Archive for the ‘floral notes’ Category

Great Feminine Scent

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

great feminine scentJuicy Couture Type Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

This feminine scent is absolutely beautiful and is a great match to the original.  A divine fragrance to scent anything from candles to perfume oils, Juicy Couture Type is both youthful and bold.  This great girly scent presents perfectly balanced layers of classic spring and summer time aromas.  Many of our clients who use this feminine scent say it only takes one whiff before their customers are hooked and are in love. 

What does Juicy Couture Type Smell Like?

The perfect fragrance oil by Natures Garden for girls who want it all!  This fragrance combines wild berries and mandarin, honeysuckle, gardenia and jasmine.  Embodied with the aroma of amber, caramel, sandalwood, vanilla and praline to add just the right touch of sweetness.

How Do Our Customers Use Juicy Couture Type Fragrance Oil?

For all of you candle crafters out there; Juicy Couture Type Fragrance Oil is used in Soy, soy blends, paraffin, WOW, Joy, and Pillar of Bliss waxes.  This feminine scent is very aromatic and has a great throw, both hot and cold.  If you are a home scenter, this fragrance oil also works extremely well for oil burners, aroma beads, tarts, smelly jellies, and even linen sprays.

For bath and body crafters, this fragrance is a win!  The usage rate for this fragrance oil is 5% and it has a .3% vanillin so vanilla white color stabilizer is suggested to reduce discoloration in the finished product.  This lovely feminine scent is used to make: solid lotion bars, bath bombs, body scrubs, spray lotions, perfumes, melt and pour soaps, body sprays, bath gels, whipped body butters, foaming body butters, lotions, and salt bars.  Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance smells great.  Here are the official results: Slight ricing, stick blend, low acceleration, very manageable, discolors to a maple fudge color.   

Lavender Essential Oil

Monday, February 24th, 2014

lavender essential oil Lavender Essential Oils

When it comes to using essential oils in products, lavender is one of the most popular ones selected.  Used throughout history, lavender has made its mark in the cosmetics, medicinal, and perfumery industries.

This is true for two reasons; first lavender is one of the most recognized scents worldwide.  And second, with such an array of skin and health benefits from lavender, it is easily a front runner for induction in to products.  There is only one problem though.  As with any essential oil, it is very difficult to get an identical essential oil each time.

Any essential oil can fluctuate greatly in scent for many different reasons.  These differences can be due to lots, varying seasons of harvest, the environment in which the plant was grown, soil conditions of the area, cross pollination of the plant, and even the distillation process of the essential oil itself.  Any one of these factors can change the essential oil.

There are different lavender essential oils available in the market.  Natures Garden currently carries two various forms of lavender essential oil.  These essential oils are Lavender Essential Oil 40/42 and Lavandin Grosso Pure Essential Oil.

What is Lavender Essential Oil 40/42
This Lavender Essential Oil carries the botanical name Lavendula angustifolia, which is also known as “true lavender”.  This name is also synonymous with English Lavender.   When it comes to scent, this type of essential oil is produced to have what is traditionally (and commercially) accepted as the lavender aroma.  More specifically, lavender 40/42 is the sweet flower smell of lavender.

The number 40/42 at the end of the essential oil name signifies the amount of linalool and linalyl acetate in the essential oil.  Linalool is a natural occurring organic compound (terpene alcohol) which is responsible for the floral scent of a plant.  Linalyl acetate is also a naturally occurring chemical compound found in many “flowering” plants.

When it comes to the creation of Lavender Essential Oil 40/42, it is commonly achieved by the combination of varying distilled lavender oils.  These lavender oils are not only selected by their species but also by their economical cost.  The natural lavender oils are then integrated together to yield an essential oil that contains 40% linalool and 42% linalyl acetate.  These percentages allow the two biggest components of the traditional lavender scent, and also make for an essential oil that is cost effective and can be replicated time and time again with very little scent difference.

Both Linalool and Linalyl acetate are important factors for this essential oil because it helps to ensure a dependable aroma.  Because essential oils can vary from batch to batch throughout the year, these amounts of linalool and linalyl acetate can help to produce a more consistent essential oil.  For this oil precisely, a lavender essential oil with its very distinctive and well known flowery aroma.

What is
Lavandin Grosso Pure Essential Oil
This essential oil which carries the botanical name Lavendula hybrid is a cross breeding of two different lavender plants; the angustifolia (English) and latifolia (spike).  The resulting oil has comparable attributes to angustifolia, however, due to its distinctive and differing chemical content the essential oil has separate features.  This essential oil is a refreshing more camphor like scent that does not focus on the floral aspect of lavender like Lavender 40/42 essential oil.  As one of the 39 species of lavender, lavandin grosso has camphorous notes that are more evident in the essential oil as opposed to its counterpart 40/42.  This is because lavandin essential oils contain a higher percentage of terpenes (particularly camphor) in it.  This scent is long lasting and sharp, especially in soaps and lotions; unlike Lavender 40/42 which is considered a more sweet and subtle aroma.

The actual essential oil itself is produced by the distillation of the flowering tops of the plant lavender grosso.  These plants blossom later than the Lavender angustifolia.   Another advantage of these plants is that they yield a larger volume of essential oil; up to 3 times the amount of Lavender angustifolia; making it cost effective too.

Although there are some differences in these two lavender essential oils, they both maintain a plethora of wonderful skin and health benefits.  If you are interested in reading about all of the wonderful benefits that lavender (herb or essential oil) provides to your products, please click on this link.

Natures Garden sells our essential oils for external applications only.  In the above post, we discussed the differences between Lavender 40/42 Essential Oil and Lavandin Grosso Pure Essential Oil.  Nothing in this article is to be construed as medical advice.  Please consult your doctor before using any of this information for treatment purposes. We provide this data for educational purposes only.

Kinds of Fragrance Notes

Saturday, October 26th, 2013

There are several different categories of notes used to create a fragrance oil.  These notes offer fragrance oils different elements.  Here is a list of fragrance notes and what aspects they provide to an aroma.

ANIMALIC ingredients create allure within a fragrance.  Generally base note materials, animalic nuances add subtle sensual tones.  Aromatic animalic ingredients can be used to enhance spicy, woody, and sweet base notes.  They can sometimes produce a leathery tone.  Balance is important when using the aromatic animalic ingredients to prevent unpleasant and repulsive base notes.
EXAMPLES OF ANIMALIC INGREDIENTS:  Musk, Civet

rf-aa18BALSAMIC notes are warm and/or sweet and can frequently be found in the resinous group of materials.  Balsamic notes support a fragrance from within, offering richness and providing a natural sensation.  Base notes are sometimes composed of several balsamic materials.
EXAMPLES OF BALSAMIC MATERIALS: Amber, Tolu, Fir

CAMPHORACEOUS/ AGRESTIC notes create a cooling sensation, and can be described as fresh.  Natural essential oils in the herbaceous family often exhibit camphoraceous tones, with naturally occurring camphor oil producing this effect.  On some occasions camphoraceous tones can produce a medicinal effect.
EXAMPLES OF CAMPHORACEOUS MATERIALS: Rosemary oil, Eucalyptus oil, Camphor powder

rf-2019CITRUS/ HESPERIDIC tones are easily identified due to the association with food and beverages.  Citrus essential oils are produced from the citrus fruit peel, and a fresh, slightly acidic note is displayed.  Citrus tones are usually top notes where they produce a fresh, juicy, effervescent effect.
EXAMPLES OF CITRUS MATERIALS: Lemon oil, Grapefruit oil, Bergamot oil

FLORAL is the largest generic fragrance category.  Within the floral category there are many sub categories such as aldehydic floral or green floral.  Flowery notes such as rose, gardenia, or jasmine can be used alone or in combination with one another to produce a “floral bouquet.”  Since some flowers have little or no scent, creative floral accords are often produced to fulfill the need for scents such as daisy or orchid.  Floral tones will generally be found at the heart of the fragrance.
EXAMPLES OF FLORAL NOTES: Lily, Tuberose, Floral bouquet

fresh fruit slicesLike the citrus accords, FRUIT notes can be easily identified due their similarity to real fruit aromas.  Sweet/sour tones found in apple, peach, strawberry, and banana are replicated for use in perfumery.  These fruit compounds are generally produced from synthetic materials, although touches of natural materials such as critrus may be added for a juicy effect.  Fruit notes will be found in the top note or middle note of a scent, but exceptions exist in fruit scents such a peach which have creamy and sweet undertones.
EXAMPLES OF FRUIT NOTES: Apple, melon, raspberry

The GREEN category is very significant in today’s market.  Market positioning of products based on “natural themes” has created a demand for fragrances that smell like plants, leaves, and grasses.  Green notes provide bright, strong, natural smelling accents for all types of fragrances.  Green notes can be top notes, middle notes, and they traditionally exhibit food stability in a wide variety of products.
EXAMPLES OF GREEN NOTES: Herbs, Vegetables, Leaves

rf-98MARINE notes add fresh, bright, watery, and/or algae like accents to fragrance blends.  They are rarely used alone due to their elusive quality, yet combined with florals, woods, or fruit types they create sparkle and add a natural sensation.  Marine notes are often found accenting the top note of a scent and are reminiscent of the smell of sea breezes.
EXAMPLES OF MARINE NOTES: Sea spray, Dewy, Ocean breeze

The MINT family is characterized by its pierce cooling effect.  Mint provides an invigoration effect and fresh lift for all fragrance types.  It has become more important as a single note in today’s products that feature natural positioning.  Mint accents the top note of a fragrance.
EXAMPLES OF MINT INGREDIENTS: Peppermint, Spearmint, Menthol

rf-112SPICE notes are familiar due to their use in cooking and baking.  They create warm or pungent sensations, and are used in almost all fragrance types.  Most spice notes are derived from nature, and they can be found accenting the middle notes of a fragrance or used alone.
EXAMPLES OF SPICE INGREDIENTS: Cinnamon, Ginger, Pepper

SWEET notes are important base notes for most fragrance blends.  Recalling familiar sensations found in vanilla, sugar, honey and syrup, sweet notes are long lasting and comforting.  Gourmand type scents have created a new demand for sweet notes in perfumery, where they provide edible sensations that captivate the senses.
EXAMPLES OF SWEET NOTES: Vanilla, Caramel, honey

rf-117WOODS are important building blocks for fragrance.  Woody notes enhance and enrich the base notes of most fragrance.  They provide warmth, naturalness and long lasting richness.   Most woody notes are derived from nature, where essential oils are distilled from fresh cut wood, tree bark or roots of a tree.  In today’s market we find wood blends being used frequently in candles, particularly at the prestige level of distribution.
EXAMPLES OF WOOD INGREDIENTS: Sandalwood, Cedar wood, Vetiver