Category Archives: soap making recipes

Oct
16

Calendula Swirl Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, Calendula soap, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

calendula swirl soapCalendula Swirl Soap

Hey all you cold process soapers out there! Are you looking for a new and exciting soap to make? Do you love to find new recipes to make? Maybe something fall like to go with the holiday season? Do you love calendula? Well here at Nature’s Garden we would like to introduce a brand new recipe for our Calendula Swirl Soap! This cold process soap is sure to be a hit for the fall season! All of your friends, family and customers will love this soap that is perfect for this time of year!

 

Ingredients:

194 grams of Lye

517 grams of distilled water

55 grams of Sodium Lactate

408 grams of Pomace Olive Oil

408 grams of Coconut Oil 76

408 grams of Palm Oil

68 grams of Castor Oil

68 grams of Grapeseed Oil

90 grams of Aromatherapy Energizing Fragrance Oil

20 grams of Titanium Dioxide

3 grams Neon Yellow FUN Soap Colorant

1 gram of Yellow Oxide FUN Soap Colorant

3 grams of Orange Oxide FUN Soap Colorant

1 Square Loaf Mold Market Mold

Mixing Bowls

Stick Blender

Calendula Petals

Safety Masks

Safety Gloves

Safety Glasses

Thermometer

 

Directions:

Always make sure to wear your safety gear when working with lye!

1. First, start with 517 grams of distilled water. Add 194 grams of lye to your water. Never add water to lye, always add the lye to water! Mix together and then set aside to let cool until it reaches about 90-100 degrees.

014

2. Combine and melt down 408 grams of Pomace Olive Oil, 408 grams of Coconut Oil 76, 408 grams of Palm Oil, 68 grams of Castor Oil and 68 grams of Grapeseed Oil. Make sure your oils are at a temperature within 5-10 degrees of your cooled lye.

018

 

3. Once your lye has cooled to the correct temperature, add 55 grams of sodium lactate to your lye water.

001

4. Once the temperatures are correct, add the lye to your oil mixture. Using a stick blender, blend it together until the solution is emulsified.

026

5. You will need 3 separate soap safe bowls for these next few steps. Pour 500 grams of the solution in one, and 500 grams in the other. Add 40 grams of your Aromatherapy Energizing Fragrance Oil and 20 grams of Titanium Dioxide Oil Dispersible to the leftover solution and mix together with the stick blender. Then pour 200 grams of the leftover solution into the third bowl.

041

043

7. In one of the bowls with 500 grams of the solution, add 1 gram of Yellow Oxide FUN Soap Colorant, 3 grams of Neon Yellow FUN Soap Colorant, and 25 grams of fragrance and mix with the stick blender.

047

8. In the second bowl with 500 grams, add 3 grams of Orange Oxide FUN Soap Colorant and 25 grams of fragrance and mix together.

048

9. Next, in a completely separate bowl, add all of the contents of the colored bowls and the contents of the 200 gram bowl, in dollops throughout the whole bowl. Then with a spatula, drag the spatula through the middle of the mixture and then back and forth around the whole bowl. Pour the mixture into your mold.

050

 

052

10. Let the bowl with the the leftover solution sit until it is about the texture of whipped cream and then pour on top of your mold and shape into whipped cream.

056

11. Last, add the calendula petals on top and allow you soap to set for about 24 hours and remove from the mold.  Now slice the soap and allow it to finish curing.  Enjoy your Calendula Swirl soap!

061

Calendula Swirl Soap is sure to be a fall season favorite! This is a soap that you should try as soon as possible to go with the autumn season. Please contact us with any questions and watch out for more Enlightened by Layla!

enlightened-by-layla (1)

Sep
22

30 Free CP Soap Recipes

This entry was posted in bath and body, cold process soap, free recipe, Natures Garden, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

cold process soap recipes30 Free CP Soap Recipes

Hello everyone! For all you cold process soapers out there, don’t you just love finding new recipes? Or maybe you’re just tired of making the same old soaps over and over. Well do I have a solution for you! Here at Nature’s Garden we offer tons of free recipes for many products! And come on, who turns down free? Here are 30 free CP soap recipes available for you!

 

 

 

1. Beginner’s Soap A great recipe if you are just starting out in your soap making!

beginners soap

2. World Peace Soap Your kids will love these tie dye colored peace signs!

world peace soap

 3. Hippies and Hemp Soap Another great tie dye recipe that everyone will love!

hippies and hemp soap 4. Soap Frosting This frosting looks good enough to eat! Yummy and delicious!

soap frosting

 5. Lemonade Soap A favorite drink for a hot day, and an awesome soap for bath time?

lemonade soap 6. Fruit Frenzy Soap For all the health fanatics out there, this soap is sure to inspire you!

fruit frenzy soap

7. Hot Fudge Brownies Soap Your sweet tooth will go nuts at the name alone!

hot fudge brownies soap

8. Oatmeal Milk Soap Oatmeal milk is a soap that is sure to relax you after a long day!

oatmeal milk and honey soap

9. Royal Honey Bee Soap You will become the queen bee in your house with this soap.

royal honey bee soap

10. Caramel Custard Soap The name alone sounds delicious enough to eat, doesn’t it?

caramel custard soap

11. Baby Shower Soap What an adorable gift for the mom-to-be, or even fun baby shower favors!

baby shower soap

12. St. Patty’s Day Soap Let yourself  go crazy with some green fever!

st pattys day soap

13. Carrot Soap A fun “treat” for your kids to leave on Easter for the Easter bunny!

carrot soap

14. Pumpkin Puree Soap A homey fun way to celebrate the fall season and the spookiest day of the year!

pumpkin puree soap

15. Beer Soap Let’s not forget about our lovable men! Beer Soap is perfect for a bachelor party or a special game!

beer soap

16. Blueberry Cheesecake Soap Doesn’t it just make your mouth water?

blueberry cheesecake soap

17. Wine Soap Another perfect soap to help unwind from a long day.

wine soap

18. Total Hot Man Soap Hot Man. Ladies, what more explanation do you need?

total hot man soap

19. Hunters Soap For all those manly hunters out there!

hunters soap

20. Blackberry Sage Soap Another relaxing addition to your home with it’s special scent.

blackberry sage soap

21. Calendula Sunshine Soap Warm and happy thoughts of sunshine will surround you!

calendula sunshine soap

22. Cleopatra Heavy Cream Soap Pyramids and ancient Egypt will invade your thoughts!

cleopatra soap

23. Energize Soap Anyone need an energy boost? Your loved ones are sure to love this boost!

energize soap

24. Argan Soap The beautiful designs of our argan soap recipe are sure to make everyone happy!

argan soap

25. Creamy Cocoa Craziness Soap Cocoa=chocolate. Just yum!

creamy cocoa craziness soap

26. Manly Soap Another one for all our manly men out there!

manly soap

27. Peppered Poppy Seed Soap These flowered shapes soaps are sure to remind you of new Spring flowers!

peppered poppy seed soap

28. Pineapple Paprika Soap One spicy unique combination that is sure to be remembered!

pineapple paprika soap

29. Sweet Wheatgrass Soap Another calming and relaxing soap to help you unwind!

sweet wheatgrass soap

30. Sweet Orange Chili Pepper Soap With such an intriguing name you just have to try it!

sweet orange chili pepper soap

You should definitely try each and every one of these! You just can’t go wrong! And make sure to watch for more Enlightened by Layla!

enlightened-by-layla (1)

Sep
17

Soap Making Made Easy

This entry was posted in bath and body, Natures Garden, soap, soap fragrance, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

soapsSoap Making Made Easy

 

        Hey you! Do you like soaps? Oh, you do? Well then you are in the right place! Let me take it a step further. Have you ever made your own soap? You haven’t?! Then what in the world are you waiting for?! I’m telling you, making your own soap will be one of the coolest things you’ve ever done. Forget about all that store bought soap. Stay with me, and I will teach you soap making made easy! Or even if you don’t want to make soap for yourself, you can learn to make it for others! It can be a great birthday gift, Christmas gift….you get the picture. The best gifts are always the ones that come from the heart and something that you actually made for your loved one is always the best.

Here at Nature’s Garden, we have everything you will need to start your soap making. On the homepage of our site, on the top left, you will see a section called Soap Supplies. If you look at all the options under Soap Supplies, we have everything from Discount Soap Supplies to Soap Making Safety Gear. If you’re new to the site and to soap making, click on any of the options to explore all of our awesome soap making products. Can I make a suggestion though? If this is your first time trying soap making, check out our Melt and Pour Soap kit! Soap Making Kits is one of the options under Soap Supplies, and it will take you directly to the Melt and Pour kit. The kit will include everything you need to get started creating your soaps! It is great for someone just starting out, not only does it come with everything you need, it also includes complete how-to instructions!

soap drop box

If you want to be more adventurous though, we also sell all of our products separately. Buying everything separately gives you the chance to explore more of our website and choose whatever fragrances you would like as well. We have over 800, so it is certain that we will have something that you will love! Also be sure to check out our fun and friendly soap recipes!

Now that you’ve chosen your products, I’m sure you’re wondering how to actually get started! That is why Nature’s Garden is so awesome, we only sell ingredients so that you can succeed at your creations or business! We offer classes on our website to teach you how to make your soaps. On the left side of our home site, you will see a section titled Free Classes and Recipes. In the Free Classes and Recipes section, you will see a Soap Making Classes option. We offer everything from The History of Soap Making to Making Your Own Soap Recipe.

free classes and recipes

Once you’ve experimented and finished your soaps, let us know how they turned out! We would love to hear from you, we love when we get feedback! Your soaping creations are sure to be a great gift for your loved ones, or awesome for yourself! It will definitely be a new treat for you to enjoy! If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us here at Nature’s Garden! We are here to help you succeed! Have fun with your soaping experience and keep watch for more Enlightened by Layla!

enlightened-by-layla (1)

 

May
06

Jersey Soap Recipe

This entry was posted in cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, homemade soap, how to make cold process soap, make your own soap, soap ingredients, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies, soap recipes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

jersey soap recipe

 

This manly themed Jersey Soap Recipe is easy and fun to make if you have soaped before.  Perfect for a Fathers Day gift or a gift for your favorite sports fan; using a combination of both cold processed and hot processed soap, you will be able to create a manly scented soap that looks very similar to a sports jersey.  In creating this masterpiece, feel free to swap out the colors to select ones that batter fit the theme of the end product you are looking for.

Please Note:  To complete this homemade project, it will take two days to create.  Day one will be the cold process soap steps.  Then, you will have to wait 24 hours before unmolding this soap.  Once that time has elapsed, the second day will involve the hot process soap steps.  Then, of course there is cure time involved due to the fact that there is cold process soap in your end product.  But, you will have nice and firm bars when finished.

The majority of the ingredients and some of the supplies used in this recipe can be purchased at Natures Garden.

Here are the ingredients that you will need to make the cold process portion of this recipe:
For the lye solution:
65 grams Water
24 grams Lye
For your soaping ingredients:
60 grams Shea Butter
50 grams Coconut Oil 76
33 grams Apricot Kernel Oil
21 grams Grapeseed Oil
9 grams Castor Oil
6 grams Sodium Lactate
11 grams Game On Fragrance Oil
2 grams Titanium Dioxide

As for the mold, you will need to have the Mold Market Square Loaf mold.  This mold is also available at Natures Garden.

Once you have everything and you are ready to start soaping, here are the steps, complete with pictures to show you how it is done:

make your lye solution

Put on your safety gear, and prep your area. Then, make your lye solution.

melting down your soaping ingredients

Now, melt and combine your Apricot Kernel Oil, Grapeseed Oil, Shea Butter, Coconut Oil 76, and Castor Oil.

adding sodium lactate

Once the lye solution has cooled add the sodium lactate and stir.

titanium dioxide paste

Next, remove 8 grams of the melted soaping ingredients, and place it into a separate mixing bowl.  Then, add your titanium dioxide to this and stir in to make a paste.   Set aside.

emulsify soap batter

When ready, combine the lye solution and soaping ingredients together. Stick blend to emulsify.

scenting and coloring the batter

Next, add titanium dioxide paste and stick blend to make the whole batter white in color.  Then, add the fragrance and stick blend.

pouring your soap

Once you have reached trace, pour the white soap batter into the 4 pound mold.  Please Note:  The batter will NOT fill the mold.  This is done intentionally.  Insulate.

measuring out your embed

After 24 hours:  Carefully remove the white soap from the mold.   Place it down flat and horizontally in front of you. Then, using a ruler, measure out 2 inches in height and mark it.

the number in your jersey soap
Now, using a knife, cut the soap so that you have one long bar.  This will be the number one in your jersey soap.  Then, set aside.

The cold process steps are now complete.  You are now half way there.  The next step is the Hot Process and here is the recipe (using the same ingredients with the addition soap colorant).
For the Lye solution:
420 grams Water
153 grams Lye
For your soaping ingredients:
387 grams Shea Butter
321 grams Coconut Oil 76
210 grams Apricot Kernel Oil
133 grams Grapeseed Oil
55 grams Castor Oil
35 grams Sodium Lactate
69 grams Game On Fragrance Oil
15 grams Ultramarine Blue Fun Soap Colorant

meling your ingredients for hp recipe

Set your crock pot to a low heat setting. Next, place all of your oils and butter into the crock pot. Heat and occasionally stir them until melted.

adding the sodium lactate to hp

While you are melting the soaping ingredients, make your lye solution.  Also, add the sodium lactate. Stir in to incorporate.

combining the soap ingredients

Once all of the soaping ingredients are melted, slowly pour the lye mixture into the crock pot.

coloring the hp soap

Next, in short bursts, stick blend directly in the crock pot. Once you have the batter at light trace, add the ultramarine blue soap colorant. Then, stick blend to incorporate throughout the whole batter.

hp soap pudding like state
Now, keep blending in short bursts with your stick blender until the batter reaches a pudding like state.  Remember to periodically stir the soap in between with your spatula.  Once the batter has reached this state, lid the crock pot.

hp soap with waxy appearance
Allow the soap mixture to cook, and periodically stir it. Doing this will prevent the soap from scorching.  As the soap cooks, the soap will start to dry out and take on a waxy appearance.

hp soap that has consistency of mashed potatoes
Remember to stir occasionally, but allow the soap to cook for about 2 hours.  You will know that your soap has cooked long enough once it has the consistency of mashed potatoes.

adding the scent and stirring it in
Next, quickly add the Game On scent to the soap.  Then, stir well throughout the whole batter.

about one inch of soap in the mold
Now, get your mold and place about one inch worth of the soap into it.  Gently tap the soap in the mold to remove any air bubbles.

placing the number 1 in the soap
Once the mold has been tapped, vertically place the white soap into the mold.  Using your fingers, gently wedge the soap into place.  Try to keep the white soap centered.  This will be the number 1 on the jersey soap.

filling in the rest of the mold

Once the number 1 has been set into the soap, begin to carefully fill in the open sides with soap.  As you are doing this, remember to gently tap the soap mold to remove any trapped air.  Please Note:  Due to the tapping  of the mold, you may have to recenter the number 1 in the soap if it becomes askew.

heap the top of the soap
Once the mold is filled, heap the top lip portion with the remaining soap.

how to get the jersey shape

Now, using your ladle, carefully run it down the center of the mold and remove the excess soap.  Place the excess soap along the sides.  This scooping manner will give your jersey soap its neck line.  Allow the soap to mold overnight.

removing the soap from the mold
The next morning, remove the soap from the mold.

cut your jersey soap

Finally, cut the soap into bar sized slices. Allow the soap to cure further (because of the cold process soap) before use.

That is it!  You have just accomplished the jersey soap recipe.  Enjoy your new soap!

 

Apr
22

Rebatching Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath and body fragrances, bath products, cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, homemade, Natures Garden, soap ingredients, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies, soap mold and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

rebatching soap Whether you view rebatching as an art, a doorway for the addition of gentle ingredients, or a second chance for your soap, this method of soap making offers opportunity.

The term rebatching for soap simply means remaking soap.  This method would be very similar to melt and pour soap in that you are melting down soap that has already gone through the saponification process.  Rebatching is more intricate than melt and pour soap though.  Rebatching involves cold processed or hot processed soap bars that are melted down for specific reasons.

A common technique used in soap making, rebatching allows many soap making handcrafters the chance to rework their soap recipes, introduce delicate scents and herbs, as well as add ingredients or colors they may have missed the opportunity to add the first time.

Since rebatched soap has already gone through the saponification process, the rebatching steps do not involve lye.  This is why rebatching allows the opportunity to add those delicate soaping ingredients; without fear.  With the rebatching method, these ingredients; which normally would not survive the saponification process, now have the chance to add wonderful benefits to your finished bars of soap.

Although time consuming, the rebatch process is fairly easy to do.  To put it briefly, the rebatching process is finely grating the soap, then heating (sometimes with the addition of a liquid like water to help prevent burning).  There are a few different ways to introduce heat to the shredded soap.  These ways would include:  double boiler, microwave, and crock pot.  But, please advise: you must monitor the soap while it is heating because you never want to scorch the soap.  This may be slightly more difficult using the microwave approach.

Now, as the soap is heated and starts to liquefy; it will have a very thick gel like density.  Once the soap hits this consistency, any additives or scents are added and stirred in.  Once the soap is stirred well, it is then scooped into a mold, left to harden, and finally cut into slices.

So, now that you have an understanding as to what the method of rebatching is, we will shortly post a blog as to the various reasons to rebatch.  This post will also cover the benefits as well as the drawbacks of rebatching your soap.

Apr
17

How to Rebatch

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, body safe fragrance oils, cold process soap, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, homemade soap, how to rebatch, Natures Garden, soap ingredients, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies, soap safety and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

rebatched soap How to Rebatch

Sometimes it is a hard pill to swallow, but when it comes to soaping, mistakes will be made, tears will fall, and you learn from your errors!

This week, we had a slight oversight.

All of our soaping ingredients were weighed out and ready for the combination and melt down.  We had the lye and water ready to make the lye mixture.  Everything else was prepped and ready to go.

We put on our safety gear and started the soap making procedure.  Everything seemed to be going flawlessly.  Our scent was perfect, the color combination was the spot on, and the soap batter poured beautifully into the mold.  It was soaping bliss.

Then, we started cleaning up.  That was when we found the sunflower oil.  It was still in its dish, waiting to be added to the soap recipe.  And, it was about 5% of our total soaping oils no less.

Devastated, it was now time to play the waiting game.  We had to wait for our beautiful soap to mold for at least 24 hours before it would be sturdy enough to remove it.

What resulted, after unmolding, was a gorgeous shade of green soap that broke into pieces when sliced.  Our soap was too lye heavy.  And, we knew this was because of the forgotten and overlooked sunflower oil.

One way to correct this soaping error was through rebatching.  Rebatching is almost like a do over for soap.  Although there are various reasons as to why you would rebatch, one of them is the fact that you can add an oil to your soap.  Our soaping oversight would be a perfect example to rebatch.

So, in order to save the 4 pound soap batch we had, we decided that we would take this opportunity to learn about rebatching and write a blog post on how to rebatch.  Although it was the very first time we ever attempted a rebatch, here is the process we did to show how to rebatch soap (pictures included).

Step 1:  Grate the soap.  This was no small feat for us.  In total, 4 pounds of soap took us about 45 minutes to do.

grating soap for rebatch

Step 2:  Melt the soap back down.  For this we selected to use our crock pot.  Since we had missed the first opportunity to add the sunflower oil, we did this now to the grated soap.

superfatting the rebatch

Step 3:  Stir.  Actually, this step is more like trying to rotate the soap.  Since you never want to scorch your soap when using a crock pot, this stir was more like a rotation of the soap within the crock pot.

melting the grated soap

Step 4:  Wait about 25-30 minutes, then check the soap again and stir/rotate.  The longer the soap melts, you will notice more of it becoming very gel like.

soap is still melting down

Step 5:  At this point, we noticed that the soap looked a little dry.  If this occurs, add a little water.

adding water to rebatch
Step 6:  Stir to disperse the water among all of the soap.

stirring the water through all of the soap
Step 7:  Wait for another 20 minutes or so, then give the soap a good stir.

a final good stir before rescenting
Step 8:  Add fragrance and stir.  Although we did scent the original batch, we wanted to rescent the rebatch for any scent that may have been lost through the saponification process and the reheating process.

rescenting and stirring one final time
Step 9:  Get your mold, and start to fill it with the soap.  Remember to tap your mold as you fill to reduce any bubbles that may be trapped in your soap.

molding your rebatch soap
Step 10:  Continue filling your mold and tapping it until all of the soap is out of the crock pot and into your mold.

molded rebatch soap
Step 11:  Insulate and wait.  The soap will need about 12 hours or so in the mold.  Once the time elapses, remove the soap from the molds and slice.

Our rebatched soap bars are awesome now.  They have a creamy full lather, and even better they don’t crumble and are actual bars!  Although the finished rebatch bars do have a rustic appeal, it kind of suits them.  Overall, this was a great learning experience, and we were able to save the 4 pound batch of soap.  Learning how to rebatch really was not difficult, and was well worth the effort in the end.

 

Mar
05

In the Pot Swirl Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, soap colorants, soap fragrances, soap ingredients, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies, soap mold, soap recipe and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

in the pot swirl soap Soaping with the cold process method allows you to create some really beautiful bars.  Not only are these bars creamy, bubbly, and cleansing, but they are also conditioning.  Plus, with the right recipe, bars can contain skin loving ingredients that nourish your skin too.

There are various ways to achieve beautiful designs in your cold process bars.  Some of the more popular designs include:  the peacock swirl, the mantra swirl, and the mica swirl. You can even try your hand at marbling your soap if you like.

When it comes to swirling, this is where you really get to let your creativity soar.  Through colors and varying design techniques, you can take your wonderful soap recipe and make the visual aspect just as appealing as the skin nourishing one!

The ideal scent when making cold process soap is one that is a Perfect Pour.  What this means is that the fragrance oil does not accelerate trace, rice, or discolor.  However, many times with floral scents, acceleration is a part of the package.  Although swirling is not impossible to achieve with an accelerator, it can be difficult if you do not move fast enough.  There is however, a swirling method that can be done when a fragrance oil accelerates trace.  This is known as the in the pot swirl.

Here is how to make an in the pot swirl soap.  The recipe, steps, and photos are included to help.  With the exemption of the lye and water, all of the ingredients for this soaping venture can be purchased at Natures Garden.  Although for this recipe, the Peace Sign Mold was used, any mold that is cold process soap safe will work.  To see the full list of soap molds available, please click on this link.

If you have never made cold process soap before, please click here for a  Basic CP Soap Making Class. Also, before attempting to make any cold process soap, please become familiar with Soap Making Safety Class first.

The Recipe:
108 grams of water
40 grams of lye
20 grams of Apricot Kernel Oil
11 grams of Castor Oil
85 grams of Coconut Oil 76
40 grams of Mango Butter
43 grams of Palm Oil
37 grams of Shea Butter
48 grams of Sunflower Oil
17 grams of Sodium Lactate
18 grams of Peace Fragrance Oil
18 grams of Vanilla White Color Stabilizer
FUN Soap Colorants: Neon Red, Neon Yellow, Neon Orange, Neon Blue, Ultramarine Violet

The Process:
Step 1: 
Put on your  safety gloves,  apron, safety mask, and safety glasses.

safety gear for soap making

Step 2:  Weigh out your lye and water.  In a well ventilated area, slowly pour the lye into the water.  Use a spatula to stir slowly.  Keep stirring until no lye granules are left in the water.  Do not breathe in any of the lye water fumes.  Allow this to cool to around 90-100 degrees F.

stirring the lye water

Step 3:  According to the recipe, in a pot weigh out the coconut oil 76, mango butter, palm oil, and shea butter.  Melt all of these ingredients down on low heat until each one is in a liquid state.  Stir.  Then add the apricot kernel oil, castor oil, and sunflower oil.  Stir again.  Remove from heat.  Transfer all of this into your mixing bowl.

melting your oils and butters

Step 4:  Now, get your 5 mixing bowls.  Assign each bowl a color.  Then, weigh out 2 grams of each neon colorant in its specific bowl.  The ultramarine violet bowl needs 4 grams weighed out.  A great tip:  Reuse the containers from the 1lb Whipped Soap Base.  They make perfect mixing bowls for colorant in cold process soaping!

weighing out the colorant for soap

Step 5:  Check the temperature of the lye water.  When it is cooled to around 90-100 degrees F, add your 17 grams of Sodium Lactate.  Stir carefully.  Now, once the temperatures of the lye water and the soaping oils and butters are within 5-10 degrees of one another, it is time to move on to the next step.

adding sodium lactate

Step 6:  Slowly pour the lye water/sodium lactate into your oils and butters bowl.  Use a spatula to get all of this out and into the other bowl.

mixing the oils, butters, and lye water

Step 7:  Using your stick blender, begin to mix everything together.  You will notice your batter will begin to look creamy and thicken slightly.  Now, stop blending.

stick blending cold process soap

Step 8:  Add your fragrance oil.

adding scent to in the pot swirl

Step 9:  Now add your Vanilla White Color Stabilizer.  Once added, stick blend to incorporate.  Do not forget to scrap the sides with a spatula.

preventing discoloration in soap

 

Step 10:  Now, place 90 grams of the soap batter into each bowl.  Stir well with a spoon.  This will help slow down trace.  Then, starting with the yellow soap, pour it back into the mixing bowl.  Try your best to keep it in one area.

multiple color in the pot swirl

 

Step 11:  Repeat with the orange.

second color in the pot swirl

Step 12:  Now, the red.

adding red in the pot swirl

Step 13:  Then the purple.

adding the purple batter
Step 14:  Finally, get your blue soap batter into the bowl.

all five colors in the pot swirl

Step 15:  Get your spatula, start by placing it alongside the inside bottom edge of the bowl.  Then, come straight up the center of the bowl.  When you reach the top, pick the spatula up.  Now, starring on one side, begin your swirls (using the spatula).  Repeat on the other side.  Do not over swirl.

step by step in the pot swirl
Step 16:
  Grab your mold.  Then begin to pour the soap batter into each mold opening.

molding the in the pot swirl

Step 17:  Once the mold is filled, cover it with plastic wrap.  When the soap has hardened enough to move, place the mold somewhere it will not be disturbed.

insulating your soap
Step 18: 
After your soap has set for 24 hours, place it in the freezer for about 10 minutes.  This step will help to release the soap from the mold.  Then, carefully remove the soaps from the mold.

unmolded soap

Step 19:  Now, allow your soap to finish curing before use.

Congratulations, you just completed an in the pot swirl technique!  Note:  You will notice as your soap cures that the neon colors will become more vivid.

After the cure, your in the pot swirl soap is now finished.  The ending bar will be nice and firm.  The lather will be creamy and filled with lots of bubbles.  These bars will cleanse, yet still provide your skin conditioning elements.  Enjoy!

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

Nov
11

Orange Clove Fragrance Oil

This entry was posted in air freshening scents, bath and body fragrances, candle fragrance oils, candle making supplies, fragrance oil, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, soap making recipes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

orange clove fragrance oilOrange Clove Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

The perfect balance of fresh and spicy, Orange Clove Fragrance Oil is a great year round selling scent.  This fabulous scent is very well received in all products, especially in candles because of the terrific throw this aroma has.  A warm and inviting scent with a clean twist, Orange Clove is just simply incredible no matter what medium it is put in!

What does Orange Clove Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

This fragrance oil by Natures Garden is the wonderful aroma of fresh orange slices with hints of nutmeg, cinnamon, and clove. A Best Seller!

How Do Our Customers Use Orange Clove Fragrance Oil?

For those of you that are candle crafters; our customers absolutely love this fragrance oil.  Since the hot and cold throw is so phenomenal, this scent is used in an array of waxes including soy, pillar of bliss, WOW, palm, paraffin, and Joy wax.  When it comes to home scenters, this fragrance also leads the pack in scent throw.  Many people use Orange Clove in aroma beads, smelly jellies, oil burners, and scented potpourri.

On the bath and body end, the usage percent for this fragrance oil is 4% in bath oils, soaps, and bath gels, and 2% for lotions and perfumes.  This fragrance is used to make:  melt and pour soaps, body butters, lotions, shower gels, and bath bombs.  Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance received awesome reviews.  Here are the official results:  No ricing, some acceleration, scent retention is very good.  Discolors to a light orange color.

Oct
15

Top 50 Soap Making Blogs

This entry was posted in cleansing, cold process soap, cosmetic recipe, creative, essential oil, handcrafted soap, handmade soap, herb, herbal oil infusion, homemade, homemade soap, soap, soap making recipes, soaps and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

soap making blogs

Soap making has grown from a hobby, to a seriously competitive trade that attracts new talent all the time. The trick is finding the right soap making blogs to get the best recipes, ingredient list, tutorials, and expert advice to learn the pro’s tips on soap making. What I have created is the ultimate online resource that compiles the best of the best soap making blogs into one post.

I wanted to create a quality resource for people seeking information about soap making so I’ve collected what I believe to be some of the top soap making blogs out there. I endorse them so much that I’ve created a badge for them to display and be endorsed as one of the top soap making blogs on the Internet. The order below is not in any particular order. They are all #1 in my eyes.

Best Soap Making Blogs

1. Evik – The Curious Soapmaker – Evik has been making soap since she accidentally discovered a natural soap making book while browsing her favorite book store. Suddenly, she became more interested in a natural lifestyle and became a vegetarian and started learning more about the products and ingredients she was using in her every day life. Learn from her passion for soapmaking, the importance of selecting the proper ingredients, and basic recipes tutorials and principles.

2. Jennifer Young – Jennifer has a successful business of soaps, lip balms, salves and more. What makes her, and her blog, stand out are the four principles she runs her business by: she enjoys what she does, only uses natural ingredients in her products, supports the local community and economy, and treats the environment well. Kuddos to you Jennifer!

3. Amanda Griffin – Amanda shares her passion for soap making, and her gratitude for being a part of the “soaping” community. She loves all things soap, including talking, sharing, and teaching soap making. Follow her site for handmade soap, bath and body products, reviews, interviews, how-to’s and more.

4. Ruth Esteves – Ruth was trained as a laboratory assistant, and found herself craving more creativity in her life. She fused her passion for soapmaking with a career, and has successfully combined her talents for a business that “feeds her soul,” since 2006. Now she sells, teaches, and speaks about soapmaking and has even recently published her first eBook.

5. Rebecca Dillon – Soap Delicatessen is a one woman operation that has been running since 2001. She started out making soap as an alternative to commercial brands that often irritated her very sensitive skin. Over a decade later, now she creates her own unique recipes for various skin and bath products and sells them on her site.

6. Rene Whitlock – Rene started with aromatherapy and essential oils before she discovered her love for soap making. Now she passionately shares her discovery for better ingredients, natural products, and converting commercial product consumers to products more beneficial for their skin and the planet.

7. TheSoapBar.com – The Soap Bar is a fun spot for the soap makers out there. This site is loaded with contests, challenges, creative new tips and ideas, and wonderful tutorials to keep your soap making fresh and inspired. Follow along for wonderful recipes and a fun community of soap makers.

8. TheSoapMagician - Sharon has done her homework and has plenty of certificates to prove it. She has been making soap for well over a decade, and has no plans on stopping. Share her fountain of knowledge from aromatherapy to holistic uses of herbs, and how she incorporates all that into soap making.

9. TheSoapSister.com – This country gal loves her handmade soap and she can’t deny it! Her soap, Heirloom, is featured in local shops and on etsy. She shares the joys of soapmaking, making a messing, learning the tricks, and more on her oh-so-passionate blog.

10. TierraVerdeSoaps.com – A true self-proclaimed soap nerd, this mom has an entrepenurial spirit and a true talent at that. Follow her exploration of soap making where art meets science. Beautiful pictures are always the end result that you’ll find yourself wishing you could smell through your computer screen.

11. Stacie – Another successful business created as the result of a suffering tale of overly sensitive skin. Stacie’s first line of products resulted in her true love for sharing her results with others and the benefits she discovered in natural soaps. Share her recipes and learn about her new products, and cute crafts, on this charming site.

12. Angela – Angela, and her husband Brian, are the savvy creators of this blog that will educate and inspire you to spend more time together creating healthier, more natural products for you and your family. Browse their recipes and tutorials; it’s a great place to get started at making your own soaps.

13. SoaphisticatedLady.com – Beginner soap makers rejoice; here is the perfect spot for you to try your talent at soap making. Learn the basic process of melt-and-pour (MAP) soap making, and new tips and tricks “not available anywhere else.” A wonderful place to learn recipes, colors, and fragrance tips for your first, or twentieth batch of soaps.

14. Gavin Webber – Gavin’s site is delightfully personal, refreshingly real, and absolutely inspiring. He deems himself an ordinary man that had a sudden epiphony while watching a documentary and seriously overhauled his life. Follow his progressively shrinking carbon footprint, and marvel at his conversion to a green life.

15. TheNerdyFarmWife.com – A true self-proclaimed soap nerd, this mom has an entrepenurial spirit and a true talent at that. Follow her exploration of soap making where art meets science. Beautiful pictures are always the end result that you’ll find yourself wishing you could smell.

16. Tiggy – Future Primitive Soap Co.’ is Tiggy’s blog to share, and sell, her fine bath goods and aromatic oils. With names as catchy as the ingredients list, you will likely be as intrigued as you are curious. Inspire the soapmaker in you, or buy from the creator of soaps like, “Mama Didn’t Listen So I Told The Bees soap.”

17. Annie – Follow Annie’s adventures through soap making and “other things.” Shop her homemade lip balms, custom cupcake soaps, and body butters. She posts her creations on her blog, often swaying reading over to her “shop,” section linking to her good-enough-to-eat etsy store where she sells all of her fabulous creations.

18. Jenny – From melt-and-pour soap making to cold process soap, Jenny shares her hobbyist adventures in all things soapy. Follow her recipes through candle making, soaps of all colors and styles, and even men’s shaving cream.

19. BurntMill.com – This busy crafter may slack on the updates, but certainly not on the content. Follow some amazing recipes for colorful soaps. Learn how to make soap for a baby or bridal shower from start to finish, or give soap to friends and family and save some money this holiday.

20. SoapAndRestless.com – Did you know pictures of soap could literally make your mouth water? If you don’t believe me, check out ‘Soap and Restless,’ and just scroll through the photos. Those soaps are so beautifully made they honestly look good enough to eat. What’s not to love that the recipes, and plenty of tips and tricks, are shared for readers to delightfully attempt to recreate.

21. Erin Nute – Erin has learned the in’s and out’s of soap making and is happy to share her successes, and failures, so that you can create your own natural products. She’ll teach you layering techniques, color tips, and even how to make a long-lasting bar of soap. If you like what you read, you can pick up her new book, “Soap Making Made Easy.”

22. Patrice – Even those that don’t make soaps will fall in love with Patrice’s blog. She shares her passion for soap making, candle making, bath goods, and oil, but her personality is what keeps you coming back for more. Patrice has been at it for years, so share what she’s learned and have fun!

23. Bianca – This Brooklyn-based beauty is a full-time designer and hobbyist soap maker. Her blog is a meeting place for the best of both of her talents; where soap making meets design. Eye candy for the masses here, but definitely visual inspiration for the soap makers and designer readers.

24. Claudia Mold – Follow a busy mom of six through crafting projects, soap making, cooking, of raising her kids. Learn the recipe behind her “happy,” rainbow soap, or her mouth-watering handmade cheeseburger.

25. Erica Pence – Erica’s blog is more inspiration than the secrets of soap making, and if I were you, I’d listen. This business woman is savvy, successful, and passionate about what she does. She shares all of her interests from bath and body, to candles and business advice. Need more? Check out her tutorials and contests.

26. HorseOPeaceRanch.com – What a fun story behind this successful soap making business. After deciding to use some leftover goat’s milk to make some soap, an event 10 days later led to the first selling and teaching of soap making. Business officially began just months later, and has been a success ever since.

27. Magdoline – Addicted to Soap,’ started out of a mom’s need to help her eczema diagnosed children heal their sensitive skin. An encouraging husband pushed her to start selling her beautiful creations, and alas, a business was born. Browse the site, take a class, discover the joy of soap making.

28. LionAndRoseSoap.com – Handmade soap is an art, a hobby, but most importantly a passion. ‘Lion and Rose Handmade Soap,’ has them all. Share in the day-to-day family life behind this soap-making mom, and enjoy her honest opinion, recipes, and delightful creations on her site.

29. Aunt Nancy – Aunt Nancy’s blog is chock-full of homemade soap recipes. From pumpkin soap, to oatmeal & honey goat milk soap, you’ll have enough recipes here to keep you busy for an entire year (and more!)

30. Amy Warden – Amy’s soap is a work of art. If you have a few minutes and want some inspiration, I highly recommend going to her website and reviewing the amazing concoctions she has created. Absolutely stunning!

31. Tatania – Tatania’s soap is so beautiful it looks more like artisan fudge. I’d caution you against making her banofee pie soap as you really might confuse it for fudge!

32. Cee – Cee’s soap recipes are so unique! Pumpkin maple soap… Doesn’t get any better than that for fall, does it? How about a gift for mom of cocoa butter soap with lavender and lemon infused oil? My goodness! A must bookmark blog.

33. Jennifer – Add Jennifer to your list of soap blogs you must follow. From peppermint bark soap to polka dot themed apple, peach & cinammon, her soap recipes will inspire you for hours.

34. HomeMadeBathProducts.com – HomeMadeBathProducts is a site I know you will love! The writers feature great recipes and products from around the web.

35. Angela – Jamaican vanilla café, Hummingbird, Hula Hula… Angela’s soap names are as unique as the soap itself. Great photos and great blog… Just wish she provided more of her recipes.

36. Sabons Carmeta – This Spanish soap blog features beautiful soap recipes… From lavender and shea to Marigold… You won’t be disapointed by Sabons Carmeta.

37. Celine – Celine’s soap looks like it could be decoration in a pop movie. Full of sparkles, ridges & beauty, you’ll be hard-pressed to find more bubbilicious soap photos than hers.

38. Sue – Although the content has rarely been updated over the last few years, this blog features beautiful soap that you just must look into.

39. T.A. Helton – I Just love what T.A. Helton does with her blog. Occasionally you’ll see her featuring ‘soap porn’ so you can admire the greatest soaps she makes on her site, from apples & oak to bay rum spice… we love it all!

40. Elizabeth – Elizabeth shares her soap making adventures on this blog and we love it! She even shares how she uses her Vitamix for soap making (And for smoothies!).

41. Julia – Julia’s Spanish soap making blog is amazing. Beautiful designs, photos, packaging… You get the entire package here.

42. Milla – Milla not only shares photos of her end results, but even creates videos of how she prepares her soap. Definitely worth a read!

43. Super Soapers – Super Soapers is amazing: They feature soap artists every month to help inspire and educate you. This is one you must bookmark.

44. Ana Maria – Ana Maria shares her soap making adventures in this Spanish soap making blog. Just wish there were more recipes to accompany her beautiful photos

Our Favorite Soap Recipes

45. Nina Nelson – Nina shares her recipe for a homemade herbal bar soap here. She uses marshmallow root and calendula petals to make this bar soap very soothing and healing.

46. Allyson – Allyson shares 3 homemade dish soap recipes. They are all natural and quick and easy to make. She leaves out essential oils, but you can easily toss some lavender, cinnamon, peppermint or anything your heart desires in and it will work perfectly.

47. Stephanie – Pink grapefruit soap! Love it! Stephanie shares this unique soap recipe idea here. We definitely encourage you to try it.

48. Liz Marie – Liz has been using a DIY laundry soap recipe for over a year. After a year of refining her recipe, she finally has made it perfect and shares her secrets with you.

49. Clare – Another goat milk recipe! This time with orange and calendula. Thanks, Clare, for the great inspiration!

50. Brandy – Brandy shares her homemade poppy seed soap recipe here… I can’t wait to give this a go. Her photos are beautiful and the end result is even more gorgeous.

Oct
09

Making Cold Process Beer Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath and body fragrances, cold process soap, creative, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, soap ingredients, soap making recipes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , on by .
Cold Process Beer Soap

Soaping with beer involves a few extra steps, but is totally worth the effort!

Some times the littlest things- like the addition of a unique ingredient to your recipe- converts to major sales of your product.  Beer would happen to be one of those ingredients.

But, what exactly is it about Beer in Soaps?

There is no straight forward answer to this question.  Some people are just amazed by Beer Soap because it was made with beer.  For some, they look at beer soap and can instantly list 10 people that love beer and therefore would get a kick out of beer soap.  For others, they seek out the thick and super creamy elements that a bar of beer soap provides them every time they wash.  And, even still there are others out there that know the great conditioning aspects that beer soap contributes to their skin.  The list of reasons is limitless, but one thing is for sure… Cold Process Beer Soap does get attention!

Soaping with Beer

Please Note:  Soaping with beer is a more advanced process.  Therefore, if you are new to soaping, you may want to sidebar this recipe until you are completely comfortable with the soaping process and have a few cold process soap batches under your belt.

Recently, we decided that we had to give cold process beer soap making a try.  As we found out, the addition of beer to a soaping recipe is not something that can be taken lightly or on a whim.  First things first; one of the most important steps in prepping your beer soap recipe is removing all of the carbonation from the beer itself.  This is extremely important to the soap recipe because beer is used to replace the full water portion of your recipe.  When adding the lye to a beer that is still carbonated you just don’t get a volcano, the volcano you get is supercharged with bubbles (carbonation.)  This is why you want a flat beer before beginning to soap.

One of the best ways to remove the carbonation from the beer is to let it set out for 3 days.  You do this by opening the can, pouring it into a bowl, and occasionally stirring it throughout the 3 days.  A good rule of thumb to use is every time you enter the room that the beer is setting in, give it a stir.

The next step in preparing your beer is the boil.  After the three days have elapsed, place your beer into a pot on the stove top and boil it and simmer for 30-40 minutes, stirring occasionally.  This step is also taken as a precaution to eliminate any leftover carbonation.

The final step after the boil is to freeze the beer.  Let the beer temperature drop to room temp, then carefully place the beer in an empty ice cube tray and freeze overnight.  This step is beneficial in two ways- eliminating carbonation (once again) and offsetting the high temperature for when the lye is added to the frozen beer.

Once the beer is frozen, it is now ready for soaping use.

Now, when adding the lye to the frozen beer, the best precaution to take (besides the regular safety gear and steps) is to mix this portion of the recipe in a deep bowl or pitcher in the sink.  This way, if there is any chance of a volcano effect taking place the sink will minimize the affected area.  Now, the other special note to be aware of in this step is the adding of the lye.  Because the beer is frozen, the lye (as it reacts) will melt the beer.  You want to constantly stir the beer cubes around after each small spurt of lye is added.  This will become easier as the frozen beer melts into a liquid.  Keep adding the lye in small amounts until all is used.  And, stir until you are sure that all the lye is dissolved.  Also, it should also be noted, there is quite a distinctive odor that is given off by the beer/lye solution- you will want to definitely want to make sure that you are in a well ventilated area.

The rest of the soaping recipe steps take place as normal.

In the End

Soaping with beer was a new experience!   The end results are simply amazing.  The color of the bars is a perfect beer hue.  The lather of the soap bar truly is thick and creamy.  And, after bathing with it, your skin feels soft and supple.  Cold Process Beer Soap is worth the extra steps.

Since the beer is added as the water portion of the recipe, you can use your favorite cold process soap recipe.  However, if you would like a Cold Process Beer Recipe, Natures Garden has one listed under their free recipes and classes section of their website.  Or, you can simply click here to see the 4 pound Beer Soap Recipe.