Archive for the ‘cold process soap colorant’ Category

Jersey Soap Recipe

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

jersey soap recipe

 

This manly themed Jersey Soap Recipe is easy and fun to make if you have soaped before.  Perfect for a Fathers Day gift or a gift for your favorite sports fan; using a combination of both cold processed and hot processed soap, you will be able to create a manly scented soap that looks very similar to a sports jersey.  In creating this masterpiece, feel free to swap out the colors to select ones that batter fit the theme of the end product you are looking for.

Please Note:  To complete this homemade project, it will take two days to create.  Day one will be the cold process soap steps.  Then, you will have to wait 24 hours before unmolding this soap.  Once that time has elapsed, the second day will involve the hot process soap steps.  Then, of course there is cure time involved due to the fact that there is cold process soap in your end product.  But, you will have nice and firm bars when finished.

The majority of the ingredients and some of the supplies used in this recipe can be purchased at Natures Garden.

Here are the ingredients that you will need to make the cold process portion of this recipe:
For the lye solution:
65 grams Water
24 grams Lye
For your soaping ingredients:
60 grams Shea Butter
50 grams Coconut Oil 76
33 grams Apricot Kernel Oil
21 grams Grapeseed Oil
9 grams Castor Oil
6 grams Sodium Lactate
11 grams Game On Fragrance Oil
2 grams Titanium Dioxide

As for the mold, you will need to have the Mold Market Square Loaf mold.  This mold is also available at Natures Garden.

Once you have everything and you are ready to start soaping, here are the steps, complete with pictures to show you how it is done:

make your lye solution

Put on your safety gear, and prep your area. Then, make your lye solution.

melting down your soaping ingredients

Now, melt and combine your Apricot Kernel Oil, Grapeseed Oil, Shea Butter, Coconut Oil 76, and Castor Oil.

adding sodium lactate

Once the lye solution has cooled add the sodium lactate and stir.

titanium dioxide paste

Next, remove 8 grams of the melted soaping ingredients, and place it into a separate mixing bowl.  Then, add your titanium dioxide to this and stir in to make a paste.   Set aside.

emulsify soap batter

When ready, combine the lye solution and soaping ingredients together. Stick blend to emulsify.

scenting and coloring the batter

Next, add titanium dioxide paste and stick blend to make the whole batter white in color.  Then, add the fragrance and stick blend.

pouring your soap

Once you have reached trace, pour the white soap batter into the 4 pound mold.  Please Note:  The batter will NOT fill the mold.  This is done intentionally.  Insulate.

measuring out your embed

After 24 hours:  Carefully remove the white soap from the mold.   Place it down flat and horizontally in front of you. Then, using a ruler, measure out 2 inches in height and mark it.

the number in your jersey soap
Now, using a knife, cut the soap so that you have one long bar.  This will be the number one in your jersey soap.  Then, set aside.

The cold process steps are now complete.  You are now half way there.  The next step is the Hot Process and here is the recipe (using the same ingredients with the addition soap colorant).
For the Lye solution:
420 grams Water
153 grams Lye
For your soaping ingredients:
387 grams Shea Butter
321 grams Coconut Oil 76
210 grams Apricot Kernel Oil
133 grams Grapeseed Oil
55 grams Castor Oil
35 grams Sodium Lactate
69 grams Game On Fragrance Oil
15 grams Ultramarine Blue Fun Soap Colorant

meling your ingredients for hp recipe

Set your crock pot to a low heat setting. Next, place all of your oils and butter into the crock pot. Heat and occasionally stir them until melted.

adding the sodium lactate to hp

While you are melting the soaping ingredients, make your lye solution.  Also, add the sodium lactate. Stir in to incorporate.

combining the soap ingredients

Once all of the soaping ingredients are melted, slowly pour the lye mixture into the crock pot.

coloring the hp soap

Next, in short bursts, stick blend directly in the crock pot. Once you have the batter at light trace, add the ultramarine blue soap colorant. Then, stick blend to incorporate throughout the whole batter.

hp soap pudding like state
Now, keep blending in short bursts with your stick blender until the batter reaches a pudding like state.  Remember to periodically stir the soap in between with your spatula.  Once the batter has reached this state, lid the crock pot.

hp soap with waxy appearance
Allow the soap mixture to cook, and periodically stir it. Doing this will prevent the soap from scorching.  As the soap cooks, the soap will start to dry out and take on a waxy appearance.

hp soap that has consistency of mashed potatoes
Remember to stir occasionally, but allow the soap to cook for about 2 hours.  You will know that your soap has cooked long enough once it has the consistency of mashed potatoes.

adding the scent and stirring it in
Next, quickly add the Game On scent to the soap.  Then, stir well throughout the whole batter.

about one inch of soap in the mold
Now, get your mold and place about one inch worth of the soap into it.  Gently tap the soap in the mold to remove any air bubbles.

placing the number 1 in the soap
Once the mold has been tapped, vertically place the white soap into the mold.  Using your fingers, gently wedge the soap into place.  Try to keep the white soap centered.  This will be the number 1 on the jersey soap.

filling in the rest of the mold

Once the number 1 has been set into the soap, begin to carefully fill in the open sides with soap.  As you are doing this, remember to gently tap the soap mold to remove any trapped air.  Please Note:  Due to the tapping  of the mold, you may have to recenter the number 1 in the soap if it becomes askew.

heap the top of the soap
Once the mold is filled, heap the top lip portion with the remaining soap.

how to get the jersey shape

Now, using your ladle, carefully run it down the center of the mold and remove the excess soap.  Place the excess soap along the sides.  This scooping manner will give your jersey soap its neck line.  Allow the soap to mold overnight.

removing the soap from the mold
The next morning, remove the soap from the mold.

cut your jersey soap

Finally, cut the soap into bar sized slices. Allow the soap to cure further (because of the cold process soap) before use.

That is it!  You have just accomplished the jersey soap recipe.  Enjoy your new soap!

 

Color Dispersion

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

color dispersionColor Dispersion in Soap

This picture shows the same exact recipe using two different methods of color dispersion in soap. Once the soap was poured, we noticed that some of the colorant was still on the sides of the bowls instead of actually incorporated into the soap (as shown in the soap on the right).  In addition, we noticed concentrated pockets of colorant in this cut soap.   Mainly, it is the difference between hand stirring the colorants in verses stick blending the colorants in, and failure to scrape the sides of the bowls to incorporate all of the coloring.  Regardless of the method that you choose, there are distinct advantages and disadvantages. The key to knowing which method works best for you is knowing your soap recipe and the time that it allows you.

Color Dispersion in cold process soap making can be a tricky aspect. After you figure out your color scheme for your recipe and the technique as to how you are adding your color, it then comes down to the actual challenge.

Really there are three options to color dispersion in your soap. They are hand stirring the colorant into the batter with a spoon, stick blending the colorant in, or the combination of both. The correct decision relies on a few factors though. These factors are: your recipe, time, and the number of colorants you want to add.

Hand Stirring
The best advantage of hand stirring colorants into soap is that it does not speed up trace. This allows you the perfect fluid soap batter for accomplishing a multi color swirl in your soap. But, hand stirring the colorant into your soap batter is slightly more time consuming because you really have to stir for some time to get the colorant dispersed. So, this is where knowing your recipe and window of time, especially if you are using multiple colorants, comes into play.

You will also have to be ready to move. When hand stirring, you have to stir, and stir quickly to get the full color dispersion of the soap colorant. And, do not forget to have your spatula ready to clean the sides and rotate the soap from the bottom of the bowl to make sure all of the colorant is evenly dispersed.

However, not all colorants can be hand stirred. Some of the colorants do not disperse as well as others with this method. The examples of these types of colorants would be titanium dioxide and the ultramarines. Colorants like these often need to be stick blended in order to get the full color dispersion among all of the soap.

Stick Blending
Stick blending your colorants in soap batter is ideal for true color dispersion. But, with stick blending time is a major factor. Stick blending will speed up trace (or the saponification process) in your soap. If too much time elapses while stick blending your colorants into the batter; certain swirling techniques cannot be accomplished. This is because the soap batter will be too thick, especially if you are using more than two colors in your soap recipe.

Besides speeding up trace, there is another factor to consider. When using multiple soap colorants and stick blending you will have to quickly clean your stick blender in between colors. But, you do have a few options when it comes to this. Some soapers keep a small bowl of water by their coloring station to quickly clean their stick blender in between colors. And, some just stick blend their colors in the correct order, but gently tap the stick blender to remove as much colored batter as possible before moving on to the next color. For example if you are coloring your soap green and yellow; you would start by stick blending the yellow first. This is because the yellow color is the lightest, and then move to the green.

The Combo
For the situations where you want to use ultramarines which almost require a stick blend to get the best color dispersion, but you still want several other colors in your soap; you can combo the blend. You would start by stick blending the colorants that need it, and then move on to the hand stirred colorants. If the stick blended colorants become too thick, simply stir them by hand and the soap batter will thin out slightly (or enough to pour). Just remember, you must move quickly.

What this really all comes down to is testing. Through making various batches of soap, you will be able to find exactly which method of color dispersion is best for you and your soaping recipe. There really is no right or wrong answer as to which method to use. Each soap recipe will vary.

Natures Garden offers FUN Soap colorants for soap making.  We even carry multiple neon colors to really make your soap “come alive”.

Gel Phase

Saturday, April 26th, 2014

inhibited gel phase soap In an earlier blog post, we briefly discussed insulation of cold process soap. Through insulating your soap, you are encouraging the best environment for the gel phase to occur during saponification. Keeping the soap evenly heated using insulation will prevent a partial gel from occurring. But, still there are no guarantees. Even with the best insulation, you may still end up with bars of soap that have partial gel evident.

So, what if you prevented the gel phase in your soap?

Although this is possible, it is still not guaranteed. It can be very tough to prevent the gel phase. But, there are some factors that need to be noted to help you in your quest to stop the gel phase. These factors are: the size of your mold, and the various ingredients in your recipe. The saponification process involves heat; it is the nature of the soaping beast. Choosing to eliminate the gel phase will change some elements to your soap and soaping process.

But, before we get to that information, let’s look at some specific reasons to prohibit the gel phase.

First, since you are decreasing the amount of heat that is in your soap, this will allow you to introduce certain soaping ingredients that normally would be finicky. Examples of these heat sensitive ingredients would be: dairy products, heat sensitive colorants; prone to morphing, and fragrances or essential oils with a low flashpoint.

Dairy Products
Soaping with ingredients such as creams, milks, and butters for example will provide your finished bars with rich, extra moisturizing elements. However, soaping with dairy products can be tricky. With the heat that is involved with the saponification process, there is a chance that dairy products will burn. This results in both discoloration and an off smell in your soap. By preventing the gel phase from occurring, you allow these ingredients a fighting chance in soap. And, you can even produce a creamier bar of finished soap.

Colorants
Whether you are deciding to go the natural route with herbs, or using colorants that you worry may morph; preventing gel phase allows the window of opportunity to stay open. Certain herbs discolor or darker from the saponification process. The same is true for some colorants that completely alter like deep purple to brown.

Now, for the colorants in the finished soap when the gel phase is eliminated: the bar colors are bolder and more vivid. Even if you choose not to color your soap batter, the elimination of the gel phase stops the darkening of the fats and oils in your recipe, allowing for a “whiter” finished bar.

Scenting Options
If you do not want to rebatch your soap recipe, preventing the gel phase in your cold process soap may allow you to scent your soap with low flashpoint oils without worrying that the saponification process will eliminate the scent. It is also possible for fragrance or essential oil scents to come through stronger in the soap because of the reduction of heat.

As for what preventing the gel phase means for your soaps, there are key points you should know. First, you must keep your molded soap chilled for the full 24 hours. Depending on your recipe, you may have to keep the soap chilled for an additional 24 hours as well.

Now, when you are ready to unmold your soap, it is crucial to let your molded soap reach room temperature before trying to slice it. Not allowing your soap to be at room temperature before cutting may result with your bars being brittle, and breaking apart as you slice them.

As for the saponification process, since you inhibit the gel phase, it will take your soaps longer to complete the saponification process. What this means is that the soap will need additional cure time before it will be ready to use.

So, whether you choose to insulate or prevent the gel phase, it is really up to personal discretion. Regardless of the method, the result is the same; a finished bar of soap. The only variables that change are the molding environment and the cure time.

Rebatching Soap

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

rebatching soap Whether you view rebatching as an art, a doorway for the addition of gentle ingredients, or a second chance for your soap, this method of soap making offers opportunity.

The term rebatching for soap simply means remaking soap.  This method would be very similar to melt and pour soap in that you are melting down soap that has already gone through the saponification process.  Rebatching is more intricate than melt and pour soap though.  Rebatching involves cold processed or hot processed soap bars that are melted down for specific reasons.

A common technique used in soap making, rebatching allows many soap making handcrafters the chance to rework their soap recipes, introduce delicate scents and herbs, as well as add ingredients or colors they may have missed the opportunity to add the first time.

Since rebatched soap has already gone through the saponification process, the rebatching steps do not involve lye.  This is why rebatching allows the opportunity to add those delicate soaping ingredients; without fear.  With the rebatching method, these ingredients; which normally would not survive the saponification process, now have the chance to add wonderful benefits to your finished bars of soap.

Although time consuming, the rebatch process is fairly easy to do.  To put it briefly, the rebatching process is finely grating the soap, then heating (sometimes with the addition of a liquid like water to help prevent burning).  There are a few different ways to introduce heat to the shredded soap.  These ways would include:  double boiler, microwave, and crock pot.  But, please advise: you must monitor the soap while it is heating because you never want to scorch the soap.  This may be slightly more difficult using the microwave approach.

Now, as the soap is heated and starts to liquefy; it will have a very thick gel like density.  Once the soap hits this consistency, any additives or scents are added and stirred in.  Once the soap is stirred well, it is then scooped into a mold, left to harden, and finally cut into slices.

So, now that you have an understanding as to what the method of rebatching is, we will shortly post a blog as to the various reasons to rebatch.  This post will also cover the benefits as well as the drawbacks of rebatching your soap.

Why Rebatch

Friday, April 18th, 2014

rebatch soapRebatching your soap can literally be a “saving redo” for your soap recipe.

Sometimes your homemade soap bars are cracked, brittle, or just not performing like what you were hoping for. 

These are all perfect examples as to why you would rebatch your recipe.  But, it just doesn’t stop there. 

Soapers rebatch a soap recipe for a variety of reasons.  Below is a list of the benefits and key points you should know about rebatching a soap recipe.  Rebatching soap is essentially making the soap twice.  The first time you are completing the saponification process.  (Or, you may be using soap that has already been through the saponification process.)  Then, the second time you grate down the soap and melt it (for the reason you are rebatching). 

Benefits of a Rebatch
Rebatching a soap recipe for the addition of heat sensitive ingredients: 

Sometimes with homemade soap crafting, there are certain fragrances or essential oils that you really want to scent your soap bars; but worry that the scents cannot handle the high heat due to the saponification process.  Many times with low flash point fragrances or essential oils, there is scent burn off.  What results in your finished bars is soap that has little or no scent.  Rebatching soap will not only safely allow you to add these heat sensitive scents, but allow them to stay true to their scent (less burn off). 

Also, some fragrance oils may cause cold process soap to seize (turning your soap into a solid mass with no fluidity).  If you have your heart set on using one of these fragrances in your soap recipe, it can be done through the process of rebatching; without seizing your batch.  Usually fragrance oils that seize  your soap contain DPG.  None of the fragrance oils we carry at Natures Garden contain DPG. 

When it comes to coloring for cold process soap, it is very important to select ones that do not morph.  Through the process of rebatching, you do not need to worry about pH sensitive colorants.  And, sometimes this is just the answer to achieve that certain color.  With rebatch soap, the soap base that you are using has already completed the saponification process; therefore, the colorants that normally would discolor will not.   This is true for herbs that are used as natural soap colorants as well.  Although it should be stated that some herbs naturally discolor due to oxidation. 

Herbs not only offer color, but also wonderful and various benefits to your finished bars of soap.  The only problem is they can directly affect your soaping procedure.  Many herbs can speed up trace.  Even more so, some herbs cannot survive the saponification process and will discolor as a result.  With rebatching, this is not as big of an issue.  Herbs like lavender flowers, for example, can be added without worrying that those beautiful flowers will turn brown. 

Rebatch Opportunity
Rebatching allows for perfection:

Rebatching is also a wonderful method to use to correct a soap recipe.  Things can get a little chaotic when soaping, and it could be possible that you overlooked adding one of your soaping ingredients and did not realize it until after the soap was molded.  This resulted in your finished bars being too lye heavy.  A rebatch allows you the perfect opportunity to add that missing ingredient and balance out your soap.  This opportunity also allows for superfatting a recipe after saponification; or correcting soap bars that are too soft (made with too many fats or soft oils).

It is possible too that while making soap, your batter becomes too thick too quick for the addition of color or scent.  With rebatch, the soap can be scented and colored like you never missed a beat. 

Rebatch can also help correct a false trace recipe.
 
Rebatch, a Second Chance for Soaps
Sometimes, as a soaper, you will have pounds of soap scraps that you have on hand.  Rebatching the soap lets you make loaves (and bars) of them once more.  And will clear out all of that soaping space. 

Points to Know about Rebatch
Some soapers love to rebatch soap, others rebatch only when necessary, and some soapers just do not like to rebatch.  What ever your stance is on rebatch, it is a method that allows for many otherwise missed opportunities.   Here are some key points to know about rebatch. 

When making soap that is a rebatch, it will never completely liquefy.  Even after spending hours in the crock pot, or on the stove top (with the double boiler method), the best you will ever achieve is more of a thick gel like state.  Sometimes the soap may even be globby like.  This does not affect the soap being soap, but it will affect the finished look of your bars. 

When it comes to molding your rebatch soap, it is highly likely to get trapped air bubbles.  This is just the nature of the thick gel like globby beast.  It is extremely important to tap your mold as your fill it to prevent these pesky little buggers from being a problem in your finished soap bars.  You may also notice that it may be slightly more difficult to mold your soap while in this state.  This will be especially true if you are used to pouring it (like cold process soap batter).  With rebatch soap, you will need a ladle and scoop the rebatch soap into your mold. 

For the finished bars of rebatch soap, they will look very similar to hot process soap bars.  They have a very rustic look to them, and will not have the traditional smooth and creamy look that cold process has. 

On a final note, rebatching soap is truly a labor of love.  There will be lots of TLC (because of the time put in) and additional work to do this method.  But, if you are willing to put in the extra effort in (grating the soap), you will be able to rebatch your soap and have the end results that you are looking to achieve. 

Argan Soap

Friday, April 11th, 2014

argan soap Hello everyone, today I made Argan Soap!

I am here to share my recent adventure in the world of soap making.  Today I made CP soap.  For those of you that are new at this, CP means cold process.  This is soaping without adding any additional heat.

I made this soap by creating my own recipe using the soapcalc.  This wonderful soaping tool was able to help me find ingredients and exact percentages for my homemade soaping recipe.  All of this information assisted me in producing my latest project.

For this soap cleverly named “Argan Soap”, I used Mango butter, Avocado oil, Coconut oil 76, Argan oil, and Sunflower oil.  To add a vibrant and tropical look to my soap, I selected Fun Colorants:  Neon orange and Neon blue.  I thought that these colors would look nice in combination with white.  So, I decided to also use titanium dioxide to get a nice bright white soap color.  I really felt that these colors captured the tone of the scent Kulu Bay, which I was using to fragrance my soap.

Due to the fact that I am SO over winter (clearing throat); I decided to try a soap with a summery feel.  Sorry, was venting (smiley face).   Also, I was going to try something new with this soap recipe.  For my very first time, I was doing the “in the pot swirl” technique using 3 colors.  I do have to say, I was beyond excited to get this going since I created this soap from beginning to end all by myself.

That is the moment I quickly became aware that I was DOING THIS BY MYSELF….Oh boy I thought.  No supervision, no guidance, nobody standing next to me for support, only my directions.

Ok, so, after getting all of my supplies, I put on my safety gear and began the first step.  Lye and water.  I want to caution any new soapers reading this:  Please remember to wear your gloves, mask, and safety glasses when handling the Lye and lye solution.  It is also just as important to have vinegar by your side (as your best friend) throughout your whole soaping process.  Vinegar is used in case the Lye or soap batter gets on your skin.

Once I melted all of my oils and butter, I waited for my Lye solution and oils to reach their desired temperature.  I then proceeded to put it all together and stick blended quickly to emulsification.

Being it was an in the pot swirl soap, I did have to put some of my soap batter into 2 smaller bowls and mix my colors really good.  That way I was ready to accomplish the swirl.

Moving quickly, I “plopped” globs of the orange and blue soap batter into the white batter.  I did this until it was all gone.  And, let me just tell you how fast you have to move to color, mix, and plop when using more than one color…holy cow!  You need to fly!  At this point, I was wondering why I used 3 colors….what was I thinking?  Creativity, that’s what!  Now not all recipes will do this, but it seems the one I chose was just that…FAST!

I did however get everything together and really enjoyed seeing my white, neon blue, and neon orange soap come together as I “swirled” around and through my colors.  After using my spatula to make this pretty cool design, I poured it into my silicone mold.  But, I poured it slowly back and forth from end to end.  I was mesmerized at how cool the colors were as they moved about inside the mold.

After the soap  in the mold had set up enough, I used the remaining batter to get an awesome heaping loaf of soap.  When I was done, I was happy with what I created.  A little stressed but only because I wanted it to be perfect.  I strive for perfection and unfortunately for me, I will fail at this (and have) a few times before I perfect it.  I am glad that I will fail however, only because it will make me a better soaper.  This is how you will learn, right?

When I tell my friends what I do here at Natures Garden, they are like, “wow, that sounds like so much fun”, and it is, creating and making your own stuff, heck ya!  Sometimes these recipes may seem a bit intimidating, but, be aware of your ingredients, and know their personalities and how they work together.  We have “fool” proof instructions, we HAVE failed too.  This is the best ways to become experts on what works.  When it comes to the free recipes that Natures Garden provides, what we present to you, is easily understood with virtually no guess work needed.

If you would like to see the full Argan Soap Recipe, please click on this link.

In closing, I can still say, it was a lot of fun making this soap; even if I did stress myself out.

We kids, until my next adventure, have a FABULOUS day!

Cindy

Hot Soap

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014

hot soap

Sweet Orange Chili Pepper CP Soap Recipe

This hot soap is just too good to pass up!

For this recipe, we wanted to really knock it out of the box.  And, in the end, the whole Hot Soap theme really tied together nicely with the scent and color.  We could not be happier with the total package of this awesome soap and recipe.  In fact, our testing and end results were so amazing, we couldn’t even wait to share the cold process soap recipe, so you to can recreateyour very own hot soap.  Since, this cold process soap recipe makes approximately 4.5 pounds of  beautiful, creamy and rich lathering bars; we used the Mold Market Square Loaf Mold and have enough soap batter to achieve a nice and full heaped top to the soap.  This made for very hearty sized slices.

To scent the soap, we selected Sweet Orange Chili Pepper.  This fragrance oil qualifies as a hot soap scent candidate because it is one of Natures Garden’s top selling cold process soap scents.  Not only does this fragrance oil have a kick, but it also behaves.  This means it is a Perfect Pour, and the scent retention is hands down amazing in the cured bar of soap.  If you have yet to try this scent in soap, you are really missing out!

Sticking with the hot soap theme, we went with the additions of a bold red and vibrant orange color.  This was accomplished using the FUN soap colorant tomato red, and neon orange.  However, for these colors to truly dazzle, we decided that the colors should be added as swirls to a white soap base.  Now, although Sweet Orange Chili Pepper fragrance oil does not discolor, we wanted a clean white.  We attained this by adding titanium dioxide.

The red and orange colored batter was introduced to the white soap batter using the in the pot swirl technique.  We personally love using this method to create beautiful and flowing swirls in our finished soap bars.  But, don’t get overwhelmed, this hot soap is really easy to make; and in this blog post we will go over each step with pictures of our process included.

Now, before we get started, if you have never made cold process soap before; please read these two classes to familiarize yourself with the soap making process.  They are Basic CP Soap Making Class and Soap Making Safety Class.

If you have already soaped before, lets move on to the recipe and ingredients!

For the Lye Solution
517 grams of water
189 grams of lye
For your soaping ingredients
340 grams of Shea Butter
408 grams of Coconut Oil 76
122 grams of Sunflower Oil
136 grams of Rice Bran Oil
272 grams of Olive Oil-pomace
82 grams of Castor Oil
85 grams of Sweet Orange Chili Pepper Fragrance Oil
50 grams of Sodium Lactate
7 grams of Titanium Dioxide
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant- Tomato Red
4 grams of FUN Soap Colorant- Neon Orange

As for other supplies that you will need in addition to the standard soaping supplies:  2 mixing bowls (1 for the red soap colorant, and 1 for the orange soap colorant) and a spatula (for the in the pot swirl technique).

So, now that you have everything that you need lets get our safety gear on and get started.

soap making safety gear

Next, make your lye solution.

making your lye solution

Then, weigh out and combine your soaping ingredients and melt.

melted soaping ingredients
Now, back to the lye solution.  Once it has cooled, add the sodium lactate.  Use your spatula to carefully stir this in.

adding sodium lactate

When your lye solution and soaping ingredients are within 5-10 degrees of each other, it is time to combine them together.

adding the lye solution to the soap ingredients
Then, stick blend for emulsion.

stick blending until emulsion
Now, get your two mixing bowls for the colorants.  To the first bowl, weigh out the tomato red soap colorant.  Then, to the second bowl, weigh out the neon orange soap colorant.

hot soap colorant
Next, add the fragrance oil to the soap batter and stick blend to incorporate.

scenting your hot soap

Then, get your soap batter, and place 400 grams into each soap colorant bowl.  To incorporate the orange soap colorant, stir this with a spoon.  To incorporate the red soap colorant, stick blend.  Once both colors are incorporated in their bowls, set them aside.

separating out soap batter for color
Moving quickly, to the remaining soap batter, add titanium dioxide.  Then, stick blend well to incorporate.

adding titanium dioxide to the soap batter

Now, bring the white soap batter over to your color soap bowls.  Then, drop some of the orange soap batter throughout the white soap.  Continue doing this until all of the orange soap is gone.  Repeat the same action with the red soap batter.

pouring the hot soap colors into the soap batter
Now, for the in the pot swirl:  Start by placing the spatula alongside the inside bottom edge of the bowl.  Then, come straight up the center.  When you reach the top, pick the spatula up.  Now, starting on one side, begin your swirls in a “s” pattern (using the spatula).  Repeat on the other side.

hot soap in the pot swirl

Next, carefully pour the soap batter into the mold.

pouring the hot soap
Once the mold has been filled, use the remaining batter to add a nice heaped topping.  You may need to wait a few minutes for the soap batter to thicken slightly before attempting this.  Then once all of the remaining soap has been heaped, insulate.  Please note:  You may want to insulate your soap using something that will not touch the top of the heaped soap.

one hot soap

After 24 hours, remove the soap from the mold.  Then, using your knife, slice the hot soap into bars.  Allow them to further cure before using.

That is it!  Your hot soap performs and smells fantastic.  Plus, you will have created the most beautiful swirls.  Enjoy!

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

Tie Dye Soap

Thursday, March 6th, 2014

cup column swirl soapWatching all of the cool Youtube videos on making column swirl soap, we had to give it a try.  We thought that the column concept would make a great tie dye soap.  This soap recipe was our attempt at doing a column swirl soap.  Since we did not have wooden columns at our disposal, we thought we would improvise and try disposable cups.

To make this recipe, the majority of the ingredients and supplies can be found at Natures Garden.  You will however have to have water, lye, and your disposable cups- these items can not be purchased there.

For this soap, the scent that was selected was cannabis flower.  Now, since this scent has a vanillin content of .2%, we also included vanilla white color stabilizer in the recipe.  This decision was made after checking the cold process soap results for discoloration in this fragrance.  We saw that naturally without this additive the bar would discolor to a very light beige.  Considering we did not want our tie dye soap colors affected by this, it was a smart choice.  Also, since the mold that we are using is the 18 bar rectangle grid tray, we also decided to add sodium lactate to our recipe.  Not only will this allow the soap to be removed more easily from the mold, but it will also provide our finished bars with additional moisturizing aspects.

As for the colors in this soap, you can add as many or as few as you want.  Any of Natures Garden FUN Soap colorants will work!

So, lets get started in making tie dye soap.

Here is the recipe:
582 grams of water
215 grams of lye

413 grams of Shea Butter
306 grams of Coconut Oil 76
153 grams of Safflower Oil
107 grams of Rice Bran Oil
245 grams of Olive Oil pomace
184 grams of Meadowfoam Seed Oil
122 grams of Fractionated Coconut Oil
96 grams of Cannabis Flower Fragrance Oil
48 grams of Vanilla White Color Stabilizer
63 grams of Sodium Lactate

Now, if you would like to use the same colors shown in the steps, below are the weights.

Tie Dye Soap Colors:
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Red
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Yellow
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Orange
6 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Green
8 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Neon Blue
12 grams of FUN Soap Colorant Ultramarine Violet

If this is your first time making cold process soap, please Click Here For Basic CP Soap Making Class. Also, before attempting to make any cold process soap, please become familiar with Soap Making Safety Class.

Step 1:  Put on your safety gear:  This would include your safety gloves,  apron, safety mask, and safety glasses.

cp soap making safety gear

Step 2:  In your mold, space your 6 disposable cups equally apart from one another.

prepping your mold

Step 3:  In a small bowl, weigh out your lye.  In a separate bowl, weigh out your water.  In a well ventilated area, slowly pour the lye into the water.  Use a spatula to stir slowly.  Avoid breathing in any of the lye water fumes.  Keep stirring the lye water until there are no lye granules are left in the water.    Allow this to cool to 90-100 degrees F.

stirring the lye water

Step 4:  According to the recipe listed above: in a pot weigh out the Shea Butter and coconut oil 76.  Melt these two ingredients down on low heat until each one is in a liquid state.  Stir.  Then, add the safflower oil, rice bran oil, olive oil, meadowfoam seed oil, and fractionated coconut oil.  Stir again.  Remove from heat.  Then, transfer all of this into a large mixing bowl.

mixing your oils

Step 5:  Next, get your 6 mixing bowls.  Assign each bowl a color.  Then, weigh out the appropriate color amount for each bowl.

colorants in bowls

Step 6:  Using your thermometer, check the temperature of the lye water.  When it has cooled to 90 degrees Fahrenheit, add your Sodium Lactate.  Stir carefully.  Now, once the temperatures of the lye water and the soaping oils and butters are within 5-10 degrees of one another, it is time to move on to the next step.

adding sodium lactate to the recipe
Step 7:   Now, slowly pour the lye water/sodium lactate into your oils and butters bowl.  Use a spatula to get all of this out and into the other bowl.

adding lye water to the soaping oils

Step 8:  Using your stick blender, carefully mix everything together.  You will notice your batter will begin to look creamy and thicken slightly.  Now, stop blending.

blending the soap batter

Step 9:  Next, add the fragrance oil.

scenting the column swirl

Step 10:  Then, add the Vanilla White Color Stabilizer.  Once added, stick blend to incorporate.

adding vanilla white color stabilizer
Step 11:
  Now, place 405 grams of the soap batter into each bowl.  Stir each bowl with a spoon.  This will help slow down trace.

spoon stirred colored soap
Step 12: 
Starting with any one of your colors, begin to pour about half of the batter over 3 cups.  Repeat with a second and third color.  Then, using a new color, pour about half of the batter over the 3 cups that do not have soap over them yet.  Repeat this with your two remaining colors.  Then, with the remaining batter, keep covering different cups.  While you are doing this step, if any cups move, use your spatula to put them back into place.  When all of the pourable batter is out of your bowls, use your spatula to scrape the soap from the cups.  Then remove them.

column swirl pour
Step 13:  Now, using your spatula, scrape the colored bowls.  Then, splatter this soap over the mold.

splattering the soap
Step 14:  When all the soap is in the mold, insulate it and allow it to harden for 24 hours.

insulating your soap
Step 15:  After 24 hours, remove your soap from the mold.  Carefully, using a knife or a mitre cutter, slice the soap bars.  Once all of the soap is sliced, allow it to fully cure.

cutting your soap

After the cure time has elapsed, enjoy your Tie Dye Soap!

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

 

 

In the Pot Swirl Soap

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014

in the pot swirl soap Soaping with the cold process method allows you to create some really beautiful bars.  Not only are these bars creamy, bubbly, and cleansing, but they are also conditioning.  Plus, with the right recipe, bars can contain skin loving ingredients that nourish your skin too.

There are various ways to achieve beautiful designs in your cold process bars.  Some of the more popular designs include:  the peacock swirl, the mantra swirl, and the mica swirl. You can even try your hand at marbling your soap if you like.

When it comes to swirling, this is where you really get to let your creativity soar.  Through colors and varying design techniques, you can take your wonderful soap recipe and make the visual aspect just as appealing as the skin nourishing one!

The ideal scent when making cold process soap is one that is a Perfect Pour.  What this means is that the fragrance oil does not accelerate trace, rice, or discolor.  However, many times with floral scents, acceleration is a part of the package.  Although swirling is not impossible to achieve with an accelerator, it can be difficult if you do not move fast enough.  There is however, a swirling method that can be done when a fragrance oil accelerates trace.  This is known as the in the pot swirl.

Here is how to make an in the pot swirl soap.  The recipe, steps, and photos are included to help.  With the exemption of the lye and water, all of the ingredients for this soaping venture can be purchased at Natures Garden.  Although for this recipe, the Peace Sign Mold was used, any mold that is cold process soap safe will work.  To see the full list of soap molds available, please click on this link.

If you have never made cold process soap before, please click here for a  Basic CP Soap Making Class. Also, before attempting to make any cold process soap, please become familiar with Soap Making Safety Class first.

The Recipe:
108 grams of water
40 grams of lye
20 grams of Apricot Kernel Oil
11 grams of Castor Oil
85 grams of Coconut Oil 76
40 grams of Mango Butter
43 grams of Palm Oil
37 grams of Shea Butter
48 grams of Sunflower Oil
17 grams of Sodium Lactate
18 grams of Peace Fragrance Oil
18 grams of Vanilla White Color Stabilizer
FUN Soap Colorants: Neon Red, Neon Yellow, Neon Orange, Neon Blue, Ultramarine Violet

The Process:
Step 1: 
Put on your  safety gloves,  apron, safety mask, and safety glasses.

safety gear for soap making

Step 2:  Weigh out your lye and water.  In a well ventilated area, slowly pour the lye into the water.  Use a spatula to stir slowly.  Keep stirring until no lye granules are left in the water.  Do not breathe in any of the lye water fumes.  Allow this to cool to around 90-100 degrees F.

stirring the lye water

Step 3:  According to the recipe, in a pot weigh out the coconut oil 76, mango butter, palm oil, and shea butter.  Melt all of these ingredients down on low heat until each one is in a liquid state.  Stir.  Then add the apricot kernel oil, castor oil, and sunflower oil.  Stir again.  Remove from heat.  Transfer all of this into your mixing bowl.

melting your oils and butters

Step 4:  Now, get your 5 mixing bowls.  Assign each bowl a color.  Then, weigh out 2 grams of each neon colorant in its specific bowl.  The ultramarine violet bowl needs 4 grams weighed out.  A great tip:  Reuse the containers from the 1lb Whipped Soap Base.  They make perfect mixing bowls for colorant in cold process soaping!

weighing out the colorant for soap

Step 5:  Check the temperature of the lye water.  When it is cooled to around 90-100 degrees F, add your 17 grams of Sodium Lactate.  Stir carefully.  Now, once the temperatures of the lye water and the soaping oils and butters are within 5-10 degrees of one another, it is time to move on to the next step.

adding sodium lactate

Step 6:  Slowly pour the lye water/sodium lactate into your oils and butters bowl.  Use a spatula to get all of this out and into the other bowl.

mixing the oils, butters, and lye water

Step 7:  Using your stick blender, begin to mix everything together.  You will notice your batter will begin to look creamy and thicken slightly.  Now, stop blending.

stick blending cold process soap

Step 8:  Add your fragrance oil.

adding scent to in the pot swirl

Step 9:  Now add your Vanilla White Color Stabilizer.  Once added, stick blend to incorporate.  Do not forget to scrap the sides with a spatula.

preventing discoloration in soap

 

Step 10:  Now, place 90 grams of the soap batter into each bowl.  Stir well with a spoon.  This will help slow down trace.  Then, starting with the yellow soap, pour it back into the mixing bowl.  Try your best to keep it in one area.

multiple color in the pot swirl

 

Step 11:  Repeat with the orange.

second color in the pot swirl

Step 12:  Now, the red.

adding red in the pot swirl

Step 13:  Then the purple.

adding the purple batter
Step 14:  Finally, get your blue soap batter into the bowl.

all five colors in the pot swirl

Step 15:  Get your spatula, start by placing it alongside the inside bottom edge of the bowl.  Then, come straight up the center of the bowl.  When you reach the top, pick the spatula up.  Now, starring on one side, begin your swirls (using the spatula).  Repeat on the other side.  Do not over swirl.

step by step in the pot swirl
Step 16:
  Grab your mold.  Then begin to pour the soap batter into each mold opening.

molding the in the pot swirl

Step 17:  Once the mold is filled, cover it with plastic wrap.  When the soap has hardened enough to move, place the mold somewhere it will not be disturbed.

insulating your soap
Step 18: 
After your soap has set for 24 hours, place it in the freezer for about 10 minutes.  This step will help to release the soap from the mold.  Then, carefully remove the soaps from the mold.

unmolded soap

Step 19:  Now, allow your soap to finish curing before use.

Congratulations, you just completed an in the pot swirl technique!  Note:  You will notice as your soap cures that the neon colors will become more vivid.

After the cure, your in the pot swirl soap is now finished.  The ending bar will be nice and firm.  The lather will be creamy and filled with lots of bubbles.  These bars will cleanse, yet still provide your skin conditioning elements.  Enjoy!

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients.

Coloring Cold Process Soaps with Herbs

Monday, September 30th, 2013
Picture1

Adding herbs to your soap not only provides great skin loving benefits, but also can naturally color your soaps as well.

If you are looking for a way to naturally color your cold process soaps, herbs may be your answer.  The addition of herbs to your soaping recipes not only can provide your skin with different skin loving benefits, but can also give your soaps beautiful color as well.

There are basically three ways to incorporate herbs into your soaping recipe they are:

1.  As is.  If the herb you are adding is in a powder or small leaf/seed form, they can be added when your soap batter has reached trace.
2. Herbs in tea form.  This is done by steeping the herbs in water to create a tea, and then this “tea” is used as the water portion of your soap recipe.
3.  Oil infusion.  If you are selecting to infuse your herbs this way, you must make your herb oil infusion several weeks before using it in a soaping recipe.  The selected herbs are placed into one of your oils (that will be used in your soap recipe) and allowed to set for 4-6 weeks.  Then, strain the herbs out and use the oil in your soap recipe.  Please Note:  This process can also be done by adding the herbs to the melting pot as you wait for your soaping oils to melt.

The choice of how you would like to infuse your herbs is up to you and testing.  It is important to keep in mind what the end goal of adding the herb is before choosing your herbal addition method.  The answers as to why some people prefer different methods over others various based on easiness, time frame, best color production, or even strongest herbal infusion.  However, if you are simply looking to add herbs to your soap recipe for natural color, the herbs are added to your soap batter at trace.

It is also important that you test for discoloration in a soap recipe before adding an herb for colorant.  Natures Garden has a list of every fragrance oil they carry and how it preformed in cold process soap.  It is on their website under each fragrance oil’s page in the Fragrance Tested area, or for a complete list click Fragrances Tested in CP Soap Results.  You want to be prepared when adding herbs to soaping recipes, so knowing a little about how the fragrance oil reacts will only prepare you more for what to expect, especially when it comes to colorants!