Category Archives: cosmetic ingredients

Sep
25

Essential Oils

This entry was posted in bath and body, cosmetic ingredients, cosmetic supplies, Enlightened by Layla, essential oils, Natures Garden, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

essential oils Essential Oils

Hello everyone! Have you figured out all of our features on our new site yet? We think it’s awesome and amazing and we hope you feel the same way! For all you crafters out there, do you like to make products that include essential oils? Here at Nature’s Garden we offer many different products including many pure grade essential oils! Being pure grade, they are not diluted with any solvents or carrier oils. We have over 20+ essential oils available to our customers. If you haven’t worked with them before, maybe they could be a cool new project for you to try? They are great for soap making and cosmetics!

Never used essential oils before? Are you worried that you may not know how to use them correctly but really want to try them? Have no fear! We offer a free class! On our homepage, on the left in the Free Recipes and Classes Box, if you click on Soap Making Classes that will take you to our Soap Classes page which offers every soap making class we have. Our Essentials Oils Class is right in the top row! You can also get to the class by clicking on our Free Recipes and Classes box right on the top of our page. Once that takes you to our Free Recipes and Classes page, click on Herb Classes and our Essential Oils Class is available there also.

free classes and recipes

Soap Classes

free recipes and classes box

free classes and recipes page

essential oils class

 

Are you an experienced essential oils user? Haven’t used ours before? You should definitely try them out! We offer 20+ of them! To get to our essential oils, go to our Fragrance Oils option at the top of our site. A drop box will appear and Essential Oils is right on top in the second column. If you click on that, it will take you right to our Essential Oils page with all of our options available right there. We have everything from a Cassia Essential Oil to Sweet Fennel! Many many different and great options! We have also included a Natural Vanilla Infusion with our essential oils section. We even have our top sellers listed at the bottom of the page.

fragrance oils drop box

essential oils page

We have also included the IFRA Certificate (International Fragrance Association) for each and every essential oil we have. Once you’ve chosen a specific oil, underneath the picture click on the little link that says IFRA Certificate. The certificates also show a little chart that states the maximum use for that oil in different categories. Each category is listed underneath the chart. For example, Category 2 is deoderants and antiperspirants, Category 8 is make up removers, hair dyes, and nail care, etc etc. Be sure to check the certificate for the maximum usage amounts for each essential oil before using them in your products!

IFRA certificate link

IFRA certificate

Essential oils are wonderful to use in your soaps and cosmetics. Don’t hesitate to try ours! We offer 20+ pure grade oils here at Nature’s Garden so I’m positive you will find some that you’ll love! Have fun! Please contact us with any questions or concerns you have! We are here to help you succeed! Be sure to keep watching for more Enlightened by Layla postings!

enlightened-by-layla (1)

May
01

Ohio Soapers Gathering

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, cold process soap scents, cosmetic ingredients, cosmetic supplies, crafts as a hobby, fragrance oil, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

cindy ohio soapers gatheringHello everyone!

Well I made it through my first ever Ohio Soapers Gathering! I have to say, it was great to meet the people who love soaping as much as we do. They are a fantastic group of individuals. I was however a bit nervous being my first gathering, but, upon my arrival the coordinator of the gathering, Jackie Harris greeted me with such warmth how could I not feel welcomed? She was just so thrilled we were able to attend, what a lovely lady she is. I set up my tables and waited for the event to begin. Every one of my booth visitors were just as excited as ever that we had attended the gathering for the day with some of our products. So much so that even those who preordered, bought more stuff while I was there. There was no stopping them!

Our Facebook followers told me how excited they were about the opening of our store and that the pictures were amazing! I told them the pictures don’t do it justice and that they will just have to come down in person. They fully and enthusiastically agreed, saying a road trip is definitely in the near future. Several of my customers that had already been there, raved to the others standing nearby.

Throughout the event there were informative demonstrators. Bobbie Eastman with hair shine, Kim Craig with handmade cream, Kristy Schemrich with laundry soap, and a few others. I am glad they held these demos in the same room, otherwise I would have missed out. Even though I could never get away from the table due to my fabulous customers, I could still hear and gather information from the demos. I even got a few samples!

They had a “garage sale” table which I thought was cute (I should have brought my stuff of odds and ends to sell). These were things the donators couldn’t use anymore but knew someone else could. Then there was a table called the “swap table.” You donate stuff you made, up to 5 things and you received as many in return. How fun is that? I can only imagine what kind of things were made by these amazing crafters. Everyone was so creative, I was in awe!

The door prizes were great too, there was everything from Tickets to Kalahari Water Park, gift certificates, several soaping products, and of course Natures Garden shopping bags and Tshirts! All of the winners were so happy to come away from the gathering with new knowledge, new products, winnings, and a full belly. All in all I believe it was a great success for everyone all around.

natures garden winners
I can’t wait for the next one because I will get to meet a whole new realm of awesome people. Their creativity inspires me and it’s good to know there are people out there using their knowledge for things that are good and can offer information that will help others. Whether it is to teach them, save them money, or inspire THEIR creative juices, soaping is a great artistic field to venture into. The avenues are endless…seriously!

So my friends, if you have never been to a gathering, go! If you know someone who makes soap, learn! If you don’t personally know somebody, come out to our website at naturesgardencandles.com and look at our blogs, show and tells, all of our free recipes, or, check out our starter kits. It may seem intimidating but know we are always here to help…always!

Although I had a blast in Sandusky at the Ohio Soapers Gathering, I was past exhausted! It was a good exhaustion and I came away from it with more then I went there with…I am glad I was a part of it.

Well kids until the adventure, have a fabulous day!

Cindy

Feb
19

Firming Facial Mask

This entry was posted in all natural, bath and body, bath products, cosmetic clays, cosmetic ingredients, cosmetic recipe, facial masks, herbal tea, herbs, homemade, humectant, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

make your own facial maskFirming Facial Mask

Whether you are looking to spend some quality time with the girls, or just wanting to treat yourself; using a homemade facial mask is the route to go.

Not only is making a facial mask super easy, it is also a great way to tone, firm, and even revitalize your face.  There are a variety of herbs and clays that you can use to make your very own facial masks.  Each herb or clay has its very own distinctive skin loving benefits that you can introduce into your facial masks.  The herb and clay that you select is dependent upon what you want the end results of your mask to have.

For this firming facial mask recipe, the herb that was focused on was Hibiscus.  This includes both hibiscus flowers and hibiscus flower powder.

Hibiscus is quite the amazing flower and has even been affectionately named “the botox plant”.  Used in skin and hair care for thousands of years, this amazing herb is a natural source of alpha hydroxy acids (Vitamin C).  These acids can gently exfoliate your skin while encouraging the replacement of dead and dull cells with new ones.  This herb also has anti aging properties with the capability of soothing, smoothing, and firming the skin.

As for the main ingredient for the firming facial mask, Red Moroccan clay was selected.  This clay is one of the purest forms of cosmetic clays available.  With the ability to draw out toxins and impurities, Red Moroccan clay also acts as a moisturizing agent for your skin.

To help to keep the skin moisturized vegetable glycerin is also used in this recipe.  Vegetable Glycerin  is a humectant.  What this means is that this ingredient will help to draw moisture to your skin and keep it there.

If you want to make this recipe, all ingredients can be found at Natures Garden.

Now, on to the firming facial mask recipe:
This easy homemade recipe will make 2 facial masks.  The total time the masks take to make is about 45 minutes.  Game on wrinkles!

Step 1:  In a pot, weigh out 120 grams of distilled water.  Then, place the water on the stove top and heat it until it reaches 180 degrees Fahrenheit.  Once you hit this temperature, allow the water to hold for an additional 20 minutes.

Step 2:  Weigh out 2 grams of Hibiscus flowers.  Place the dried flowers into an empty tea bag and tie it shut.  Place the tea bag into a coffee cup.

Step 3:  When the 20 minutes have elapsed, remove the water from the heat source.  Now, carefully pour the hot water into the coffee over.  Using a spoon, hold the tea bag down into the water until it is completely saturated.  Then allow the tea bag to steep for about 10 minutes or so.  Occassionally while the tea bag is steeping, use a spoon to press the tea bag.  This will ensure you have a nice and strong Hibiscus Tea.

Step 4:  In a small bowl, weigh out 23 grams of Red Moroccan clay and 3 grams of Hibiscus flower powder.  Break up any clumps you may have.  Then, gently stir these two ingredients together.

Step 5:  When your hibiscus tea is finished steeping, in a separate bowl, weigh out 18 grams of the tea.  To this add 6 grams of vegetable glycerin.  Stir.

Step 6:  Now, carefully scoop the clay/flower mixture into the tea/glycerin bowl.  With each scoop that is added, stir well to fully incorporate.  Keep adding the clay/flower mixture until it is all in the tea/glycerin.    Keep stirring this until there is no visible powder left.

Note:  If you plan on selling this mixed facial mask, you will need to add 1% optiphen preservative to the mask at a temperature that is not higher than 140F.  This will help prevent bacterial growth.  If you are making this recipe for self use, but do not plan to use all of it at one time, place the remainder in the refrigerator up to 1 week.  Throw away after 1 week if the mixture is not properly preserved.

Now, to use your firming facial mask:

Once the mixture has cooled, start applying it generously to your face.  Once the mask is completely applied, allow it to fully dry.  This drying process will take about 20 minutes to complete.  As the mask dries, you will notice a color change in the mask itself.  Your face will also begin to feel tighter.

When the mask has dried, wash it off with warm water.  Then, pat your face dry with a towel.

Please Note:  Hibiscus WILL stain your clothes/towels.  It is advisable to wear clothes and use towels that can be stained.  Also, there will be a slight stain left on your face once the mask is removed.  This stain will disappear after an additional wash or two.

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

Jan
17

Herbs as Gifts

This entry was posted in all natural, aromatherapy, bath and body, bath products, bath teas, cosmetic ingredients, creative, essential oils, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

herbsHerbs and their meanings

Herbs have many uses.  They can be used for cooking, medicinal purposes, or for aromatic serenity.

For this blog post, we will be focusing on the symbolic meaning of herbs when they are used in the gift giving manner.  Herbs have had symbolic meanings behind them for centuries.  These meanings have been assigned to them through various religious and cultural reasoning.

In order to package these herbs as gifts in a usable manner, Natures Garden suggests making a bath tea for your herbal gift giving.  A bath tea is a tea bag that is stuffed full with various herbs.  These tea bags are then used by placing them into a tub filled with hot water and allowed to steep.  The steeping of the herbs allows the passing of wonderful aromas as well as the medicinal capabilities of the herbs.

When selecting the herbs for gift giving, it is important to know the meaning behind each one.  The herbs listed below offer a generally accepted symbolic meaning.  However, please note: This post is just for fun, there may be varying differences in the meanings due to differences in religion and culture.

If considering making symbolic bath teas for loved ones, it is a good idea to also include small card explaining this symbolism.  This will add a delightful sentimental aspect to your well thought out gift.

Below is a list of some of the more commonly used herbs for bath teas and their symbolic meaning.  This list is by no means a complete herb list.

what can you use lemon peel c/s for Herbs for Cleansing:
Acacia, Lavender, Lemon, Lemon Verbana, Peppermint, Turmeric

Herbs for Courage:
Fennel, Mullein, St. John’s Wort, Thyme

what can you use passion flower for Herbs for Friendship:
Lemon, Passion flower

Herbs for Happiness:
Calendula, Catnip, Dandelion, Lavender, Parsley, St. John’s Wort

what can you use nettle for Herbs for Healing:
Aloe, Barley, Basil, Eucalyptus, Juniper, Mullein, Nettle, Olive, Peppermint, Spearmint

Herbs for Love:
Barley, Basil, Beet Powder, Catnip, Clove, Hibiscus, Jasmine, Juniper, Lemon, Mullein, Orange, Papaya, Peppermint, Red Clover, Rose, Rosemary, Spearmint, St. John’s Wort, Yarrow

what can you use lavender for Herbs for Peace:
Lavender, Olive, Passion Flower

Herbs for Safety:
Aloe, Barley, Basil, Blueberry, Clove, Eucalyptus, Frankincense, Juniper, Mullein, Nettle, Olive, Papaya, Red Clover, St. John’s Wort

what can you use chamomile for Herbs for Sleep:
Chamomile, Passion flower, Peppermint

Herbs for Wealth:
Alfalfa, Chamomile, Clove, Comfrey, Jasmine, Orange, Patchouli, Pomegranate, Red Clover

what can you use sage for Herbs for Wisdom:
Chamomile, Mint, Sage

Now, when making tea bags for gift giving; you may add extra scent to your herbs.  This can be done with the addition of fragrance oils or essential oils.  Just keep in mind of the final blend of aromas (the herbs with the scent oil because many herbs are aromatic in nature).

Place the herbs that you would like to use in a mixing bowl.  Then, using a pipette, add a few drops of the scenting oil (whether it is essential oil or fragrance oil).  Please note:  For best absorption, you will need to have herbs that can soak up the oil.  Then, stir using a mixing spoon.  Finally, spoon the herbs into a tea bag, and tie shut.  Optional:  Then add your card explaining the symbolic meaning of the herbs and a cute ribbon.

Jan
16

Herbal Infusion Recipe

This entry was posted in all natural, aromatherapy, bath and body, bath products, cosmetic ingredients, cosmetic recipe, herb, herbal oil infusion, herbs, homemade, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

herbal oilHerbal Infusion Recipe

This is the basic recipe for making patchouli infused oil to be used in the creation of various bath and body products.  For this recipe we are going to be using the double boiler method.  There are various methods to choose from when making an herbal oil infusion.  To view other processes of infusing herbs for bath and body products please click on this linkPlease note:  Depending on the herb/herbs that you are selecting to infuse, will determine whether you go with a hot method or a cold method route of infusion.  Some herbs are very heat sensitive.  Therefore, if heat is introduced for the infusion, some of the medicinal benefits may be lost.

With oil infusion, a key to remember is the longer that the herbs are allowed to set in the oil, the stronger the herbal infusion will be.  Our herbal infusion sat undisturbed for 4 weeks (after the double boiler method) before we strained the herbs out and introduced the infusion to a recipe.

We selected sweet almond oil because it readily absorbs into the skin and has a non-greasy feel to it.  There are however other oils you can choose from.  For the selection of your solvent (liquid you are infusing the herbs into), you will want to pick an oil that has a low rancidity rate.  Some other great solvents that can be used are: vegetable glycerin, apricot kernel oil, and olive oil.  Each oil has various skin loving attributes to them, so it is very easy to cater the oil infusion you want to make to the specific need you are looking for.

Although there are other herbs you can select for oil infusion; for this recipe, we wanted to make an oil infusion that was great for dry skin and promoted a healthy and radiant glow.  Besides being an astringent, patchouli is also known for its antimicrobial, anti inflammatory and antiseptic properties.  Plus, since Valentine’s Day is coming, and patchouli is known for its possible APHRODISIAC properties, we found patchouli to be a good herb of choice.

For this infusion, you will need:

patchouli oil infusionPatchouli c/s
Sweet Almond Oil
a pint sized canning jar with lid
2 pots (one smaller with lid, and one larger)
Water
Stove top
Scale

Here are the steps for making patchouli infused oil (double boiler method):

Using a scale, weigh out 45 grams of patchouli c/s.  Place the herb into the smaller pot.  Next, weigh out 392 grams of Sweet Almond Oil.  Pour this over the herbs in the smaller pot, set aside.  Next, place some water into the larger pot.  You want to have at least 3-4 inches of water.  Next, place the large pot onto the stove top on the lowest setting of heat possible.

making patchouli oil infusion

Then, place the lid on the smaller pot and then place the smaller pot into the larger one.  Although it is essential to keep the small pot lidded the entire time it is heated, you will want to monitor the oil infusion and stir it occasionally.  You will want to let the oil infusion simmer slowly for 30 minutes to an hour.  Do not allow water to get into your infusion.

double boiler herbal oil infusion

Once this time period has passed, remove the smaller pot from the larger one.  Allow the oil infusion to reach room temperature and then place the oil infusion into a pint sized canning jar and lid.

herb in oil

Although technically, once the herbs have simmered, you may strain them out and use the oil infusion once it reaches room temperature.  We however wanted a very strong patchouli oil infusion so we let the oil infusion set and steep for an additional 4 weeks after double boiling.  While the herbs were steeping, we took advantage of the sun and placed the jar in the window sill during the daytime.

Once four weeks had passed, the patchouli herb was strained out of the oil using cheesecloth.  Please note:  When you are ready to strain out the herbs, do not forget to apply pressure to the drenched herbs to get out as much oil as you can.  Finally, after tons of anticipation our oil infusion was ready to be put to use.

In the End
The patchouli oil infusion smelled amazing!  Not only was this recipe super easy to make, but it was fun too.  The addition of the oil infusion to our formulation allowed our end product that extra boost in the moisturizing category, and our skin was soft and supple after use too.

Happy Homemade!

Jan
14

Shea Butter Recipes

This entry was posted in all natural, bath and body, bath products, body butter, body safe fragrance oils, cold process soap, cosmetic ingredients, essential oils, herbal oil infusion, homemade, melts, natural ingredients and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Shea butter cold process soap Great Shea Butter Recipes

Shea Butter has amazing benefits for your skin.  The addition of this ingredient in your products will give your merchandise often sought out advantages.  Rich in vitamins a and e, Shea butter is great for reviving and moisturizing skin, hair, and nails.  Plus, Shea butter is readily absorbed into the skin without leaving a greasy feel behind.  Shea butter also does not clog pores, and is gentle enough to use for skin irritations on babies.

Key Points of Shea Butter

Shea butter can help in the removal of age spots, scars, and stretch marks.  It also helps to invigorate collagen production from our bodies, keeping our skin looking healthy, radiant, and supple; therefore reducing sagging skin.

Shea butter is anti inflammatory.  This makes it a perfect ingredient for body products that help to alleviate pain associated with arthritis, sore and achy muscles, and wind/sun/minor heat burns.

Shea butter is a natural moisturizing agent.  This is a great ingredient to use for people that suffer from skin irritations such as psoriasis, eczema, and dermatitis.  However, Shea butter is gentle enough to use on babies for diaper rashes.  Also, Shea butter is a superb additive to combat those rougher areas of your body; such as the heels, knees, and elbows.

For hair products, Shea butter is a winner.  Not only does Shea butter help thinning and damaged hair, but it will also promote growth of hair as well.  A perfect bonus to this butter is that it fights dandruff and can even be used as a natural hair conditioner.

Shea butter will also help cracked cuticles and promote healthy nail beds.

A great massage oil, Shea butter allows for penetrating, deep tissues massages and can be scented for aromatherapy reasons.

Here are some phenomenal Shea butter themed recipes for homemade bath and body products:

Rose Violet Bath MeltsBath Recipes
Berry Bewitching Bath Brew Recipe
Gourmet Chocolate Bath Melts Recipe
Lemon Lavender Bath Melts Recipe
Rose Petal Bath Melts Recipe
Rose Violet Bath Melts Recipe

black raspberry vanilla body butter recipeBody Balms/Butters
Black Raspberry Vanilla Body Butter Recipe
Hydrating Hand Sticks Recipe
Sugar Cookie Whipped Body Butter Recipe
Rejuvenating Foot Balm Recipe
Winter Body Butter Recipe

Massage
Massage Candle Recipe

shea lotion with herbal infusionLotions
Shea Lotion with Herbal Infusion Recipe
Solid Lotion Bar Recipe

Melt and Pour Soaps
7 Up Bundt Cake Soap Recipe
Zebra Print Soap Recipe

Blueberry Cheesecake Cold Process Soap Cold Process Soaps
Peppermint Cold Process Foot Soap Recipe
Apricotie Hottie Soap Recipe
Beer Cold Process Soap Recipe
Blueberry Cheesecake Cold Process Soap Recipe
Calendula Sunshine Cold Process Soap Recipe
Caramel Custard Cold Process Soap Recipe
Carrot Cold Process Soap Recipe
Cleopatra Heavy Cream Cold Process Soap Recipe
Cold Fashioned Lemonade Soap Recipe
Cold Process Shaving Soap Recipe
Gentle Avocado Cold Process Soap Recipe
Lavender Luxury Cold Process Soap Recipe
Mango Cold Process Soap Recipe
Pineapple Paprika Cold Process Soap Recipe
Royal Honey Bee Cold Process Soap Recipe
Shampoo Bar Cold Process Soap Recipe
Shea Butter Cold Process Soap Recipe
Hot Process Soap Recipe

Lip Balms/Glosses
Crazy for Coconuts Lip Balm Recipe
Natural Beet Root Lip Gloss Recipe
Strawberry Cheesecake Lip Balm Recipe

cotton candy emulsified sugar scrub Scrubs
Cotton Candy Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe
Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe
Fruity Rings Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe
Neapolitan Ice Cream Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe
Strawberry Milkshake Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe
Watermelon Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe

Jan
14

Shea Butter

This entry was posted in all natural, bath and body, bath products, body butter, cold process soap, cosmetic ingredients, humectant, lotion, massage oils, natural skincare ingredients and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Shea ButterShea Butter

An essential element to Africans for thousands of years, the benefits of Shea Butter are quickly becoming center stage in many western parts of the world.  Shea butter is a substance that naturally contains vitamins a and e.  This butter is very beneficial to skin care and medicinal industries.  It can be added to various body products such as lotions or salves for anti-inflammatory (reduce inflammation), emollient (softening or soothing skin), and humectant (retaining or keeping moisture) properties.   But, more over, Shea butter also assists with the removal of scars and stretch marks.  Shea butter can even help with skin irritations such as diaper rashes.

Shea Butter comes from the wild growing Karite tree in Africa. The Karite tree can live up to 300 years of age.  The Karite tree starts to produce seeds at 10-15 years of age.  These seeds (or nuts) parallel that of a large plum. The fruit of the Karite tree has become a priceless item to the people of Africa.  Often considered “women’s gold”, these nuts not only provide food and medicine to the people of Africa, but they are also a main source of income for many of the women who are employed by the production of Shea butter.

Shea butter can be made in various different ways:

When a Karite tree produces nuts, they are collected.  Traditionally, the nuts are then opened and roasted.  This roasting is done to ensure a constant texture in the Shea butter.  When this consistency is achieved, the butter is then removed from the nuts, kneaded, and finally is analyzed for quality.  Once it is approved, the Shea butter, which has a ivory or cream like color, is then exported out of Africa.

Another way to get Shea butter is the crushing and boiling of the nuts.  Since the Shea butter is really a fatty substance, it will float to the top of the water.  The Shea butter is then skimmed out of the water and then it naturally solidifies.  Once it is in a solid form, it is checked for quality and exported.

Shea butter can also be extracted by the cold pressing method.   

Shea butter can also be filtered.  This form of Shea butter involves a process of clay filtering which allows for a smoother texture.  This clay filtering method allows for the removal of any shell particles that may still be in the Shea Butter.

Physically speaking Shea butter is a great substance to apply raw (right on the skin).  Its butter like consistency readily melts (from the heat of our bodies), and is absorbed into the skin.  Shea butter is invaluable to both the medicinal and cosmetic industries. 

Medical Uses:

Some of the key components as to why Shea butter is beneficial to the medical industry are that Shea butter is:  antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti inflammatory.

Shea Butter works as a natural sun block.  This is because it is able to absorb some ultraviolet rays, due to the fact that Shea butter contains the component cinnamic acid.  The addition of Shea butter to a lotion or cream will allow the product to provide some sun blocking properties against harmful UV rays.

Shea butter is also used as a base in many medicinal ointments because of its anti-inflammatory properties.

This amazing product can even help to alleviate discomfort from bruises and even burns (heat/wind/sun burns).  Medicinally speaking, using raw Shea butter on sore and achy muscles will actually drain the toxins from the area, helping to reduce the soreness.

This is a go to ingredient for massaging people who suffer from arthritis and pains in their joints.  This is because Shea butter contains stigmasterol, an agent for preventing stiffness.

And, within the realm of massaging, Shea butter is a perfect massaging agent.  Because this ingredient melts when it is in contact with the skin, it creates an ideal situation for deep tissue massages.

Cosmetic Uses:

Shea butter is one of the best all natural skin care products available hence it growing popularity in this booming market.

Due to its moisturizing benefits, Shea butter prevents chapping and extremely dry skin.  It is a great go to ingredient for dermatitis, psoriasis, and eczema.  As an exemplary moisturizer, Shea butter contains many fatty acids.  These fatty acids are necessary to help keep skin looking supple and youthful.  Shea butter also assists our skin in keeping its elasticity.  This is because Shea butter can actually encourage collagen production from our bodies.

Shea butter can be used as a natural hair conditioner.  But, the healthy hair benefits do not stop there.  Shea Butter can actually prevent hair from breaking and thinning and actually stimulates hair growth!  Shea butter can even be used as hair pomade.

For hand creams and body lotions, not only does the addition of Shea butter help to keep skin moisturized, but it also helps with cracked cuticles and even fortifies nail beds.  This ingredient is ideal for the super dry areas of your skin such as elbows, knees, and heels.

In shaving creams Shea butter can help to prevent irritations.  It even promotes the skin to have a radiant and healthy glow.

Shea Butter is ideal for soap making.  Because many of the components of Shea butter are non-saponifiable, therefore, many of the nutrients and skin loving elements are still existent in the finished bar of soap.  To view a great cold process soap making recipe that contains Shea butter and all its healthy benefits, please click here. 

To help firm and rejuvenate sagged, wrinkled, or aged skin, use Shea butter in the formulation of your bath and body products.  Promoting cell renewal and increasing circulation, this is an overall great ingredient for your whole body product line.

A great makeup remover that does not clog pores, Shea butter can be used to remove facial makeup in a cinch.

As you can see, Shea butter has many versatile uses.  A great addition to any bath and body recipe, Shea butter is easy to work with and will provide your products will numerous healthy benefits.  To purchase Shea butter from a trusted supplier in the soap and cosmetic industry, please click on this link.

Jan
10

Patchouli

This entry was posted in cosmetic ingredients, distillation, essential oil, herb, herbs, homemade, natural ingredients, Natures Garden, patchouli essential oil, soap ingredients, wholesale craft supplies, woody notes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

patchouli essential oil Facts about Patchouli

In America, when most people hear the word patchouli, they immediately think of hippies, universal love for one another, and tie dyed peace signs. But patchouli is so much more than that and has quite an interesting history.

Deriving its name from the Tamil language (the official dialect of Singapore and Sri Lanka), patchouli means “green leaf”.  A robust and extremely fragrant plant; especially when rubbed, patchouli’s scent has been used for centuries in perfumes.

Belonging to the genus Pogostemon, patchouli is a green, leafy herb that is in the mint family.  Growing best in hot, tropical climates; patchouli thrives when it is not in direct sunlight and has the potential of reaching a height of 2-3 ft.  Contrary to common belief, patchouli is more than just leaves; the plant also has flowers that bloom in late fall.  These flowers produce seeds that can be harvested to produce even more patchouli plants.

There are two ways to grow patchouli.  The first is to attain cuttings from the mother plant.  These cuttings are then rooted in water and will cultivate additional patchouli plants.  The second way to grow patchouli is to plant the seeds of the flowers.  The only hesitance with this way is that patchouli seeds are very small and have to be handled with great care.  These seeds are extremely fragile and can be easily crushed, deeming them useless.

When it comes to harvesting patchouli, the leaves of the plant can be collected several times in one year.  However, the strongest scent/oil comes from the top 3-4 pairs of leaves in the patchouli plant.  In order to attain the extraction of patchouli essential oil from these leaves, the leaves must go through a steam distillation process.  This is typically achieved with dried patchouli leaves.  However, there are some claims that to achieve the highest quality of patchouli essential oil, fresh leaves should be distilled.  Ideally, close to where the leaves are harvested, ensuring true freshness.

There are other ways to obtain patchouli essential oil.  One is through a fermentation process.  This process involves bundling the dry patchouli leaves and allowing them to ferment for a long period of time.

The essential oil of patchouli is a rich, earthy aroma with a woody yet minty undertone.  One of the most notable characteristics of this essential oil is that it actually improves over time.  The two most sought out components of patchouli essential oil are patchoulol and norpatchoulenol.

Although, it is true that patchouli essential oil is vital to the perfume industry, patchouli also had another massive worth in history.  Patchouli is believed to be an insect repellent.  It was common place for silk traders of the oriental to pack the valuable silk that they were trading with dried patchouli leaves.  Not only did the leaves prevent the mating of moths on the traders’ silk, but also hindered the moth from laying eggs on the precious silk as well.

This practice, which had started as a means of protection for the silk, ended with patchouli being considered an affluent scent.  Historians now hypothesize that due to the fragrant nature of patchouli; much of the traded silk acquired the aroma during the long travel.  Before long the distinguished scent of patchouli marked authenticity in traded fabric goods although the vast majority did not know what it was called.

One of the possible explanations as to why patchouli was considered an upscale scent to Europeans of that time is due to a notable historical conqueror.  The infamous Napoleon Bonaparte attained some of these patchouli scented cashmeres, through his vast travels to Egypt.  He then brought them back to France.  This mysterious scent of patchouli and its origin were kept secret, and it was not until the year 1837, that the smell and the source were identified to the remainder of the western world.

Oct
02

Titanium Dioxide

This entry was posted in candle making supplies, cold process soap, cosmetic ingredients, melt and pour soap, Natures Garden, Soap making supplies, titanium dioxide and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .
titanium

Whether you are a candle, soap, or personal care products crafter, chances are you have run across Titanium Dioxide in your field.

Sometimes, you just want your products to be so wonderful that they can sell themselves.  Usually, the look your product has is the turning point as to whether someone’s interest is peaked enough to further investigate.  Instantly, your first urge is to make a product that is beautifully fragranced and colored, therefore snatching the potential sale.  But, what if your end goal was a finished product that was white in color?  Ahhh, the elusive white product- clean, pure, brilliant.  This my friends is where Titanium Dioxide comes into play.

Titanium Dioxide is a naturally occurring mineral that appears with the oxidation of titanium.  Once these minerals are collected, they are then processed and refined to remove any impurities.  What this all results in is a whitening product that can be used in a wide array of mediums.  In fact, Titanium Dioxide is the most widely used whitening pigment for many industries.

The additive itself is without odor and has excellent absorbing properties.  Titanium Dioxide is not only noted for its whitening power in products, but also for its thickening capabilities as well.  Yet, another notable property of Titanium Dioxide is its light reflection potential.  It’s no secret that Titanium Dioxide is a well known ingredient in many sunscreen applications.  This is due to its light reflection properties of reflecting, scattering, and absorbing sunlight therefore protecting the skin underneath from any harmful rays.

When to add it:  Titanium Dioxide can be oil based or water based.  If using water based titanium dioxide in your bath and body recipes, you will want to incorporate this ingredient during the water phase of your recipe.  If using the oil based titanium dioxide, you will incorporate it during the oil phase of your recipe.  If using titanium dioxide for candles, it can only be used for the overdips of the candles.  Incorporating this additive to your melted candle wax, will clog your wick in a finished product.

How Much to Add:  When integrating titanium dioxide in your products, remember testing is key to finding your perfect recipe.  However, Natures Garden suggests the following usage rates for titanium dioxide.  In cosmetics, Titanium dioxide is used in mineral makeup as your matte base. It allows your product to flow nicely. For candle making, typical usage of titanium dioxide for dipped candles is 1% titanium dioxide to 3%-6% stearic acid.  In everything else bath and body, usage level is no more than 1 teaspoon per pound of soap/cosmetic product.

But, What If:  If you are considering Titanium Dioxide in your recipe, but would still like to maintain some colored aspects to your finished product, this can be done as well.  Incorporating titanium dioxide to certain parts of your product offers a great contrast of white and color; making the colored aspects of your product even more vibrant, bold, and eye catching.

In closing, regardless of whether you are seeking out that perfect white bar of soap, mastering a body care product that effectively shields skin from harmful UV rays, or even giving the outside of your candle that clean white look, Titanium Dioxide is your solution.

Sep
26

Sodium Lactate in Soap & Lotions

This entry was posted in cold process soap, cosmetic ingredients, humectant, moisturizing ingredient, Natures Garden, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies, sodium lactate and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .
sodium lactate

Sodium Lactate: Most commonly derived by the fermentation of corn or beets, this natural body product additive has a smooth, clear appearance with almost no odor.

 

Sodium Lactate is quickly gaining the spotlight as an additive in the creation of bath and body products.  Although it is not a mandatory ingredient, sodium lactate can hold its own when it comes to functionality in a recipe.  

Sodium lactate, a water soluble ingredient, is added during the water phase of the creation.  It is used in bath products and has many beneficial aspects to its use.  It is a natural moisturizer, humectant (bringing moisture to itself), and pH regulator.  Sodium Lactate is used in a variety of bath products such as soaps, lotions, and shampoos.   In fact, when it comes to lotion formulations, sodium lactate can be used to replace vegetable glycerin.  Why is this a benefit?  Using sodium lactate instead of vegetable glycerin will give you a final product that lacks the stickiness that usually occurs when using vegetable glycerin in a lotion recipe.  Sodium lactate also helps reduce the “greasiness” of the oils in your emulsions, while improving the absorption capability of emulsions.   In emulsions like lotions, sodium lactate is used at the rate of 1-3% of the weight of your recipe.

Sodium lactate is used in cold process soap recipes to harden the soap, making for a harder, longer lasting bar of soap in the tub.  One of the great bonuses of using sodium lactate in your soap recipe is the easier releasing of the soap from the mold, especially if you are using more of a complex shaped mold.  Besides adding moisture and conditioning aspects to your soap, sodium lactate helps to increase lather and can even add mildness to the soap.

For cold process soap makers, the sodium lactate is added to your cooled lye water solution.  What results is a harder bar of soap that will release from the mold easier, and can be cut earlier than the traditional cold process soap.  Also, the physical appearance of a soap that has the addition of sodium lactate will improve.  The bars will have a creamier look to them, and the soap will provide a more luxurious lather. Sodium Lactate aids in keeping your soap batter in a liquid state longer.  This makes coloring/swirling and pouring easier.  But once the soap is molded, sodium lactate will harden your soap faster, allowing for the soap to unmold easily.

For hot process soap makers, sodium lactate is added to your lye water solution, and other ingredients are mixed in.

Testing is key for finding the right percentage of use for sodium lactate in your recipe.  For a great starting point is 1/2 oz.  sodium lactate per pound of soap oils. But, test, test, test!  Be cautious not to add too much sodium lactate, this will cause your soap to be brittle and/or crumbly.

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.