloring process. We offer only the best candle coloring products out there, with each item having its own vibrant personality! We offer so many different dye products, each having their own different specifications when used in your candles. We have liquid candle dye options as well as color block dye. We even have mica dust that you can sprinkle on the outside of you pillar candles to give them the effect of sparkling!

For liquid candle dyes, we offer various Spectrum Liquid Candle Dyes ranging in color. The colors of liquid dyes we offer here at Nature’s Garden are brown, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, black, burgundy, purple, and teal. (However, when using these liquid dyes, please just note that they are very concentrated!) To use the liquid dyes, just put a few drops of the liquid into your melted wax.  If you are in the mood for more of a pastel color (or if you are doing a very small batch) for your candle, all you have to do to the dye is dilute it using vegetable oil with the ratio of 1:1. Be careful with the amount of dye you use as well. When you use liquid dye, it allows you to create more consistent coloring in your candles since you count how any drops are put in. But be careful not use more than 10 drops per pound of wax, or else your candles may have a chemical smell to them.

For our color block dyes, the colors we offer are red, burgundy, yellow, blue, green, purple, brown, cinnamon, teal, cranberry, and a coral/peach. To use a color block to color your candle, simply shave off the desired amount and place it into your melted wax.  One color block is actually enough to easily deeply dye 15 pounds of wax. When using color blocks, they actually do not produce colors as vibrant as the liquid dyes, so they are better when trying to attain more subtle colors. However, when using color blocks, make sure that the block is fully incorporated before pouring your candle! They can tend to produce little specks of colors on the bottoms of your candles if they are not fully melted and mixed into the wax.

Want to give your pillar some sparkle to bling it up a little bit? Use some of our Gold Pigment Mica or our Diamond Dust Mica to dust the outside of your pillars! This will give your pillars a beautiful shimmer! Have you ever thoughts of using crayons to color your candles? Well, please don’t! Using crayons for coloring can actually cause the candle to start smoking and may even clog your wicks! Crayons are not alone in this predicament. When dying your candles, be sure not to use too much color as this can cause the wick to become clogged and it may cause your candle to smoke more than it should be. It can even inhibit the throw of your chosen scent and reduce the melt pool of the candle. Candle dyes are not for cosmetic use either! Check out all of our free recipes and classes, we offer many free candle recipes, and even a Candle Coloring Class that tells all about our candle coloring products! If you click on candle supplies then candle colorants on our website, that will show you all of the candle colorants we offer. Our Candle Coloring class even tells how to mix your own colors to achieve the colors you want. Enjoy these wonderful products and watch out for more Enlightened by Layla!

 

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Dec
09

Colorants and Candle Making

This entry was posted in candle colorants, candle making supplies, color blocks, colorants, Fragrance Oils, liquid candle dye, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Spectrum Liquid Candle DyeThere are a variety of different colorants available to candle makers.  Each different colorant form has its own positives and negatives.  Finding the correct candle colorant for you is up to a little research and testing in your candle wax.

Color Blocks–  Color blocks contribute to a rich color in candle wax, especially if you are trying to achieve a dark color in your candles.  Of the different colorants available, color blocks are the most cost effective with one block coloring as much as 15 pounds of candle wax.  However, because color blocks arrive in block form, it is very hard to reproduce the exact same color every time.  If color accuracy is important to your candles, color blocks may not be your answer unless you purchase a gram scale for candle making.  In order to use color blocks in candle wax, the blocks have to be shaved down into smaller amounts.  These smaller amounts would then be weighed out and documented in your testing notebook before adding them to the melted candle wax.

Liquid Dye– Liquid candle dye is the answer to your colorant selection if candle coloring accuracy is important to your candles.  Because liquid candle dye is easy to administer and record (since it is in liquid form), color accuracy time and time again is no longer an issue.  The negative to liquid candle dye is the slight chemical smell it has to it.  Through our testing, we have found that anything over 10 drops of liquid dye in 4 pounds of candle wax will present a slight chemical smell in your finished candle.  Make 10 drops of liquid candle dye your cut off for using this colorant.

Color Chips-  Color Chips are color blocks that have already been broken up for you.  The negative to this colorant is the cost.  The other problem that color chips present is that fact they are not broken up in a fine enough matter to be readily used for some color hues.  And, once again we have an issue if color accuracy is important unless you are weighing and documenting.

Crayons-  No matter what the brand of the crayon is, crayons never make a good candle colorant.  Although it is tempting with the amazing color spread that crayons provide, do not give into temptation.  Using crayons as your candle wax colorant will clog your wick and prevent your candle from burning properly.  Candles that have been colored with crayons also have a tendency to smoke.  You are better off not even acknowledging crayons as a wax colorant.