Category Archives: handmade soap

Apr
28

Too Much Castor

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, castor oil, cold process soap, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, homemade soap, how to make cold process soap, Natures Garden, soap challenge, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

too much castor

The following blog was written by a new employee of Natures Garden who is doing her best to learn the science and art of soap making.  Please take that into consideration before commenting on her experiences, successes, and yes…failures.

Hello everyone!

The other day I wrote a blog about how I figured out my own recipe and all the details of my soap. I was so very excited about this project. I did really well throughout the whole process and was happy with the outcome of my soap. My soap bars were gorgeous and I was  officially a successful soap maker!

Well, the following day, I was assigned a new project: to write another recipe from start to finish. This would include everything from ingredients, to scent, to color, whether or not to add sodium lactate or color stabilizer, the swirl technique (aka design), and the mold. We are talking about EVERYTHING! I said, OK, I can do that!

The only difference between this assignment and my last project was this time there was not going to be a double check. Yes, the last few times I embarked on this journey, my work was double checked. I am in training, and there are a lot of things you need to know about the soap making process and everything that comes along with it. With all of that being said, I felt confident I could do this…really! So off I went.

I figured out my recipe, gathered all of my ingredients, put on my safety gear, and prepped.

Once I melted all of my oils, put together my lye solution, emulsified and scented, I was ready to design. I placed my colors in their bowls, and I was ready for the in the pot swirl. If you have not noticed, I am fond of this technique! Everything was going smoothly!

I took the colored batter that I was using and plopped it into my main soap batter and began the swirling technique. And, let me just tell you, my soap looked beautiful. I couldn’t even get over how nicely it poured into the silicone loaf mold. I was excited!

Now this was on Friday so I had to play the waiting game all weekend. By Sunday night, I couldn’t wait to see my masterpiece. When Monday morning finally arrived, I was ready to unveil my homemade soap. I picked it up and started to the chopping block. Hmmm, this soap seemed a bit squishy. I thought this can’t be good.

Starting to work the soap out of the mold, I realized that now it seemed sticky. This was not at all what I was hoping for. Finally, I got the soap out of the mold, and proceeded to cut it. That was when the soap stuck to my knife…just great! Despite the fact that the colors were awesome and it smelled great, I had messed up somewhere.  My soap bars were tacky and very soft.

So, I checked my weights and percentages. Everything was good. Then, I had my recipe double checked by someone else. They pointed out their opinion of what the problem could be.  I had too much castor oil in my recipe. Oopsy! I had totally overlooked the frequently-held opinion that when making soap that contains  Castor Oil , you may want to stay at 8% or less castor oil in your formulation.   My addition was 20%.

In the end, I felt defeated, and was totally bummed! I did however, make a note to self: while Castor oil is good for the “bubbly” in your soap, my experience showed me that using too much castor oil may produce soap that is tacky and hard to remove from the mold.  In the future, if I want to produce a harder bar of soap, I may want to increase my percentages of oils that are known to produce harder bars of soap such as coconut oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil.

I predicted I was going to fail…and when I do, I do it right…lol.

So my epic failure is a lesson learned. And, even though I am hard on my little feelings, don’t be too hard on yourself for your mistakes. My advice to any new soapers: Turn setbacks into future achievements, and lessons to be taught to others so they don’t make the same boo boos.

Until next time, have a fabulous day!

Cindy

 

 

Apr
22

Rebatching Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath and body fragrances, bath products, cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, homemade, Natures Garden, soap ingredients, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies, soap mold and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

rebatching soap Whether you view rebatching as an art, a doorway for the addition of gentle ingredients, or a second chance for your soap, this method of soap making offers opportunity.

The term rebatching for soap simply means remaking soap.  This method would be very similar to melt and pour soap in that you are melting down soap that has already gone through the saponification process.  Rebatching is more intricate than melt and pour soap though.  Rebatching involves cold processed or hot processed soap bars that are melted down for specific reasons.

A common technique used in soap making, rebatching allows many soap making handcrafters the chance to rework their soap recipes, introduce delicate scents and herbs, as well as add ingredients or colors they may have missed the opportunity to add the first time.

Since rebatched soap has already gone through the saponification process, the rebatching steps do not involve lye.  This is why rebatching allows the opportunity to add those delicate soaping ingredients; without fear.  With the rebatching method, these ingredients; which normally would not survive the saponification process, now have the chance to add wonderful benefits to your finished bars of soap.

Although time consuming, the rebatch process is fairly easy to do.  To put it briefly, the rebatching process is finely grating the soap, then heating (sometimes with the addition of a liquid like water to help prevent burning).  There are a few different ways to introduce heat to the shredded soap.  These ways would include:  double boiler, microwave, and crock pot.  But, please advise: you must monitor the soap while it is heating because you never want to scorch the soap.  This may be slightly more difficult using the microwave approach.

Now, as the soap is heated and starts to liquefy; it will have a very thick gel like density.  Once the soap hits this consistency, any additives or scents are added and stirred in.  Once the soap is stirred well, it is then scooped into a mold, left to harden, and finally cut into slices.

So, now that you have an understanding as to what the method of rebatching is, we will shortly post a blog as to the various reasons to rebatch.  This post will also cover the benefits as well as the drawbacks of rebatching your soap.

Apr
18

Why Rebatch

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, body safe fragrance oils, cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, essential oils, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, homemade soap, natural colorants, Natures Garden, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

rebatch soapRebatching your soap can literally be a “saving redo” for your soap recipe.

Sometimes your homemade soap bars are cracked, brittle, or just not performing like what you were hoping for. 

These are all perfect examples as to why you would rebatch your recipe.  But, it just doesn’t stop there. 

Soapers rebatch a soap recipe for a variety of reasons.  Below is a list of the benefits and key points you should know about rebatching a soap recipe.  Rebatching soap is essentially making the soap twice.  The first time you are completing the saponification process.  (Or, you may be using soap that has already been through the saponification process.)  Then, the second time you grate down the soap and melt it (for the reason you are rebatching). 

Benefits of a Rebatch
Rebatching a soap recipe for the addition of heat sensitive ingredients: 

Sometimes with homemade soap crafting, there are certain fragrances or essential oils that you really want to scent your soap bars; but worry that the scents cannot handle the high heat due to the saponification process.  Many times with low flash point fragrances or essential oils, there is scent burn off.  What results in your finished bars is soap that has little or no scent.  Rebatching soap will not only safely allow you to add these heat sensitive scents, but allow them to stay true to their scent (less burn off). 

Also, some fragrance oils may cause cold process soap to seize (turning your soap into a solid mass with no fluidity).  If you have your heart set on using one of these fragrances in your soap recipe, it can be done through the process of rebatching; without seizing your batch.  Usually fragrance oils that seize  your soap contain DPG.  None of the fragrance oils we carry at Natures Garden contain DPG. 

When it comes to coloring for cold process soap, it is very important to select ones that do not morph.  Through the process of rebatching, you do not need to worry about pH sensitive colorants.  And, sometimes this is just the answer to achieve that certain color.  With rebatch soap, the soap base that you are using has already completed the saponification process; therefore, the colorants that normally would discolor will not.   This is true for herbs that are used as natural soap colorants as well.  Although it should be stated that some herbs naturally discolor due to oxidation. 

Herbs not only offer color, but also wonderful and various benefits to your finished bars of soap.  The only problem is they can directly affect your soaping procedure.  Many herbs can speed up trace.  Even more so, some herbs cannot survive the saponification process and will discolor as a result.  With rebatching, this is not as big of an issue.  Herbs like lavender flowers, for example, can be added without worrying that those beautiful flowers will turn brown. 

Rebatch Opportunity
Rebatching allows for perfection:

Rebatching is also a wonderful method to use to correct a soap recipe.  Things can get a little chaotic when soaping, and it could be possible that you overlooked adding one of your soaping ingredients and did not realize it until after the soap was molded.  This resulted in your finished bars being too lye heavy.  A rebatch allows you the perfect opportunity to add that missing ingredient and balance out your soap.  This opportunity also allows for superfatting a recipe after saponification; or correcting soap bars that are too soft (made with too many fats or soft oils).

It is possible too that while making soap, your batter becomes too thick too quick for the addition of color or scent.  With rebatch, the soap can be scented and colored like you never missed a beat. 

Rebatch can also help correct a false trace recipe.
 
Rebatch, a Second Chance for Soaps
Sometimes, as a soaper, you will have pounds of soap scraps that you have on hand.  Rebatching the soap lets you make loaves (and bars) of them once more.  And will clear out all of that soaping space. 

Points to Know about Rebatch
Some soapers love to rebatch soap, others rebatch only when necessary, and some soapers just do not like to rebatch.  What ever your stance is on rebatch, it is a method that allows for many otherwise missed opportunities.   Here are some key points to know about rebatch. 

When making soap that is a rebatch, it will never completely liquefy.  Even after spending hours in the crock pot, or on the stove top (with the double boiler method), the best you will ever achieve is more of a thick gel like state.  Sometimes the soap may even be globby like.  This does not affect the soap being soap, but it will affect the finished look of your bars. 

When it comes to molding your rebatch soap, it is highly likely to get trapped air bubbles.  This is just the nature of the thick gel like globby beast.  It is extremely important to tap your mold as your fill it to prevent these pesky little buggers from being a problem in your finished soap bars.  You may also notice that it may be slightly more difficult to mold your soap while in this state.  This will be especially true if you are used to pouring it (like cold process soap batter).  With rebatch soap, you will need a ladle and scoop the rebatch soap into your mold. 

For the finished bars of rebatch soap, they will look very similar to hot process soap bars.  They have a very rustic look to them, and will not have the traditional smooth and creamy look that cold process has. 

On a final note, rebatching soap is truly a labor of love.  There will be lots of TLC (because of the time put in) and additional work to do this method.  But, if you are willing to put in the extra effort in (grating the soap), you will be able to rebatch your soap and have the end results that you are looking to achieve. 

Apr
17

Exotic Fragrance

This entry was posted in air freshening scents, bath and body, bath fizzies, bath products, body safe fragrance oils, candle fragrance oils, candle making supplies, candle scents, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, Natures Garden, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

exotic fragranceBlackened Amethyst Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Welcome to quite possibly one of the most alluring female fragrances that Natures Garden carries!  Blackened Amethyst Fragrance Oil is soft, sexy, and spicy.  This scent is one exotic fragrance.  It is very classy and intriguing.  Plus, this scent sells extremely well in bath and body products.  If you are looking to add a great complex scent to your feminine product line, this exotic fragrance oil is it.  Blackened Amethyst scent is sophistication at its finest!

What does Blackened Amethyst smell like?

This seductive fragrance oil by Natures Garden was created for chic, confident women who like to “live a little”.  This fragrance combine’s aquatic top notes with Italian bergamot, rare camellias, and lime; followed by notes of exotic sandalwood and vetiver.

How do our customers use Blackened Amethyst Fragrance Oil?

For all you candle crafters and home scenters, this exotic fragrance oil can be used in a variety of waxes.  These waxes would include:  Joy wax, soy wax, soy blends, pillar of bliss, Palm wax, WOW wax, and beeswax, all with great scent throw.  For home scenters, Blackened Amethyst Fragrance Oil works great in aroma beads, smelly jellies, odor eliminator sprays, potpourri, oil burners, diffusers, and hanging air fresheners.

For the bath and body market; this exotic fragrance oil has endless possibilities.  The usage rate for this fragrance oil in products is 5%.  Blackened Amethyst does contain a 1% vanillin content, so vanilla white color stabilizer is recommended to prevent discoloration in your finished products.  This alluring fragrance oil can be used to scent:  homemade lotions, bath fizzies, body creams, body sprays, shower gels, melt and pour soap, conditioners, and shampoos.  For anyone that is curious about this exotic fragrance oils performance in cold process soap, this scent scored phenomenally.  Here are the official testing results: Perfect Pour, no ricing, no acceleration.  Discolors to a taupe.  This one pops out nicely when added to the soap batter.  Very Nice!

Apr
14

Brittle Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, handmade soap, homemade soap, how to make cold process soap, make your own soap, natural colorants, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies, soap mold, soap recipe, soap supplies, sodium lactate and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

soap that has too much sodium lactate
Warning, the following pictures may disturb some soapers!

Here was the scenario:  Using a Hot Process Recipe, we made a soap batch that we thought would work.  However, we got a little too sodium lactate happy.  As a result, our soap bars were not functional.  And, to be completely honest, some of our soap could not even be classified as a bar.

Can you feel the soaping life lesson coming on?

Our hot process soap was molded and ready to be removed and sliced.  The end was trimmed off, and we went in for our first cut… that was when the slice fell, and broke into two pieces.

brittle slice of soap

Again we tried, but to no avail…

crumbly soap

That was when we thought to slice the bars thicker.  Still the same result, a broken bar of soap.

high amount of sodium lactate

Heart broken, we came to the conclusion that there was too much sodium lactate in our recipe.

Yes, sad but true; we have brittle soap.  And, a 4 pound batch at that!  Even though the soap was brittle, we still wanted to find out how it performed.  So, we washed our hands with the bar pieces.  This action made the finished bars completely crumble as we rubbed them together under the running water.

testing the processed soap

The original recipe was a failure, but not a complete one.  We were able to see first hand what happens to soap when too much sodium lactate is added.

soap that needs a rebatch

In one of the earlier Natures Gardens blog posts, we wrote that using too much sodium lactate in your soap recipe will produce finished bars that crumble or are brittle.  This soap is the perfect example of exactly how this worked.

The recipe that we used contained 1 ounce of sodium lactate per pound of soaping oils in our recipe.  We thought that this would help harden the bar, especially since the soap was made from very soft oils.

Well, we were wrong.  This is why testing is highly suggested when dealing with soaping additives like sodium lactate.

Mar
30

Smells Like Money

This entry was posted in aroma beads, bath and body, bath products, body safe fragrance oils, candle fragrance oils, candle making supplies, candle scents, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, fun fragrance oils, gel wax scents, handmade soap, home scents, Natures Garden, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

smells like moneyMoney Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Money scent quite literally smells just like freshly printed cold hard cash!  For anyone that ever wanted a scent that smells like Money, this is it!  Money Fragrance Oil has such a clean, fresh, and crisp aroma to it, you will want to use it in everything.  Plus, with a unique scent that smells like money, the marketing possibilities are endless.  In fact, many of our customers state that Money Fragrance Oil is definitely a top seller with both men and women.

What does Money Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

We actually had our perfumist chemically analyze fresh money in order to create Natures Garden’s Money Fragrance Oil.  You wouldn’t believe how long it took to get our hands on fresh, new money!  You can actually smell the cotton of the money, as well as the fresh ink top notes. It smells wonderful in candles, and you would not believe how good it smells in bath products and cologne! This is a unisex fragrance all the way!  NG Original Fragrance!

How Do Our Customers Use Money Fragrance Oil?

For candle crafters using this scent in candles will literally allow you to say you have money to burn LOL.  Many of our clients use this fragrance oil in their soy, Palm, parasoy blends, Joy, WOW, gel, and Pillar of Bliss waxes.  But, not only is this scent fresh and clean, customers attest this green scent has phenomenal scent throw!  As for the home scenting realm, this aroma is terrific.  Money’s scent performance is remarkable in aroma beads, diffusers, oil burners, and incense.

On the bath and body end of products, celebrate because this unisex scent is one great seller!  With a recommended usage of 5%, this fabulous fragrance is used to create:  lotions, perfume oils, foaming body butters, melt and pour soaps, body scrubs, and body sprays.  And, our customers just love the fresh, clean scent this fragrance gives their products.  Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance is great.  Here are the official results:  Slight acceleration, but nothing major.  No ricing.  Discolors to a very slight beige.  Scent is super strong, nice, and clean!

Mar
24

Sinus Relief Scent

This entry was posted in aroma beads, bath and body, bath products, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle scents, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, homemade, make candles, Natures Garden, soap, soap fragrances, Soap making supplies, soap supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Sinus ReliefSinus Relief Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Sinus Relief scent is great for personal use or for scenting your marketable products.  In fact,  this fragrance is considered a must have by many of our clients because it works in everything from candles to bath and body products.  This highly recommended sinus relief scent smells just like the popular rub.  Many of our customers state not only do products scented in this fragrance oil sell out, but it also brings many people coming back for more.  If you are looking for a soothing type fragrance oil that really impresses, sinus relief should be on the top of your list.

What does Sinus Relief Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

Ever smell the scent of Vick’s Vapor Rub?  This fragrance oil by Natures Garden is a cool, crisp blend of camphor, eucalyptus, and mint. Great for stuffed up noses!

How Do Our Customers Use Sinus Relief Fragrance Oil?

For crafters in the candle making realm or home scenting realm; Sinus Relief is a definite for anytime of the year!  Many of our customers rave about this fragrance oil and use it in their Joy wax, WOW wax, palm wax, and Soy waxes.  Both the hot and cold scent throw are nice and strong, filling the whole house!  As for other home scenting ideas; this fragrance oil has been used to make aroma beads, reed diffusers, smelly jellies, and works exceptionally well for oil burners too.

On the bath and body end of products, the usage rate for this fragrance oil is 5%.  Sinus Relief fragrance is used to make:  bath salts, bath bombs, shower steam melts, body rubs, and body creams.  For those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance is soothing and performed very well.  Here are the official results: Perfect Pour, no ricing, no acceleration.  Scent is wonderful.  The perfect soap for sinus problems.  No discoloration.

If you want to try an amazing recipe using this great sinus relief scent, please click on this link to view Natures Gardens Sinus Relief Bath Bomb Recipe.  These bath bombs are quite simply the best. 

Mar
19

Hot Process Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, fragrance oil, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, hot process soap, Natures Garden, Soap making supplies, soap mold, sodium lactate and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

hot process soap Hello everyone!

I just finished my second round of training in…..wait for it…..HOT PROCESS SOAP MAKING….(insert scream)….dunt, dunt, duuunnnn!!!

Yep, that was my initial thought as the word Lye came into the conversation.  However, going through the checklist and noting that safety glasses, gloves, and a mask are extremely necessary for any recipe containing this soaping ingredient, I felt safer.  Although, the well written instructions helped as well.

This hot process soap recipe is pretty lengthy and I almost felt like I was engaged in a major project.  So I decided to take each step slowly and precisely.

After reviewing the process, something I thought was interesting was that I would be using a crockpot to slowly cook the ingredients.  Now, I will certainly never look at my crockpot the same way again!  Please remember that you CAN NOT use this or any other household item you use for these types of recipes (containing Lye) for everyday cooking.  They MUST be kept separate!

Now, another key factor for soaping is that all of the measurements must be exact in order for your recipe to work properly.  Hot process is similar to cold process but you are “cooking” your ingredients in the crockpot.  This heat speeds up the “saponification” process.  Yea that IS a big word!  What does it mean?  It means “the process of the chemical reaction that the lye solution and the oils/fats/butters go through when making soap.”  Another interesting thing I learned during my adventure was a little thing called a soap calculator.  Yea, it’s a calculator used to determine if all of the ingredients you want to use are going to work together and figures out how much of everything you will need.  This is a definite must in the world of soap making.

I knew I was gonna like this recipe when I was told to watch for when my creation looked like mashed potatoes and when it does…it’s done!  I mean, who doesn’t like mashed potatoes?  Keep in mind you must be patient when making this type of soap because the process is slow going.  The stirring and cooking and watching is the longest part, aside from the setting up of the soap.  This soap doesn’t look as pretty as some of the other recipes while in the molds, but the results are ones you will be happy with.  If you don’t make your own soap, but you buy other peoples; I hope after reading this, you look at it a bit differently.  Just knowing what all is involved in the homemade soap making process, gives you a whole new understanding.

However, I hope you all try this recipe if you have never made soap before.  

Please Note: With the exemption of the lye and water, all other soaping ingredients can be purchased at Natures Garden.  Also, if this is the first time you are attempting the process of making soap (like me), please review these classes to familiarize yourself with the processes.

Soap Making Safety
Making Your Own Soap Recipe
Soap Making Terminology
Finding the Perfect Recipe
Soaping Oils Properties

Here are the steps that I took to make my very first batch of Hot Process Soap.  I also included pictures to show you the process.  In the end, I ended up with (4) beautiful 1 pound loaves of soap.

Step 1:  Prior to making this hot process soap recipe, clean and sanitize your work area.  Then, put on your safety gear.  You will want to wear gloves, a face mask, and safety glasses while preparing this recipe.

safety gear for soap making

Step 2:  Now, turn your crockpot on a low heat setting.  Then, place one of your mixing bowls on your scale.  Next, weigh out the 503 grams of Olive Oil, 408 grams of Coconut Oil 76, 109 grams of Castor Oil, and 340 grams of Palm Oil.

hot process soaping ingredients

Step 3:   Once you have all your oils weighed out, place them into the crockpot.  Heat this on low until the palm oil and coconut oil 76 are in a liquid state.  Stir occasionally.

soaping oils in the crockpot
Step 4:  Now, get your two mixing bowls.  In one bowl, weigh out your 188 grams of lye.  In the second bowl, weigh out your 517 grams of water.

weigh out your lye and water
Step 5:  Next, take your lye and water bowls to a well ventilated area.  NEVER add the water to the lye!  Slowly add small amounts of the lye to the water.  Stir in between each addition of the lye to the water.  DO NOT breath in the fumes.  Continue doing this until all of the lye has been mixed into the water.

stirring the lye water

Step 6:  Now, weigh out and add the 50 grams of sodium lactate to the lye water.  Using your spatula, stir this slowly to incorporate.

adding sodium lactate to the recipe

Step 7:  Carefully, add the mixture of the lye water and sodium lactate to the crockpot.  Then, give this a quick stir with your spatula.

adding the lye water to the crockpots

Step 8:  Now, get your stick blender.  Place the stick blender into the crockpot and start to blend.  You will want to do this for about 10 minutes off and on.  Keep your blend periods short.  In between blending, use your spatula to clean the sides of the crockpot.

stick blending the soap batter

Step 9:  Once the batter has been well blended, add 8 grams Teal Fun Soap Colorant.  Now, stick blend to incorporate the color.

adding the colorant to hp soap

Step 10:  As you blend in the color, you will notice the soap batter will resemble pudding.  Now, take your spatula with a little bit of soap batter on it and carefully in a spatter like motion, let the batter fall back into the crockpot.  You are looking for trace.  You will know trace when you can see “lines” of batter from your spatula.  A full trace is reached when the line stays on top of the rest of the soap batter.

soap batter at trace

Step 11:  After trace has been reached in your soap batter, place your lid on your crockpot.

Step 12:  Stirring periodically with your spatula, allow your soap mixture to cook.  You will want to check it every 15 minutes or so.  This is done to ensure that the soap cooks evenly, and does not scorch on the bottom.  As the soap cooks, you will notice along the sides of the crockpot that the soap looks dry.  The soap batter will even take on a waxy look.

soap batter with a waxy look
Step 13:  After about an hour has elapsed, your soap batter will have the consistency of mashed potatoes.  Now, place your mold on a flat surface near your crockpot.  Please Note:  This hour time can vary based on your soaping oils.

the look of hot process soap batter before adding fragrance oil

Step 14:  You will want to move quickly for this step.  If you are using herbs or other additives, you will want to add them now.  If not, add 85 grams Purrs & Paws Fragrance Oil.  Then, stick blend to fully incorporate.

adding fragrance oil to hot process soap

Step 15:  Now, in a scooping manner; begin filling your pound loaf molds individually.

filling your mold with hot process soap

Step 16:  When the mold cavities are all filled, carefully hit the mold against the counter top.  This motion will release any bubbles of air that may be trapped in your soap batter.

filled soap mold with hp
Step 17:  Now, insulate your soap.  Once the soap has been covered, let it cool and harden overnight (for about 12 hours).

insulate your hot process soap
Step 18:  The next day, when your soap has completely cooled and hardened, you can remove it from the mold.  Then, cut the soap into bar size.  Your soap is now ready to use.  Please Note:  If you are seeking a harder bar, allow the soap to cure longer.

finished hot process soap

Overall, making this soap really was a lot of fun and I felt really creative, like a mad scientist….mmmwwaahahaha…(clearing throat)…

Well kids, until my next adventure, have a FABULOUS day!
Cindy

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

Jan
28

Great Summer Scent

This entry was posted in Air Fresheners, bath and body, bath and body fragrances, bath products, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, melt and pour soap, Natures Garden, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

summer scentCoco Mango Fragrance OilFragrance Oil Spotlight

If you are looking for the perfect summer scent with sultry notes that will whisk you away; coco mango fragrance oil is a big hit.  An aroma that smells just like a Caribbean vacation, this tropical scent is sure to please with its perfect balance of mango and coconut aroma.  A personal favorite among many of our customers, this tropical scent will exceed expectations.  Coco Mango fragrance with its rich, warm, and creamy fruit blend; does not smell like suntan lotion, so get ready to fall in love.

What does Coco Mango Smell Like?

In this fragrance oil by Natures Garden, we have taken this highly requested scent and made it better than ever thought possible! This complex fragrance begins with fruity notes of mango, fresh strawberries, elderberries, and ripe papaya. This scent is completed with rich vanilla and toasted coconut with just a hint of soft musk.  An NG original!  A Best Seller!

How Do Our Customers Use Coco Mango Fragrance Oil?

For those of you that are candle crafters; our customers consider this fragrance amazing in both candles and tarts.  They use this summer scent in their WOW, soy, pillar of bliss, palm, Joy, and blended waxes.  The scent throw from this fragrance is fantastic, but is also long lasting.  A best selling summer scent for them, this fragrance oil can even be used make aroma beads, room spray, diffuser oils, car fresheners, and smelly jellies.

On the bath and body end, this clean summer scent is advised as a must have and will make for repeat customers.  The usage percent for Coco Mango is 5%, and the Vanillin Content is 7% so Vanilla White Color Stabilizer is advised by our customers to stabilize discoloration in finished products.  Some of the products this summer scent is used for are:  Melt and pour soaps, lotions, body butters, bath melts, bubble baths, shower gels, perfume oils, body sprays, and body creams.  In fact, many of our clientele say their customers rant and rave over this scent.    Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance is perfect; not too sweet and not candy like either.  Here are the official results:  Finally a coco mango that does not separate!  Perfect Pour, no ricing, no acceleration, YUM!  Discolors to a chocolate brown after cure.

how to make bath meltsIf you are interested in trying Coco Mango Fragrance Oil in a product, Natures Garden has a wonderful Rose Petal Bath Melt Recipe using this amazing scent.  You can just simply click on this link, or find the recipe under the Free Recipes and Classes section of the website.

 

Jan
27

Menthol Crystals

This entry was posted in all natural, All natural shampoo, bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, cosmetic supplies, handmade soap, homemade, homemade lotion, homemade soap, lip balm, lotion, menthol crystals, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

menthol crystalsThe menthol crystals that Natures Garden carries are actually crystallized peppermint essential oil.  These crystals are 100% natural and have a variety of uses when introduced into your products.

Although menthol crystals can be made synthetically, when derived naturally they come from mint oils such as cornmint or peppermint.  Once the extraction occurs, the oil is immediately frozen (cold extraction) which forms the menthol crystals.  These crystals, which look similar to smaller oblong rock crystals, are solid at room temperature but have a melting point of around 107 degrees Fahrenheit.  These menthol crystals which are a white or clear crystalline substance are soluble in alcohol and propylene glycol and they are miscible in oils.

Menthol crystals have many uses.  They can be found in many industries such as oral hygiene, candies, pharmaceuticals, personal care, perfumery, and tobacco.  They naturally have a strong minty odor to them.  And, their usage percentage in a product can vary anywhere from .2% to 10% depending on the end product that is being formulated.

Menthol contains local anesthetic, antipruritic, analgesic, antispasmodic and anti irritant qualities.  The use of menthol in bath and body products can actually engage the cold sensitive receptors in our skin and provide a cooling sensation.  This same sensation can also occur from inhaling menthol as well as ingesting it.

menthol crystals in oral hygiene
Oral Hygiene:

In the realm of oral hygiene this ingredient is used not only for its refreshing flavor, but also to combat bad breath and can be used in mouthwash and toothpaste.

 

menthol crystals in gumFlavoring and Candies:
Menthol crystals are used to flavor many of our favorite go to minty pleasures.  It is used with the addition of anise to produce the tried and true flavor of licorice.  The crystals are used in peppermint and spearmint chewing gum for their refreshing and cooling feeling when chewed.  And, it is also even used in the production of many hard candies.

menthol crystal usesPharmaceuticals:
For slight throat irritations, menthol crystals can be used in items like cough medicines, cough drops, and throat lozenges.  The addition of this ingredient will cause a soothing and cooling sensation in the inflamed area.

Menthol crystals can be used to alleviate nausea, especially when the nausea is due to motion sickness.  This is because peppermint (which is used in making menthol crystals) is a natural carminative herb, meaning it can settle the digestive system.

Because menthol crystals have antipruritic and anti irritant qualities, they are great for anti itch creams and balms.

When it comes to chest congestion and upper respiratory issues; menthol can work as a decongestant.  The uses in this category for menthol crystals include: rubs, balms, or salves.  Inhaling the minty aroma of these crystals will also help to alleviate the blockages.

For an excellent fever reducer, menthol crystals can be made into wraps to be applied to the head or feet.  These wraps can also be made into balms or cooling gels.

menthol crystals in bath productsBath and Body: (Once made into a liquid form)

Menthol crystals are a great addition to lip balms.

Menthol crystals are a remarkable additive to lotions and creams for their analgesic property.  This provides temporary relief of minor aches and pains, as well as sprains in muscles.  Because menthol is antispasmodic, they can also help to reduce muscle cramping and muscle spasms.

Due of their amazing cooling, analgesic, and anesthetic properties, menthol crystals are extremely helpful in the treating of sunburns and razor burns.  The cooling sensation in gels and shaving balms simulates the feeling of ice providing some instant relief from the pain.  But, menthol can also penetrate deeply to numb the pain area temporarily.

Menthol crystals can even be used in deodorants, hair shampoos, and hair conditioners for their refreshing and cooling sensations.

Adding menthol crystals to soap recipes can enhance your soap for any of menthol’s benefits.  Just make sure the crystals are completely dissolved in the soaping oils and stirred well to reduce skin irritations. 

menthol crystals in perfumes

Perfumery:
Menthol is even used in the perfumery industry.  When dealing with notes of floral, especially that of rose, perfumists will use menthol to produce menthyl esters.  These esters actually accentuate these delicate notes.


Tobacco:

Menthol crystals are used to flavor various tobacco items such as cigarette tobacco, pipe tobacco, and chewing tobacco. 

The shelf life for these crystals is 2 years when stored accordingly.  However, areas with high humidity may experience the hardening and mass joining of these crystals into a solid lump.  This lump may be broken up by lightly hitting it with a mallet.  Also, areas with high levels of heat may melt the crystals.  Menthol crystals are best stored in a tight fitted glass, aluminum, or double lined container.  The crystals should be kept in a cool and dry area away from heat and direct sunlight.

Care should be taken when using menthol crystals in skincare products, as using too much may irritate the skin.

Natures Garden sells our menthol crystals for external applications only.  In the preceding post, we discussed how these wonderful crystals have many different uses in vast industries.  Nothing in this article is to be construed as medical advice.  Please consult your doctor before using any of this information for treatment purposes. We provide this data for educational purposes only.