Category Archives: soap recipes


Salt Water Taffy Soap Recipe

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Salt Water Taffy Soap RecipeSalt Water Taffy Soap Recipe

Salt Water Taffy Soap Recipe is sure to take you back to your childhood.  Not only does it have a great candy scent, but it also shows you an adorable way to package soap.  We took these fun soaps to a couple soap gatherings over the past couple months and they were a huge hit!  We had many soap makers ask how exactly we made these.  So by popular request here are the instructions for this unique salt water taffy fragranced soap.

Things you will need:

Diamond Clear Melt and Pour Soap

FUN Soap Colorant- Neon Blue

FUN Soap Colorant- Neon Orange

FUN Soap Colorant- Neon Pink

FUN Soap Colorant- Neon Green

Salt Water Taffy Fragrance Oil

Silicone Soap Mold- 4 Loaf Mold

8 oz. Clear PET Bullet Bottle

White Fine Mist Sprayer 24/410

4 Microwave Safe Containers


Mixing Spoons

Cutting Board


Rubbing Alcohol

Parchment Paper

Twist Ties

Total Amounts for Blue Soap:

219 grams Diamond Clear Melt and Pour Soap

10 grams Salt Water Taffy Fragrance Oil

3 drops FUN Soap Colorant- Neon Blue

Total Amounts for Orange Soap:

219 grams Diamond Clear Melt and Pour Soap

10 grams Salt Water Taffy Fragrance Oil

4 drops FUN Soap Colorant- Neon Orange

Total Amounts for Pink Soap:

219 grams Diamond Clear Melt and Pour Soap

10 grams Salt Water Taffy Fragrance Oil

2 drops FUN Soap Colorant- Neon Pink

Total Amounts for Green Soap:

219 grams Diamond Clear Melt and Pour Soap

10 grams Salt Water Taffy Fragrance Oil

3 drops FUN Soap Colorant- Neon Green



Begin with four heat safe bowls.  Place 219 grams of Diamond Clear Melt and Pour Soap in each bowl.  Use a microwave to melt the soap.  We recommend melting the soap base 30 seconds at a time until it is completely melted.



Salt-Water-Taffy-Soap-RecipeOnce it is melted, add 10 grams of Natures Garden’s Salt Water Taffy Fragrance Oil to each bowl.  Stir well to fully incorporate the fragrance oil.

In the first bowl, add three drops of the neon blue soap colorant.  To the second bowl, add two drops of the neon pink colorant.  The third bowl will need four drops of the neon orange colorant.  In last bowl, place three drops of the neon green soap colorant.  Stir each bowl well to incorporate the colors.



Once the color is mixed,  pour your soap.  Pour each color into its own cavity of the mold.  Once the soap has setup, you can go ahead and remove the melt and pour soap from the mold.  Cut it into three equal sections.

Lastly, it is time to wrap your soap.  Using scissors, cut strips of parchment paper.  They need to be 6 inches long and 7 inches wide.  Wrap the soap with the parchment paper and use a twist ties to close the sides.  It will look similar to wrapped piece of salt water taffy.

This recipe is not only simple and fun to make, it also gives you an easy, inexpensive, and creative way to package your soap.  It’s the perfect craft to do with your kids as well!  We hope that you  have as much fun making this recipe as we did!  For even more fragrance fun visit all of our free craft recipes!   Keep watching for even more creative soap and candle making ideas.


Tiger Stripe Soap Recipe

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tiger stripe soap recipeTiger Stripe Soap Recipe

What inspires you? Well, here at Nature’s Garden, we are inspired by pretty much everything, but lately we’ve been on a serious animal print kick! We found this amazing picture of this gorgeous tiger and couldn’t wait to get started on making a tiger stripe soap recipe! And we of course have used our Animalistic Instinct Fragrance, I mean how could we not? It’s absolutely perfect!

tiger stripe soap recipe




Our wonderful inspiration!




animalistic instinct fragrance oil




Make sure to try out our amazing Animalistic Instinct scent!





272 grams of Olive Oil

272 grams of Shea Butter

181 grams of Palm Oil

181 grams of Coconut Oil

70 grams of Animalistic Instinct Fragrance Oil

15 grams of Titanium Dioxide

7 grams of Neon Orange FUN Soap Colorant

5 grams of Black Oxide FUN Soap Colorant

125 grams of Lye

345 grams of Distilled Water

Other Ingredients Needed:

Square Loaf Mold Market Mold


Safety Mask

Safety Glasses

Safety Gloves

Stick Blender




Mixing Bowls



animalistic instinct soap


Always make sure to protect yourself first with your gloves, glasses, and mask! Then you can prepare your lye water. Weigh 345 grams of distilled water, and 125 grams of lye. Carefully pour your lye into your water. Never pour water into lye! This can cause an explosion! Thoroughly mix your lye water and then set it aside to cool down.


animalistic instinct soap



Next, you can get your butters and oils ready. Weigh out 272 grams of Shea Butter, 272 grams of Olive Oil, 181 grams of Palm Oil, and 181 grams of Coconut Oil 76. Melt these down completely and then set them aside to cool as well.


animalistic instinct soap


While you are waiting for both of these to cool, you can get your colors ready. In separate bowls, add 5 grams of Black Oxide colorant, and 7 grams of Neon Orange. Then in another bowl, measure out 15 grams of Titanium Dioxide, mixing this thoroughly with just a little bit of your oils from your base bowl until you have achieved a paste-like consistency.


animalistic instinct soap


Make sure to keep checking your oils and lye water temperatures using your thermometer, until they have reached about 72 degrees Fahrenheit (room temperature) and are within ten degrees of each other. Then carefully pour your lye water into your butters and oils, mixing it together very thoroughly with a stick blender until you have come to a light trace.


animalistic instinct soap



When your mixture is at a light trace, pour 400 grams into the bowl with black colorant, 500 into the orange, and 500 in a separate bowl, adding your titanium paste to this last bowl. Then thoroughly mix each color. Make sure to add 20 grams of your Animalistic Instinct fragrance to your black bowl, and 25 grams to the orange and white. Again, make sure to mix them thoroughly!




Once your colors are completely mixed, you can begin to pour them into your mold. We started with our orange, carefully pouring just a little bit in a straight line all the way across the mold.







Then we alternated all three colors until the mold was almost full, leaving just a little bit of each color in our bowls.

animalistic instinct soap





With the remaining colors, we splattered it over the top of the soap into gorgeous designs! Splatter the rest of your soap however your heart desires!



Once you have finished your soap, it will need to sit to set up for at least 24 hours before removing it from the mold. Once it is removed, your new Tiger Stripe Soap will need to sit for at least 4 to 6 weeks to give it enough time to cure and become less alkaline. After that, your soap will be ready for you to use and enjoy! Check out all the rest of our free recipes and classes and watch out for more Enlightened by Layla!



Spearmint Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, free recipe, Natures Garden, soap, Soap making supplies, soap recipes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

spearmint soapSpearmint Soap

Doesn’t the scent of spearmint just completely delight you? I know it’s an aroma that can instantly lift my spirits! This is one scent that everyone you know is sure to adore, and one that you can easily fill your home with! We’re bringing you a brand new free recipe, and it is for our beautiful new Spearmint Soap! Doesn’t this amazing combination of green, gray, and white just make you extremely happy? We have used our Shea Butter Soap Recipe for the base.


272 grams of Shea Butter

181 grams of Palm Oil

272 grams of Olive Oil

181 grams of Coconut Oil

125 grams of Lye

345 grams of Distilled Water

30 grams of Titanium Dioxide

68 grams of Spearmint Fragrance Oil

4 drops of Neon Green FUN Soap Colorant

2 drops of Black Oxide FUN Soap Colorant

Other Ingredients Needed:

Spearmint Leaves

Square Loaf Mold Market Molds

Safety Glasses

Safety Gloves

Safety Mask




Mixing Bowls


Stick Blender



spearmint soap

Always start with safety first! Make sure you are wearing your safety glasses, gloves, and mask! Once you are protected, you can prepare your lye water. Measure and weigh out 345 grams of distilled water. Then measure and weigh out 125 grams of lye, and add it to your water. Always add lye to water, never add water to lye as this can cause an explosion! Mix your lye water together thoroughly, and then set it aside to cool down.


spearmint soap


While you are waiting for your lye water to cool, you can get your oils and butters ready. Measure and weigh out 272 grams of Olive Oil, 181 grams of Palm Oil, 272 grams of Shea Butter, and 181 grams of Coconut Oil. Then completely melt these down, and set them aside to cool as well.



spearmint soapAs you’re waiting for your butters and oils and lye water to cool, you can prepare your colorants. In separate mixing bowls, add 4 drops of Neon Green colorant to one, and 2 drops of Black Oxide to another. Then measure and weigh out 8 grams of Titanium Dioxide in a bowl and pour just a little bit of your oils into it. Mix it together until it has become a paste-like consistency. This will be for your white swirl. For your white top, in a separate bowl, measure and weigh out 22 grams of Titanium Dioxide and pour a little bit of your oils, again making a paste-like consistency.

spearmint soap


Using your thermometer, keep checking the temperatures of your lye water and oils until they have reached around room temperature (72 degrees Fahrenheit) and are within ten degrees of each other. Then carefully pour your lye water into your oils, and thoroughly mix them until they have come to a light trace.


spearmint soap



After you have come to trace, pour 461 grams of your mixture into a another mixing bowl and add your Titanium Dioxide paste with 22 grams. Mix it thoroughly and then add 23 grams of Spearmint fragrance, once again thoroughly mixing. Then set this bowl aside to let it sit and set up to become your topping.


spearmint soap


Next, into the bowls with your green and black colorants, add 308 grams of your mixture to each. In a third bowl, add 308 grams of your mix and add your white paste with the 8 grams of Titanium Dioxide. Thoroughly mix these together until you have achieved an all over gray color, all over mint green, and an all over white.


spearmint soap




Add 15 grams of your Spearmint fragrance to each of these and mix them together thoroughly.



spearmint soap



Then using the in the pot swirl method in another bowl, pour each of your three colors into the bowl. pouring each into a separate section.




spearmint soap




Using a spatula, start at the edge of the bowl and drag it in a straight line all the way across.




spearmint soap




Then place the spatula right where two colors begin to mix and drag it in a full circle around the bowl.



spearmint soap



After you have swirled your soap, you can begin to pour it into your mold. If you carefully pour it from side to side using the “granny pour” method, this will help you achieve an even prettier swirl!



spearmint soap



Once your soap is completely poured, make sure your topping is set up to about the consistency of cake frosting and then pour it on top of your soap. You can peak it with your spatula.



spearmint soap




After all of your topping is on your soap, lightly sprinkle some Spearmint leaves over top!



Once your soap is finished, you will need to let it sit to set up for at least 24 hours before removing it from your mold. Once it is removed, let your soap sit for at least 4 to 6 weeks, giving it enough time to fully cure and become less alkaline. Be sure to check out all the rest of our wonderful free recipes and classes, and keep watching for more Enlightened by Layla!



Tea Tree Soap

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tea tree soapTea Tree Soap

Hey all you crafty people out there, we’re bringing you a brand new unique free soap recipe, and it is actually made with amazing tea tree essential oil! Tea Tree Soap! This wonderful soap is made with actual tea tree essential oil, and is sure to delight you and all of your friends and family!  Deborah makes this soap for her family to help dry skin during the winter months.  So she wanted me to share this recipe with all of you!  This soap has a beautiful teal and white swirl to it, which is actually achieved very easily! The swirl is brought on by using cosmetic clay. The clay actually works as a barrier between the different soap mixtures, allowing them to swirl around each other!



Hemp Oil Melt and Pour Soap

Kaolin Clay Powder

Tea Tree Australian Essential Oil

Teal FUN Soap Colorant

Basic Oval Mold Market Mold

Vegetable Glycerin

Rubbing Alcohol

Glass Mixing Bowls

Mixing Spoons



Total Weights for White Layer:

288 grams of Hemp Oil Melt and Pour Soap

7 grams of Tea Tree Australian Essential Oil

7 grams of Kaolin Clay Powder

15 grams of Vegetable Glycerin


Total Weights for Teal Layer:

288 grams of Hemp Oil Melt and Pour Soap

7 grams of Tea Tree Australian Essential Oil

10 drops of Teal FUN Soap Colorant




Start by weighing out the amounts of soap for each layer in two separate bowls. (Using glass bowls is better for insulation, it helps the soap to stay melted longer once it has been melted down.) Then go ahead and measure out the amount of Kaolin Clay Powder in a bowl. Once you have measured out your clay, add 15 grams of vegetable glycerin and mix them together thoroughly until they become a paste.

tea tree soap

Next, go ahead and begin to melt down your soap. When the soap is partially melted, pour the clay and vegetable glycerin paste into one bowl of soap. Then add 10 drops of Teal FUN Soap Colorant into the second bowl of soap. Mix each bowl and then continue to melt them. You want to do these steps when the soaps are only partially melted because once it is fully melted, it sets up very fast. The only thing you should have to do when they are completely melted is adding the tea tree oil.

tea tree soap

Once your soaps are completely melted down, add 7 grams of Tea Tree Australian Essential to one bowl and 7 grams to the second bowl. Mix thoroughly. You’ll want to work quickly at this point as the soap tends to set up very fast.

tea tree soap

Using your Basic Oval Mold Market Mold, quickly but carefully pour each bowl into the mold at the same time so as to achieve your swirl effect. You will have some soap left over after you have filled the mold. This is so that you will have enough time to fill the molds because the soap sets up very fast.

tea tree soap

Let your soaps sit until they have completely set up and hardened and then your Tea Tree Soap is ready to use! This is definitely one recipe you just can’t pass up, check out our free Tea Tree Class for all of the wonderful benefits tea tree oil can bring to your skin! Make sure to check out all the rest of our free recipes and classes as well! Enjoy this fantastic soap and keep watching for more Enlightened by Layla!

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Uses for Sage

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath bombs, free recipe, Natures Garden, sage, soap recipes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

uses for sageUses for Sage

Hello everyone! Are you into crafting or making new projects? Are you just looking for something new to try or maybe a new product to intrigue your customers with? Have you ever used sage in any of your products? If you haven’t, you need to get on that! Sage is such an awesome product, and there are so many different species and uses for sage! Sage can be used for so many different products and industries like soaping, bath and body products, skin care, hair, cosmetics, medicinal purposes, and even foods and beverages! White sage was even used by the Native Americans for smudging ceremonies to cleanse people of negative energies, relax the body and clear the mind!

There are so many different uses for sage. It can be used in many different bath and body products such as lotions, creams, ointments, eye pillows, bath bombs, scrubs, bath teas, facial masks, incense, and shampoos and conditioners. When used in these products, it bring many skin care benefits like making the skin look lighter and younger, treating cold sores, stimulating new cell growth, improving blood circulation, reducing redness and treating signs of aging. It is also great for hair care because it stops hair loss, stops premature graying, and it bring better blood flow to the scalp. When used for soaping, sage relieves itchy skin and works as an astringent. Sage is also a natural disinfectant and deodorizer. It helps to eliminate body odor and dry up perspiration. It also helps to reduce overproduction of saliva.

When used for all of its medicinal purposes, the many species of sage have many different benefits. Lyreleaf sage for example is used to treat colds, coughs, and diarrhea while scarlet sage is used to treat diabetes. Hummingbird sage is used as a sedative and baby sage can treat fevers. Pineapple sage has been used as an antidepressant, has anti anxiety properties, and helps to lower blood pressure. Common sage, or otherwise known as kitchen sage is great for women. It helps to treat the pain caused by menstrual cramps, regulate blood flow, and reduce menopausal hot flashes. However pregnant women should avoid it as it stimulates the muscles of the uterus and could cause a miscarriage.

There are even uses for sage for culinary purposes! Sage tea is great for relieving the itching caused by poison ivy and sage is also used in pork casserole, Derby cheese, and Lincolnshire sausages! Are you wondering how to get this awesome product? Well just type “sage” into the search bar on our site and it will show you many different options including our Sage Smudge Incense Wand, our Cut and Sifted Sage Leaves, and our Whole Leaves of White Sage. It will also show you some of our great free recipes like our Lavender Sage Bath Bombs or our Blackberry Sage Soap recipe! Make sure to try out all of these amazing products! Did you know you can even freeze sage and use it in ice cubes? How much more amazing can this product get? Make sure to try it as soon as you can! Please don’t hesitate to contact us with any thoughts or questions you may have, and make sure to watch out for more Enlightened by Layla!

sage results page

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Jersey Soap Recipe

This entry was posted in cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, homemade soap, how to make cold process soap, make your own soap, soap ingredients, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies, soap recipes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

jersey soap recipe


This manly themed Jersey Soap Recipe is easy and fun to make if you have soaped before.  Perfect for a Fathers Day gift or a gift for your favorite sports fan; using a combination of both cold processed and hot processed soap, you will be able to create a manly scented soap that looks very similar to a sports jersey.  In creating this masterpiece, feel free to swap out the colors to select ones that batter fit the theme of the end product you are looking for.

Please Note:  To complete this homemade project, it will take two days to create.  Day one will be the cold process soap steps.  Then, you will have to wait 24 hours before unmolding this soap.  Once that time has elapsed, the second day will involve the hot process soap steps.  Then, of course there is cure time involved due to the fact that there is cold process soap in your end product.  But, you will have nice and firm bars when finished.

The majority of the ingredients and some of the supplies used in this recipe can be purchased at Natures Garden.

Here are the ingredients that you will need to make the cold process portion of this recipe:
For the lye solution:
65 grams Water
24 grams Lye
For your soaping ingredients:
60 grams Shea Butter
50 grams Coconut Oil 76
33 grams Apricot Kernel Oil
21 grams Grapeseed Oil
9 grams Castor Oil
6 grams Sodium Lactate
11 grams Game On Fragrance Oil
2 grams Titanium Dioxide

As for the mold, you will need to have the Mold Market Square Loaf mold.  This mold is also available at Natures Garden.

Once you have everything and you are ready to start soaping, here are the steps, complete with pictures to show you how it is done:

make your lye solution

Put on your safety gear, and prep your area. Then, make your lye solution.

melting down your soaping ingredients

Now, melt and combine your Apricot Kernel Oil, Grapeseed Oil, Shea Butter, Coconut Oil 76, and Castor Oil.

adding sodium lactate

Once the lye solution has cooled add the sodium lactate and stir.

titanium dioxide paste

Next, remove 8 grams of the melted soaping ingredients, and place it into a separate mixing bowl.  Then, add your titanium dioxide to this and stir in to make a paste.   Set aside.

emulsify soap batter

When ready, combine the lye solution and soaping ingredients together. Stick blend to emulsify.

scenting and coloring the batter

Next, add titanium dioxide paste and stick blend to make the whole batter white in color.  Then, add the fragrance and stick blend.

pouring your soap

Once you have reached trace, pour the white soap batter into the 4 pound mold.  Please Note:  The batter will NOT fill the mold.  This is done intentionally.  Insulate.

measuring out your embed

After 24 hours:  Carefully remove the white soap from the mold.   Place it down flat and horizontally in front of you. Then, using a ruler, measure out 2 inches in height and mark it.

the number in your jersey soap
Now, using a knife, cut the soap so that you have one long bar.  This will be the number one in your jersey soap.  Then, set aside.

The cold process steps are now complete.  You are now half way there.  The next step is the Hot Process and here is the recipe (using the same ingredients with the addition soap colorant).
For the Lye solution:
420 grams Water
153 grams Lye
For your soaping ingredients:
387 grams Shea Butter
321 grams Coconut Oil 76
210 grams Apricot Kernel Oil
133 grams Grapeseed Oil
55 grams Castor Oil
35 grams Sodium Lactate
69 grams Game On Fragrance Oil
15 grams Ultramarine Blue Fun Soap Colorant

meling your ingredients for hp recipe

Set your crock pot to a low heat setting. Next, place all of your oils and butter into the crock pot. Heat and occasionally stir them until melted.

adding the sodium lactate to hp

While you are melting the soaping ingredients, make your lye solution.  Also, add the sodium lactate. Stir in to incorporate.

combining the soap ingredients

Once all of the soaping ingredients are melted, slowly pour the lye mixture into the crock pot.

coloring the hp soap

Next, in short bursts, stick blend directly in the crock pot. Once you have the batter at light trace, add the ultramarine blue soap colorant. Then, stick blend to incorporate throughout the whole batter.

hp soap pudding like state
Now, keep blending in short bursts with your stick blender until the batter reaches a pudding like state.  Remember to periodically stir the soap in between with your spatula.  Once the batter has reached this state, lid the crock pot.

hp soap with waxy appearance
Allow the soap mixture to cook, and periodically stir it. Doing this will prevent the soap from scorching.  As the soap cooks, the soap will start to dry out and take on a waxy appearance.

hp soap that has consistency of mashed potatoes
Remember to stir occasionally, but allow the soap to cook for about 2 hours.  You will know that your soap has cooked long enough once it has the consistency of mashed potatoes.

adding the scent and stirring it in
Next, quickly add the Game On scent to the soap.  Then, stir well throughout the whole batter.

about one inch of soap in the mold
Now, get your mold and place about one inch worth of the soap into it.  Gently tap the soap in the mold to remove any air bubbles.

placing the number 1 in the soap
Once the mold has been tapped, vertically place the white soap into the mold.  Using your fingers, gently wedge the soap into place.  Try to keep the white soap centered.  This will be the number 1 on the jersey soap.

filling in the rest of the mold

Once the number 1 has been set into the soap, begin to carefully fill in the open sides with soap.  As you are doing this, remember to gently tap the soap mold to remove any trapped air.  Please Note:  Due to the tapping  of the mold, you may have to recenter the number 1 in the soap if it becomes askew.

heap the top of the soap
Once the mold is filled, heap the top lip portion with the remaining soap.

how to get the jersey shape

Now, using your ladle, carefully run it down the center of the mold and remove the excess soap.  Place the excess soap along the sides.  This scooping manner will give your jersey soap its neck line.  Allow the soap to mold overnight.

removing the soap from the mold
The next morning, remove the soap from the mold.

cut your jersey soap

Finally, cut the soap into bar sized slices. Allow the soap to cure further (because of the cold process soap) before use.

That is it!  You have just accomplished the jersey soap recipe.  Enjoy your new soap!



Making Your Own Soap Recipe

This entry was posted in cold process soap, make your own soap, soap making recipes, soap recipes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Making Your Own Soap Recipe

As a newbie, it may be difficult to figure out your soaping recipe, especially if you do not have a starting point.  Or, maybe you are a veteran that is just looking to expand your recipes, catering to new cliental with special skin needs.  Well, we at Natures Garden want to help you produce the best soap bars on the market.  Whether for personal use or for selling, let’s talk recipes!

After you have decided which method of soaping you are going to choose, the next step will be determining the purpose of your soap bars.  Soap bars have 5 distinct qualities that you are looking to have a nice range or balance in.  They are:  Hardness, Conditioning, Cleansing, Bubbly Lather, and Creamy Lather.  Additives such as fragrance (scent) and color (or appearance) of bars should also be considered when trying to determine a soap recipe.

After you have a good idea as to what type of soap bar you would like to achieve, it is time to configure a recipe.

There are various soaping calculators available on the internet; however, SoapCalc provides a FREE, comprehensive, easy to use soaping calculator.  Not only is it  known as one of the best, but this site is also improved and updated frequently.

For this post, we will be looking at how to use the SoapCalc.  Below is the link.  Feel free to go ahead and save it to your favorites:

Note:  In order for the SoapCalc to work, your computer must have JavaScript enabled.

Now, remember that it is imperative that all the correct information is given to calculate the proper saponification totals needed.

Once you are on the SoapCalc website, you will enter various items.  Starting from left and proceeding to the right, the first information needed is the type of lye.  If you are making bar soaps, you will need to ensure that the NaOH button is selected.  If you are making liquid soaps, you will need to ensure that the KOH button is selected.  Yea, the first step is done.

The next step is to calculate the weight of oils.  These will be based on the weight solely of the oils; do not include water or lye into this total.  You will have to select the button in pounds, ounces, or grams.  Our suggestion is that it is easiest to use ounces for this category.  However, regardless of which weight unit you select all 3 (pounds, ounces, and grams) will be presented on your printable recipe.  As a rule of thumb, using 16oz of soaping oils will produce about 20 oz of soap.  This however, may vary.  It is completely dependent on the types of oils used, any additional additives, and the amount of water used.  We have found that 48 ounces of soaping oils typically create 4 pounds of finished bar soap; allowing you to fill all 4 loaf molds in our 4 Loaf Silicone Mold.

For the third section of the soaping calculator, you will be entering the water.  This can be a little confusing.  If you are a beginner, it is best if you select the water as % of oils button.  This automatically fills in a default of 38%.  This number can be changed, but if you are new, this is a standard suggested by the soap calculator.  Once you have accomplished making your first few batches of soap, you may want to start to decrease this percentage little by little until about 33%.  For the advanced soaper and those with soaping experience you also have the option of entering a lye concentration percentage or an option for entering a water to lye ratio.

The next section is the super fat and fragrance.  If you recall from the earlier soap making blogs, a super fat pertains to the amount of soaping oils that is unsaponified by the lye.  This could also be considered the surplus of oils.  Since the soaping calculator provides your calculated recipe, you may want to deliberately leave a certain percentage of your soaping oils in your bars of soap.  SoapCalc automatically has a default of 5%, but this can be changed.  Some soapers choose to do this to add certain skin benefits such as creaminess or conditioning to their finished products.   However, be careful not to over super fat your soaps.  While saponified  oils in soap typically do not become rancid, the extra oils in your soap that were not saponified can overtime become rancid; producing the Dreaded Orange Spots.

As for the fragrance per pound section, it is not mandatory to enter something here.  If you do not plan on adding any fragrance to your recipe, the soap calculator will still produce your recipe.  However, if you do plan on adding a body safe fragrance oil to your soap recipe, you will want to add the weight of the fragrance oil per pound of soap.  A general starting point is .8 oz per lb, or 50 gm per kg.  Also, before using a fragrance oil in soap, make sure that the fragrance oil  was formulated for soap making, and check its IFRA maximum safe usage percentage (category #9).  At Natures Garden, we like our soap very fragrant, so if IFRA allows for it, we use 1 oz. fragrance per pound of soap in our recipes.

For the next section of the soaping calculator you will be selecting your soaping oils.  There is a list provided of common soaping oils used.  By double clicking on the specific oil that you would like or by clicking the oil once (to where it is highlighted) and then clicking on the plus sign (to the right of the list of oils), you will notice two things.  First, the oil name will appear in the next section, Section 6; as well as numbers will appear under the soap qualities and fatty acids box.  Each time you select a new oil to your recipe, the soap quality and fatty acid numbers will change.   This is a great section to review the soaping qualities of certain oils, as well as explore possibly adding some new oils to your recipe.  A quick tip:  by placing your icon over the soaping qualities listed in section 5, a green box will appear with a general range guideline.  This is for reference only.  Once you feel comfortable with your soap making skills, you may want to go above or below the ranges.

Other important information that is provided with each oil that you select is the SAP value.  This is the amount of lye that is required to saponify that specific oil.  The values will be located directly below the list of commonly used soaping oils.  The Iodine value of each soaping oil selected will also appear.  It is located directly under the 5 soaping qualities.  This number is a general gauge for the hardness of the soap bar supplied by that oil.  Always remember:  the lower the Iodine number, the harder your bars will be.

The final number that you need to acknowledge is the INS value.  This value is decided based on the Iodine value and the SAP value.  The optimal number here is 160 for your total recipe oils value.  Although it is not yet concrete, studies have been conducted to show that reaching the ideal INS of 160 in soaping recipes, improves trace, gel phase, and total saponification time.

If at any time you accidently select the wrong soaping oil, or change your mind on which oils you will be using, there are plus and minus signs to the left of the listed oils in section 6.  By simply clicking the minus sign, the soaping oil that you had selected will now be removed.

Once you have all of the soaping oils you would like included in your recipe listed in section 6, the final step in this section is to add the amounts.  You can do this in two ways.  The first is by percentage.  You do this by clicking the circle above the symbol %.  Please note the total amount of weight for your soaping oils must equal 100%.  The actual weight based on the percent of the oil that you would like to use will be calculated for you once you view your recipe, but let’s not get too far ahead.  The other possible way to enter your amounts of oils is by clicking the weight button.  This will either say lb (pound), oz (ounce), or gm (gram), depending on which weight unit you selected in section 2- weight of oils.

In the seventh section of the soaping calculator, you will click the calculate recipe button.  Once this button is selected, the soaping calculator fills in information about your total recipe.  If there is anything off with the recipe, an alert will appear on your screen.  An example of one of these messages would be if your recipe contains a high lye to water percentage.  Usually, a percentage of 40 or higher is considered not safe, but the soaping calculator will still present your recipe.  The soaping calculator will also provide you with a solution and an explanation as to why there may be issues with your recipe.

Once any problems are acknowledged or solved, it is time to take a look at what characteristics your soap recipe provides.  There are 3 categories that you will want to review:  the soap bar qualities, the percentages of fatty acid, and the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fats.

If you are a newbie:  Remember, you may want to reference your ranges for qualities on a nice balanced bar of soap, making sure you have oils that accommodate nicely among all 5 of the distinct soaping qualities.

If you are unhappy with your recipes results, modifications can be made until you are.  It is as simple as correcting the area you are not happy with and selecting the calculate recipe button until your results are where you want them to be.  When you are ready to print your recipe, simply select the View/Print Recipe button.  This button will become active after the calculate button has been selected.  The recipe will be viewed in two ways.  You will either have a new window pop up, or a new tab appear.   This will show you the recipe with amounts, plus give you some other useful information where you can reference the total soaping qualities of the recipe.

If you would like to compare several recipes against one another, you will want to click the multiple tabs button next to the view/print recipe button.  This will allow you to either have multiple screens or tabs to compare with ease before you print.

Now let’s take a quick look at the information that the printable recipe page provides.

The top portion (blue boxes) of the page provides a quick look summary of your recipes parameters.  The next section (pink boxes) references the required amount of lye and water that is necessary for your recipe.  This section’s information is provided in pounds, ounces, and grams.  The soaping oils section (green boxes) also is provided in pounds, ounces, and grams.  The soaping qualities range is provided in the next section (yellow boxes).  Your recipes total is configured right next to the range, as is the fatty acid profile of your recipe.

When you are ready to print, select the print recipe button.  There is one button in the top right corner, and there is a second print button in the bottom right corner as well.

And, that it is.  Don’t be afraid to get out there and explore with all of your new found soaping information.

Visit Natures Garden’s website for soap making supplies!

Have fun!

Fragrance & Fun for Everyone

Inspire, Create, and Dominate!

Sparkles!!! Nicole

(Corporate Manager of Natures Garden Candle Supplies)