Tag Archives: candle making equipment

Jul
05

How Do I Make Wax Melts


This entry was posted in candle clamshell tarts, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle molds, candle recipe, Natures Garden, wholesale fragrance oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

How Do I Make Wax MeltsHow Do I Make Wax Melts

If you have been asking, “How Do I Make Wax Melts?”, then you are in the right place! Whether you are an experienced candle maker expanding into wax melts or a beginning crafter looking to make their own wax tarts, you can find everything you need to get started right here at Natures Garden. You can use this blog to figure out the ingredients that you will need. Then, head over to our site to find everything you need at a push of a button. Plus, there are even recipes for different wax melt ideas that provide you with step-by-step instructions for creating wax tarts. If you find you need a bit more guidance, then you can call our HUG line as well. We are here to help make this process both fun and easy!

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Candle Making SuppliesHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Candle Making Supplies

Just like with candle making, there is some equipment that you are going to need to get started. First, you will need a pouring pot to melt your wax. You will also need a pot filled with a few inches of water and a stove top. Your pouring pot will then be placed into the pot of warm water. Also, you will need a thermometer because you will need to add the fragrance oil at a certain temperature and you need to make sure the wax isn’t too hot when you pour.

Also, you will need to make sure you have a least have your basic supplies, which are candle wax, a scented oil, and packaging supplies. While there are many choices and options for customizing your wax melts, these two key ingredients are all you need to create your scented wax tarts. Also, you need to make sure that you have a plan for packaging your wax melts. There are many options, like clamshells, molds, and much more, and you just need one method to ensure that you are able to store your finished wax melts for later use.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Waxes for Making Wax TartsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Waxes for Making Wax Tarts

There are many different types of waxes available from Natures Garden. We recommend using a pillar wax for your melts if you are putting them into a mold. However, there are still quite a few that are great when it comes to making a wax melt using a container wax. Choosing the type of wax is very important to the quality of your scented wax melts. So, you may want to learn a bit about your options before choosing a wax.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Beeswax Wax MeltsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Beeswax Wax Melts

Beeswax is a great choice for making wax tarts. It is perfect for creating hard wax tarts that are easy to package and use. You can either scent this wax on its own or add about 5-10% to a paraffin wax. Adding beeswax to paraffin wax will increase the integrity of the wax melt, which will make it easy to package and then use later. Also, adding some beeswax to your recipe will improve the color and your burn time of your wax tart.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Wow Wax Wax TartsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Wow Wax Wax Tarts

Speaking of paraffin wax, WOW Wax is a paraffin blend that is soft, creamy and has an excellent scent throw. While you may want to use this wax to make wax tarts, it could be difficult to make tarts. When you go to remove a wax melt from your clamshell or mold, the wax is likely to stick the container. This will ruin the shape and lead to a mess. So, this is when the beeswax comes in handy! Adding a portion of stearic acid or beeswax will make the wax harder and easier to use for making wax tarts. Alternatively, you could package your soft wax melts into portion cups. This will make it easier to transfer the wax to the warmer and cut down on some of that mess.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Can I Use Soy Wax for Wax Melts?How Do I Make Wax Melts: Can I Use Soy Wax for Wax Melts?

While you can use soy wax to create your homemade wax melts, a softer wax like soy wax may be harder to remove from a mold or clamshell container. Similarly, Joy Wax is a candle wax that blends soy with other ingredients to enhance the quality. So, Joy Wax will be a bit soft, as well. However, there are ways that you can effectively use this wax. Again, you could use individually portioned containers and just squeeze the wax into your warmer. Also, you can use Stearic Acid to harden your wax tarts. 

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Best Wax for Clamshell TartsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Best Wax for Clamshell Tarts

One of the best waxes for making wax tarts is our Pillar of Bliss Wax, as it is a strong wax made to create pillar candles. So, it will be sure to maintain its shape in the packages. We have made our basic Candle Wax Tarts Recipe with this wax because it is one of the easiest for clamshell wax melts. Also, we have done a few other recipes, like the Pumpkin Delight Chamshell Tarts and the Candy Corn Clamshell Tarts Recipe, with this candle wax.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: How do I Scent Wax Tarts?

Scented oils are an important part of creating your own wax tarts. Your fragrance oil warmers won’t be able to do much without a great scent. Plus, you need to make sure that your scented oil is added correctly or it may not mix properly with the candle wax. So, you need to be able to add your fragrance oils at the right temperatures.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: What Temperature Do I Add My Fragrance Oil?How Do I Make Wax Melts: What Temperature Do I Add My Fragrance Oil?

One crucial thing that you need to remember with fragrance oils is that they should be added to the wax at the correct temperature. This can be found on the page for the individual candle wax. Each candle wax will be different. So, for the best results follow the instructions for that particular candle wax.  Each wax has been tested to find the temperature that will give you the best results using that particular candle wax.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: How to Scent Candles with SpicesHow Do I Make Wax Melts: How to Scent Candles with Spices

Not only are fragrance oils great for scenting your home, but there are some fragrance herbs that will do make you wax melts look amazing! Our Rustic Wax Melts Recipe was created with Cloves, Juniper Berries, Cinnamon, and Orange Peel that perfectly compliment the Christmas Wassail Fragrance Oil. It has such a wonderful spicy aroma that will fill up your whole house. If you want to find more herbs to try in your wax melts, then check out the Herbs & Spices page.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Shape and Packaging Ideas for Wax MeltsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Shape and Packaging Ideas for Wax Melts

Also, you need to make sure that you have an idea for packaging your wax melts. Otherwise, your tarts may set up before you are able to pour. Depending on the type of wax tart you are making, there are many different options. Here are a few of the most common options.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Clamshell Packaging for Wax MeltsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Clamshell Packaging for Wax Melts

First, we have clamshell wax tarts containers These are most often used for packaging because they are convenient to make and use. Plus, the divider allows you to easily create six individual wax melts in one container! If you want to use this method of packaging, Natures Garden has some high quality clamshell containers.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Portion CupsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Portion Cups

Another good option for wax melts is portion cups. These are especially useful for soft waxes, like container waxes. Many candle makers choose to use the same candle wax in their tarts that they use in their container candles. This way they do not have to purchase two different types of candle wax.  When using portion cups there will be less struggle trying to get the wax out of the container. Just squeeze the container and pop the wax into your wax warmer and don’t worry about a mess. This could also be a good container for transporting wax embeds of various shapes. For example, a few retro flower wax tarts could fit in a container for storage.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Candle MoldsHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Candle Molds

Another perfect way to create your wax melts is to use silicone candle molds wholesale. This allows you to make all kinds of fun shapes and designs. We used this recipe to create our scrumptious Pumpkin Cheesecake Wax Melts Recipe, which is perfect for creating some little cupcake wax melts, too.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Other Ideas for Your Wax Potpourri WarmerHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Other Ideas for Your Wax Potpourri Warmer

Wax melts are great, but there are even more fun ideas out there that you can use for your wax burner. These fun craft recipes take candle wax and make unique creations that are perfect for scenting your home. Plus, you can even use these ideas to get yourself thinking about your own alternatives to typical wax tarts. Just start crafting and see what you can come up with!

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Shimmer Gel Potpourri RecipeHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Shimmer Gel Potpourri Recipe

One fun room scenting idea is the Shimmer Gel Potpourri Recipe. This wax burner potpourri uses a soft candle wax and uses an oil to create a gel consistency. Then, the recipe uses fragrance, mica. and bottles to finish off this great recipe. Now you can simply squeeze out some of this potpourri into your wax warmer and cut out all the worry about using soft soy wax.

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Autumn Leaves Potpourri RecipeHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Autumn Leaves Potpourri Recipe

Next, we have a scoop-able wax potpourri recipe that uses cute leaf embeds. The Autumn Leaves Potpourri Recipe is a simple and fun way to create a room scenting recipe. Most of your wax doesn’t need to be melted and a PET jar is an easy way to package a finished product!

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Glistening Snowflakes Potpourri RecipeHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Glistening Snowflakes Potpourri Recipe

The Glistening Snowflakes Potpourri Recipe is similar to the previous recipe with a different wax embed. Part of the fun is being able to use all sorts of different shapes in your recipes.  You can find all of our embed molds here. If you wanted you could even just color the pillar of bliss wax and layer the product without embeds. It is all up to you!

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Make Your Own Wax Melts KitHow Do I Make Wax Melts: Make Your Own Wax Melts Kit

If you are new to making diy wax tarts, then you may want to try out a wax melts kit. This wax tart starter kit has all of the ingredients and packaging that you need to make homemade wax melts. The Clamshell Wax Tart Kit comes with fragrance oils, candle wax, and clamshell containers. Plus, this kit even has a complete set of instructions that will help to guide you through the process of making wax melts!

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Wax Melt Warmers

If you are looking for a new candle warmer, then you may want to check out Broad Review’s article on the Best Candle Wax Warmers. This article talks about five of the best-selling candle wax warmers on the market. Plus, they break down some of the best qualities in each to compare to other warmers. So, you may want to check out this article and see what they have found to be the best!

How Do I Make Wax Melts: Need Some Help?How Do I Make Wax Melts: Need Some Advise?

We are here to help! This craft blog is all to help you understand wax melts and hopefully learn something new! There are quite a few combinations for creating your wax melt recipe, but once you make your decision they are pretty easy to create. However, you can reach out to us with any questions that you make have about home made wax melts. Not only are you able to call or stop by the store, but you can find us on social media, too. We are on Facebook, Twitter (@ngscents), and Instagram (@ngscents). Good luck with your wax melts and fun some fun!

Jun
14

Candle Making Terminology


This entry was posted in candle colorant, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle molds, candle recipe, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, candles and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Candle Making TerminologyCandle Making Terminology

We at Natures Garden know that there is a lot of candle making terminology and techniques that you need to know to make great homemade candles. So, we are going to answer some common candle making questions and problems to make your experience more fun. So, set aside your candle making equipment and let’s figure out how to make gorgeous scented candles!

Candle Making Terminology: Types of Candles

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Pillar Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Pillar Candle?

Pillar candles are free-standing candles that don’t require a container. These often use a harder type of candle wax that is made for creating pillar candles, like Pillar of Bliss Wax or Palm Pillar Wax.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Votive Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Votive Candle?

Votive Candles are a smaller kind of candle. The average size is 1.5 ounces and they are about two inches tall and one and a half inches wide. These are often made with a Votive Mold.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Tealight Candle?Candle Making Terminology: What is a Tealight Candle?

Tea Lights are very small candles that are about an inch and a half wide and a half inch tall. They can be made in Tea Light Cups .

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Fragrances

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Fragrance Load Mean?

In candle making, fragrance load refers to the amount of fragrance oil that you are using in your homemade candle recipe.

Candle Making Terminology: My Candle Wax Will Hold a 10% Fragrance Load. How Do I Know How Much to Add?Candle Making Terminology: My Candle Wax Will Hold a 10% Fragrance Load. How Do I Know How Much to Add?

All you need to do is some simple math that we will walk you through! First, weigh the amount of candle wax you are using. Then, multiply this amount by 0.10, which is 10% to determine the amount of fragrance oil that you can use.

  • Formula: Candle Wax Weight X Fragrance Percentage = Amount of Fragrance That Can Be Added
  • Example: 20 (ounces of candle wax) X 0.10 = 2 ounces of fragrance oil So, since your candle wax is in ounces, the fragrance amount that can be added to the candle wax will also be in ounces.
Candle Making Terminology: What Does Scent Throw Mean?

The scent throw is the strength of fragrance that the candle releases into the air. Cold throw is the strength of scent when the candle is not lit yet. Hot throw is the strength of the scent throw when the candle is lit and burning.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Waxes

Candle Making Terminology: What Kind of Wax Should I Use for Candles?Candle Making Terminology: What Kind of Wax Should I Use for Candles?

Choosing a candle wax type depends on the type of candle that you want to create. So, the isn’t a universal answer to the question, “Which is the best wax for candle making?” For example, pillar candles would require a pillar wax, which includes Pillar of Bliss Candle Wax and Palm Pillar Wax. The Pillar of Bliss Wax is a blend of soy and paraffin that has a great scent throw and a creamy finish. The Palm Pillar Wax has a crystal finish, has a wonderful scent throw, and comes form sustainable sources.

However, container candles would be best with a container wax, which includes soy wax, Joy wax, WOW Wax, palm wax, and gel wax. Soy wax would make a great, inexpensive addition to your natural candle making supplies. It has a clean burn and and excellent cold throw, but it can be tricky to get a good hot throw from certain fragrances. Wow wax is mostly paraffin and has an amazing hot throw, but has a less clean burn. Joy wax is a perfect blend of paraffin wax and soy wax, as well as veggie wax and proprietary ingredients, that provides a cleaner burn with an amazing scent throw. Gel wax has a neat translucent look, but is not compatible with all fragrance oils. Our palm wax comes from sustainable sources that aren’t harming the rainforest, has a beautiful crystal appearance, and a great scent throw.

Candle Making Terminology: What is Granulated Wax?Candle Making Terminology: What is Granulated Wax?

Simply, this is wax that is grainy and looks kind of like sand. This wax can be scented and colored without melting, so it is a easy and fun way to create candles with kids. We have made candle recipes like the Bacon Candle Recipe and the Hydrangea Candle Recipe with this type of wax.

Candle Making Terminology: Crucial Temperatures

Candle Making Terminology: Do I Need to Worry About the Temperatures When Making Candles?Candle Making Terminology: Do I Need to Worry About the Temperatures When Making Candles?

Yes, this is very important for creating quality homemade candles! There are a few key moments where you will need a thermometer to be aware of the temperature of your wax. First, you need to make sure that your fragrance oil isn’t added at a temperature that is too hot. If your fragrance is added at a temperature that is too high, then some of the notes may burn off and leave you with a less satisfying scent. Another issue is pouring your wax into the container too soon. If you pour at a temperature that is too cool, you could have improper adhesion, wet spots, sinking, and other issues. So, be sure to check your wax’s description to see the temperature that is should be poured.

Candle Making Terminology: What does sinkhole mean?

Sinkhole is a hole or cavity that appears on your candle as it is setting up. Often, this occurs when the candle wax is poured at too low of a temperature.

Candle Making Terminology: Can You Cool a Candle in the Fridge?Candle Making Terminology: Can You Cool a Candle in the Fridge?

No, candles should cool as slowly as possible on their own. If you place a candle in the fridge to cool, they may not adhere to the glass properly, which can lead to wet spots.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Wicks

Candle Making Terminology: Choosing the Right WickCandle Making Terminology: Choosing the Right Wick

The size of your wick depends on the diameter of your container. You can see the radius for each wick under it’s description. However, you will still need to test because there are many variable between wax type and fragrance oil. A fragrance with a high flash point and high specific gravity, like vanilla, requires a hotter burn. But, low flash point scents with low specific gravity, like citrus, need a smaller wick. Also, you may hear the terms “wick up’ and “wick down” when talking about find the right wick size. Wick down means that you should use a wick that is smaller than what you have been using and wick up means that you should use a wick that is larger than what you use for candles this size.

Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Stop a Candle From Tunneling?Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Stop a Candle From Tunneling?

If you don’t know, tunneling is often the answer for the question, “Why isn’t my candle wax not burning evenly all of the way down?” Tunneling can happen for a few reasons, which includes issues with wick size. If your wick is too small for the diameter of your candle, then it will not burn all the way to the outside edge. So, you may either need a larger wick, multiple wicks, or a different type of wick that will burn hotter.

However, there are a few other issues that could cause tunneling. If you think your wick is the right size, then look into some of these potential issues, First, you may have a clogged wick, which can cause uneven burning. Also, it could be that you didn’t do a memory burn for the candle’s first use to ensure a proper burn. Finally, you may need to use a wax that has a lower melt point that is easier for you chosen wick to handle.

Candle Making Terminology: Why Are My Candle Jars Black After I Burn My Candles?

Often, this occurs when you wick is too big for your jar or your wick is too long. If your wick is trimmed down to 1/4 inch, then the length is fine. You can check the suggested radius for your wick to see if you need to get a smaller size. Also, using too much fragrance can clog the wick and cause more soot than normal.

Candle Making Terminology: Do Candle Wicks Contain Lead?

No, candle wicks in the Unites States, like ours, do not contain lead. In fact, lead core wicks were banned in the US in 2003.

Candle Making Terminology: Proper Burning

Candle Making Terminology: What is a Memory Burn?

This is the first burn of your candles and is the most important. This burn will set the boundary of your melt pool and will determines whether the edges of your candle will be reached. A guide is to burn an hour for every inch your candle is wide to ensure that it will burn properly as it is used in future burns. Also, you will want to make sure that you wick isn’t too low and isn’t longer than 1/4 inch high.

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Melt Pool Mean?

Melt Pool is the candle wax that has melted on the top of the candle. Ideally, you will want this to be all the way across the top of your candle to ensure an even burn.

Candle Making Terminology: What Does Mushrooming Mean in Candle Making?

When I notice black clumps on top of my wick, I know that it is mushrooming. While all wick produce this carbon as they burn, some are worse than others. Also, factors that clog the wick can increase the mushrooming effect. The CD wicks produce the least amount of mushrooming, but there isn’t a way to completely stop it due to it being a product of burning the wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Coloring

Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Color a Candle?Candle Making Terminology: How Do You Color a Candle?

There are a few different candle colorant options for your home made candles. First, you can use our Liquid Candle Dyes, which are extremely concentrated and will last a long time. Also, you can use a color block, which is made with paraffin, vegan, and can color up to 15 pounds of wax. Lastly, you can use a bit of powder dye. Just be careful not to use too much because it can clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Can You Use Crayons to Make Candles?

We do not suggest using crayons to color candles. They don’t burn properly and are likely to clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: What is a UV Light Inhibitor?Candle Making Terminology: What is a UV Light Inhibitor?

Since UV light from the sun can bleach the color out of candles, the UV light inhibitor is used to protect the color of your candles. This candle ingredient is most useful for preventing fading in burgundy, blue, and violet candle colors due to direct sunlight.

Candle Making Terminology: How Do I Color My Candles White?

While titanium dioxide can be used to create white pillar candles, you don’t want to add it straight to your container candles as it can clog your wick.

Candle Making Terminology: Candle Apearance

Candle Making Terminology: How Do I Get Rid of Wet Spots on My Candles?

Wet spots are air pockets that are formed when your candle didn’t adhere properly to your candle jar. You can take a few steps to prevent this if you are having problems. First, try warming your candle jars to give you wax more time to cool. Also, you can try pouring your wax at a hotter temperature. Another good tip is to make sure the room your are making your candles in a room that is warm.

Candle Making Terminology: What Is Frosting In Candle Making?

Frosting is the white stuff that appears on waxes that contain soy wax. You can use a heat gun or blow dryer to re-melt the surface and give it a smoother finish. While you can lessen the effect of frosting, you can’t eliminate it completely.

Candle Making Terminology: What Are Jump Lines?

These are the line that you can see on the side of either a container candle or a pillar candle.

Candle Making Terminology: Progression of Candles

As you can tell, there is a lot that goes into candle making. But, it is a process that has been developed overtime and takes time to master. If you are interested in learning a bit about the evolution of candles, then check out The History of Candles from Prehistoric Times Until Now by Pioneer Thinking.

Candle Making Terminology: Talk to UsCandle Making Terminology: Talk to Us

If you have any more questions about candle making, you can look at our candle making classes or just ask us! We are on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter (@ngscents).

May
14

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?


This entry was posted in candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making questions, Candle Making Recipes, candle making supplies, candle molds, candle supplies, candle wicking, candle wicks, candles and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

WWhat Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?hat Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?

Welcome to the wonderful world of candle making! If you are new to the craft of making candles, then you may be thinking to yourself; What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles? While there are quite a few options out there, you just need to learn about your options and choosing gets simplified. At Natures Garden we strive to make sure that our customers never feel lost or alone while crafting. So, we try to provide you with as much information as you need as well as offer a Toll-Free H.U.G Line; HUG stands for Help U Grow. 1-866-647-2368. So, you can call us anytime to receive help. Furthermore, we are creating this blog to have all the basic information that you need to get started and have a reference for when you need it!

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: What Wax to Use for CandlesWhat Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: What Wax to Use for Candles

One of the most important ingredients for making candles is the wax. Your candle wax is what determines the strength and quality of your candle. While you may think that you can just add more fragrance oil to increase the scent of your candles, this just isn’t true. In fact, once your candle wax has been saturated the fragrance oil will simply leak out and be wasted. Also, this leakage can lead to a potential fire hazard. So, it’s best to stay within the recommended amounts. You can check out the Candle Wax Information to figure out which type of canlde wax that you want!

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: AdditivesWhat Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Additives

Additives are an option that candle makers have to include ingredients into their wax. This is done to try to enhance the quality of their final product. This can be beneficial for some waxes, but we don’t suggest using these additives in any preblended waxes.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: How to Make Candles With Crisco

One additive that you can include is Crisco shortening for some of your candles. About 1-2 ounces can be added per pound of paraffin candle wax. This will help to decrease wet spots, increase your melt pool, absorb fragrance oil, and help to decrease the chance of your fragrance sitting on the bottom of the pouring pot. So, this can be used to increase scent throw in candles made of this type of wax. But, you will find that a blended wax like our Joy Wax is already formulated to provide a great scent throw without adding any Crisco.

You will probably read differing opinions on using Crisco in your candles; however, if it had been such a bad idea, then wax manufacturers would not be making wax out of soy. Crisco is soy based. Use your own judgment on this one!

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Vybar

Another additive that is used to enhance candles is Vybar. This additive’s primary use is enhancing the scent throw. Plus, this ingredient will create a marble appearance on the top of the candle, which looks very cool! Another thing that this ingredient does is harden the wax consistency and raise the melt point. While some people use stearin, we believe that Vybar does the same thing with less issues.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: UV Light Protectors

If you want to sell your candles wholesale or want to have them keep their color for a long time, then you may want a UV Light InhibitorHowever, these can be expensive and aren’t necessary otherwise. Colors that you need to be most worried about are Blue, Violet, Burgundy, and sometimes pink. Also, even after adding this ingredient we would recommend keeping them out of direct sunlight as the sun will still be able to fade your color over time. If your find that your colors our still fading quite a bit even after adding this, then it could be due to your fragrance oil.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Petrolatum

Also, you can use petrolatum as a candle making additive. This ingredient will help increase the number of pores in the candle. So, you candle will be able to absorb even more fragrance oil. This means an even stronger scent! Plus, it will help your wax cling to the sides of your container. However, this may lead to a less clean burn and sometimes even smoking. So, there are some trade offs with this one.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Fragrance OilWhat Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Fragrance Oil

The fragrance oil is another ingredient that is important for making wonderfully scented homemade candles. Firstly, you should make sure that the fragrance oil you want to use is not alcohol based, as this can be dangerous. Next, you will want to consider the concentration of your fragrance. Obviously, you want a good scent that hasn’t been diluted, like our fragrance oils, but there are some companies that dilute their scents and you should be cognizant of it. When using a concentrated fragrance oil, you can use about 1 ounce per pound of fragrance. If you try to use more, it will just be wasted. This is because the wax is already fully saturated and your fragrance will simply be left on the bottom of your pouring pot.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: ColorantsWhat Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Colorants

Also, you have the option to add colorants to your candles. There are a few routes you can go for coloring your homemade candles. One thing that we’d like to note here is that candles aren’t a very good candle colorant. While there are many diy recipes on how to make candles out of crayons, we have found that candles should never be used if you want quality candles. Any amount of crayons added to your candles will cause smoking and will clog your wick. Instead, you can use liquid candle dye, color blocks, or powdered candle dye for your candles.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Liquid Candle DyeWhat Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Liquid Candle Dye

First, you can use the Spectrum Liquid Candle Dyes to color your candles. These dyes are very concentrated, so it only take a little bit. Often a few drops or even a toothpicks amount will suffice. Make sure that you never use more than 10 drops of the liquid candle dye because it will cause a sight chemical smell that may ruin your scent! Plus, adding too much color can clog your wick, reduce the scent throw, create smoking, and may reduce the melt pool of your candle. But, as long as you stay under our recommended maximum you should be fine. Plus, the liquid dye allows you to make candles that have consistent coloring each time because you can simply count the number of drops you add to your melted wax.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Color BlocksWhat Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Color Blocks

Next, you have the option of color blocks for your homemade candles. These candle coloring blocks are dye that has been concentrated in a wax medium. This block will provide enough color to deeply dye 15 pounds of wax in total. However, the color blocks do not provide as vibrant of a color compared to our liquid candle dye or a powdered candle dye. We have these colorants available in red, coral/peach, yellow, blue, green, purple, burgundy, brown, teal, cinnamon, and cranberry. You can mix these colors, but make sure not too add too much as it may clog your wick, cause smoking, reduce the melt pool, or inhibit scent throw. To use this colorant you can cut just a piece off the block and add it to your melting candle wax. Just make sure that your color blocks are fully melted before pouring your candle wax.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Powdered Candle DyesWhat Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Powdered Candle Dyes

Lastly, you can use for your homemade candle creations. These are the most concentrated form of candle dye out there. You can use very small amounts of the dye to provide some vibrant color results. Plus, you can combine colors to create any color that you prefer! Also, you can add this powder to melted Stearic Acid to provide a better dispersion in your candle wax. Stearic acid can be added to your candle to help harden them. Also, you should avoid using too much as it could clog your wick, create more smoking, reduce the melt pool of your candle, or inhibit the scent throw.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Candle WicksWhat Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Candle Wicks

Another important aspect to candle making is the wick. There are two things you need to consider when picking a wick, which are the type of wax you are using and the size of your container. First, you need to think about the type of wick that you want to use. While there is some preference involved, there are some wicks that will work better in certain types of waxes. You can see on the website for each wick or at the bottom of the Science of Candle Making page.

Next, we need to think about what size wick that we will need. The size of your wick will determine the radius of wax that the flame can cover. If the flame doesn’t reach the edges you will be wasting perfectly good candle wax. However, a wick that is too large can result in mushrooming or even smoking, or loss of scent.  So, you will need to make sure that you choose the correct sized wick for each of your different container sizes. If you need help figuring out which type of wick and the size you need then check out our Candle Wick Chart for sizing.

Also, you can check out our Types of Candle Wicks for a condensed version of candle wicking information.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: EquipmentWhat Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Equipment

Next, we have some basic equipment is important for candle making and can potentially last forever. Both the pouring pot and thermometer are important pieces of equipment in the candle making process that you really can’t go without.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Pouring PotWhat Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Pouring Pot

First, the pouring pot is great to have for your melting wax. If you are using a pot from your kitchen, then it will be nearly impossible to reclaim it for cooking. Plus, you won’t have the convenience of a pouring spout in a typical cooking pot. So, its best to just get a pouring pot that is more efficient for candle making.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: ThermometerWhat Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Thermometer

Also, the thermometer is crucial for making sure that your wax is used properly. Firstly, this allows you to monitor the temperature to prevent you from getting your wax to hot. If your wax gets hotter than 200 degrees Fahrenheit, in some cases, it will burn. At this temperature the wax’s molecules begin to break down and the wax will take on a burnt smell. Another issue that this helps you with is pouring your wax at the right temperature. You need to make sure that your candles are poured at the temperature recommended for the candle wax you are using.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Worlds Largest Candle

In the spirit of candle making, we figured we would talk about the largest candle ever! According to Waymarking.com, the largest candle in the world is in South Deerfield, MA. It is a big, red giant made of 1,377 pounds of wax and standing about 6 feet tall. If you are curious in seeing this phenomenal candle, then check out the World’s Largest Candle in World’s Largest Candle Store.

What Do You Need To Make Your Own Candles?: Learn With Us

If you are interested in learning more about candle-making, you can find more details in the Natures Garden candle manual. Also, you can reach out to us at Natures Garden with any other questions that you may have. One great way to reach out to us is through social media. We are on Facebook, Twitter (@ngscents), and Instagram (@ngscents). We hope to hear from you soon!

May
09

Types of Candle Wicks


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Candle WicksTypes of Candle Wicks

Choosing the right wick for your homemade candles is one of the most important parts of candle making! The candle’s wick is what feeds the flame to keep it going, as the wick collects the candle wax vapor as the wax is heated. So, a good wick will keep your flame burning evenly and for a long time! Since there are many types of candle wicks, we thought it would be useful to have a guide with candle wick information all in one place. So, this blog explains the importance of choosing the best wick along with some details on the wicks available from Natures Garden!

Types of Candle Wicks: Choosing a TypeTypes of Candle Wicks: Choosing a Type

There are three main types that nearly all candle wicks fall into. First, we have the most common type of candle wick, which are flat wicks. These are usually made from three bundles of fiber knitted together and are very consistent in burning. Plus, they curl in the flame for a self-trimming effect. Second, we have square wicks, which are often braided or knitted. These will curl in the flame, but are a bit more rounded than flat wicks and are better able to resist clogging. Lastly, we have the cored wicks, which use a core material around the braided wick to keep it upright. These wicks have a round cross section and use different materials, like cotton, paper, zinc, or tin, to keep the wick upright.

Types of Candle Wicks: Why Are Wicks Different Sizes?Types of Candle Wicks: Why Are Wicks Different Sizes?

Choosing the proper wick is very important.  The size and type you need depends on the size container and type of wax you use. Every candle is unique and many come in different shapes and sizes, so wicks come in different sizes too!  For the wick, both its length and width have a purpose for the candle. Also, you will need to know that the different numbers signify the size of the wick. This means that a CD-10 wick is more narrow than a CD-12, which is why the CD-12 wick can cover a larger candle radius compared to the CD-10.  We should also note, when a candle wick is created, it is then coated in wax.  At times, this coating can make a smaller wick appear larger than a bigger sized wick.  It’s not really larger, it simply has a thicker wax coating than the larger candle wick.

Types of Candle Wicks: Why is my candle wick mushrooming?

One issue that you can have due to choosing the wrong size wick is mushrooming. This is when a build up of carbon forms on your wick and creates a sort of mushroom-like shape. If your wick is too large for you container, then your candle will burn way too fast. This rapid burning leads to an increased amount of build up in a short time and causes the mushrooming appearance.

Types of Candle Wicks: What is tunneling in candles?

Another issue that you could run into is tunneling. This is when the flame doesn’t burn all the way to the edges, which leaves a ring around the outside. Not only does this waste parts of you candle that could’ve been put to good use, but this can make it difficult to relight as the flame begins to drop further. Some times you can have this with the correct sized wick, but there are ways to prevent this from happening. For example, a memory burn and longer burns can make sure that all of the wax is used as the flame burns. However, a wick that is too small for your container will tunnel no matter what you do.

Types of Candle Wicks: CD Candle WicksTypes of Candle Wicks: CD Candle Wicks

First, we have the CD Candle Wicks – 100 count, which are made of a flat, cotton braid with a special paper around it. This is perfect for a hot flame as this gives the wick excellent capillary action. Also, this wick will provide a cleaner burn, is basically self- trimming, and can be used in any type of wax. If you are looking for the best wick for soy wax or vegetate wax, then this is a good option to try out! So, its no wonder why this wick is a favorite for many of us  at Natures Garden

Types of Candle Wicks: Guide for CD Candle Wicks
  • CD5 candle wicks- Use with votives and containers 2 inch in diameter.
  • CD7 candle wicks- Use with containers approximately 2.5 inches in diameter.
  • CD10 candle wicks- Use with Medium sized containers approximately 3 inches in diameter.
  • CD 12 candle wicks- Use with medium sized containers approximately 3- 3.5 inches in diameter.
  • CD14 candle wicks- Use with Large sized containers approximately 4 inches in diameter.
  • CD16 candle wicks- Use with large sized containers approximately 4.25 inches in diameter.
  • CD18 candle wicks- Use with large containers approximately 4.5 inches in diameter.
  • CD20 candle wicks- Use with extra large containers approximately 5 inches in diameter.
  • CD 22 candle wicks- Extra large wick for use in large containers approximately 5.5 inches in diameter.

Types of Candle Wicks: Hemp Candle WicksTypes of Candle Wicks: Hemp Candle Wicks

Next, we have the Hemp Candle Wicks- 100 count. These are braided wicks like many candle wicks, but they use natural hemp fibers instead of the typical cotton fibers. This makes the wick more rigid, so it can stay more on its own. Plus, these fibers allow the candle wick to provide a hotter burn. This wick can be used perfectly for any and all candle waxes. Plus, this wick is another great one to try for anyone looking for the best wick for soy wax!

Types of Candle Wicks: Guide for Hemp Candle Wicks
  • 838 Hemp candle wicks- use for votives and small candles- 1.5 to 2 inch diameter.
  • 1400 Hemp candle wicks- use for large candles- 2.5 to 3 inch diameter.
  • 60048 Hemp candle wicks- use with extra large candles- 3.5 to 4 inch diameter.

Types of Candle Wicks: HTP Candle WicksTypes of Candle Wicks: HTP Candle Wicks

Also, you can try out the HTP Candle Wicks – 100 Count. These wicks are mad from a blend of paper fibers and cotton fibers that create a flat, braided design. This design provides the wick with a hotter and cleaner burn that you are sure to enjoy! Plus, this wick’s cleaner burn is able to reduce any issues with either smoking or mushrooming. Although these wicks can be used effectively in any kind of candle wax, we would recommend these wicks for your Gel Wax or Soy Wax. HTP wick’s performance for these two types of wax is phenomenal!

Types of Candle Wicks: Guide for HTP Candle Wicks
  • HTP-31 candle wick (2.5 inch) (20mm tab, 3mm neck)- Use for votives or small containers with a diameter of approximately 1.5 inches.
  • HTP-52 candle wick (4 inch)(20mm tab, 3mm neck) – Use for containers with a diameter of approximately 2.5 inches.
  • HTP-73 candle wicks (6 inch)(20mm tab, 3mm neck) – Use for medium sized containers with a diameter of approximately 3 inches.
  • HTP-83 candle wicks (7 inch)(20mm tab, 3mm neck) – Use for medium sized containers with a diameter of approximately 3.5 inches.
  • HTP-104 candle wicks (7 inch) (20mm tab, 6mm neck)- Use for large containers with a diameter of approximately 4 inches.
  • HTP-1212 candle wicks (7 inch) (20mm tab, 6mm neck)-Use for extra large containers with a diameter of approximately 4.5 inches.

Types of Candle Wicks: Zinc Core Candle WicksTypes of Candle Wicks: Zinc Core Candle Wicks

Lastly, we have the Zinc Core Candle Wicks- 100 wicks. These wicks are the most popular for creating homemade candles. These wicks have a cotton fiber braid surrounded by a zinc core.  Also, these wicks can be used in all applications.This style of wick is great for creating container candles as the zinc core allows the wick to stand up. While you can use these wicks in vegetable waxes, you will need to go up a size on your wick. Instead of using the normal size wick for your container, just get a size bigger as these wicks don’t burn as hot as other candle wicks.

Types of Candle Wicks: Guide For Zinc Core Candle Wicks
  • 1 3/4 inch zinc core candle wick (44-20-18z)- great for tealights, and small containers with a diameter of about 1 inch.
  • 2 1/2 inch zinc core candle wick (44-28-18z)- great for votives, and containers with a diameter of about 2 inches.
  • 7 inch zinc core candle wick (44-24-18z)- great for candles with diameter of 2-2.5 inch diameter.
  • 7 inch zinc core candle wick (51-32-18z)- great for candles with a diameter of about 2.5 to 3 inches.
  • 6 inch zinc core candle wick (44-28-18z)- great for candles with a diameter of about 2-2.75 inches. Also, a nice wick for cylinder candles.
  • 7 inch Extra Large zinc Core candle wick (62-52-18z)- great for candles with a diameter of 3 inches to 4 inches.
  • 3 inch self centering zinc core candle wick (44-24-18z)- great for votives and candles with the diameter of 2-2.5 inches. These wicks self center themselves due to their 33 mm wick tabs.

Types of Candle Wicks: Spooled Candle WickingTypes of Candle Wicks: Spooled Candle Wicking

Another fun option to consider when choosing your wicks is the Spooled Candle Wicking- 8 oz. Roll. You can get about 400 feet of this spooled candle wick in either the 44-24-18 zinc core candle wicking or the 34-30 cotton wicking. According to our own candle testing, both of these types of wicks will be able to handle a diameter of between 2 inches and 3 inches. So, this wicking could be beneficial for making pillar candles, as they are taller than most of our other wicks. Further, you can cut each wick to the exact size. This means you will have less wasted wicking due to trimming.

Types of Candle Wicks: Candle Wick TabsTypes of Candle Wicks: Candle Wick Tabs

Additionally, you may want to get Candle Wick Tabs – 1/2 Pound to go along with your spool of wicking. These tabs come in a few different sizes that vary in width and neck height. The width of the tab gives your wick a base to hold the wick in place. There are 15mm, which are great for tea lights, and 20mm, which are most popular for candle making. The neck size controls how far down the wick will burn and protects the bottom of the container from getting too hot, without this the candle glass could over heat and break. This comes in either the 3mm, which is most common for candle making, or the 6mm, which is good for gel wax candles. Unless you are making tea lights or using gel wax, you will likely want to use the 20mm standard 3mm neck tabs.

Types of Candle Wicks: Votive Candle Wick PinTypes of Candle Wicks: Votive Candle Wick Pin

While the Votive Candle Wick Pin isn’t necessary a wick, it can be very useful tool for wicking! If you want to create fun candles without containers, then the wick pin is a great way to keep your wick centered. While this pin was designed to create votive candles with perfectly centered wicks, this pin is great for other fun shapes, too! We have use this pin to create cupcake candles, smores candles, and so much more! This particular pin is 2 and 5/16 inches tall, so you can use it for smaller candle designs and, of course, votive candles.

Types of Candle Wicks: History of Candles

According to the National Candle Association, candles are an ancient tool that have evolved right along side mankind. Beginning as primitive candles with reeds or beeswax, early Egyptian and Roman societies used these to light their homes and perform ceremonies. Then, the candles changed over the centuries as the ingredients were improved and changed. Overtime, they went from a source of light to a method of scenting the home, as we use them today. If you are interested in how candles have changed though time, the History of Candles article has some interesting details of what was used for all kinds of different candles from the past.

Types of Candle Wicks: Give Us a ShoutTypes of Candle Wicks: Give Us a Shout

We hope that you learned something new that you can use in future candle making. If you are interested in learning more, then you can find more detailed information on either our wicking chart or Science of Candle Wicking Class. Also, you can reach out to us at Natures Garden with any other unanswered questions. An easy way to contact us is through social media. We are available on our Facebook page. Also, you can find us on Instagram and Twitter with @ngscents. We can’t wait to hear from you!

Note: We do not accept returns on our wicks, so we advise you to purchase sample packs before committing to a larger sized bag of wicks.

May
04

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe


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Keylime Pie Candle Recipe

Keylime Pie Candle RecipeThis keylime pie candle recipe was inspired by my absolute favorite dessert that not only tastes delicious but, with this free candle recipe, it smells delicious too!  As a kid, I remember my favorite place to visit was my Aunt. Not only because she is an amazing person, but her keylime pie was out of this world!  Luckily for me, she would send me home with the leftovers. She just knew how much I loved it. Since keylime pie isn’t on my diet this candle was just what I needed to get rid of that craving. Natures Garden’s keylime pie fragrance smells just like the dessert that I, and I’m sure many of you love.

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe Ingredients Available at Natures Garden

Joy Wax
Pillar of Bliss Wax
Key Lime Pie Fragrance Oil
Green Spectrum Candle Dye
Yellow Spectrum Candle Dye
Brown Spectrum Candle Dye
CD-12 Candle Wicks
Pouring Pot
Thermometer

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe Other Ingredients and Supplies You Will Need

Mini Lemon/Lime Slices Soap and Candle Mold
Pot (For Double Boiler)
Mixing Bowl
Stainless Steel Mixing Spoons
Toothpicks
Scale
16 ounce Apothecary Jar
Hot Glue Gun
Pencil

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe Prepare Your Embeds

First, we will prepare our lime embeds.  This will later use a couple of these to top our keylime candle.  Before we begin, I want to note just one thing.  We chose to prepare 10 of them, however, this recipe will only create one candle.  So, the remaining slices can be used in your wax melter or you can prepare less of the lime slices.  When melting 50 grams of wax, it will prepare 10 lime slices.

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe Prepare Your EmbedsLet’s begin by melting the Pillar of Bliss Candle Wax.  Weigh out 50 grams of Pillar of Bliss Wax.  Then use a double boiler to melt the wax.  Once you have melted the wax remove it from the heat.  Then, add 5 grams of Keylime Pie Fragrance Oil.  Mix well to incorporate the fragrance oil.  Next, use a toothpick to add a tiny bit of green liquid candle dye.  Then mix the candle colorant into the candle wax.  Then, pour the melted candle wax into the mini lemon/lime slices mold.  Allow these to setup.  Then, remove them from the mold.  You can go ahead and move on to the next step while you are waiting.

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe Prepare Your Wax Pie Crust

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe Prepare Your Wax Pie CrustNow, we will prepare the pie crust layer of the candle.  First, prepare your candle jar.  Use a hot glue gun to adhere two CD-12 candle wicks to the bottom of a 16 ounce apothecary jar.  Make sure the wicks are evenly spaced and centered.  Then, weigh out 115 grams of Joy Wax.  Again, using a double boiler, melt the Joy Wax.  Once melted, you will once again use a toothpick to add the color.  Dip your toothpick into the brown liquid candle dye.  Then, dip it into your melted wax.  Repeat this process with the yellow candle colorant.  Then, mix well to incorporate the color.  Next, add 10 grams of Keylime Pie Fragrance Oil.  Then, mix once again to incorporate the fragrance oil.  Pour the candle wax carefully into your jar.  Allow this layer to setup before moving to the next step.

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe Prepare Your Lime Colored Wax

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe Prepare Your Lime Colored Wax

First, weigh out and melt 285 grams of Joy Wax using a double boiler.  Then, add 28 grams of Natures Garden Keylime Pie Fragrance Oil.  Mix the fragrance into the candle wax.  Next, you will once again need a toothpick.  Use a toothpick to add a tiny bit of green liquid candle colorant.  Make sure you mix the green dye into the wax.  Finally, pour the lime layer right on top of the pie crust layer.  Allow this layer to setup before moving to the next step.

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe Prepare Your Whipped Topping

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe Prepare Your Whipped ToppingNow, begin preparing the whipped cream topping of the candle.  We will once again be using Joy Wax.  Weigh out and melt 228 grams of Joy Wax using your double boiler.  Next, remove the wax from the heat and add 22 grams of Keylime Pie Fragrance Oil and stir to incorporate the fragrance oil.  We will not be adding color to this portion of the candle.  Once you have added the lime scent, allow the wax to setup just a little bit.  Then, begin whipping the wax using a mixing spoon.  You want to get the wax to a whipped frosting consistency.

 

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe Prepare Your Whipped Topping

 

 

Finally, scoop the whipped wax directly on top of your lime layer.  As you are adding the wax to the top make sure you are keeping your wicks straight.  You want to create a whipped cream appearance.  Use your spoon to create peaks in the whipped candle wax

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe Finishing Touches

Keylime Pie Candle Recipe Finishing Touches

 

The last part of this candle will be the finishing touches.  First, use your mixing spoon, or a fork to add peaks in the wax.  Then, place one or two lime slices you prepared earlier on top of the whipped cream layer.  Once you have allowed the candle to cure, trim your wicks to about 1/4 inch.  Finally, it is ready to be lit.

We hope that you enjoy this keylime pie candle.  For even more fragrance fun recipe be sure to check out our recipe box.  Show us what you have made with Natures Garden’s Keylime Pie Fragrance Oil!  Tag us on Instagram @ngscents or post you picture on our Facebook Page.

Mar
10

Easter Basket Candles Recipe


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Easter Basket Candles Recipe

Easter Basket Candles RecipeThe Easter Basket Candles Recipe is a super cute layered candle creation by Natures Garden. Not only does this recipe walk you through some easy steps to create this recipe, but the layered effect of this candle is only the beginning. This adorable recipe has a topping that resembles Easter Eggs hidden in some bright green grass. If this recipe doesn’t perfect for the spring season, then I don’t know what would be. Creating these two candles would be a great gift idea for a family member or friend this Easter, or even as decoration in your own home. Either way, these cute creations are sure to get some positive attention. So, try out this super cute recipe and have yourself a happy Easter!

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Ingredients Needed From Natures Garden

Joy Wax

Pillar of Bliss Wax

Carrot Cake Fragrance Oil

Embed Mold Easter Eggs

CD Candle Wicks (100 wicks)

Green- Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye

Red- Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye

Yellow- Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye

Blue- Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye

Purple-Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye 

Pouring Pot

Thermometer

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Other Ingredients and Equipment

Mixing Spoon

Stove

Scale

Pot (for double boiler)

Apothecary Jars (2)

Toothpicks

Cheese Grater

Paper Bowl

Hot Glue Gun

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Weights and Amounts

1150 grams of Joy Wax

120 grams of Pillar of Bliss Wax

127 grams of Carrot Cake Fragrance Oil

A Small Amount of Red- Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye

5 Drops of Green- Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye

A Small Amount of Yellow- Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye

Small Amount of Blue- Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye

A Small Amount of Purple-Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye

4 of the CD Candle Wicks (100 wicks)

Easter Basket Candles Recipe EggsEaster Basket Candles Recipe Preparing the Easter Egg Embeds

First, we are going to get the egg embeds ready. You will end up making twenty little Easter Eggs in each color, which may be too many. So, you can use any possible extras as wax tart melts to avoid waste. Once these are done you can set them aside to use in a later step.

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Creating the Yellow Easter Egg Embeds

Now, you are going to create your first batch of Egg Embeds. Use a double boiler to melt 30 grams of your Pillar of Bliss Wax. Afterwards, use a toothpick to add in a tiny bit of Yellow Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye and mix in the color. To add the yellow dye, dip the toothpick in the candle colorant then dip it in the melted candle wax.  Next, add and incorporate 3 grams of the Carrot Cake Fragrance Oil. Finally, pour the wax into your  Easter egg embed mold. Once they set up, remove them and set them aside for later use.

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Creating the Pink Easter Egg Embeds

Now, melt more wax to create the second batch of eggs. Put 30 grams of the Pillar of Bliss Wax into the double boiler. Then, once again, use a toothpick to add in a tiny bit of the Red Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye and 3 grams of the Carrot Cake Fragrance. Mix these ingredients into the batch and pour into the embed mold. Later, pop out your eggs and put them with your yellow Easter eggs.

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Finished EggsEaster Basket Candles Recipe Creating the Blue Easter Egg Embeds

Next, create the blue egg embeds for the top your candle. Use the double boiler to melt 30 grams of the Pillar of Bliss Wax. Add color to the wax with Blue Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye and a toothpick. Scent your wax with 3 grams of the Carrot Cake Fragrance Oil. Mix well and pour into the Easter Egg Embed Mold. Then, remove your eggs and place them with the others.

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Creating the Purple Easter Egg Embeds

Finally, make the purple eggs to decorate the candle near the end of this process. Melt 30 grams of the Pillar of Bliss Wax in the double boiler. Scent the wax with 3 grams of the Carrot Cake Fragrance Oil and color the wax with Purple Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye using a toothpick. Now, wait for the eggs to set up, remove them, and place them with all the other finished eggs.

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Preparing the Easter Basket Grass

Second, we are going to create the green grass on top of the candle. We will create a solid chunk of green wax. Then, we will grate the wax into small pieces. These pieces will be sprinkled on top of your candles after all the layers are created. Thus, it will appear as though your candle has little Easter Eggs hidden in the green grass.

EEaster Basket Candles Recipe Green Waxaster Basket Candles Recipe Preparing the Green Wax

Now, we are going to prepare the wax that will be used as green grass. So, weigh and melt 200 grams of the Joy Wax. Then, add five drops of Green Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye. Also, add 20 grams of Carrot Cake Fragrance Oil. Mix this mixture well to evenly disperse the color and scent. Next, pour your wax from before into a paper bowl.

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Shred Easter Basket Candles Recipe Shredding the Green Wax

Next, we will shred the wax to make it possible to sprinkle on the candles. Once it sets up, remove the solid chunk of green wax for your paper bowl. Then, use a cheese grater to shred the wax into a medium sized bowl. Set the finished grass aside for later use. You will have enough grass to top both of the candles we are making today.

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Creating the Candle Layers

Thirdly, you are going to create the actual candle part of this recipe. We will use four colored layers and three white layers to entirely fill the jar. When adding colorant, we use a dip a toothpick in the candle dye then into the melted wax.  We did this for each colored layer.  This prevented too much dye from being added.  It ensures a nice pastel candle color.  Also,make sure that each layer is fully set up before you proceed to the next layer. Further, we suggest that you work slowly and pour the wax into the center of the jar when you add a new layer.  Pouring in this manner will help you keep the layers level and even.  Also, make sure your jar will not be disturbed as each layer sets up.

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Adhering the Wicks

First, you will need to adhere two wicks to the bottom of each of your jars. You can use hot glue to make sure that they each stay in place as you pour your layers. Otherwise, they may move during the process. This movement could result in the candle not being able to burn properly or the wicks being off center. Either way, you’ll want to prevent this.

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Blue and WhiteEaster Basket Candles Recipe Creating the Blue and White Layers

Next, you will be creating the first two layers for this candle. Take 200 grams of Joy Wax and melt it in the double boiler. Then, use a toothpick to add in a tiny bit of the Blue Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye and 20 grams of the Carrot Cake Fragrance Oil. Now, add 100 grams of the blue wax to each of the candle jars. It may help to weigh this into another bowl before pouring.

After, make sure that this layer is completely set up. Then, your can begin the white layer. Weigh and melt 50 grams of the Joy Wax. Add 5 grams of the fragrance oil and mix well. Now, pour 25 grams of the wax into each of the candles.

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Purple and WhiteEaster Basket Candles Recipe Creating the Purple and White Layers

Now, you will be creating the next two candle layers. Weigh and melt 200 grams of the Joy Wax in a double boiler. Then, add a tiny bit of the Purple Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye and 20 grams of the fragrance oil. After the white layer is entirely set up, pour 100 grams of the purple wax to each jar to create the next layer.

Later, you will be adding the second white layer. After the purple layer is completely set up, begin by melting 50 grams of the Joy Wax in the double boiler. Then, add 5 grams of the Carrot Cake Fragrance Oil. Finally, pour 25 grams of the wax into each of the candles.

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Creating the Yellow and White LayersEaster Basket Candles Recipe Creating the Yellow and White Layers

Next, create the yellow and another white layer for the candle. So, weigh and melt 200 grams of Joy Wax in a the double boiler. Later, add a tiny bit of the Yellow Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye along with 20 grams of the fragrance oil. Mix well and wait for the previous layer to fully set up. Then, add 100 grams of the yellow wax to each of the candles.

Then, you are going to make the final white layer. After the yellow layer is entirely set up, get 50 grams of Joy Candle Wax melting in the double boiler. Next, add 5 grams of Carrot Cake Fragrance and mix well. Pour 25 grams of the wax into each of the candles.

Easter Basket Candles Recipe Pink LayerEaster Basket Candles Recipe Creating the Pink Layer

Finally, you are going to create the final layer for this candle. Take 200 grams of the Joy Wax and melt it in the double boiler. Then, add a tiny bit of the Pink Spectrum Liquid Candle Dye and 20 grams of the Carrot Cake Fragrance Oil. After you mix this well, check that the previous layer is set up. Then, pour your the final layer of the candles.

Easter Basket Candles Recipe DoneEaster Basket Candles Recipe Adding the Eggs and Grass

Lastly, you are going to top your candle to look like eggs hidden in the grass. So, take the green wax that you have already shred. Sprinkle a generous amount into each of your candles. Next, take the eggs that you created in a the first steps. Choose the colors you’d like in any combination or amount to tuck into the bits of green wax.

Now, your candle is finished and ready for you to use!