Archive for the ‘moisturizing ingredient’ Category

Sealing Oils

Sunday, July 20th, 2014

sealing oilSealing Oils for Hair

When your hair is dry, moisturizing will help prevent the hair from having split ends, or becoming brittle and breaking off.  However, sometimes you need more than just moisturizing.  In order to help keep the hair moisturized, you can also seal it.  By sealing your hair, you are essentially trapping the moisturizing agent into each strand of hair.

Sealing oils are light oils.  There are several different sealing oils that you can use on your hair.  After these oils are applied, they do not completely absorb into the hair.  This is because these oils contain molecules that are of a larger size.  So, instead of being absorbed fully by the hair, they coat the hair.  This coating is what allows the moisturizing element to stay put.

Whether you moisturize your hair with a specific water based product, or simply apply the sealing oil (or light hair oil) after your hair is wet from the shower, the sealing oils do their job; prevent evaporation and seal in the moisture.  The perfect solution when there is high humidity outside and you want to block the outside environment from wreaking havoc on your hair.  Or, just a great way to prevent frizzy hair; sealing oils are the answer.  A sealing oil will not only lock the moisture in, but also keep outside elements out, and as an added bonus you will find that your hair style will stay in place for a longer period of time.

Now, when it comes to using these oils to seal in moisture there are a few different routes you can take.  Here are two of them:

One option is if your hair is dry.  Using a spray bottle, mix the oil or oils of your choosing.  Then, to the bottle add some leave in conditioner and water.  Shake vigorously and spritz thoroughly into the hair.

The next option for applying sealing oils would be after your hair is already wet.  To the wet hair, you would add the leave in conditioner. Then using your hands, gently work the sealing oil in.  When going this route, it is important to remember to really focus on the ends of the hair.

Regardless of which way you apply your sealing oil, once it is in you may proceed with styling as normal.  Because these sealing oils do not absorb but rather coat the moisture in, you will find that after your hair is styled, it will have a beautiful shine.  This is especially true if your are styling with a blow dryer.

Sealing Oils
These oils are considered to be very light.  This means that they will not weigh down your hair.  Also, unlike other oils, these oils will not leaving your hair looking greasy either.  Used alone or in combination with one another, these oils will seal the deal when it comes to locking in moisture for your hair.  And, they also contain various other benefits for your hair.

Grape Seed Oil-  An effective oil in preventing moisture loss, grape seed oil has a high amount of linoleic acid.  This acid is a type of omega-6 fatty acid.  A light oil that does not leave hair looking or feeling greasy, grape seed oil also contains important nutrients, nourishing and promoting healthy hair.  In fact some of the key benefits for the use of this oil include: moisturizing hair, strengthening hair, combating dandruff, and encourage hair growth.   Besides the linoleic acid, grape seed oil also contains antioxidants like the nourishing Vitamin E, proteins, and minerals.

Jojoba Oil-  Jojoba oil has always been known as a wonderful ingredient to include in any body care product.  But, this sealing oil is extremely special in that it is the one that most closely resembles our hairs natural oil, aka sebum.  Having 98% monounsaturated fats, jojoba oil strengthen the hair strands while it hydrates, and can even help repair damage.  This creates hair that is shiny, soft, and full of body.  Being rich in Vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, and especially Vitamin E, jojoba oil not only nurtures it also nourishes. And, because jojoba oil is so similar to sebum, this sealing oil not only keeps the hair moisturized, but it can incredibly enhance the overall healthiness of your hair.

Sweet Almond Oil-  This sealing oil is great because it does not only nourish but also smooths the hair. Containing tons of vital nutrients to allow your hair to not only be healthy but also grow thick, long, and strong, Sweet Almond Oil has both polyunsaturated and mono fatty acids.  Besides the nutrients, sweet almond oil also has vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, D, and high amounts of E.  Vitamin E is beneficial for its conditioning aspects for hair.  It is also believed that when massaged into the scalp on a regular basis, sweet almond oil will also help to reduce and control hair loss.

Sunflower Oil- The second most popular oil for hair care products, sunflower oil is plentiful and rich gamma linolenic acid (omega-6).  But, it also includes oleic and palmitic acids, lecithin, and tocopherols.  This sealing oil is also considered an emollient meaning it has lubricating elements which prevent water loss.  A very nourishing oil for hair, sunflower oil contains vitamin A, B1, B5, B6, C, D, and E.  A versatile oil with many benefits, using sunflower oil in your hair will help make your hair more manageable, control frizz, and hydrate.

These oils are all great candidates to having a healthy, full bodied head of hair with lustrous sheen and elasticity.  And let’s not forget about all of the nourishing and repairing aspects these oils also provide.  All in all, pampering your hair by showing it a little TLC with these oils will make for one happy head of hair.

Sodium Lactate in Soap & Lotions

Thursday, September 26th, 2013
sodium lactate

Sodium Lactate: Most commonly derived by the fermentation of corn or beets, this natural body product additive has a smooth, clear appearance with almost no odor.

 

Sodium Lactate is quickly gaining the spotlight as an additive in the creation of bath and body products.  Although it is not a mandatory ingredient, sodium lactate can hold its own when it comes to functionality in a recipe.  

Sodium lactate, a water soluble ingredient, is added during the water phase of the creation.  It is used in bath products and has many beneficial aspects to its use.  It is a natural moisturizer, humectant (bringing moisture to itself), and pH regulator.  Sodium Lactate is used in a variety of bath products such as soaps, lotions, and shampoos.   In fact, when it comes to lotion formulations, sodium lactate can be used to replace vegetable glycerin.  Why is this a benefit?  Using sodium lactate instead of vegetable glycerin will give you a final product that lacks the stickiness that usually occurs when using vegetable glycerin in a lotion recipe.  Sodium lactate also helps reduce the “greasiness” of the oils in your emulsions, while improving the absorption capability of emulsions.   In emulsions like lotions, sodium lactate is used at the rate of 1-3% of the weight of your recipe.

Sodium lactate is used in cold process soap recipes to harden the soap, making for a harder, longer lasting bar of soap in the tub.  One of the great bonuses of using sodium lactate in your soap recipe is the easier releasing of the soap from the mold, especially if you are using more of a complex shaped mold.  Besides adding moisture and conditioning aspects to your soap, sodium lactate helps to increase lather and can even add mildness to the soap.

For cold process soap makers, the sodium lactate is added to your cooled lye water solution.  What results is a harder bar of soap that will release from the mold easier, and can be cut earlier than the traditional cold process soap.  Also, the physical appearance of a soap that has the addition of sodium lactate will improve.  The bars will have a creamier look to them, and the soap will provide a more luxurious lather. Sodium Lactate aids in keeping your soap batter in a liquid state longer.  This makes coloring/swirling and pouring easier.  But once the soap is molded, sodium lactate will harden your soap faster, allowing for the soap to unmold easily.

For hot process soap makers, sodium lactate is added to your lye water solution, and other ingredients are mixed in.

Testing is key for finding the right percentage of use for sodium lactate in your recipe.  For a great starting point is 1/2 oz.  sodium lactate per pound of soap oils. But, test, test, test!  Be cautious not to add too much sodium lactate, this will cause your soap to be brittle and/or crumbly.

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.