Category Archives: herbal tea

Jul
17

Spearmint Leaf Benefits


This entry was posted in bath products, herb, herbal tea, herbs, herbs in cosmetics, Herbs in Soap, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden Wholesale, wholesale supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Spearmint Leaf BenefitsSpearmint Leaf Benefits

There are many beneficial properties in spearmint leaves that you can use for your whole body. There is spearmint that you can use to create food and herbal teas. Also, there are herbs like ours that you can use to nourish your body from the outside in. Further, there are tons of beneficial properties that can be utilized. Whether you are looking for a natural remedy for a cold or just love the aroma of spearmint, you are sure to enjoy this cosmetic herb. The Natures Garden Spearmint Leaf Cut and Sifted herb is perfect for creating herbal spearmint soap and so many more wholesale bath and body products. So, try out some of these spearmint leaf benefits in your own natural bath and body recipes.

Spearmint Leaf Benefits: Growing ConditionsSpearmint Leaf Benefits: Growing Conditions

While spearmint can be grown either in a garden outside or in a planter inside, you will likely what to plant it in a pot This mint plant can grow quickly and possibly over take other plants in a garden. Further, this plant is considered invasive in many areas outside of the Mediterranean and could harm the local environment. The root system of a mint plant is dense and can stretch out many feet and pop up all over the place. So, proving borders for you plant is a safe way to prevent your delicious mint from becoming a pesky weed. Many gardeners will use a hanging basket or separate containers for their mint.

Since spearmint is popular for cooking, it is a perfect plant to add to the herb garden anyways. The plant will prosper in partial shade and a pH of 6.5 or 7. Also, the spearmint plant requires moist soil that drains well. Once your plant has sprouted, you can water the plant one or two times a week, just be careful not to water too often. It is believed that infrequent, thorough waters are better than a shallow watering that occurs more often. Also, you can fertilize the soil but be care to avoid getting the fertilizer on the leaves. You could dilute the fertilizer to help reduce or eliminate the possibility of burning your spearmint leaves.

Spearmint Leaf Benefits: Industry Uses

Spearmint is great herb with a bright, minty aroma and some wonderful properties for the body. Both the aroma and natural properties of this mint provide benefits for the body. You can use spearmint in natural home remedies for feeling sick. Also, you can use this wholesale mint herb to create bath and body products that care for your skin and hair as well as help to relieve congestion. Plus, spearmint is perfect for adding flavor to delicious foods, like ice cream or candy. So, there are many ways to use the beneficial properties of this herb.

Spearmint Leaf Benefits: Bath and BodySpearmint Leaf Benefits: Bath and Body

Also, this wonderful cosmetic herb has many wonderful properties for your body. These properties are perfect for providing you skin and hair with wonderful benefits. Plus, the aromatic scent of spearmint is useful for your respiratory system. So, this is an especially great herb for anyone that is sick or has allergies. However, healthy people will enjoy the properties of this herb just as much! So, check out all the properties that the spearmint leaves has for your body.

Due to this herb’s antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anti fungal properties it is great for creating effective bars of soap. Further, the antibacterial properties are beneficial for treating and naturally disinfecting minor cuts and scrapes. Also, many have found that spearmint was useful for some skin conditions. Another bonus is that the spearmint herb has a cooling and refreshing feeling for the skin. Some people have found that spearmint was effective for treating their acne. So, this is a perfect ingredient for making spearmint soap or even lotion recipes. Also, you can include this cosmetic herb to create cleansing hair care products. This herb would be perfect for a natural lice remedy recipe. Plus, the soothing properties are useful for reducing the irritation of an itchy, dry scalp.

Spearmint Leaf Benefits: How to Add Herbs to Recipes

If you are interested in adding this cosmetic herb to your homemade bath and body products, there are a few ways you can do it. First, you can add the whole herbs to the recipe. This can be especially useful for creating a light exfoliation in your final product. However, this isn’t the only way to include this natural herb. Anyone that wants a smooth product can use a teabag to hold the herb and soak them in the ingredients. If your recipe uses water, then you can create a tea. Similarly, you can soak the herbal tea bag in your melting oils for recipes that don’t use any water. This will allow the beneficial properties to escape form the herb to incorporate into your natural recipe.

Spearmint Leaf Benefits: Natures Garden RecipesSpearmint Leaf Benefits: Natures Garden Recipes

We included this wonderful herb in our own bath bomb supplies wholesale to create the Sinus Relief Bath Bomb Recipe. This recipe uses both peppermint leaf and spearmint leaf to enhance the scent of our Sinus Relief Fragrance Oil. This fragrance oil has a cool, crisp blend of camphor, eucalyptus, and mint that makes it perfect for clearing your sinuses. In fact, it smells just like Vick’s Vapor Rub! So, the mint herbs blended perfectly to add a stronger mint note to the fantastic aroma. 

Spearmint Leaf Benefits: Medicinal UsesSpearmint Leaf Benefits: Medicinal Uses

Not only is spearmint enjoyed for its flavor, but it has some medicinal properties that many people enjoy. Often, people will create a tea with spearmint to benefit from these properties. This will allow the body take in a larger amount without too much extra other stuff. But, you can also add spearmint to a sweet tea or even food. So, there are plenty of options for you to get these beneficial properties into your system. Check out all the potential benefits for you body before you look into the different types of food that you can create!

First, many people use spearmint on its own or in teas to settle their stomachs. This mint herb is useful for soothing your stomach during digestion and dealing with indigestion. Further, some studies have shown that spearmint can be used to reduce nausea due to illness, morning sickness, or even motion sickness. Not only will spearmint help to calm your sick stomach, but it has been known to be beneficial for treating respiratory problems, like colds. Plus, there is evidence that the aroma of spearmint is useful for allergies and asthma.

Spearmint Leaf Benefits: Spearmint Tea Hormones

Additionally, spearmint has been found to help regulate the hormones that may throw our periods out of wack. So, any ladies out there that are frustrated with irregular periods may want to give spearmint a try. Not only do some people find that this herb is able to help stabilize irregular periods, but some women have been able to solve their issue of early menopause. Further, many women have found spearmint tea useful for relieving symptoms of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. The spearmint has been known to help balance the excess androgens produced by the body by suppressing testosterone a bit. So, this may be useful for keeping the hormone imbalances in check and remedying the symptoms.

Spearmint Leaf Benefits: Food and BeverageSpearmint Leaf Benefits: Food and Beverage

Spearmint is one of the most beloved types of mint, as it has cool and crisp notes  a  peppermint with a sweeter, smoother taste. Since spearmint is about as popular as peppermint, it has been incorporated into quite a lot of different types of food. First, spearmint has been used to flavor different candies and desserts, which is perfect for achieving a great, mint taste that is sweet and delicious. If you are looking for a yummy dessert recipe to try using fresh spearmint at home, then check out Martha Stewart’s Fresh Spearmint Ice Cream recipe! This ice cream recipe uses natural ingredients to create a scrumptious dessert without ever leaving the comfort of home.

Also, spearmint is used to create teas or naturally flavor drinks like sweet tea. Although many people prepare spearmint this way to enjoy its medicinal properties, as it is simple to make, it is actually tasty, too. Plus, spearmint is even occasionally used as a garnish or a flavoring in certain recipes. So, there are tons of ways that spearmint has been integrated into our foods. Further, spearmint is used in gum, mouth wash. and tooth paste. The spearmint is added  both the cool, refreshing flavor and the benefits it can provide for your mouth. Spearmint has antibacterial and antimicrobial properties that are useful for killing bad bacteria in your mouth. So, spearmint will keep bad breath away as well as help to promote healthy teeth and gums.

Spearmint Leaf Benefits: OtherSpearmint Leaf Benefits: Other

Also, you can use spearmint to create a homemade mosquito repellent recipe, as it has been known to repel various insects. So, you can create a natural lotion recipe that is both loving for the skin and repels pesky bugs. Also, it thought that the herb may repel other pests, like moths, flies, and ants. Although you may not need to repel these bugs from swarming you, the spearmint can be useful for creating natural bug repellent for your home.

Additionally, some people believe that the aroma of spearmint has relaxing properties that are useful for dealing with some negative emotions. You can use the oil to relieve stress. It is said that spearmint helps to relax you by reducing headaches and by helping to promote overall brain health. Also, some have found that this was able to help with anxiety and depression. Plus, using spearmint as aroma therapy is thought to improve alertness too. This is useful for periods of heavy work, or feeling tired, and lose of motivation. So, you can use this herb to combat the stresses of being overworked.

Spearmint Leaf Benefits: History of Spearmint

Spearmint originally began growing in Mediterranean. It was initially used to scent bath water, clear the voice, cure hiccups, and more. Plus, it was used as an aphrodisiac in Greece. Later, it spread to other areas in Europe, including Great Britain. Then, spearmint was brought to American by the pilgrims for aromatic and herbal purposes. Although this plant is useful for us and has many benefits, spearmint is considered an invasive species in many places outside of the Mediterranean.

Spearmint Leaf Benefits: Ask Us Your QuestionsSpearmint Leaf Benefits: Ask Us Your Questions

We hope that you enjoyed this cosmetic blog on spearmint and learned something about its uses and benefits. You can use this herb in your natural bath and body products and enjoy the wonderful benefits. Plus, you can mix it with other Herbs and Spices from our website. If you have any questions about using this herb, then please reach out to us. We are available on the Natures Garden Facebook page and you can find us on Twitter or Instagram using @ngscents. Also, feel free to share your opinions on this herbs and your favorite recipe to include spearmint in. Good luck with your wonderful recipes and we hope to hear from you soon.

Spearmint Leaf Benefits: Reminder About Our Herbs

Note: Natures Garden sells herbs, like our Spearmint Leaf Cut & Sifted, for external use only. Although some people use spearmint leaves in food, we do not sell our herbs as food items. So, the information that we provide about our herbs is only for educational purposes. We do not intend for you to use this information to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease. The Food and Drug Administration has not evaluated any of this information. Make sure that you keep all herbs out of reach of children and pets. Also, pregnant and/or lactating women should take special care and attention when handling any of our herbs. Natures Garden accepts no responsibility (written or implied) for any products you make with our herbs. Also, all product testing is the responsibility of the customer.

Jul
09

Green Tea Benefits


This entry was posted in cosmetic ingredients, cosmetic recipe, herbal tea, herbs, herbs in cosmetics, natural ingredients, Natures Garden, Natures Garden craft recipes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Green Tea BenefitsGreen Tea Benefits

Many people enjoy drinking green tea, but the taste isn’t all that this tea is good for. In fact, there are many green tea benefits that you can enjoy in your various products. Just drinking green tea have some wonderful benefits for your body. Plus, you can even use green tea to provide benefits that make it perfect to add combine with bath and body supplies and create some fantastic products. Both our Green Tea Powder and our Green Tea Leaves Cut and Sifted from Natures Garden are perfect for creating wonderful homemade bath and body recipes. Plus, you can combine these herbs with other flower and herb powders that can be used as wonderful soap making supplies. So, let’s get into some of the amazing benefits that people can have from this wonderful cosmetic herb.

Green Tea Benefits: Growing ConditionsGreen Tea Benefits: Growing Conditions

Although green tea plants will grow best in areas that are considered zone 7, you can grow this plant in colder areas, too. All you have to do is put your tea plant in a pot and bring it in during the winter. This plant can survive down to about 0 degrees Fahrenheit. Then, you can transfer your plant to larger pots as it grows. You will know when it is time if you see that the roots begin to push out of the drain holes in the bottom. Your green tea plant will prefer soil that drains well, like a light sandy or medium loamy soil. Further, these plants like soil that is acidic that has a pH between 4.5 and 6. Also, your plant will prefer to be in either full or partial shade.

Once your plant is thriving, you can start thinking about harvesting your tea leaves. You will want to use the young tender tea leaves. So, pick a new shoot with only a few leaves on it. For best results, you may want a new shoot with about two or three leaves on it. Typically, you will be able to harvest your tea leaves in the summer. Later, the plant will bloom to produce pretty flowers, this will happen between September and November. While these blooms are quite pretty, they aren’t all that great for making green tea. So, you may want to store some for after green tea season.

Green Tea Benefits: Industrial Uses

There are many benefits that you can have from bringing green tea into your life. You can use this as a regular tea to provide your insides with all kinds of benefits. Also, you could use green tea to create all kinds of yummy foods. Another fun option is to create fun bath and body creations that you can use to care for your skin and hair. So, check out all the amazing benefits that you can use to pamper your body from head to toe.

GGreen Tea Benefits: Bath and Body Productsreen Tea Benefits: Bath and Body Products

Creating homemade bath and body products is great for making easy crafts for adults that produce some amazing results. One option for incorporating green tea into your products is adding the powdered herb directly into your products. Also, you could use our whole green tea cut and sifted to create a tea to use in the water phase of your cosmetic recipes. This homemade tea can be added to many recipes. You can also infuse green tea into the oils you are using in your recipe. Another option for you is to add the whole herb directly into your cosmetic recipes. Adding the whole green tea leaves will provide the regular benefits of green tea along with some light exfoliation for your skin. This could be useful for creating homemade scrub recipes. Now that we have options for incorporating this herb, let’s look at some of the potential benefits.

Green Tea Benefits: Bath and Body Product Benefits

First, this cosmetic herb has been found to be useful for skin complexion. A study had been done with green tea that revealed this herb can be used to rejuvenate the appearance of your skin. Not only does this herbal tea help your complexion, but it can be used to reduce circles or puffy under eyes. This is because green tea contains antioxidants and an astringent that can help shrink the blood vessels. So, you may want to create a lotion soap, or other bath and body product. Also, this herb would be perfect for making bath bombs, as you can soak in the rejuvenating herb as you relax in the tub.

Another great benefit of this herb is that it has been known to help reduce breakouts of acne and pimples. The antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties are both thought to be useful for fighting acne. These properties are thought to fight the bacteria that cause acne and reduce the redness and inflammation, too. Further, it is thought that the catechins in this tea can be used to help regulate hormone imbalances. So, creating an acne soap recipe with green tea would be a great idea!

Green Tea Benefits: Natures Garden Bath and Body Recipes

We incorporated our green tea cut and sifted herb to add some refreshing, soothing properties to our Sunburn Relief Bath Tea Recipe. We included this herb because green tea is popular for homemade sunburn remedies. First, the anti-inflammatory properties will help to reduce the redness and pain. Further, some have found that this herb is effective for reducing your risk of skin cancer or tumors due to UV sunlight. So, green tea is an amazing way to care for your skin after a sunburn and makes a perfect addition to our recipe for sunburn relief.

Green Tea Benefits: Food and BeveragesGreen Tea Benefits: Food and Beverages

The taste of green tea is often bittersweet, but the taste can vary slightly. This variation depends on the growing conditions, processing methods, and harvesting methods. Most often, people will use these leaves to create a tea. This practice is so common that the herb has been called green tea. However, there are other ways that people will use this herb. This includes adding it into their food recipes, as this herb can be a delicious flavor for some meal recipes, like the Green Tea Teriyaki Chicken Recipe. Another delicious example is all of the green tea themed dessert recipes on this Green Tea Food Recipes board on Pinterest, which is full of all kinds of ideas for green tea recipes.

Green Tea Benefits: Medicinal UsesGreen Tea Benefits: Medicinal Uses

Green Tea was one of the many herbs included in traditional Chinese medicine. The natural flavor was said to have cooling properties, which can be used to refresh the mind and promote a positive, alert mental state. Plus, it was thought that this tea will quench your thirst, promote body fluid production, and lead to good digestion. Also, some green tea would be good for a cold, as it has been thought to cool the body and clear phlegm. Plus, it was thought that this tea could flush out toxic evils, as it would flush the body by promoting urination and bowel movements. Some of the traditional benefits that have been studied were immune and cardiac health. First, it was found that green tea contains polyphenols, which can reduce oxidative stress. and prevent oxidation of bad cholesterol. Further, another study on these polyphenols were linked to reduced abnormal cell growth.

Green Tea Benefits: More Medicinal Uses

Also, green tea has been known to kill bad bacteria. So, this tea is thought to help lower your risk of infection and possibly help reduce the length of illnesses. Plus, these properties are beneficial for promoting good oral health. The tea is thought to kill the bad bacteria in the mouth that are responsible for forming plaque and creating cavities. Further, the properties in this herb are thought to help reduce bone loss.

Some people will try green tea to help reduce their chance of cancer. There are properties in this tea that can help protect your cells from oxidation damage. This kind of damage can damage cells and lead to the uncontrolled growth of cancer cells. A few studies were done that found a correlation between drinking green tea and having a reduced risk of certain cancers.

Additionally, green tea has been thought to promote brain health. A study on green tea found that the polyphenols were able to boost the amount of available dopamine in the brain, which promotes a positive mood. Further, these chemicals were found to help regulate insulin in the brain by enhancing the sensitivity for it in the brain. Also, some studies have linked green tea to a reduced risk of certain brain diseases common in old age. These diseases include both Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Since Parkinson’s disease involves the death of dopamine producing neurons, an herb that promotes the production of dopamine from other cells could be beneficial. Also, EGCG was found to help protect your brain from forming the plaques that are thought to cause Alzhemer’s disease.

Green Tea Benefits: Other UsesGreen Tea Benefits: Other Uses

Another benefit of green tea is that it can help you stay awake. Many people prefer to drink tea instead of coffee, as it doesn’t provide the same “jittery” feeling that coffee can. Although green tea does naturally contain some caffeine, it has a much lower concentration than coffee. So, this is a more gentle way to wake yourself up in the morning. Furthermore, there is a chemical in green tea called theanine, which can provide a calming effect. So, you may be able to use tea to have a calm, alert feeling without the nervous jitters.

Additionally, green tea contains chemicals that are useful for reducing anxiety. This tea contains L-theanine, which has been found to increase leaves of dopamine and improve positive mental function. Also, there have been studies that like green tea to weight loss. It is thought that this tea can help to reduce appetite. Further, there have been mixed results on the EGCG, a powerful antioxidant, in green tea being able to promote weight loss.

Green Tea Benefits: Boseong Green Tea Fields

Anyone that is a really big fan of green tea will want to hear about the Boseong Green Tea Fields. These Green Tea Fields in Korea are absolutely stunning and you can stroll through the beautiful landscape, stop at souvenir shops, or even try green tea ice cream. If you want to hear about a tea lover’s actual experience, then check out Boseong Green Tea Fields: Everything You Need To Know To Visit. Not only does she show pictures and share her experience, but she provides tips for travel and other nearby destinations to visit for anyone that is interested in going!

Green Tea Benefits: Ask Us Any QuestionsGreen Tea Benefits: Ask Us Any Questions

We hope that you learned something new about green tea from our natural cosmetic blog. Also, you can use this botanical herb along with some of our other herbs and spices to create some amazing bath and body recipes. If you have any other questions about this wholesale herb or any other, then reach out and ask us. You can find us in the Natures Garden store, on the phone, or online. You can easily find us on Facebook, Twitter (@ngscents), or Instagram (@ngscents). Hope to hear from you soon!

Green Tea Benefits: Reminder About All Our Herbs

Note: Natures Garden sells herbs, like our Green Tea Powder and our Green Tea Leaves Cut and Sifted, for external use only. Although other suppliers may sell green tea that is food grade, we do not sell our herbs as food items. So, the information that we provide about our herbs is only for educational purposes. We do not intend for you to use this information to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease. The Food and Drug Administration has not evaluated any of this information. Make sure that you keep your herbs out of reach of any children or pets. Also, pregnant and/or lactating women should take special care when handling our various herbs. Natures Garden accepts no responsibility (written or implied) for any products you make with these herbs. All product testing is the responsibility of the customer.

Oct
30

White Willow Bark Uses


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, herbal tea, herbs, Natures Garden, white willow bark and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

white willow barkWhite Willow Bark Uses

Hello all you wonderful people! For all you crafters out there, are you looking for something new and exciting to try? Do you love adding different herbs and ingredients to your bath and body products? Or maybe even trying different ingredients in your soaps? Well, have you ever used white willow bark before? This product is simply amazing, it has so many uses that you’ll be itching to try it as soon as you’re done reading this! White willow bark can be used for so many different industries and products such as hair care, skin care, medicinal uses, bath and body products, and you can even make a white willow bark tea!

There are so many different white willow bark uses. It can be used in many common bath and body products such as facial masks, bath teas and salts, lotions, ointments, creams, bath bombs, scrubs and even soaps. With using these products, there are many skin care and hair care benefits. For the hair, white willow bark helps to moisturize it and the scalp. It also is used to remove dandruff and excess oils. For your skin, the white willow bark will help brighten any dark areas of the skin and give it an even smooth complexion. It is also used to treat black heads, white heads, acne, and even oily or inflamed skin. When you use this product in some herbal concoctions, it is known to help relieve pain.

White willow bark has many medicinal benefits as well. The tea can be used as a foot soak to help with smelly, sweaty, or sore feet and the tea can also be used as a gargle to treat sore throats and tonsillitis. White willow bark contains a compound called salicin that is like aspirin. It is better on the stomach than aspirin and doesn’t irritate the lining. White willow bark also has many different properties like being antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, astringent, and anti-pyretic. It can be used to treat arthritis, gout, diarrhea, gas, fever, headaches, heartburn, joint pains, colds, bursitis, the flu, osteoarthritis, and tendonitis. It also contains natural antioxidants and flavonoids that help to remove harmful chemicals from the body that could later cause cancers. It even can remove warts, stop vomiting and suppress sexual desire. Pregnant women are recommended not to use this product, however it does help to alleviate women’s pain caused from menstrual cramps. It also helps with hot flashes and night sweats brought on from menopause. White willow bark also speeds up any herbal supplements being used to help a person lose weight.

Are you wondering how to find this fantastic product as soon as possible? Well, on our website, just type “white willow” into the search bar. That will take you directly to our cut and sifted white willow bark. But don’t take my blog as medical advice please, always consult with your doctor before using anything in place of medical treatment! Did you know that the wood from the white willow tree is used to make bats for the game cricket? And the wood used to be an important ingredient in the manufacturing of gun powder? Enjoy this awesome product! And be sure to watch out for more Enlightened by Layla! Are you looking for even more fun things to try? Check out all of our awesome free classes and recipes!

white willow bark page

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Feb
21

Lavender


This entry was posted in Air Fresheners, all natural, aromatherapy, bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, herbal tea, herbs, Natures Garden, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

lavender in bath productsLavender Flowers

This amazing herb does wonderful things when introduced as a skin care ingredient.  Whether it is used in flower form, powder form, or in the form of an essential oil, lavender can be a go to ingredient for aromatherapy needs, antiseptic benefits, or even relief from pain and discomfort due to skin irritations.  This beautiful herb is also cherished for its decorative nature in both the body care industry as well as food and beverage industries, especially when it comes to the realm of teas and desserts.

The name lavender comes from its scientific name lavandula which is actually derived from the Latin word lavare which means to wash.  In fact, lavender was often heavily used by the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans for its antiseptic benefits for the skin, healing powers, and as an aromatic perfume.

There are several ways to use the wonderful benefits of lavender in your homemade skin care and body wellness products.  The very aromatic herb lavender is available for purchase in several different mediums at Natures Garden.

Lavender Flower Whole Select–  In this shape, it can be used directly in items like bath teas and soaps.  This form of herb can be steeped to make an oil infusion which then can be used in a plethora of bath and body products like: skin toners, lotions, body creams, perfumes, shampoos, etc.

Lavender Flower Powder–  In powder form, lavender can be used directly in your formulations and this even includes body powders.  The only precaution to remember when using this herb is that as with any powder, it is prone to clumping if not made into a paste first.

As an essential oil, lavender is available as Lavender Essential Oil 40/42 or Lavandin Grosso Pure Essential Oil.  Either of these essential oils can be used to scent your products for aromatherapy needs or to take advantage of all of the skin care benefits lavender provides.

The scent of lavender is one of the most well known aromas worldwide.  No matter where you live, chances are you have smelled this distinctive scent.  Often used in aromatherapy and in body care products as a natural antidepressant; lavender will ease stress and tension by promoting relaxation.  Lavender works as a nervine; calming the nerves and reducing irritability of the mind and body.

As an analgesic, this herb can actually help to reduce pain from skin issues and aliments like acne, boils, eczema, and psoriasis.  This herb is even beneficial for treating burns, sunburns, insect bites and stings.

As a natural air freshener, lavender also works to fight against air borne viruses.  You can achieve this by simply steeping lavender buds in water and letting the aroma fill the air.

Lavender has an array of uses; to read the full class on all of the benefits of lavender, please click on this link.

To view some wonderful bath and body recipes that contain the amazing herb of lavender in flower form or in powder form, please check out the links below:

Lemon Lavender Bath Melts Recipe
Lavender Sage Bath Bomb Recipe
Fizzy Milk Bath Recipe
Sensual Massage Oil Recipe
Lavender Luxury Cold Process Soap Recipe
Relaxing Eye Pillow Recipe
Lavender Apple Sugar Scrub Recipe
Lavender Vanilla Body Powder Recipe

Natures Garden sells our lavender flowers herbs and essential oils for external applications only.  In the above written blog post, we briefly discussed the wonderful benefits of lavender and the some of its uses across various industries.  Nothing in this article is to be construed as medical advice.  Please consult your doctor before using any of this information for treatment purposes.  We provide this data for educational purposes only.

Feb
19

Firming Facial Mask


This entry was posted in all natural, bath and body, bath products, cosmetic clays, cosmetic ingredients, cosmetic recipe, facial masks, herbal tea, herbs, homemade, humectant, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

make your own facial maskFirming Facial Mask

Whether you are looking to spend some quality time with the girls, or just wanting to treat yourself; using a homemade facial mask is the route to go.

Not only is making a facial mask super easy, it is also a great way to tone, firm, and even revitalize your face.  There are a variety of herbs and clays that you can use to make your very own facial masks.  Each herb or clay has its very own distinctive skin loving benefits that you can introduce into your facial masks.  The herb and clay that you select is dependent upon what you want the end results of your mask to have.

For this firming facial mask recipe, the herb that was focused on was Hibiscus.  This includes both hibiscus flowers and hibiscus flower powder.

Hibiscus is quite the amazing flower and has even been affectionately named “the botox plant”.  Used in skin and hair care for thousands of years, this amazing herb is a natural source of alpha hydroxy acids (Vitamin C).  These acids can gently exfoliate your skin while encouraging the replacement of dead and dull cells with new ones.  This herb also has anti aging properties with the capability of soothing, smoothing, and firming the skin.

As for the main ingredient for the firming facial mask, Red Moroccan clay was selected.  This clay is one of the purest forms of cosmetic clays available.  With the ability to draw out toxins and impurities, Red Moroccan clay also acts as a moisturizing agent for your skin.

To help to keep the skin moisturized vegetable glycerin is also used in this recipe.  Vegetable Glycerin  is a humectant.  What this means is that this ingredient will help to draw moisture to your skin and keep it there.

If you want to make this recipe, all ingredients can be found at Natures Garden.

Now, on to the firming facial mask recipe:
This easy homemade recipe will make 2 facial masks.  The total time the masks take to make is about 45 minutes.  Game on wrinkles!

Step 1:  In a pot, weigh out 120 grams of distilled water.  Then, place the water on the stove top and heat it until it reaches 180 degrees Fahrenheit.  Once you hit this temperature, allow the water to hold for an additional 20 minutes.

Step 2:  Weigh out 2 grams of Hibiscus flowers.  Place the dried flowers into an empty tea bag and tie it shut.  Place the tea bag into a coffee cup.

Step 3:  When the 20 minutes have elapsed, remove the water from the heat source.  Now, carefully pour the hot water into the coffee over.  Using a spoon, hold the tea bag down into the water until it is completely saturated.  Then allow the tea bag to steep for about 10 minutes or so.  Occassionally while the tea bag is steeping, use a spoon to press the tea bag.  This will ensure you have a nice and strong Hibiscus Tea.

Step 4:  In a small bowl, weigh out 23 grams of Red Moroccan clay and 3 grams of Hibiscus flower powder.  Break up any clumps you may have.  Then, gently stir these two ingredients together.

Step 5:  When your hibiscus tea is finished steeping, in a separate bowl, weigh out 18 grams of the tea.  To this add 6 grams of vegetable glycerin.  Stir.

Step 6:  Now, carefully scoop the clay/flower mixture into the tea/glycerin bowl.  With each scoop that is added, stir well to fully incorporate.  Keep adding the clay/flower mixture until it is all in the tea/glycerin.    Keep stirring this until there is no visible powder left.

Note:  If you plan on selling this mixed facial mask, you will need to add 1% optiphen preservative to the mask at a temperature that is not higher than 140F.  This will help prevent bacterial growth.  If you are making this recipe for self use, but do not plan to use all of it at one time, place the remainder in the refrigerator up to 1 week.  Throw away after 1 week if the mixture is not properly preserved.

Now, to use your firming facial mask:

Once the mixture has cooled, start applying it generously to your face.  Once the mask is completely applied, allow it to fully dry.  This drying process will take about 20 minutes to complete.  As the mask dries, you will notice a color change in the mask itself.  Your face will also begin to feel tighter.

When the mask has dried, wash it off with warm water.  Then, pat your face dry with a towel.

Please Note:  Hibiscus WILL stain your clothes/towels.  It is advisable to wear clothes and use towels that can be stained.  Also, there will be a slight stain left on your face once the mask is removed.  This stain will disappear after an additional wash or two.

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

Jan
15

Herbal Infusion


This entry was posted in all natural, bath and body, bath products, essential oils, fragrance oil, herb, herbal oil infusion, herbal tea, herbs, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Herbal InfusionHerbal Infusion

Many times the herbs that we seek out to use in a bath or body recipe may be a little too coarse for our skin.  This is the point where typically a conundrum lies.  The battle that is at hand is the great skin loving nutrients and benefits that herbs are able to provide versus the rigidity and awkwardness of the herbs physical form.  This is especially true for herbs that are cut and sifted.

There is however great news to share.  An herbal infusion is the problem solver in this situation.

What is an Herbal Infusion:  The true definition of the action of infusion is a procedure of withdrawing various nutritive compounds of an herb into a solvent, and allowing them to linger in the solvent for a period of time.  Basically, an herbal infusion is the method of extracting the medicinal benefits of herbs and steeping them to allow the transfer of herbal benefits into another medium.

There are different kinds of herbal infusions that can be made.  They all vary according to what medium is used.  The different solvents or mediums that can be used for an herbal infusion are water, oil (such as olive oil, apricot kernel oil, or sweet almond oil), vegetable glycerin, vinegar, propylene glycol, or alcohol.  Typically, herbal infusions made with alcohol or vegetable glycerin are referred to as tinctures or extracts.  The difference between extracts and tinctures is the amount of herb infused in the alcohol or glycerin.  An extract is considered 1 part herb to 1 part alcohol or glycerin.  A tincture is considered 1 part herbs to 3 parts alcohol or glycerin.

Infusions are necessary with some herbs due to their delicate nature.  Typically the fragile parts of the plant are used for infusions; this would be the parts that are above ground.  These parts would include:  leaves, flowers, stems, or aromatic pieces.   It is important to know your herbs and understand their nature before deciding the best infusion route to take.

Hot infusions:
Hot infusions will bring out vitamins, and enzymes.  This type of infusion will also allow the aromatic notes of the herbs out, which are also known as essential oils.  This method works best for the herbs that are a little more reluctant to forgo their medicinal characteristics.  This is generally the herbs in the form of barks and roots; although all portions of the plant can be used.  Herbal tea is the most popular example of a hot herbal infusion.

Cold infusions:
Cold infusions are best for herbs that have a heat sensitive nature.  Using the hot method with these types of herbs may eliminate some of the remedial properties.  This process is best for these types of herbs because through steeping (allowing a plant material to set in a medium undisturbed), they will release their medicinal attributes without being forced to do so with heat.

It is believed that the best types of herbs to use for an infusion are dried ones.  This is because nourishing minerals and phytochemicals that are naturally in herbs are best accessed by the drying out of the herb.  However, fresh herbs may also be used.

Depending on the method of your herbal infusion, it will vary the strength of the infusion itself.  Another deciding factor with infusion is the time that your herbal infusion will take as well as the deadline of your need for the infusion.  There are several different ways varying in strength and steep time that you can infuse herbs.

solar herbal infusionSolar Infusion:  This method involves the placement of your herbs and your solvent into a covered glass jar.  Make sure the cover is on tightly.  Then you allow your jar to set undisturbed in a warm/sunny area of your home-under a skylight or in a window sill. Allow this mixture to set for at least two weeks.  For more potent infusions, allow to set for 4-6 weeks.  After the time has passed, you may strain the herbs out with cheesecloth and use.  To make an even stronger infusion with this method, after straining, add another round of herbs to the same oil and allow it to set and steep again for two additional weeks.  Solar infusions typically use oils as the medium.  NOTE:  While sun tea can be made this way, it is important to understand that water can grow mold and bacteria within days.  Therefore, refrain from allowing sun tea to set in the sun more than a day before using or before refrigerating.

Oven Extraction:  The best method to use if you have selected a heat sensitive oil as your solvent and you are in a time crunch.  This method involves placing your herbs and solvent in a glass jar.  You will also want to make sure that you have it covered with a tight fitting lid.  Once sealed, select a deep cake pan and fill it with water.  The water level should rise to cover about half of your jar.  Then, simply place your deep cake pan into the oven and allow it to heat for several hours.  You want to make sure your oven temperature is on its lowest setting.  Once the time has passed, strain the herb out and allow the infusion to reach room temperature before using.

Hot water herbal infusionHot Water Steep:  This herbal infusion can be done if water is your selected solvent.  To do this method, place your herbs in a glass container.  Then, boil water.  Once your water is at a boil, turn off the stove top and carefully pour the boiling water over the herbs and into the jar.  Once the hot water has been added, quickly lid the jar tightly.  Allow the herbs to steep for 4-10 hours before opening the container to strain the herbs out.  Allow the infusion to reach room temperature before using.  A recipe for this hot water tea infusion:  Place 1 cup of dried herbs into a quart jar.  Pour hot water over the herbs.  Lid.  Set for 4-6 hours.  Strain.

Double Boiler:  This method is done by placing the herbs and oil in a lidded pot with the tightest lid possible.  Herbal Oil Infusion Recipe:  45 grams white sage leaves  + 392 grams of apricot kernel oil.  Next, take a second bigger pot and place water into it. Then, place the bigger pot on the stove top and set it on a lower temperature setting.  Next, place the smaller lidded pot containing your herbs and oil into the bigger one.   Allow this to simmer slowly for 30 minutes to an hour.  Throughout the time, continuously check your oil to make sure it is not overheating, and stir.  After the time has elapsed, strain the herbs out using a cheesecloth.   Allow the infusion to reach room temperature before using.

Tips for Infusions:
You can add extra scent to your infusion by adding fragrance oils or essential oils.

You can place the herbs that you will be infusing into a teabag or cheesecloth to help make the straining process easier.

No matter which method of infusion you are doing, a tight fitting lid is essential to the process.

You can combine herbs to make creative herbal infusions.

Uses for Infusions:
Water infusions can be used as a hair rinse.  This rinse can be left on the hair until the next time you shampoo.

Water infusions can be ingested as a tea (hot or cold) as long as the herb is safe for consumption.  Some herbs cannot be ingested at all, and can be deadly if consumed.   Check with your doctor before ingesting any herbs.  Honey can be added to make the taste of the tea more favorable.  If you have remaining infusion, refrigerate to slow spoilage rate.

Herbal infusions can be applied directly to the skin.  Oil infusions can be used for oil based bath and body products like massaging oils.

Herbal infusions can be inhaled for aromatherapy purposes.

Oil infusions can be bases for salves and balms.

You can use an oil infusion for emulsion products like sugar scrubs, lotions, and soaps.

For all natural herbs that you can use to make your own herbal infusions, shop Natures Garden’s Herbs.

Natures Garden sells our herbs for external applications only.  We are providing this information for herbal infusions for educational purposes only.  Nothing we mention should be construed as medical advice or for medical treatment purposes.   Please consult your doctor before using any herbs for treatment or other medicinal purposes.

Dec
31

White Sage Uses


This entry was posted in herb, herbal oil infusion, herbal tea, herbs, Uncategorized, white sage and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

white sageWhite Sage was considered a Holy herb by the American Indians who used it for smudging ceremonies, for bathing, for deodorant, and for medicinal purposes.  Natures Garden sells our white sage for external applications only, but in the following article, we will discuss how this wonderful herb has been used throughout history.  Nothing in this article is to be construed as medical advice; consult your doctor before using any herbs for treatment purposes. We provide this data for educational purposes only.    

White Sage (Salvia apiana) is an evergreen shrub that grows to 4-5 feet in height.  White sage grows well in climates that provide lots of sunlight, well-drained soil, mild winters, and little water.  Over-watering white sage can kill the plant. The leaves of white sage contain essential oils and resins that provide a wonderful aroma when rubbed together.  White sage’s scientific name is salvia apiana (apiana refers to the fact that bees are attracted to this plant); salvia means salvation.

The American Indians referred to white sage as the king of all sages, and frequently used this herb for medicinal and ceremonial purposes.  In fact, it is believed that the term “Holy Smoke” originated from the American Indians “smudging” white sage to rid people and places of unwanted evil spirits, and to protect themselves from those spirits.  In addition, they believe that the smoke of sage attaches itself to negative energy found within a person, and removes it from their body.   

White sage is still used today for smudging purposes.  The smudging process involves lighting the tips of dried sage leaves, blowing them out, and allowing the smoke to escape into the air.  Smudging is typically done using a sage wand (smudge stick), but loose white sage leaves can be used instead.  Sage wands are sage leaves wrapped tightly together.  To burn a smudge stick, light the tip of a few leaves and blow it out.  You can either wave the stick in air or place stick in a fire-safe container that contains salt or sand. The salt or sand will allow the smudge stick to stand erect while burning. To extinguish the smudge stick, place smoking end of the stick into the salt or sand and smolder. The smoke created from burning sage produces a calming effect on those who inhale it.  (Always use caution when burning sage, as anything that is on fire can potentially catch other things on fire.  Also, keep anything that is burning away from children and pets).

In addition to smudging, white sage may be used for topical applications by preparing teas, poultices, and/or oil infusions.  White sage is used in these applications because it has anti-fungal, antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, calming, deodorizing, and healing properties.  White sage contains diterpenoids, which are compounds which have been shown to fight bacterial infections, and reduce allergy symptoms.  It also contains cineole, which acts as an anti-inflammatory/anti-bacterial agent.  Tannic acid content provides anti-fungal properties.  Sage is also used as an antipyretic; used as a sweat bath to reduce fever. White sage has a calming effect on the body and soul.  This is likely due to its miltirone content (a compound which performs similar to valium to reduce anxiety).  Finally, white sage contains phytoestrogens, which are compounds very similar to the female hormone estrogen.  Herbalists have used white sage to help treat the hot flashes that accompany menopause.

 

White sage tea is prepared by steeping sage leaves in hot water.  Care is taken not to add white sage leaves to boiling water, as boiling water will destroy some of its medicinal value.  Once this tea is made, it can be used to make natural lotions and creams, soap, and hair care products.  The American Indians used white sage tea as a “soapless” shampoo.  Since white sage has deodorant qualities, sage tea can be used as a fabulous hair rinse that leaves your hair soft and manageable.  Sage tea can be used in place of plain water to make wonderful homemade soaps.  Natural lotions and creams can also be made using white sage tea in place of plain water.  This tea can also be added directly to your bathtub for a relaxing herbal bath.  Due to its tannic acid content (which has anti-fungal properties), white sage tea can be used as a foot bath to treat athlete’s foot.  White sage tea can also be used as a refreshing, natural vaginal deodorant.

White sage can be infused into oils to make fabulous massage oils, ointments, body butters, salves, lip balms, ect.  To prepare a white sage oil infusion, crush 1 cup dried white sage into 16 oz. olive oil (or another light oil such as sweet almond oil or sunflower oil), warm it gently in a double boiler for about 1 hour covered, pour the solution (including the herbs) into a jar and lid.  Allow this to set for 4-6 weeks; strain and use.  Your oil infusion will have a shelf life of about 1 year.  This white sage oil infusion can be used to make soaps, lotions, massage oils, ointments, salves, deodorants, creams, lip balms, scrubs, and other body products.

Finally, it is reported that white sage can be used internally (in small amounts) in the form of a tea for an array of medicinal treatments. Never should sage essential oil be ingested.  Before ingesting any type of herbs, you should consult with your doctor first. Herbalists use white sage as a tea, for soothing sore throats, for relaxation, for hormonal imbalances, for diarrhea, for indigestion, for ulcers, and for treating congestion in the respiratory tract.  Since white sage is a natural deodorant, it can be used to make natural douches.

White sage contains a compound known as thujone. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, this compound increases your heart rate and causes mental confusion. It can also lead to vomiting, restlessness and kidney complications when used in excess. Hence, you should exercise caution when using white sage.

A study performed at the University of Arizona in 1991 demonstrated that Salvia apiana has potential antibacterial properties against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Candida brassicae.   It was also published in March 2005 in “Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine” that scientists at the University of Southern California found white sage to contain eucalyptol, or cineole.  This compound is known to kill bacteria and can help clear a sinus infection. 

Sep
30

Coloring Cold Process Soaps with Herbs


This entry was posted in all natural, bath and body, cold process soap colorant, herbal oil infusion, herbal tea, herbs, natural colorants, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , on by .
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Adding herbs to your soap not only provides great skin loving benefits, but also can naturally color your soaps as well.

If you are looking for a way to naturally color your cold process soaps, herbs may be your answer.  The addition of herbs to your soaping recipes not only can provide your skin with different skin loving benefits, but can also give your soaps beautiful color as well.

There are basically three ways to incorporate herbs into your soaping recipe they are:

1.  As is.  If the herb you are adding is in a powder or small leaf/seed form, they can be added when your soap batter has reached trace.
2. Herbs in tea form.  This is done by steeping the herbs in water to create a tea, and then this “tea” is used as the water portion of your soap recipe.
3.  Oil infusion.  If you are selecting to infuse your herbs this way, you must make your herb oil infusion several weeks before using it in a soaping recipe.  The selected herbs are placed into one of your oils (that will be used in your soap recipe) and allowed to set for 4-6 weeks.  Then, strain the herbs out and use the oil in your soap recipe.  Please Note:  This process can also be done by adding the herbs to the melting pot as you wait for your soaping oils to melt.

The choice of how you would like to infuse your herbs is up to you and testing.  It is important to keep in mind what the end goal of adding the herb is before choosing your herbal addition method.  The answers as to why some people prefer different methods over others various based on easiness, time frame, best color production, or even strongest herbal infusion.  However, if you are simply looking to add herbs to your soap recipe for natural color, the herbs are added to your soap batter at trace.

It is also important that you test for discoloration in a soap recipe before adding an herb for colorant.  Natures Garden has a list of every fragrance oil they carry and how it preformed in cold process soap.  It is on their website under each fragrance oil’s page in the Fragrance Tested area, or for a complete list click Fragrances Tested in CP Soap Results.  You want to be prepared when adding herbs to soaping recipes, so knowing a little about how the fragrance oil reacts will only prepare you more for what to expect, especially when it comes to colorants!