Category Archives: soap colorants

Apr
30

Color Dispersion

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, homemade soap, Natures Garden, soap colorants, Soap making supplies, soap oil properties, soaping terms and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

color dispersionColor Dispersion in Soap

This picture shows the same exact recipe using two different methods of color dispersion in soap. Once the soap was poured, we noticed that some of the colorant was still on the sides of the bowls instead of actually incorporated into the soap (as shown in the soap on the right).  In addition, we noticed concentrated pockets of colorant in this cut soap.   Mainly, it is the difference between hand stirring the colorants in verses stick blending the colorants in, and failure to scrape the sides of the bowls to incorporate all of the coloring.  Regardless of the method that you choose, there are distinct advantages and disadvantages. The key to knowing which method works best for you is knowing your soap recipe and the time that it allows you.

Color Dispersion in cold process soap making can be a tricky aspect. After you figure out your color scheme for your recipe and the technique as to how you are adding your color, it then comes down to the actual challenge.

Really there are three options to color dispersion in your soap. They are hand stirring the colorant into the batter with a spoon, stick blending the colorant in, or the combination of both. The correct decision relies on a few factors though. These factors are: your recipe, time, and the number of colorants you want to add.

Hand Stirring
The best advantage of hand stirring colorants into soap is that it does not speed up trace. This allows you the perfect fluid soap batter for accomplishing a multi color swirl in your soap. But, hand stirring the colorant into your soap batter is slightly more time consuming because you really have to stir for some time to get the colorant dispersed. So, this is where knowing your recipe and window of time, especially if you are using multiple colorants, comes into play.

You will also have to be ready to move. When hand stirring, you have to stir, and stir quickly to get the full color dispersion of the soap colorant. And, do not forget to have your spatula ready to clean the sides and rotate the soap from the bottom of the bowl to make sure all of the colorant is evenly dispersed.

However, not all colorants can be hand stirred. Some of the colorants do not disperse as well as others with this method. The examples of these types of colorants would be titanium dioxide and the ultramarines. Colorants like these often need to be stick blended in order to get the full color dispersion among all of the soap.

Stick Blending
Stick blending your colorants in soap batter is ideal for true color dispersion. But, with stick blending time is a major factor. Stick blending will speed up trace (or the saponification process) in your soap. If too much time elapses while stick blending your colorants into the batter; certain swirling techniques cannot be accomplished. This is because the soap batter will be too thick, especially if you are using more than two colors in your soap recipe.

Besides speeding up trace, there is another factor to consider. When using multiple soap colorants and stick blending you will have to quickly clean your stick blender in between colors. But, you do have a few options when it comes to this. Some soapers keep a small bowl of water by their coloring station to quickly clean their stick blender in between colors. And, some just stick blend their colors in the correct order, but gently tap the stick blender to remove as much colored batter as possible before moving on to the next color. For example if you are coloring your soap green and yellow; you would start by stick blending the yellow first. This is because the yellow color is the lightest, and then move to the green.

The Combo
For the situations where you want to use ultramarines which almost require a stick blend to get the best color dispersion, but you still want several other colors in your soap; you can combo the blend. You would start by stick blending the colorants that need it, and then move on to the hand stirred colorants. If the stick blended colorants become too thick, simply stir them by hand and the soap batter will thin out slightly (or enough to pour). Just remember, you must move quickly.

What this really all comes down to is testing. Through making various batches of soap, you will be able to find exactly which method of color dispersion is best for you and your soaping recipe. There really is no right or wrong answer as to which method to use. Each soap recipe will vary.

Natures Garden offers FUN Soap colorants for soap making.  We even carry multiple neon colors to really make your soap “come alive”.

Apr
11

Argan Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, soap, soap colorants, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies, titanium dioxide and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

argan soap Hello everyone, today I made Argan Soap!

I am here to share my recent adventure in the world of soap making.  Today I made CP soap.  For those of you that are new at this, CP means cold process.  This is soaping without adding any additional heat.

I made this soap by creating my own recipe using the soapcalc.  This wonderful soaping tool was able to help me find ingredients and exact percentages for my homemade soaping recipe.  All of this information assisted me in producing my latest project.

For this soap cleverly named “Argan Soap”, I used Mango butter, Avocado oil, Coconut oil 76, Argan oil, and Sunflower oil.  To add a vibrant and tropical look to my soap, I selected Fun Colorants:  Neon orange and Neon blue.  I thought that these colors would look nice in combination with white.  So, I decided to also use titanium dioxide to get a nice bright white soap color.  I really felt that these colors captured the tone of the scent Kulu Bay, which I was using to fragrance my soap.

Due to the fact that I am SO over winter (clearing throat); I decided to try a soap with a summery feel.  Sorry, was venting (smiley face).   Also, I was going to try something new with this soap recipe.  For my very first time, I was doing the “in the pot swirl” technique using 3 colors.  I do have to say, I was beyond excited to get this going since I created this soap from beginning to end all by myself.

That is the moment I quickly became aware that I was DOING THIS BY MYSELF….Oh boy I thought.  No supervision, no guidance, nobody standing next to me for support, only my directions.

Ok, so, after getting all of my supplies, I put on my safety gear and began the first step.  Lye and water.  I want to caution any new soapers reading this:  Please remember to wear your gloves, mask, and safety glasses when handling the Lye and lye solution.  It is also just as important to have vinegar by your side (as your best friend) throughout your whole soaping process.  Vinegar is used in case the Lye or soap batter gets on your skin.

Once I melted all of my oils and butter, I waited for my Lye solution and oils to reach their desired temperature.  I then proceeded to put it all together and stick blended quickly to emulsification.

Being it was an in the pot swirl soap, I did have to put some of my soap batter into 2 smaller bowls and mix my colors really good.  That way I was ready to accomplish the swirl.

Moving quickly, I “plopped” globs of the orange and blue soap batter into the white batter.  I did this until it was all gone.  And, let me just tell you how fast you have to move to color, mix, and plop when using more than one color…holy cow!  You need to fly!  At this point, I was wondering why I used 3 colors….what was I thinking?  Creativity, that’s what!  Now not all recipes will do this, but it seems the one I chose was just that…FAST!

I did however get everything together and really enjoyed seeing my white, neon blue, and neon orange soap come together as I “swirled” around and through my colors.  After using my spatula to make this pretty cool design, I poured it into my silicone mold.  But, I poured it slowly back and forth from end to end.  I was mesmerized at how cool the colors were as they moved about inside the mold.

After the soap  in the mold had set up enough, I used the remaining batter to get an awesome heaping loaf of soap.  When I was done, I was happy with what I created.  A little stressed but only because I wanted it to be perfect.  I strive for perfection and unfortunately for me, I will fail at this (and have) a few times before I perfect it.  I am glad that I will fail however, only because it will make me a better soaper.  This is how you will learn, right?

When I tell my friends what I do here at Natures Garden, they are like, “wow, that sounds like so much fun”, and it is, creating and making your own stuff, heck ya!  Sometimes these recipes may seem a bit intimidating, but, be aware of your ingredients, and know their personalities and how they work together.  We have “fool” proof instructions, we HAVE failed too.  This is the best ways to become experts on what works.  When it comes to the free recipes that Natures Garden provides, what we present to you, is easily understood with virtually no guess work needed.

If you would like to see the full Argan Soap Recipe, please click on this link.

In closing, I can still say, it was a lot of fun making this soap; even if I did stress myself out.

We kids, until my next adventure, have a FABULOUS day!

Cindy

Mar
05

In the Pot Swirl Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, soap colorants, soap fragrances, soap ingredients, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies, soap mold, soap recipe and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

in the pot swirl soap Soaping with the cold process method allows you to create some really beautiful bars.  Not only are these bars creamy, bubbly, and cleansing, but they are also conditioning.  Plus, with the right recipe, bars can contain skin loving ingredients that nourish your skin too.

There are various ways to achieve beautiful designs in your cold process bars.  Some of the more popular designs include:  the peacock swirl, the mantra swirl, and the mica swirl. You can even try your hand at marbling your soap if you like.

When it comes to swirling, this is where you really get to let your creativity soar.  Through colors and varying design techniques, you can take your wonderful soap recipe and make the visual aspect just as appealing as the skin nourishing one!

The ideal scent when making cold process soap is one that is a Perfect Pour.  What this means is that the fragrance oil does not accelerate trace, rice, or discolor.  However, many times with floral scents, acceleration is a part of the package.  Although swirling is not impossible to achieve with an accelerator, it can be difficult if you do not move fast enough.  There is however, a swirling method that can be done when a fragrance oil accelerates trace.  This is known as the in the pot swirl.

Here is how to make an in the pot swirl soap.  The recipe, steps, and photos are included to help.  With the exemption of the lye and water, all of the ingredients for this soaping venture can be purchased at Natures Garden.  Although for this recipe, the Peace Sign Mold was used, any mold that is cold process soap safe will work.  To see the full list of soap molds available, please click on this link.

If you have never made cold process soap before, please click here for a  Basic CP Soap Making Class. Also, before attempting to make any cold process soap, please become familiar with Soap Making Safety Class first.

The Recipe:
108 grams of water
40 grams of lye
20 grams of Apricot Kernel Oil
11 grams of Castor Oil
85 grams of Coconut Oil 76
40 grams of Mango Butter
43 grams of Palm Oil
37 grams of Shea Butter
48 grams of Sunflower Oil
17 grams of Sodium Lactate
18 grams of Peace Fragrance Oil
18 grams of Vanilla White Color Stabilizer
FUN Soap Colorants: Neon Red, Neon Yellow, Neon Orange, Neon Blue, Ultramarine Violet

The Process:
Step 1: 
Put on your  safety gloves,  apron, safety mask, and safety glasses.

safety gear for soap making

Step 2:  Weigh out your lye and water.  In a well ventilated area, slowly pour the lye into the water.  Use a spatula to stir slowly.  Keep stirring until no lye granules are left in the water.  Do not breathe in any of the lye water fumes.  Allow this to cool to around 90-100 degrees F.

stirring the lye water

Step 3:  According to the recipe, in a pot weigh out the coconut oil 76, mango butter, palm oil, and shea butter.  Melt all of these ingredients down on low heat until each one is in a liquid state.  Stir.  Then add the apricot kernel oil, castor oil, and sunflower oil.  Stir again.  Remove from heat.  Transfer all of this into your mixing bowl.

melting your oils and butters

Step 4:  Now, get your 5 mixing bowls.  Assign each bowl a color.  Then, weigh out 2 grams of each neon colorant in its specific bowl.  The ultramarine violet bowl needs 4 grams weighed out.  A great tip:  Reuse the containers from the 1lb Whipped Soap Base.  They make perfect mixing bowls for colorant in cold process soaping!

weighing out the colorant for soap

Step 5:  Check the temperature of the lye water.  When it is cooled to around 90-100 degrees F, add your 17 grams of Sodium Lactate.  Stir carefully.  Now, once the temperatures of the lye water and the soaping oils and butters are within 5-10 degrees of one another, it is time to move on to the next step.

adding sodium lactate

Step 6:  Slowly pour the lye water/sodium lactate into your oils and butters bowl.  Use a spatula to get all of this out and into the other bowl.

mixing the oils, butters, and lye water

Step 7:  Using your stick blender, begin to mix everything together.  You will notice your batter will begin to look creamy and thicken slightly.  Now, stop blending.

stick blending cold process soap

Step 8:  Add your fragrance oil.

adding scent to in the pot swirl

Step 9:  Now add your Vanilla White Color Stabilizer.  Once added, stick blend to incorporate.  Do not forget to scrap the sides with a spatula.

preventing discoloration in soap

 

Step 10:  Now, place 90 grams of the soap batter into each bowl.  Stir well with a spoon.  This will help slow down trace.  Then, starting with the yellow soap, pour it back into the mixing bowl.  Try your best to keep it in one area.

multiple color in the pot swirl

 

Step 11:  Repeat with the orange.

second color in the pot swirl

Step 12:  Now, the red.

adding red in the pot swirl

Step 13:  Then the purple.

adding the purple batter
Step 14:  Finally, get your blue soap batter into the bowl.

all five colors in the pot swirl

Step 15:  Get your spatula, start by placing it alongside the inside bottom edge of the bowl.  Then, come straight up the center of the bowl.  When you reach the top, pick the spatula up.  Now, starring on one side, begin your swirls (using the spatula).  Repeat on the other side.  Do not over swirl.

step by step in the pot swirl
Step 16:
  Grab your mold.  Then begin to pour the soap batter into each mold opening.

molding the in the pot swirl

Step 17:  Once the mold is filled, cover it with plastic wrap.  When the soap has hardened enough to move, place the mold somewhere it will not be disturbed.

insulating your soap
Step 18: 
After your soap has set for 24 hours, place it in the freezer for about 10 minutes.  This step will help to release the soap from the mold.  Then, carefully remove the soaps from the mold.

unmolded soap

Step 19:  Now, allow your soap to finish curing before use.

Congratulations, you just completed an in the pot swirl technique!  Note:  You will notice as your soap cures that the neon colors will become more vivid.

After the cure, your in the pot swirl soap is now finished.  The ending bar will be nice and firm.  The lather will be creamy and filled with lots of bubbles.  These bars will cleanse, yet still provide your skin conditioning elements.  Enjoy!

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

Jul
11

Homemade Soap No More Allergies

This entry was posted in soap, soap colorants, soap dyes, soap fragrances, soap maker success news, soap making interview and tagged , , , , , , , , , on by .

smelly cat menagerie

I am Victoria Cangelosi, and I’m the owner and SoapMaster-in-Chief of Smelly Cat Soaps.
I am allergic to soap – or so I thought for the first twenty-something years of my life. I would break out in a terrible rash each time I used soap, even the hypoallergenic stuff. I subsisted on exactly one brand of rather boring body wash I found that didn’t cause breakouts like the others.

But each time I entered shops like Lush or Bath and Body Works, I found myself entranced by all the delicious smells. It was a cruel, cruel existence.

One day, I came across a soap mold for sale online that I fell in love with. I was so inspired that I decided I was going buy it and try my hand at making soap. How hard could it be?

At first, my only goal was to create soap that I could use without getting a rash. Much to my delight, I quickly found success. It turns out I am not allergic to soap after all! What I’m allergic to is the preservative that soap companies add to their soaps to prolong their shelf lives.

I shared my newfound love for soapmaking with my family and friends, and showed them what I had made. Several high pitched Ohmygoshes and Thatsadorables later, I realized I may be onto something. I already had one shop on Etsy; I make jewelry and sell it over at www.CrowCanyonJewelry.com. I opened a second shop just for selling the soap, and decided to take custom orders instead of pre-making soap and listing it for sale. It seemed less risky; I didn’t have to buy supplies or make anything until I received an order. And I don’t add any preservatives to my soap.

The name Smelly Cat Soaps is homage to one of my all time favorite television shows, “Friends.” I love when I am selling soap at craft shows and people read my shop name, smile, then start to sing the Smelly Cat song a la Phoebe Buffay. I also love to hear the squeals of excited children as they proudly yell the names of all the little soap animals I have out on my table. “Mommy look, it’s a hedgehog! Mommy Mommy, an elephant! Mommy, she has turtles and puppies” etc.

I am enjoying this business and I love being my own boss. I get to be as creative as I want, and that is AWESOME! I don’t have to answer to anyone but my customers, so if I want to get crazy silly and fun in my automatic “Thanks for your order” message, (hint – it is actually pretty hilarious) there’s no one to tell me I can’t!

Right now, this is just a small business I do on the side. But I believe my soap has the potential to really take off. I love helping customers make bath time fun for their kids, create the perfect gift, or order truly unique wedding or shower favors. Please keep me in mind for all your future soaping needs.

I use a lot of Natures Garden scents in my soaps. You can’t smell them from here, but the soaps in the picture are:

- In the Mood fragrance oil

- Misbehavin fragrance oil

- I’m Too Sexy fragrance oil

- Princess type fragrance oil

- Cashmere type fragrance oil

 

Your Website: www.SmellyCatSoaps.com

Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/SmellyCatSoaps

Apr
10

Homemade Bar Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, body butter, cold process soap, creative, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, Natures Garden, soap, soap colorants and tagged , , , , , , , , , on by .

fragrance oils1.  What’s your name & Your Company Name:  My name is Vikki Jones and my company is Mocha’s Handmade Soaps

2.  Why did you decide to go into business?  What was your motivation?  How long have you been in business? My motivation to go into the soaping business was after I tried a nice bar of homemade soap that my Mother-in-Law made and didn’t want to use store bought soaps ever again.  So I decided to start making my own soaps but just took it to the next level.  Her bar was a regular bar made with the basics of Oil, water and sodium Hydroxide and it was great so I knew from that point after studying and looking into it that I could make a wonderful bar of soap with a few added ingredients.  I’ve been in business for 7 years now.

3.  What products do you make and sell?  I make homemade bar and liquid soaps, lotions, body butters and sugar scrubs.

4.  What are your business goals?  My ultimate business goal is to actually be able to own a store front in addition to my online business.

5.  What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?  I use Natures Garden’s fragrance oils and I LOVE them.  I’ve also purchased some of Natures Garden’s  soap colorants.

Your Website: MochasHandmadeSoaps.etsy.com

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MochasSoaps

Twitter:  MochasSoaps

YouTube Channel:  LaShayla36

Apr
06

Candle Creations with Fragrance Oils

This entry was posted in candle fragrance oils, creative, Fragrance Oils, homemade, melts, Natures Garden, soap colorants, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , on by .

fragrance oils1.  What’s your name & Your Company Name:  My name is Paul Bruschi and I am the owner and operator of Jack Be Candle Creations

2.  Why did you decide to go into business?  I’ve always had a passion for candle making and after years of working to make a great smelling and burning candle I finally decided to start my business.  What was your motivation?  I was tired of using candles that had no scent and that would soot like crazy.  I really began this journey wanting to make candles for myself and found that friends and family kept telling me how great they were and that they wanted me to make some for them also.  How long have you been in business?  3 and half years.

3.  What products do you make and sell?  I make and sell soy candles, goat’s milk soaps, & scented soy wax melts.

4.  What are your business goals?  To continue to provide a quality product to the market place and grow slowly to meet the needs of my market.

5.  What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?  Well of course I love Nature’s Garden fragrance oils!  They are a must have!  I also recently started using the liquid colorants for my soaps as well as their herbs and powders when I want to color my soap naturally.

Website: http://www.jackbenimblecandles.com

Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Jack-Be-Nimble-Candle-Creations-Handcrafted-Soy-Candles-Goats-Milk-Soap/170225723000330?ref=hl

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/soycandlejack

YouTube Channel:  http://www.youtube.com/JackBeNimbleCandles

Mar
13

Melt and Pour Soap Interview

This entry was posted in bath and body, Fragrance Oils, fragrances, melt and pour soap, Natures Garden, soap colorants, soap dyes, vanilla white stabilizer and tagged , , , , , , , on by .

photoI started a couple years ago, and I love art and crafts. I have always loved bath products, color, and fragrances. What better than soaps where you get all that! I figured I’d play around making melt and pour, since I didn’t need to experiment with lye, and have the fun of creating. I needed some other things in my hair salon, besides shampoo, and jewelry, plus my customers are always asking me “what’s next? What’s new?” I thought I’d do a few soaps…well, I started ordering fragrances, etc. And I was hooked. And so were my customers. They wouldn’t let me stop making them. I’m now at the point of expanding my soap business, starting with Etsy. So far it’s been fun talking with people from all over!

Wow! What do I most like about your company? That’s a hard one. Besides customer service, wonderful fragrances, and value… I’d have to say the one thing I love love love, is your vanilla stabilizer. I was having a heck of a time with my soaps turning brown from vanilla. This has worked beautifully in my melt and pour soaps. A big “Thank you!”

I don’t have a website, and haven’t really been on Facebook much, but will be. Cindy Tedeschi is my face book name.

I haven’t been on twitter yet… I’m too busy checking out YouTube videos. It’s like having a craft class as often as you like. I have learned so much from so many talented people out there!

I’d like to make my soap business a part time hobby for now, eventually perhaps, more full time. I’ve been a hairdresser for 30 years, and love it. My joints from all the years are starting to get old, and one day, I might not be able to make an income doing hair any longer, and soaps is just a great thing to do!

My store name on Etsy is CLTCRAFTS

My hair salon is Tahoe Hair Co. South lake Tahoe , Ca. Where this soap picture was taken from.

Thank you again for taking the time to read this, and thank you for all you do.

Sincerely, Cindy Tedeschi