Archive for the ‘cold process soap’ Category

Brittle Soap

Monday, April 14th, 2014

soap that has too much sodium lactate
Warning, the following pictures may disturb some soapers!

Here was the scenario:  Using a Hot Process Recipe, we made a soap batch that we thought would work.  However, we got a little too sodium lactate happy.  As a result, our soap bars were not functional.  And, to be completely honest, some of our soap could not even be classified as a bar.

Can you feel the soaping life lesson coming on?

Our hot process soap was molded and ready to be removed and sliced.  The end was trimmed off, and we went in for our first cut… that was when the slice fell, and broke into two pieces.

brittle slice of soap

Again we tried, but to no avail…

crumbly soap

That was when we thought to slice the bars thicker.  Still the same result, a broken bar of soap.

high amount of sodium lactate

Heart broken, we came to the conclusion that there was too much sodium lactate in our recipe.

Yes, sad but true; we have brittle soap.  And, a 4 pound batch at that!  Even though the soap was brittle, we still wanted to find out how it performed.  So, we washed our hands with the bar pieces.  This action made the finished bars completely crumble as we rubbed them together under the running water.

testing the processed soap

The original recipe was a failure, but not a complete one.  We were able to see first hand what happens to soap when too much sodium lactate is added.

soap that needs a rebatch

In one of the earlier Natures Gardens blog posts, we wrote that using too much sodium lactate in your soap recipe will produce finished bars that crumble or are brittle.  This soap is the perfect example of exactly how this worked.

The recipe that we used contained 1 ounce of sodium lactate per pound of soaping oils in our recipe.  We thought that this would help harden the bar, especially since the soap was made from very soft oils.

Well, we were wrong.  This is why testing is highly suggested when dealing with soaping additives like sodium lactate.

Rain Scent

Sunday, April 13th, 2014

rain scentRain Barrel Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

The thought of falling rain water is soothing all by itself.  But, imagine a rain scent that you can smell even if it was not raining outside.  This fragrance is just that; a rain scent that will immediately take you to that special place, that place of your own personal “Zen”.  Rain Barrel fragrance is a combination of watery tones, with citrus, warm cedar, and other peaceful aromas perfectly coming together to.  This clean, crisp fragrance works in an array of homemade products and will be one of your favorites from Natures Garden line.

What does Rain Barrel Fragrance Oil smell like?

This intriguing summer fragrance oil by Natures Garden opens with fresh watery tones, crisp ozone and highlights of lemon. Leafy greens balance with lavender and warm cedar wood for the fragrance heart. Sensuous amber undertones and clear musky elements complete the fresh sensation. An NG Original Fragrance!

How do our customers use Rain Barrel Fragrance Oil?

For candles, tarts, and air fresheners, this rain scent performed perfectly in Wow, Joy, Ecosoya, and Gel waxes.  Rain Barrel fragrance oil also has a very nice, strong hot throw from soy waxes.  And, when it comes to room fresheners; this fragrance performs fabulous in aroma beads, room sprays, smelly jellies, and oil burners.

On the bath and body end, this fragrance passes with flying colors.  The usage rate for this rain scent is 5%, and is used to make:  bath fizzes, shower gels, melt and pour soaps, foaming body butters, lotions, bubble baths, lotions bars, and sugar scrubs.  Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers; this fragrance received awesome reviews.   Here are the official results: Perfect Pour. No ricing, no acceleration. No discoloration. Nice clean scent!

If you are interested in using this rain scent in a recipe, please click on this link to view the Beginners Cold Process Soap Recipe.

Argan Soap

Friday, April 11th, 2014

argan soap Hello everyone, today I made Argan Soap!

I am here to share my recent adventure in the world of soap making.  Today I made CP soap.  For those of you that are new at this, CP means cold process.  This is soaping without adding any additional heat.

I made this soap by creating my own recipe using the soapcalc.  This wonderful soaping tool was able to help me find ingredients and exact percentages for my homemade soaping recipe.  All of this information assisted me in producing my latest project.

For this soap cleverly named “Argan Soap”, I used Mango butter, Avocado oil, Coconut oil 76, Argan oil, and Sunflower oil.  To add a vibrant and tropical look to my soap, I selected Fun Colorants:  Neon orange and Neon blue.  I thought that these colors would look nice in combination with white.  So, I decided to also use titanium dioxide to get a nice bright white soap color.  I really felt that these colors captured the tone of the scent Kulu Bay, which I was using to fragrance my soap.

Due to the fact that I am SO over winter (clearing throat); I decided to try a soap with a summery feel.  Sorry, was venting (smiley face).   Also, I was going to try something new with this soap recipe.  For my very first time, I was doing the “in the pot swirl” technique using 3 colors.  I do have to say, I was beyond excited to get this going since I created this soap from beginning to end all by myself.

That is the moment I quickly became aware that I was DOING THIS BY MYSELF….Oh boy I thought.  No supervision, no guidance, nobody standing next to me for support, only my directions.

Ok, so, after getting all of my supplies, I put on my safety gear and began the first step.  Lye and water.  I want to caution any new soapers reading this:  Please remember to wear your gloves, mask, and safety glasses when handling the Lye and lye solution.  It is also just as important to have vinegar by your side (as your best friend) throughout your whole soaping process.  Vinegar is used in case the Lye or soap batter gets on your skin.

Once I melted all of my oils and butter, I waited for my Lye solution and oils to reach their desired temperature.  I then proceeded to put it all together and stick blended quickly to emulsification.

Being it was an in the pot swirl soap, I did have to put some of my soap batter into 2 smaller bowls and mix my colors really good.  That way I was ready to accomplish the swirl.

Moving quickly, I “plopped” globs of the orange and blue soap batter into the white batter.  I did this until it was all gone.  And, let me just tell you how fast you have to move to color, mix, and plop when using more than one color…holy cow!  You need to fly!  At this point, I was wondering why I used 3 colors….what was I thinking?  Creativity, that’s what!  Now not all recipes will do this, but it seems the one I chose was just that…FAST!

I did however get everything together and really enjoyed seeing my white, neon blue, and neon orange soap come together as I “swirled” around and through my colors.  After using my spatula to make this pretty cool design, I poured it into my silicone mold.  But, I poured it slowly back and forth from end to end.  I was mesmerized at how cool the colors were as they moved about inside the mold.

After the soap  in the mold had set up enough, I used the remaining batter to get an awesome heaping loaf of soap.  When I was done, I was happy with what I created.  A little stressed but only because I wanted it to be perfect.  I strive for perfection and unfortunately for me, I will fail at this (and have) a few times before I perfect it.  I am glad that I will fail however, only because it will make me a better soaper.  This is how you will learn, right?

When I tell my friends what I do here at Natures Garden, they are like, “wow, that sounds like so much fun”, and it is, creating and making your own stuff, heck ya!  Sometimes these recipes may seem a bit intimidating, but, be aware of your ingredients, and know their personalities and how they work together.  We have “fool” proof instructions, we HAVE failed too.  This is the best ways to become experts on what works.  When it comes to the free recipes that Natures Garden provides, what we present to you, is easily understood with virtually no guess work needed.

If you would like to see the full Argan Soap Recipe, please click on this link.

In closing, I can still say, it was a lot of fun making this soap; even if I did stress myself out.

We kids, until my next adventure, have a FABULOUS day!

Cindy

Hot Soap

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

hot soap

Sweet Orange Chili Pepper CP Soap Recipe

This hot soap is just too good to pass up!

For this recipe, we wanted to really knock it out of the box.  And, in the end, the whole Hot Soap theme really tied together nicely with the scent and color.  We could not be happier with the total package of this awesome soap and recipe.  In fact, our testing and end results were so amazing, we couldn’t even wait to share the cold process soap recipe, so you to can recreateyour very own hot soap.  Since, this cold process soap recipe makes approximately 4.5 pounds of  beautiful, creamy and rich lathering bars; we used the Mold Market Square Loaf Mold and have enough soap batter to achieve a nice and full heaped top to the soap.  This made for very hearty sized slices.

To scent the soap, we selected Sweet Orange Chili Pepper.  This fragrance oil qualifies as a hot soap scent candidate because it is one of Natures Garden’s top selling cold process soap scents.  Not only does this fragrance oil have a kick, but it also behaves.  This means it is a Perfect Pour, and the scent retention is hands down amazing in the cured bar of soap.  If you have yet to try this scent in soap, you are really missing out!

Sticking with the hot soap theme, we went with the additions of a bold red and vibrant orange color.  This was accomplished using the FUN soap colorant tomato red, and neon orange.  However, for these colors to truly dazzle, we decided that the colors should be added as swirls to a white soap base.  Now, although Sweet Orange Chili Pepper fragrance oil does not discolor, we wanted a clean white.  We attained this by adding titanium dioxide.

The red and orange colored batter was introduced to the white soap batter using the in the pot swirl technique.  We personally love using this method to create beautiful and flowing swirls in our finished soap bars.  But, don’t get overwhelmed, this hot soap is really easy to make; and in this blog post we will go over each step with pictures of our process included.

Now, before we get started, if you have never made cold process soap before; please read these two classes to familiarize yourself with the soap making process.  They are Basic CP Soap Making Class and Soap Making Safety Class.

If you have already soaped before, lets move on to the recipe and ingredients!

For the Lye Solution
517 grams of water
189 grams of lye
For your soaping ingredients
340 grams of Shea Butter
408 grams of Coconut Oil 76
122 grams of Sunflower Oil
136 grams of Rice Bran Oil
272 grams of Olive Oil-pomace
82 grams of Castor Oil
85 grams of Sweet Orange Chili Pepper Fragrance Oil
50 grams of Sodium Lactate
7 grams of Titanium Dioxide
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant- Tomato Red
4 grams of FUN Soap Colorant- Neon Orange

As for other supplies that you will need in addition to the standard soaping supplies:  2 mixing bowls (1 for the red soap colorant, and 1 for the orange soap colorant) and a spatula (for the in the pot swirl technique).

So, now that you have everything that you need lets get our safety gear on and get started.

soap making safety gear

Next, make your lye solution.

making your lye solution

Then, weigh out and combine your soaping ingredients and melt.

melted soaping ingredients
Now, back to the lye solution.  Once it has cooled, add the sodium lactate.  Use your spatula to carefully stir this in.

adding sodium lactate

When your lye solution and soaping ingredients are within 5-10 degrees of each other, it is time to combine them together.

adding the lye solution to the soap ingredients
Then, stick blend for emulsion.

stick blending until emulsion
Now, get your two mixing bowls for the colorants.  To the first bowl, weigh out the tomato red soap colorant.  Then, to the second bowl, weigh out the neon orange soap colorant.

hot soap colorant
Next, add the fragrance oil to the soap batter and stick blend to incorporate.

scenting your hot soap

Then, get your soap batter, and place 400 grams into each soap colorant bowl.  To incorporate the orange soap colorant, stir this with a spoon.  To incorporate the red soap colorant, stick blend.  Once both colors are incorporated in their bowls, set them aside.

separating out soap batter for color
Moving quickly, to the remaining soap batter, add titanium dioxide.  Then, stick blend well to incorporate.

adding titanium dioxide to the soap batter

Now, bring the white soap batter over to your color soap bowls.  Then, drop some of the orange soap batter throughout the white soap.  Continue doing this until all of the orange soap is gone.  Repeat the same action with the red soap batter.

pouring the hot soap colors into the soap batter
Now, for the in the pot swirl:  Start by placing the spatula alongside the inside bottom edge of the bowl.  Then, come straight up the center.  When you reach the top, pick the spatula up.  Now, starting on one side, begin your swirls in a “s” pattern (using the spatula).  Repeat on the other side.

hot soap in the pot swirl

Next, carefully pour the soap batter into the mold.

pouring the hot soap
Once the mold has been filled, use the remaining batter to add a nice heaped topping.  You may need to wait a few minutes for the soap batter to thicken slightly before attempting this.  Then once all of the remaining soap has been heaped, insulate.  Please note:  You may want to insulate your soap using something that will not touch the top of the heaped soap.

one hot soap

After 24 hours, remove the soap from the mold.  Then, using your knife, slice the hot soap into bars.  Allow them to further cure before using.

That is it!  Your hot soap performs and smells fantastic.  Plus, you will have created the most beautiful swirls.  Enjoy!

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

Great Feminine Scent

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

great feminine scentJuicy Couture Type Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

This feminine scent is absolutely beautiful and is a great match to the original.  A divine fragrance to scent anything from candles to perfume oils, Juicy Couture Type is both youthful and bold.  This great girly scent presents perfectly balanced layers of classic spring and summer time aromas.  Many of our clients who use this feminine scent say it only takes one whiff before their customers are hooked and are in love. 

What does Juicy Couture Type Smell Like?

The perfect fragrance oil by Natures Garden for girls who want it all!  This fragrance combines wild berries and mandarin, honeysuckle, gardenia and jasmine.  Embodied with the aroma of amber, caramel, sandalwood, vanilla and praline to add just the right touch of sweetness.

How Do Our Customers Use Juicy Couture Type Fragrance Oil?

For all of you candle crafters out there; Juicy Couture Type Fragrance Oil is used in Soy, soy blends, paraffin, WOW, Joy, and Pillar of Bliss waxes.  This feminine scent is very aromatic and has a great throw, both hot and cold.  If you are a home scenter, this fragrance oil also works extremely well for oil burners, aroma beads, tarts, smelly jellies, and even linen sprays.

For bath and body crafters, this fragrance is a win!  The usage rate for this fragrance oil is 5% and it has a .3% vanillin so vanilla white color stabilizer is suggested to reduce discoloration in the finished product.  This lovely feminine scent is used to make: solid lotion bars, bath bombs, body scrubs, spray lotions, perfumes, melt and pour soaps, body sprays, bath gels, whipped body butters, foaming body butters, lotions, and salt bars.  Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance smells great.  Here are the official results: Slight ricing, stick blend, low acceleration, very manageable, discolors to a maple fudge color.   

Tie Dye Soap

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

cup column swirl soapWatching all of the cool Youtube videos on making column swirl soap, we had to give it a try.  We thought that the column concept would make a great tie dye soap.  This soap recipe was our attempt at doing a column swirl soap.  Since we did not have wooden columns at our disposal, we thought we would improvise and try disposable cups.

To make this recipe, the majority of the ingredients and supplies can be found at Natures Garden.  You will however have to have water, lye, and your disposable cups- these items can not be purchased there.

For this soap, the scent that was selected was cannabis flower.  Now, since this scent has a vanillin content of .2%, we also included vanilla white color stabilizer in the recipe.  This decision was made after checking the cold process soap results for discoloration in this fragrance.  We saw that naturally without this additive the bar would discolor to a very light beige.  Considering we did not want our tie dye soap colors affected by this, it was a smart choice.  Also, since the mold that we are using is the 18 bar rectangle grid tray, we also decided to add sodium lactate to our recipe.  Not only will this allow the soap to be removed more easily from the mold, but it will also provide our finished bars with additional moisturizing aspects.

As for the colors in this soap, you can add as many or as few as you want.  Any of Natures Garden FUN Soap colorants will work!

So, lets get started in making tie dye soap.

Here is the recipe:
582 grams of water
215 grams of lye

413 grams of Shea Butter
306 grams of Coconut Oil 76
153 grams of Safflower Oil
107 grams of Rice Bran Oil
245 grams of Olive Oil pomace
184 grams of Meadowfoam Seed Oil
122 grams of Fractionated Coconut Oil
96 grams of Cannabis Flower Fragrance Oil
48 grams of Vanilla White Color Stabilizer
63 grams of Sodium Lactate

Now, if you would like to use the same colors shown in the steps, below are the weights.

Tie Dye Soap Colors:
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Red
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Yellow
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Orange
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Green
8 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Blue
12 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Ultramarine Violet

If this is your first time making cold process soap, please Click Here For Basic CP Soap Making Class. Also, before attempting to make any cold process soap, please become familiar with Soap Making Safety Class.

Step 1:  Put on your safety gear:  This would include your safety gloves,  apron, safety mask, and safety glasses.

cp soap making safety gear

Step 2:  In your mold, space your 6 disposable cups equally apart from one another.

prepping your mold

Step 3:  In a small bowl, weigh out your lye.  In a separate bowl, weigh out your water.  In a well ventilated area, slowly pour the lye into the water.  Use a spatula to stir slowly.  Avoid breathing in any of the lye water fumes.  Keep stirring the lye water until there are no lye granules are left in the water.    Allow this to cool to 90-100 degrees F.

stirring the lye water

Step 4:  According to the recipe listed above: in a pot weigh out the Shea Butter and coconut oil 76.  Melt these two ingredients down on low heat until each one is in a liquid state.  Stir.  Then, add the safflower oil, rice bran oil, olive oil, meadowfoam seed oil, and fractionated coconut oil.  Stir again.  Remove from heat.  Then, transfer all of this into a large mixing bowl.

mixing your oils

Step 5:  Next, get your 6 mixing bowls.  Assign each bowl a color.  Then, weigh out the appropriate color amount for each bowl.

colorants in bowls

Step 6:  Using your thermometer, check the temperature of the lye water.  When it has cooled to 90 degrees Fahrenheit, add your Sodium Lactate.  Stir carefully.  Now, once the temperatures of the lye water and the soaping oils and butters are within 5-10 degrees of one another, it is time to move on to the next step.

adding sodium lactate to the recipe
Step 7:   Now, slowly pour the lye water/sodium lactate into your oils and butters bowl.  Use a spatula to get all of this out and into the other bowl.

adding lye water to the soaping oils

Step 8:  Using your stick blender, carefully mix everything together.  You will notice your batter will begin to look creamy and thicken slightly.  Now, stop blending.

blending the soap batter

Step 9:  Next, add the fragrance oil.

scenting the column swirl

Step 10:  Then, add the Vanilla White Color Stabilizer.  Once added, stick blend to incorporate.

adding vanilla white color stabilizer
Step 11:
  Now, place 405 grams of the soap batter into each bowl.  Stir each bowl with a spoon.  This will help slow down trace.

spoon stirred colored soap
Step 12: 
Starting with any one of your colors, begin to pour about half of the batter over 3 cups.  Repeat with a second and third color.  Then, using a new color, pour about half of the batter over the 3 cups that do not have soap over them yet.  Repeat this with your two remaining colors.  Then, with the remaining batter, keep covering different cups.  While you are doing this step, if any cups move, use your spatula to put them back into place.  When all of the pourable batter is out of your bowls, use your spatula to scrape the soap from the cups.  Then remove them.

column swirl pour
Step 13:  Now, using your spatula, scrape the colored bowls.  Then, splatter this soap over the mold.

splattering the soap
Step 14:  When all the soap is in the mold, insulate it and allow it to harden for 24 hours.

insulating your soap
Step 15:  After 24 hours, remove your soap from the mold.  Carefully, using a knife or a mitre cutter, slice the soap bars.  Once all of the soap is sliced, allow it to fully cure.

cutting your soap

After the cure time has elapsed, enjoy your Tie Dye Soap!

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

 

 

In the Pot Swirl Soap

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014

in the pot swirl soap Soaping with the cold process method allows you to create some really beautiful bars.  Not only are these bars creamy, bubbly, and cleansing, but they are also conditioning.  Plus, with the right recipe, bars can contain skin loving ingredients that nourish your skin too.

There are various ways to achieve beautiful designs in your cold process bars.  Some of the more popular designs include:  the peacock swirl, the mantra swirl, and the mica swirl. You can even try your hand at marbling your soap if you like.

When it comes to swirling, this is where you really get to let your creativity soar.  Through colors and varying design techniques, you can take your wonderful soap recipe and make the visual aspect just as appealing as the skin nourishing one!

The ideal scent when making cold process soap is one that is a Perfect Pour.  What this means is that the fragrance oil does not accelerate trace, rice, or discolor.  However, many times with floral scents, acceleration is a part of the package.  Although swirling is not impossible to achieve with an accelerator, it can be difficult if you do not move fast enough.  There is however, a swirling method that can be done when a fragrance oil accelerates trace.  This is known as the in the pot swirl.

Here is how to make an in the pot swirl soap.  The recipe, steps, and photos are included to help.  With the exemption of the lye and water, all of the ingredients for this soaping venture can be purchased at Natures Garden.  Although for this recipe, the Peace Sign Mold was used, any mold that is cold process soap safe will work.  To see the full list of soap molds available, please click on this link.

If you have never made cold process soap before, please click here for a  Basic CP Soap Making Class. Also, before attempting to make any cold process soap, please become familiar with Soap Making Safety Class first.

The Recipe:
108 grams of water
40 grams of lye
20 grams of Apricot Kernel Oil
11 grams of Castor Oil
85 grams of Coconut Oil 76
40 grams of Mango Butter
43 grams of Palm Oil
37 grams of Shea Butter
48 grams of Sunflower Oil
17 grams of Sodium Lactate
18 grams of Peace Fragrance Oil
18 grams of Vanilla White Color Stabilizer
FUN Soap Colorants: Neon Red, Neon Yellow, Neon Orange, Neon Blue, Ultramarine Violet

The Process:
Step 1: 
Put on your  safety gloves,  apron, safety mask, and safety glasses.

safety gear for soap making

Step 2:  Weigh out your lye and water.  In a well ventilated area, slowly pour the lye into the water.  Use a spatula to stir slowly.  Keep stirring until no lye granules are left in the water.  Do not breathe in any of the lye water fumes.  Allow this to cool to around 90-100 degrees F.

stirring the lye water

Step 3:  According to the recipe, in a pot weigh out the coconut oil 76, mango butter, palm oil, and shea butter.  Melt all of these ingredients down on low heat until each one is in a liquid state.  Stir.  Then add the apricot kernel oil, castor oil, and sunflower oil.  Stir again.  Remove from heat.  Transfer all of this into your mixing bowl.

melting your oils and butters

Step 4:  Now, get your 5 mixing bowls.  Assign each bowl a color.  Then, weigh out 2 grams of each neon colorant in its specific bowl.  The ultramarine violet bowl needs 4 grams weighed out.  A great tip:  Reuse the containers from the 1lb Whipped Soap Base.  They make perfect mixing bowls for colorant in cold process soaping!

weighing out the colorant for soap

Step 5:  Check the temperature of the lye water.  When it is cooled to around 90-100 degrees F, add your 17 grams of Sodium Lactate.  Stir carefully.  Now, once the temperatures of the lye water and the soaping oils and butters are within 5-10 degrees of one another, it is time to move on to the next step.

adding sodium lactate

Step 6:  Slowly pour the lye water/sodium lactate into your oils and butters bowl.  Use a spatula to get all of this out and into the other bowl.

mixing the oils, butters, and lye water

Step 7:  Using your stick blender, begin to mix everything together.  You will notice your batter will begin to look creamy and thicken slightly.  Now, stop blending.

stick blending cold process soap

Step 8:  Add your fragrance oil.

adding scent to in the pot swirl

Step 9:  Now add your Vanilla White Color Stabilizer.  Once added, stick blend to incorporate.  Do not forget to scrap the sides with a spatula.

preventing discoloration in soap

 

Step 10:  Now, place 90 grams of the soap batter into each bowl.  Stir well with a spoon.  This will help slow down trace.  Then, starting with the yellow soap, pour it back into the mixing bowl.  Try your best to keep it in one area.

multiple color in the pot swirl

 

Step 11:  Repeat with the orange.

second color in the pot swirl

Step 12:  Now, the red.

adding red in the pot swirl

Step 13:  Then the purple.

adding the purple batter
Step 14:  Finally, get your blue soap batter into the bowl.

all five colors in the pot swirl

Step 15:  Get your spatula, start by placing it alongside the inside bottom edge of the bowl.  Then, come straight up the center of the bowl.  When you reach the top, pick the spatula up.  Now, starring on one side, begin your swirls (using the spatula).  Repeat on the other side.  Do not over swirl.

step by step in the pot swirl
Step 16:
  Grab your mold.  Then begin to pour the soap batter into each mold opening.

molding the in the pot swirl

Step 17:  Once the mold is filled, cover it with plastic wrap.  When the soap has hardened enough to move, place the mold somewhere it will not be disturbed.

insulating your soap
Step 18: 
After your soap has set for 24 hours, place it in the freezer for about 10 minutes.  This step will help to release the soap from the mold.  Then, carefully remove the soaps from the mold.

unmolded soap

Step 19:  Now, allow your soap to finish curing before use.

Congratulations, you just completed an in the pot swirl technique!  Note:  You will notice as your soap cures that the neon colors will become more vivid.

After the cure, your in the pot swirl soap is now finished.  The ending bar will be nice and firm.  The lather will be creamy and filled with lots of bubbles.  These bars will cleanse, yet still provide your skin conditioning elements.  Enjoy!

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

Lavender Essential Oil

Monday, February 24th, 2014

lavender essential oil Lavender Essential Oils

When it comes to using essential oils in products, lavender is one of the most popular ones selected.  Used throughout history, lavender has made its mark in the cosmetics, medicinal, and perfumery industries.

This is true for two reasons; first lavender is one of the most recognized scents worldwide.  And second, with such an array of skin and health benefits from lavender, it is easily a front runner for induction in to products.  There is only one problem though.  As with any essential oil, it is very difficult to get an identical essential oil each time.

Any essential oil can fluctuate greatly in scent for many different reasons.  These differences can be due to lots, varying seasons of harvest, the environment in which the plant was grown, soil conditions of the area, cross pollination of the plant, and even the distillation process of the essential oil itself.  Any one of these factors can change the essential oil.

There are different lavender essential oils available in the market.  Natures Garden currently carries two various forms of lavender essential oil.  These essential oils are Lavender Essential Oil 40/42 and Lavandin Grosso Pure Essential Oil.

What is Lavender Essential Oil 40/42
This Lavender Essential Oil carries the botanical name Lavendula angustifolia, which is also known as “true lavender”.  This name is also synonymous with English Lavender.   When it comes to scent, this type of essential oil is produced to have what is traditionally (and commercially) accepted as the lavender aroma.  More specifically, lavender 40/42 is the sweet flower smell of lavender.

The number 40/42 at the end of the essential oil name signifies the amount of linalool and linalyl acetate in the essential oil.  Linalool is a natural occurring organic compound (terpene alcohol) which is responsible for the floral scent of a plant.  Linalyl acetate is also a naturally occurring chemical compound found in many “flowering” plants.

When it comes to the creation of Lavender Essential Oil 40/42, it is commonly achieved by the combination of varying distilled lavender oils.  These lavender oils are not only selected by their species but also by their economical cost.  The natural lavender oils are then integrated together to yield an essential oil that contains 40% linalool and 42% linalyl acetate.  These percentages allow the two biggest components of the traditional lavender scent, and also make for an essential oil that is cost effective and can be replicated time and time again with very little scent difference.

Both Linalool and Linalyl acetate are important factors for this essential oil because it helps to ensure a dependable aroma.  Because essential oils can vary from batch to batch throughout the year, these amounts of linalool and linalyl acetate can help to produce a more consistent essential oil.  For this oil precisely, a lavender essential oil with its very distinctive and well known flowery aroma.

What is
Lavandin Grosso Pure Essential Oil
This essential oil which carries the botanical name Lavendula hybrid is a cross breeding of two different lavender plants; the angustifolia (English) and latifolia (spike).  The resulting oil has comparable attributes to angustifolia, however, due to its distinctive and differing chemical content the essential oil has separate features.  This essential oil is a refreshing more camphor like scent that does not focus on the floral aspect of lavender like Lavender 40/42 essential oil.  As one of the 39 species of lavender, lavandin grosso has camphorous notes that are more evident in the essential oil as opposed to its counterpart 40/42.  This is because lavandin essential oils contain a higher percentage of terpenes (particularly camphor) in it.  This scent is long lasting and sharp, especially in soaps and lotions; unlike Lavender 40/42 which is considered a more sweet and subtle aroma.

The actual essential oil itself is produced by the distillation of the flowering tops of the plant lavender grosso.  These plants blossom later than the Lavender angustifolia.   Another advantage of these plants is that they yield a larger volume of essential oil; up to 3 times the amount of Lavender angustifolia; making it cost effective too.

Although there are some differences in these two lavender essential oils, they both maintain a plethora of wonderful skin and health benefits.  If you are interested in reading about all of the wonderful benefits that lavender (herb or essential oil) provides to your products, please click on this link.

Natures Garden sells our essential oils for external applications only.  In the above post, we discussed the differences between Lavender 40/42 Essential Oil and Lavandin Grosso Pure Essential Oil.  Nothing in this article is to be construed as medical advice.  Please consult your doctor before using any of this information for treatment purposes. We provide this data for educational purposes only.

Lavender

Friday, February 21st, 2014

lavender in bath productsLavender Flowers

This amazing herb does wonderful things when introduced as a skin care ingredient.  Whether it is used in flower form, powder form, or in the form of an essential oil, lavender can be a go to ingredient for aromatherapy needs, antiseptic benefits, or even relief from pain and discomfort due to skin irritations.  This beautiful herb is also cherished for its decorative nature in both the body care industry as well as food and beverage industries, especially when it comes to the realm of teas and desserts.

The name lavender comes from its scientific name lavandula which is actually derived from the Latin word lavare which means to wash.  In fact, lavender was often heavily used by the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans for its antiseptic benefits for the skin, healing powers, and as an aromatic perfume.

There are several ways to use the wonderful benefits of lavender in your homemade skin care and body wellness products.  The very aromatic herb lavender is available for purchase in several different mediums at Natures Garden.

Lavender Flower Whole Select-  In this shape, it can be used directly in items like bath teas and soaps.  This form of herb can be steeped to make an oil infusion which then can be used in a plethora of bath and body products like: skin toners, lotions, body creams, perfumes, shampoos, etc.

Lavender Flower Powder-  In powder form, lavender can be used directly in your formulations and this even includes body powders.  The only precaution to remember when using this herb is that as with any powder, it is prone to clumping if not made into a paste first.

As an essential oil, lavender is available as Lavender Essential Oil 40/42 or Lavandin Grosso Pure Essential Oil.  Either of these essential oils can be used to scent your products for aromatherapy needs or to take advantage of all of the skin care benefits lavender provides.

The scent of lavender is one of the most well known aromas worldwide.  No matter where you live, chances are you have smelled this distinctive scent.  Often used in aromatherapy and in body care products as a natural antidepressant; lavender will ease stress and tension by promoting relaxation.  Lavender works as a nervine; calming the nerves and reducing irritability of the mind and body.

As an analgesic, this herb can actually help to reduce pain from skin issues and aliments like acne, boils, eczema, and psoriasis.  This herb is even beneficial for treating burns, sunburns, insect bites and stings.

As a natural air freshener, lavender also works to fight against air borne viruses.  You can achieve this by simply steeping lavender buds in water and letting the aroma fill the air.

Lavender has an array of uses; to read the full class on all of the benefits of lavender, please click on this link.

To view some wonderful bath and body recipes that contain the amazing herb of lavender in flower form or in powder form, please check out the links below:

Lemon Lavender Bath Melts Recipe
Lavender Sage Bath Bomb Recipe
Fizzy Milk Bath Recipe
Sensual Massage Oil Recipe
Lavender Luxury Cold Process Soap Recipe
Relaxing Eye Pillow Recipe
Lavender Apple Sugar Scrub Recipe
Lavender Vanilla Body Powder Recipe

Natures Garden sells our lavender flowers herbs and essential oils for external applications only.  In the above written blog post, we briefly discussed the wonderful benefits of lavender and the some of its uses across various industries.  Nothing in this article is to be construed as medical advice.  Please consult your doctor before using any of this information for treatment purposes.  We provide this data for educational purposes only.

Sexy for Men Scent

Monday, February 3rd, 2014

extremely sexy for men fragrance oilExtremely Sexy for Men Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Described as a scent that you just can’t stop sniffing, Extremely Sexy for Men Fragrance oil is an excellent seller.  When put in a product, this scent is adored by men young and old!  A masculine and alluring scent, many women even purchase this soap for their men!  A great dupe of a popular brand, this fragrance is classy, sensuous, and sexy to say the least.  This fragrance oil is considered a keeper by many of our clientele.

What does Extremely Sexy for Men Smell Like?

This fragrance oil by Natures Garden is a spicy citrus blend.  This scent contains top notes of pink lime, bergamot leaves, and tangerine. Middle notes of cinnamon bark, limewood, and sage. Vetiver and orange flower comprise the dry down. Very Sexy…yes he is!

How Do Our Customers Use Extremely Sexy for Men Fragrance Oil?

For candle crafters and home scenters this scent is a huge hit.  Our customers use this fragrance oil in their soy tarts, tea lights, Palm wax, WOW wax, gel wax, Joy wax, and soy.  This clean and wonderful scent has a great throw too.  As for other home scenting ideas; this fragrance oil has been used in oil diffusers, electric burners, and aroma beads.

On the bath and body end of products, the usage percent for this fragrance oil is 5%, and is used to make:  melt and pour soaps, bath bombs, shampoo, shower gel, body sprays, lotions, and body sprays with a nice long lasting scent.  And, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance is a great seller for cp soap.  Here are the official results:  No acceleration, no ricing, and no discoloration. Soaped beautifully. Nice strong scent.