Category Archives: cold process soap

May
09

Manly Scent

This entry was posted in candle fragrance oils, cold process soap, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, soap fragrances and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

manly scentFerocious Beast Fragrance Oil– Fragrance Oil Spotlight

This amazingly strong manly scent works for a vast  array of male themed products.  However, Ferocious Beast scent is highly sought after by both men and women.  The women love this manly scent on their men.  The men love it because the scent is sexy and confident.  Ferocious Beast is a light musk and woodsy scent with a touch of floral.  This addicting combination of aromas is the key to why everyone loves this manly scent.

What does Ferocious Beast smell like?

This fragrance oil by Natures Garden has citrusy top-notes of orange, lemon and lime, leading to middle notes of rosemary, jasmine, lily of the valley, vetiver and rose and finishing with a woody, oakmoss and white musk base note.

How do our customers use Ferocious Beast Fragrance Oil?

For those of you that are candle crafters; our customers use this fragrance oil in their soy, pillar of bliss, WOW, and Joy wax candles.  This manly scent is amazingly strong in both the hot and cold throw.  Some of our customers even use Ferocious Beast Fragrance Oil in their oil burners with great results.  In fact, this manly scent can even be used to fragrance room deodorizers, reed diffusers, and aroma beads.

On the bath and body end, the possibilities for this manly scent are unlimited.  The usage rate for this fragrance oil is 5%, and is used to make many manly products like:  Melt and pour soaps, body sprays, hand creams, after shave butters, shaving soaps, whipped shaving creams, shower gels, and shampoos.  Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance received awesome reviews, and is perfect in every way.  Here are the official results:  Perfect pour, no ricing, no acceleration, no discoloration after cure.  Scent stayed nice and strong!

May
08

Spring Scents

This entry was posted in bath and body, candle fragrance oils, cold process soap, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

spring scentsBest Spring Scents 2014

Spring time is a transition period.  Following the daunting months of cold and still winter, yet before the long and carefree days of summer; the season of spring resides, full of optimism and youthful changeover.

Spring, a time full of beauty, abundance of new life, and hope also offers a new captivating fragrance line up of spring time scents.  With all of the change that is occurring outside, too must come the changes in how people also want their homemade products and homes to smell like.

With all of the new life materializing and flourishing many people are prone to capture the renewed freshness of the outdoors.  It is now time to open the windows and air out their houses, and spring scented items are what is on every purchasers agenda.

With this concept in mind, Natures Garden would now like to present to you our list of the best spring scents for 2014.  These scents are fresh, floral, and clean.  Some of them are tried and true being known as top sellers and some are phenomenal florals that rock in bath and body products.  But, no matter which of these scents spark your interest, they all work in a vast amount of unique homemade products with great results.  In fact, every spring scent listed below has an average customer rating of 5 stars.

The below list of best spring scents are not listed in any particular order.  Accompanying the fragrance oil is also customer reviews about that scent.

Pink Sugar Type Fragrance–  “I’ve tried 3 different Pink Sugar formulas from 3 different retailers, this is the best! Great in soy and CP soap.”

Himalayan Pink Salt Scrub
You can also click on this link to see the Himalayan Pink Salt Scrub recipe using this fragrance oil.

Fresh Cut Roses Fragrance–  “Not too sweet, not too overpowering….exactly like freshly cut pink roses. It soaps well in CP…and I also use it in bath salts, sugar scrubs and lotions. An added bonus is that this scent blends wonderfully with many other scents…”

NG Island Fresh Gain Type Fragrance–  “Once again, I have found a better replacement for a more expensive oil at NG!  This is an intense oil that my clean scent lovers can’t resist.”

Air Freshener Recipe
You can also click on this link to see the Island Fresh Air Freshener recipe using this fragrance oil.

Lily of the Valley Fragrance–  “What a beautiful scent! Bought it on request and after making soap and candles with it my house smells wonderful! Very strong scent throw. Very clean and floral and fresh!”

Black Raspberry & Vanilla Fragrance–  “Wow I love this scent! Perfect combination of berries and sweet vanilla. Great throw in soy candles and awesome in B&B products.”

Body Butter Recipe
You can also click on this link to see the Black Raspberry Vanilla Body Butter recipe using this fragrance oil.

Monkey Farts Fragrance–  “This is easily the most popular scent of everything I have. It’s requested frequently as much for the name as the scent! The fragrance is bubblegum banana fruity fun and is nice and strong in MP soap, lotion, scrubs, and in soy wax tarts. Great all around scent and a wonderful soap/product to have at a show.”

Lilac Fragrance–  “Many, many customers have told me this smells like “real” lilacs, not imitation fragrance oil. I must agree, as lilac is my favorite floral.”

kid smelly jelly recipe
You can also click on this link to see the Spring Smelly Jelly recipe using this fragrance oil.

NG Loving Spell Fragrance–  “This smells sooooo good. Exactly like the real thing. This has quickly became my top seller. Great in lotion, bath gel, and spritzers.”

Honeysuckle Fragrance–  “This is the BEST Honeysuckle available. I have tried several and I will never use any other but this.”

Clean Cotton Type Fragrance–  “This is the best dup you can find! I have tried other suppliers but NG’s Clean Cotton (type) is right on the mark!! Strong throw, wonderful clean fragrance!”

In closing if you are looking for that great pick me up scent (in more ways than one), any one of these spring scents will work for you or your homemade products.

May
07

The Perfect Man Scent

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, body spray, body wash, candle fragrance oils, candle making supplies, cold process soap, Fragrance Oils, melt and pour soap, Natures Garden, scented candles, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

the perfect man scent

 

The Perfect Man Fragrance Oil– Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Every women out there has in mind what the perfect man should look like. And, when it comes to looks, celebrities like Sean Connery, Brad Pitt, Mathew McConaughey, or even the most recent sexiest man alive, Adam Levine come to mind. However, there is also a perfect man scent. When it comes to this fragrance, it is a chart topper. We have received many comments on how amazing and long lasting the perfect man scent is. So, needless to say when your perfect man uses your product with this scent, it stays with him all day. Now, no matter what your perfect man has been doing, he will smell amazing. The perfect man scent is not overpowering but very sexy! In fact, many of our customers say you can’t go wrong with this scent. Looks like the Perfect Man is in high demand, on several levels!

What does The Perfect Man smell like?

With this fragrance oil by Natures Garden, imagine, a man who is Confident, Trustworthy, Successful, Romantic, Sexy, Sensual, Daring, and has a great sense of humor.  Would you call that…The Perfect Man? We wanted to create a fragrance that would represent The Perfect Man in every way.  After smelling many famous male fragrances on the market, Bleu de Chanel made us smile!  We quickly had our perfumist work on creating a fragrance that was similar to Blue de Chanel, but different enough to call it our own:  The Perfect Man.  Using only the finest, expensive fragrance notes, our perfumist created what we consider to be the best male fragrance we carry at Natures Garden!  The Perfect Man fragrance begins with fresh, daring notes of Japanese grapefruit, bergamot, and lemon; followed by middle notes of peppercorn, ginger, jasmine, aquatic marine notes, and a hint of peppermint; sitting on expensive base notes of natural patchouli, cedar, vetiver, labdanum, and frankincense.  Now this is The Perfect Man!  An NG Original Scent! NG Best Seller!

How do our customers use The Perfect Man Fragrance Oil?

For candle crafters and home scenters the perfect man is a huge hit. Our customers use this fragrance oil in their soy tarts, tea lights, Palm Container wax, WOW wax, gel wax, Joy wax, and soy wax. And, this phenomenal fragrance has a great throw too. As for other home scenting ideas; this fragrance oil has been used in oil diffusers, electric burners, and aroma beads.

On the bath and body end of products the perfect man scent has immense appeal. The usage rate for this fragrance oil is 5% and is used to scent quite the variety of body products. These homemade items include: melt and pour soaps, shampoo, shower gel, body sprays, creams, and deodorants; all with a nice long lasting scent. And, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance is amazing for your masculine line. Here are the official results: Perfect pour, no ricing, no acceleration, no separation.  The scent is to die for!  An awesome, PERFECT man fragrance.  Discolors to a light beige.

May
06

Jersey Soap Recipe

This entry was posted in cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, homemade soap, how to make cold process soap, make your own soap, soap ingredients, soap making recipes, Soap making supplies, soap recipes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

jersey soap recipe

 

This manly themed Jersey Soap Recipe is easy and fun to make if you have soaped before.  Perfect for a Fathers Day gift or a gift for your favorite sports fan; using a combination of both cold processed and hot processed soap, you will be able to create a manly scented soap that looks very similar to a sports jersey.  In creating this masterpiece, feel free to swap out the colors to select ones that batter fit the theme of the end product you are looking for.

Please Note:  To complete this homemade project, it will take two days to create.  Day one will be the cold process soap steps.  Then, you will have to wait 24 hours before unmolding this soap.  Once that time has elapsed, the second day will involve the hot process soap steps.  Then, of course there is cure time involved due to the fact that there is cold process soap in your end product.  But, you will have nice and firm bars when finished.

The majority of the ingredients and some of the supplies used in this recipe can be purchased at Natures Garden.

Here are the ingredients that you will need to make the cold process portion of this recipe:
For the lye solution:
65 grams Water
24 grams Lye
For your soaping ingredients:
60 grams Shea Butter
50 grams Coconut Oil 76
33 grams Apricot Kernel Oil
21 grams Grapeseed Oil
9 grams Castor Oil
6 grams Sodium Lactate
11 grams Game On Fragrance Oil
2 grams Titanium Dioxide

As for the mold, you will need to have the Mold Market Square Loaf mold.  This mold is also available at Natures Garden.

Once you have everything and you are ready to start soaping, here are the steps, complete with pictures to show you how it is done:

make your lye solution

Put on your safety gear, and prep your area. Then, make your lye solution.

melting down your soaping ingredients

Now, melt and combine your Apricot Kernel Oil, Grapeseed Oil, Shea Butter, Coconut Oil 76, and Castor Oil.

adding sodium lactate

Once the lye solution has cooled add the sodium lactate and stir.

titanium dioxide paste

Next, remove 8 grams of the melted soaping ingredients, and place it into a separate mixing bowl.  Then, add your titanium dioxide to this and stir in to make a paste.   Set aside.

emulsify soap batter

When ready, combine the lye solution and soaping ingredients together. Stick blend to emulsify.

scenting and coloring the batter

Next, add titanium dioxide paste and stick blend to make the whole batter white in color.  Then, add the fragrance and stick blend.

pouring your soap

Once you have reached trace, pour the white soap batter into the 4 pound mold.  Please Note:  The batter will NOT fill the mold.  This is done intentionally.  Insulate.

measuring out your embed

After 24 hours:  Carefully remove the white soap from the mold.   Place it down flat and horizontally in front of you. Then, using a ruler, measure out 2 inches in height and mark it.

the number in your jersey soap
Now, using a knife, cut the soap so that you have one long bar.  This will be the number one in your jersey soap.  Then, set aside.

The cold process steps are now complete.  You are now half way there.  The next step is the Hot Process and here is the recipe (using the same ingredients with the addition soap colorant).
For the Lye solution:
420 grams Water
153 grams Lye
For your soaping ingredients:
387 grams Shea Butter
321 grams Coconut Oil 76
210 grams Apricot Kernel Oil
133 grams Grapeseed Oil
55 grams Castor Oil
35 grams Sodium Lactate
69 grams Game On Fragrance Oil
15 grams Ultramarine Blue Fun Soap Colorant

meling your ingredients for hp recipe

Set your crock pot to a low heat setting. Next, place all of your oils and butter into the crock pot. Heat and occasionally stir them until melted.

adding the sodium lactate to hp

While you are melting the soaping ingredients, make your lye solution.  Also, add the sodium lactate. Stir in to incorporate.

combining the soap ingredients

Once all of the soaping ingredients are melted, slowly pour the lye mixture into the crock pot.

coloring the hp soap

Next, in short bursts, stick blend directly in the crock pot. Once you have the batter at light trace, add the ultramarine blue soap colorant. Then, stick blend to incorporate throughout the whole batter.

hp soap pudding like state
Now, keep blending in short bursts with your stick blender until the batter reaches a pudding like state.  Remember to periodically stir the soap in between with your spatula.  Once the batter has reached this state, lid the crock pot.

hp soap with waxy appearance
Allow the soap mixture to cook, and periodically stir it. Doing this will prevent the soap from scorching.  As the soap cooks, the soap will start to dry out and take on a waxy appearance.

hp soap that has consistency of mashed potatoes
Remember to stir occasionally, but allow the soap to cook for about 2 hours.  You will know that your soap has cooked long enough once it has the consistency of mashed potatoes.

adding the scent and stirring it in
Next, quickly add the Game On scent to the soap.  Then, stir well throughout the whole batter.

about one inch of soap in the mold
Now, get your mold and place about one inch worth of the soap into it.  Gently tap the soap in the mold to remove any air bubbles.

placing the number 1 in the soap
Once the mold has been tapped, vertically place the white soap into the mold.  Using your fingers, gently wedge the soap into place.  Try to keep the white soap centered.  This will be the number 1 on the jersey soap.

filling in the rest of the mold

Once the number 1 has been set into the soap, begin to carefully fill in the open sides with soap.  As you are doing this, remember to gently tap the soap mold to remove any trapped air.  Please Note:  Due to the tapping  of the mold, you may have to recenter the number 1 in the soap if it becomes askew.

heap the top of the soap
Once the mold is filled, heap the top lip portion with the remaining soap.

how to get the jersey shape

Now, using your ladle, carefully run it down the center of the mold and remove the excess soap.  Place the excess soap along the sides.  This scooping manner will give your jersey soap its neck line.  Allow the soap to mold overnight.

removing the soap from the mold
The next morning, remove the soap from the mold.

cut your jersey soap

Finally, cut the soap into bar sized slices. Allow the soap to cure further (because of the cold process soap) before use.

That is it!  You have just accomplished the jersey soap recipe.  Enjoy your new soap!

 

May
05

Our First Stick Blender

This entry was posted in cold process soap, handcrafted soap, homemade soap, hot process soap, how to make cold process soap, Natures Garden, soap, Soap making supplies, soap supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

our first stick blender

 

This blog is dedicated in remembrance of our first official soap making utensil, Mr. Smooth Operator.

3 years ago, we started to dabble into the wonderful world of soap making. As we learned all about this art, researching the steps, ingredients, and supplies; we welcomed a new soaping utensil into our lives. It was lovingly named: Mr. Smooth Operator. He was our first stick blender.

Today, with tears in our eyes; we lay Mr. Smooth Operator to rest.

Mr. Smooth Operator was an extremely hard worker, who took on each soaping endeavor with vigor and vitality. He was there for us through thick and thin batch, and never blinked an eye when it came to having to put forth extra effort; asking for nothing in return.

Looking back, there were times when we took Mr. Smooth Operator for granted; especially early on when we were new to the soaping game. But, he never held that against us. He was a happy, go getting fellow, who lived a life of sacrifice. He would take on the task of hard labor and getting dirty; all in order for us to be clean with our soap.

He was the best stick blender.

Strongly rooted in a family that strives on performance, the Cuisinart Smart Stick Immersion Blender series should be proud. Not only did Mr. Smooth Operator fulfill his calling as a stick blender, but he willingly exceeded expectations every day. And boy, were there some days that he put in the overtime.

Through all of these amazing qualities, Mr. Smooth Operator quickly became a part of our soaping family. He has set the standard of quality work (and easy clean up), leaving behind an awful big pair of shoes for the next stick blender to fill.

Mr. Smooth Operator will truly be missed by everyone on the creative team at Natures Garden.

We hope that in his passing, he is out there somewhere blending huge batters of joy and happiness. Achieving immersions, young and fresh as the day he was first opened and used.

May
01

Ohio Soapers Gathering

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, cold process soap scents, cosmetic ingredients, cosmetic supplies, crafts as a hobby, fragrance oil, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

cindy ohio soapers gatheringHello everyone!

Well I made it through my first ever Ohio Soapers Gathering! I have to say, it was great to meet the people who love soaping as much as we do. They are a fantastic group of individuals. I was however a bit nervous being my first gathering, but, upon my arrival the coordinator of the gathering, Jackie Harris greeted me with such warmth how could I not feel welcomed? She was just so thrilled we were able to attend, what a lovely lady she is. I set up my tables and waited for the event to begin. Every one of my booth visitors were just as excited as ever that we had attended the gathering for the day with some of our products. So much so that even those who preordered, bought more stuff while I was there. There was no stopping them!

Our Facebook followers told me how excited they were about the opening of our store and that the pictures were amazing! I told them the pictures don’t do it justice and that they will just have to come down in person. They fully and enthusiastically agreed, saying a road trip is definitely in the near future. Several of my customers that had already been there, raved to the others standing nearby.

Throughout the event there were informative demonstrators. Bobbie Eastman with hair shine, Kim Craig with handmade cream, Kristy Schemrich with laundry soap, and a few others. I am glad they held these demos in the same room, otherwise I would have missed out. Even though I could never get away from the table due to my fabulous customers, I could still hear and gather information from the demos. I even got a few samples!

They had a “garage sale” table which I thought was cute (I should have brought my stuff of odds and ends to sell). These were things the donators couldn’t use anymore but knew someone else could. Then there was a table called the “swap table.” You donate stuff you made, up to 5 things and you received as many in return. How fun is that? I can only imagine what kind of things were made by these amazing crafters. Everyone was so creative, I was in awe!

The door prizes were great too, there was everything from Tickets to Kalahari Water Park, gift certificates, several soaping products, and of course Natures Garden shopping bags and Tshirts! All of the winners were so happy to come away from the gathering with new knowledge, new products, winnings, and a full belly. All in all I believe it was a great success for everyone all around.

natures garden winners
I can’t wait for the next one because I will get to meet a whole new realm of awesome people. Their creativity inspires me and it’s good to know there are people out there using their knowledge for things that are good and can offer information that will help others. Whether it is to teach them, save them money, or inspire THEIR creative juices, soaping is a great artistic field to venture into. The avenues are endless…seriously!

So my friends, if you have never been to a gathering, go! If you know someone who makes soap, learn! If you don’t personally know somebody, come out to our website at naturesgardencandles.com and look at our blogs, show and tells, all of our free recipes, or, check out our starter kits. It may seem intimidating but know we are always here to help…always!

Although I had a blast in Sandusky at the Ohio Soapers Gathering, I was past exhausted! It was a good exhaustion and I came away from it with more then I went there with…I am glad I was a part of it.

Well kids until the adventure, have a fabulous day!

Cindy

Apr
30

Color Dispersion

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, homemade soap, Natures Garden, soap colorants, Soap making supplies, soap oil properties, soaping terms and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

color dispersionColor Dispersion in Soap

This picture shows the same exact recipe using two different methods of color dispersion in soap. Once the soap was poured, we noticed that some of the colorant was still on the sides of the bowls instead of actually incorporated into the soap (as shown in the soap on the right).  In addition, we noticed concentrated pockets of colorant in this cut soap.   Mainly, it is the difference between hand stirring the colorants in verses stick blending the colorants in, and failure to scrape the sides of the bowls to incorporate all of the coloring.  Regardless of the method that you choose, there are distinct advantages and disadvantages. The key to knowing which method works best for you is knowing your soap recipe and the time that it allows you.

Color Dispersion in cold process soap making can be a tricky aspect. After you figure out your color scheme for your recipe and the technique as to how you are adding your color, it then comes down to the actual challenge.

Really there are three options to color dispersion in your soap. They are hand stirring the colorant into the batter with a spoon, stick blending the colorant in, or the combination of both. The correct decision relies on a few factors though. These factors are: your recipe, time, and the number of colorants you want to add.

Hand Stirring
The best advantage of hand stirring colorants into soap is that it does not speed up trace. This allows you the perfect fluid soap batter for accomplishing a multi color swirl in your soap. But, hand stirring the colorant into your soap batter is slightly more time consuming because you really have to stir for some time to get the colorant dispersed. So, this is where knowing your recipe and window of time, especially if you are using multiple colorants, comes into play.

You will also have to be ready to move. When hand stirring, you have to stir, and stir quickly to get the full color dispersion of the soap colorant. And, do not forget to have your spatula ready to clean the sides and rotate the soap from the bottom of the bowl to make sure all of the colorant is evenly dispersed.

However, not all colorants can be hand stirred. Some of the colorants do not disperse as well as others with this method. The examples of these types of colorants would be titanium dioxide and the ultramarines. Colorants like these often need to be stick blended in order to get the full color dispersion among all of the soap.

Stick Blending
Stick blending your colorants in soap batter is ideal for true color dispersion. But, with stick blending time is a major factor. Stick blending will speed up trace (or the saponification process) in your soap. If too much time elapses while stick blending your colorants into the batter; certain swirling techniques cannot be accomplished. This is because the soap batter will be too thick, especially if you are using more than two colors in your soap recipe.

Besides speeding up trace, there is another factor to consider. When using multiple soap colorants and stick blending you will have to quickly clean your stick blender in between colors. But, you do have a few options when it comes to this. Some soapers keep a small bowl of water by their coloring station to quickly clean their stick blender in between colors. And, some just stick blend their colors in the correct order, but gently tap the stick blender to remove as much colored batter as possible before moving on to the next color. For example if you are coloring your soap green and yellow; you would start by stick blending the yellow first. This is because the yellow color is the lightest, and then move to the green.

The Combo
For the situations where you want to use ultramarines which almost require a stick blend to get the best color dispersion, but you still want several other colors in your soap; you can combo the blend. You would start by stick blending the colorants that need it, and then move on to the hand stirred colorants. If the stick blended colorants become too thick, simply stir them by hand and the soap batter will thin out slightly (or enough to pour). Just remember, you must move quickly.

What this really all comes down to is testing. Through making various batches of soap, you will be able to find exactly which method of color dispersion is best for you and your soaping recipe. There really is no right or wrong answer as to which method to use. Each soap recipe will vary.

Natures Garden offers FUN Soap colorants for soap making.  We even carry multiple neon colors to really make your soap “come alive”.

Apr
29

Insulating Soap

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath and body fragrances, cold process soap, cold process soap scents, homemade soap, Natures Garden, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies, soap mold and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

insulating soap In an earlier blog post, we discussed how insulating soap to promote gel phase was a matter of personal choice. Whether you insulate or choose not to, your soap will still be soap.

When it comes to whether you choose to insulate or not, really there are only two factors that will change. The first is the amount of cure time. Due to the fact that the saponification process is slowed down by the prevention of gel phase, your soap may need extra cure time before use. On the other hand, promoting a full gel phase for your soap means an accelerated saponification process with a normal cure time. And, the second difference is an aesthetic one.

The finished look of your soap will differ slightly based upon whether you choose to prevent gel phase or encourage it. By preventing gel phase (sticking your molded soap in the fridge or freezer), your finished soap will have a matte look to it. By promoting gel phase, your finished soap will have a slight translucent, shiny look to it. Again, however, please remember regardless of which method you choose either method results with finished soap.

When making soap, it is important to remember that the gel phase occurs during the saponification process. While your soap is in the mold, the various soaping ingredients react with the lye mixture, and heat is used to help the acceleration of the whole saponification process. When choosing to promote gel phase during saponification, it can be accomplished through means of insulation.

Insulating your soap means wrapping the soap with various layers in an attempt to keep the heat within the soap. Because the saponification process is endothermic (meaning the process pulls heat from its surroundings), keeping the soap insulated is the best means to successfully promoting gel phase throughout your whole soap. It will also help to prevent a partial gel. If you remember, a partial gel is where the center of your soap achieves gel phase, but the outside areas do not. This typically occurs because the outside of the soap looses heat in a quicker fashion therefore inhibiting the ideal environment for a full gel phase to occur.

Through the means of insulation, you can provide your soap with its ideal environment (heat wise).  And, when it comes to insulation for your soap, there are many different items you can use.  These items would include: newspaper, cardboard, blankets, towels, etc.  Practically, you can use any layer type material that will keep the heat in the soap (but never aluminum foil).

Many soapers will use various items in combination such as: wrapping the soap with saran wrap (especially if the soap has a decorated top), then covering it with newspaper, surrounded by towels, and finally placed under a box. There really is no limit for insulation. And, many believe that over insulating can never be done. Remember the key to insulating, if you are choosing to promote the gel phase; is to keep as much heat in the soap as possible.

However, please note: If you are soaping a recipe that does contain sugar or dairy products, you may want to go a little on the lighter side of insulating due to the fact that these items in your recipe will increase heat during the saponification process. Extreme insulating in these examples may cause the ingredients to “burn”, possibly resulting in discoloration and an off smell in your finished soaps.  It can also cause your soap batter to begin to bubble out of your mold.  You do however have the choice of preventing the gel phase for these types of recipes, and sticking your molded soap in the fridge or freezer.

Apr
28

Too Much Castor

This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, castor oil, cold process soap, cold process soap scents, Fragrance Oils, handmade soap, homemade soap, how to make cold process soap, Natures Garden, soap challenge, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

too much castor

The following blog was written by a new employee of Natures Garden who is doing her best to learn the science and art of soap making.  Please take that into consideration before commenting on her experiences, successes, and yes…failures.

Hello everyone!

The other day I wrote a blog about how I figured out my own recipe and all the details of my soap. I was so very excited about this project. I did really well throughout the whole process and was happy with the outcome of my soap. My soap bars were gorgeous and I was  officially a successful soap maker!

Well, the following day, I was assigned a new project: to write another recipe from start to finish. This would include everything from ingredients, to scent, to color, whether or not to add sodium lactate or color stabilizer, the swirl technique (aka design), and the mold. We are talking about EVERYTHING! I said, OK, I can do that!

The only difference between this assignment and my last project was this time there was not going to be a double check. Yes, the last few times I embarked on this journey, my work was double checked. I am in training, and there are a lot of things you need to know about the soap making process and everything that comes along with it. With all of that being said, I felt confident I could do this…really! So off I went.

I figured out my recipe, gathered all of my ingredients, put on my safety gear, and prepped.

Once I melted all of my oils, put together my lye solution, emulsified and scented, I was ready to design. I placed my colors in their bowls, and I was ready for the in the pot swirl. If you have not noticed, I am fond of this technique! Everything was going smoothly!

I took the colored batter that I was using and plopped it into my main soap batter and began the swirling technique. And, let me just tell you, my soap looked beautiful. I couldn’t even get over how nicely it poured into the silicone loaf mold. I was excited!

Now this was on Friday so I had to play the waiting game all weekend. By Sunday night, I couldn’t wait to see my masterpiece. When Monday morning finally arrived, I was ready to unveil my homemade soap. I picked it up and started to the chopping block. Hmmm, this soap seemed a bit squishy. I thought this can’t be good.

Starting to work the soap out of the mold, I realized that now it seemed sticky. This was not at all what I was hoping for. Finally, I got the soap out of the mold, and proceeded to cut it. That was when the soap stuck to my knife…just great! Despite the fact that the colors were awesome and it smelled great, I had messed up somewhere.  My soap bars were tacky and very soft.

So, I checked my weights and percentages. Everything was good. Then, I had my recipe double checked by someone else. They pointed out their opinion of what the problem could be.  I had too much castor oil in my recipe. Oopsy! I had totally overlooked the frequently-held opinion that when making soap that contains  Castor Oil , you may want to stay at 8% or less castor oil in your formulation.   My addition was 20%.

In the end, I felt defeated, and was totally bummed! I did however, make a note to self: while Castor oil is good for the “bubbly” in your soap, my experience showed me that using too much castor oil may produce soap that is tacky and hard to remove from the mold.  In the future, if I want to produce a harder bar of soap, I may want to increase my percentages of oils that are known to produce harder bars of soap such as coconut oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil.

I predicted I was going to fail…and when I do, I do it right…lol.

So my epic failure is a lesson learned. And, even though I am hard on my little feelings, don’t be too hard on yourself for your mistakes. My advice to any new soapers: Turn setbacks into future achievements, and lessons to be taught to others so they don’t make the same boo boos.

Until next time, have a fabulous day!

Cindy

 

 

Apr
26

Gel Phase

This entry was posted in all natural, bath and body, bath products, cold process soap, cold process soap colorant, cold process soap scents, essential oil, fragrance and color, Fragrance Oils, homemade soap, Natures Garden, soap fragrances, soap ingredients, Soap making supplies, soap mold, soaping terms and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

inhibited gel phase soap In an earlier blog post, we briefly discussed insulation of cold process soap. Through insulating your soap, you are encouraging the best environment for the gel phase to occur during saponification. Keeping the soap evenly heated using insulation will prevent a partial gel from occurring. But, still there are no guarantees. Even with the best insulation, you may still end up with bars of soap that have partial gel evident.

So, what if you prevented the gel phase in your soap?

Although this is possible, it is still not guaranteed. It can be very tough to prevent the gel phase. But, there are some factors that need to be noted to help you in your quest to stop the gel phase. These factors are: the size of your mold, and the various ingredients in your recipe. The saponification process involves heat; it is the nature of the soaping beast. Choosing to eliminate the gel phase will change some elements to your soap and soaping process.

But, before we get to that information, let’s look at some specific reasons to prohibit the gel phase.

First, since you are decreasing the amount of heat that is in your soap, this will allow you to introduce certain soaping ingredients that normally would be finicky. Examples of these heat sensitive ingredients would be: dairy products, heat sensitive colorants; prone to morphing, and fragrances or essential oils with a low flashpoint.

Dairy Products
Soaping with ingredients such as creams, milks, and butters for example will provide your finished bars with rich, extra moisturizing elements. However, soaping with dairy products can be tricky. With the heat that is involved with the saponification process, there is a chance that dairy products will burn. This results in both discoloration and an off smell in your soap. By preventing the gel phase from occurring, you allow these ingredients a fighting chance in soap. And, you can even produce a creamier bar of finished soap.

Colorants
Whether you are deciding to go the natural route with herbs, or using colorants that you worry may morph; preventing gel phase allows the window of opportunity to stay open. Certain herbs discolor or darker from the saponification process. The same is true for some colorants that completely alter like deep purple to brown.

Now, for the colorants in the finished soap when the gel phase is eliminated: the bar colors are bolder and more vivid. Even if you choose not to color your soap batter, the elimination of the gel phase stops the darkening of the fats and oils in your recipe, allowing for a “whiter” finished bar.

Scenting Options
If you do not want to rebatch your soap recipe, preventing the gel phase in your cold process soap may allow you to scent your soap with low flashpoint oils without worrying that the saponification process will eliminate the scent. It is also possible for fragrance or essential oil scents to come through stronger in the soap because of the reduction of heat.

As for what preventing the gel phase means for your soaps, there are key points you should know. First, you must keep your molded soap chilled for the full 24 hours. Depending on your recipe, you may have to keep the soap chilled for an additional 24 hours as well.

Now, when you are ready to unmold your soap, it is crucial to let your molded soap reach room temperature before trying to slice it. Not allowing your soap to be at room temperature before cutting may result with your bars being brittle, and breaking apart as you slice them.

As for the saponification process, since you inhibit the gel phase, it will take your soaps longer to complete the saponification process. What this means is that the soap will need additional cure time before it will be ready to use.

So, whether you choose to insulate or prevent the gel phase, it is really up to personal discretion. Regardless of the method, the result is the same; a finished bar of soap. The only variables that change are the molding environment and the cure time.