Tag Archives: candle dyes

Jul
26

Yacht Club Fragrance Oil


This entry was posted in candle fragrance oils, candle making supplies, cold process soap, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, Soap making supplies, Uncategorized, wholesale fragrance oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Yacht Club Fragrance OilYacht Club Fragrance Oil – Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Yacht Club Fragrance Oil is a fresh ocean scent by Natures Garden. This delightful aroma is a blend of fresh rain and salty ocean fragrances with sweet notes of delicious fruits that create a perfect fragrance oil for customers that enjoy fresh and crisp ocean water scents. This high scale aroma is a perfect fragrance for all sea lovers from the yacht club to the lone dinghy.

What Does Yacht Club Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

Want to go yacht sailing on the ocean on a mid summer morning?   This fragrance oil by Natures Garden is reminiscent of upscale living with salty marine notes and fresh rain, with just a hint of fresh strawberry and kiwi to provide this scent with a well-rounded presentation. An NG Original Fragrance!

How Do Our Customers Use Yacht Club Fragrance Oil in Bath and Body Products?

First, homemade bath and body supplies can successfully include this crisp ocean fragrance oil. Bath oils, bath gels, various handmade soaps, homemade fizzies, lotions, perfumes, and other sorts of related handmade creations can include up to 5% of this water fragrance oil. Our customer enjoy using this masculine scents in these types of products.  Many have had a hard time keeping products using this manly fragrance in stock. This wholesale fragrance oil can even be put to use in homemade body kits or soap making kits.

Moreover, diy homemade soap can be created well with this fragrance oil. This is demonstrated by our Cold Process Soap Testing Results. Soap batches that include this fragrance oil will have no ricing and no separation. However, there has been slight acceleration found. You can attempt to reduce this by soaping at room temperature. The bars will discolor to a light lavender hue and the aroma will remain very strong in the soaps after the curing process. Bath and body makers that use this scent can follow our suggestion of using either six drops of of blue liquid candle dye or a small amount of shredded blue color block. Candle dyes should not be used to color products that are meant to be used on the skin or in baths.

How Do Our Customers Use Yacht Club Fragrance Oil in Room Scenting Products?

Next, customers can create their own room scent diy with this ocean water fragrance oil. Room scenting products like diy potpourri recipes and homemade incense sticks can include up to 50% of this fragrance oil. A homemade all purpose cleaner recipe can be scented by adding no more than 5% of this scent. Also, aroma bead supplies can include this fragrance oil wonderfully.

Lastly, you can use some of the strongest candles with this fragrance oil. Any candle creations made of either vegetable or paraffin waxes can use a maximum of 10% for this fragrance. Wow wax and joy wax will both use this fragrance oil perfectly. Soy wax for candle making will be great for this scent. Finally, if you want to create colored wax creations, then we would suggest using some blue liquid soap dye in the amounts that you enjoy. If you choose to color these products differently from our recommendation, then we would suggest that you avoid using any crayons as a coloring substitute as they clog wicks.

 

Dec
23

How to Color Candles


This entry was posted in candle dye, candle making, candle making supplies, candle supplies, candles, color blocks, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

how to color candlesHow to Color Candles

Hi everyone! Are you just starting out making your own candles? Wondering how to color candles? Here at Nature’s Garden, we actually have many wonderful products that are used specifically for the candle coloring process. We offer only the best candle coloring products out there, with each item having its own vibrant personality! We offer so many different dye products, each having their own different specifications when used in your candles. We have liquid candle dye options as well as color block dye. We even have mica dust that you can sprinkle on the outside of you pillar candles to give them the effect of sparkling!

For liquid candle dyes, we offer various Spectrum Liquid Candle Dyes ranging in color. The colors of liquid dyes we offer here at Nature’s Garden are brown, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, black, burgundy, purple, and teal. (However, when using these liquid dyes, please just note that they are very concentrated!) To use the liquid dyes, just put a few drops of the liquid into your melted wax.  If you are in the mood for more of a pastel color (or if you are doing a very small batch) for your candle, all you have to do to the dye is dilute it using vegetable oil with the ratio of 1:1. Be careful with the amount of dye you use as well. When you use liquid dye, it allows you to create more consistent coloring in your candles since you count how any drops are put in. But be careful not use more than 10 drops per pound of wax, or else your candles may have a chemical smell to them.

For our color block dyes, the colors we offer are red, burgundy, yellow, blue, green, purple, brown, cinnamon, teal, cranberry, and a coral/peach. To use a color block to color your candle, simply shave off the desired amount and place it into your melted wax.  One color block is actually enough to easily deeply dye 15 pounds of wax. When using color blocks, they actually do not produce colors as vibrant as the liquid dyes, so they are better when trying to attain more subtle colors. However, when using color blocks, make sure that the block is fully incorporated before pouring your candle! They can tend to produce little specks of colors on the bottoms of your candles if they are not fully melted and mixed into the wax.

Want to give your pillar some sparkle to bling it up a little bit? Use some of our Gold Pigment Mica or our Diamond Dust Mica to dust the outside of your pillars! This will give your pillars a beautiful shimmer! Have you ever thoughts of using crayons to color your candles? Well, please don’t! Using crayons for coloring can actually cause the candle to start smoking and may even clog your wicks! Crayons are not alone in this predicament. When dying your candles, be sure not to use too much color as this can cause the wick to become clogged and it may cause your candle to smoke more than it should be. It can even inhibit the throw of your chosen scent and reduce the melt pool of the candle. Candle dyes are not for cosmetic use either! Check out all of our free recipes and classes, we offer many free candle recipes, and even a Candle Coloring Class that tells all about our candle coloring products! If you click on candle supplies then candle colorants on our website, that will show you all of the candle colorants we offer. Our Candle Coloring class even tells how to mix your own colors to achieve the colors you want. Enjoy these wonderful products and watch out for more Enlightened by Layla!

 

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Jun
27

Can You Use Crayons to Color Candles


This entry was posted in candle making, candle making supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, candles, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, pigments and tagged , , , , , , , , , , on by .
fragrance oils

In order for your candles to achieve the most vibrant colors or pleasing pastels possible, a candle dye or candle colorant must be used. Using other forms of colorant may result in an nonfunctional candle.

Can you use crayons to color candles?

Although, staring at a beautiful stack of wonderfully vibrant crayons, we can understand why there would be an urge to use crayons as a colorant for candles.  I mean, let’s look at what a crayon is…a stick of colored wax, right?  Logically, they should work.  However, this is absolutely not the case.

You should never use crayons to color your candles.  The reasoning behind this is the actual colorant of the crayon.  These colors are achieved with the use of pigments, and pigments unfortunately are not soluble.  What this means is that when a crayon is melted, the color of the crayon breaks down into small pigment particles that exist in a dispersed manner among the melted wax.  These pigments appear as if they had changed the color of the wax; like candle dyes do because dyes dissolve into the candle wax, but remember the pigments are simply dispersed.

Now, due to the way that a wick works in candles, there must be a melt pool apparent to keep a candle flame going.  As the wick continues to burn, the melted wax from the wet pool is pulled through the wick.  This is how the fragrance (or hot scent throw) of the candle is released into the air.  The problem that coloring with crayons in candles presents is that since the pigments and the wax never combine, the pigments are also pulled up through the wick.  But, these pigments will not, unlike the melted wax, flow properly through the wick.  These pigments will in fact clog your wick.

The results of a clogged wick prevent your candles from burning properly, inhibit your candles hot scent throw, and will even cause your candles to smoke.

So, in summary no matter how tempting that box of 64 crayons look, never use crayons to color your candles. You will want to stick with dyes specifically formulated for candle making;  Natures Garden offers liquid candle dyes and color block dyes in an array of vibrant colors.