Archive for the ‘candle wax’ Category

How to Make Clamshell Tarts

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013
clamkit

If you are on the fence about possibly making your own clamshell wax tarts, this clamshell wax tart kit will show you just how easy it is!

 

 

How to Make Clamshell Tarts

Everybody knows someone who just loves to burn tarts in their oil burner.  I have a sister that pays top dollar for those tarts, and swears that they are the only tarts she will use.  I took on this challenge at least that is what I thought it was, and have now successfully changed her over to making her own custom tarts.

My sister has a  scent for every season type.  She had her go to fragrances.  A light floral for spring, a zesty citrus kick scent for summer, a mossy green outdoor scent for fall, and the tried and true Apple Cinnamon for winter.  This was one concept I could not grasp.  I felt compelled to show her the ways of the scenting world, and since I work for Natures Garden, I knew a few in and outs.

For anyone looking to start making their own tarts, Natures Garden offers a Clamshell Wax Tart Kit.  This was my starting place for her as well.  What is really admirable about this kit is just how easy it is.  The kit comes with everything that you would need to make your first time clamshell tarts.  Wax, Fragrance Oils, Candle Dyes, Clamshells, Pipettes, Instructions, in fact this kit is so easy, it practically makes itself.

For those of you who already have the supplies to make tarts at home, here is the list of ingredients you will need for this clamshell tart recipe:

1 Pound Pillar of Bliss Wax
1 oz. Apple Cinnamon Fragrance Oil
1 oz. Vanilla Bean Fragrance Oil
Red Liquid Candle Dye
Yellow Liquid Candle Dye
Pipettes
4 Clamshell Tart containers
Stainless Steel Spoon
Stove
Paper Bowls (2)
Toothpick
Melting Container

Step 1: Place 1 pound wax into your melting container.  Using the double boiler method, melt wax on low on the stove until the wax is completed melted. Get your four empty clamshells ready.

Step 2: Preparing the Apple Cinnamon Original Tarts: Pour 1/2 of the melted wax into a paper bowl.  Start by adding 1 drop of red liquid candle dye; add more if desired.

Step 3: Add 1 ounce of Apple Cinnamon Original fragrance oil to the melted wax. Stir. Keep remaining melted wax on stove at a low temp setting.

Step 4:  Bend the side of the paper bowl to make a pour spout, and quickly pour the melted wax into two clamshells. Do not move the clamshells until the wax has completely hardened and set up.

Step 5: Preparing the Vanilla Bean Tarts: Pour the other half of the melted wax into a paper bowl. Using a pipette, add 1 drop of yellow liquid candle dye.  Add more if desired.

Step 6: Add 1 ounce of Vanilla Bean fragrance oil to the melted wax.  Stir.

Step 7: Bend the side of the paper bowl to make a pour spout.  Quickly pour the melted wax into two clamshells. Do not move the clamshells until the wax has completely hardened and set up.

 Step 8: Break off chunks of the clamshell tart and place them into a potpourri burner and fill your room with the wonderful aromas of Apple Cinnamon and Vanilla Bean!

It is just as simple as that.  It did not take long to make these wonderful little clamshell tarts, and they smell amazing in your oil burners too.  Feel free to use any of Natures Gardens Fragrance Oils to make your own clamshell tarts.  My sister is super excited to get started on her own personal clamshell tart line, and I have a feeling I will be getting some homemade tarts for a gift very soon.

Fragrance & Fun for Everyone

Inspire, Create, and Dominate!

Sparkles!!! Nicole

(Corporate Manager of Natures Garden Candle Supplies)

www.naturesgardencandles.com

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations if applicable. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients. We also do not offer any advice on formulating or altering recipes.

What are Jump Lines in Candles?

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013
jump-lines1

We tried numerous times to recreate jump lines, however because of our flaming awesomeness, every candle was jump-line-less. So, we had to find a stock photo that best represents jump lines.

What are Jump Lines in Candles

Jump lines are the visible horizontal rings that occur on the sides of your candles.  These lines look like ridges and prevent your candle from having a smooth finish.  Ideally, to have a perfect candle pour, your candle wax will still be in a complete liquid state once it has been poured into your container/pillar.  This is the best shot you can give your candle to completely and uniformly cool naturally, therefore decreasing your chances of getting jump lines.  All candle wax has to conform to the sides of the container/pillar mold at the same rate of time.  This provides for the smooth finish of a candle.

In candle making when you are pouring the hot wax, it will begin to cool as soon as it hits the jar.  As this happens, you will visibly be able to see wax layers materialize.  If you do not pour quickly enough, the wax will naturally start to harden and stick to the wall of the container/ pillar mold.  Since the temperature of the jar stays consistent, there is no heat source to re-melt the wall portion, therefore showing each line of cooled wax aka jump lines. 

How do you prevent jump lines from occurring?

Jump lines can occur for several reasons, the first of which is intentionally.  Jump lines can also be created on purpose to give candles a textured look.  Since jump lines are an aesthetic thing, they do not have any kind of effect on the candles burn or scent throw. 

One of the first things as a preventative measure that you can do is pour your wax at the correct temperature.  You can do this by using a candy thermometer.  You may have to increase your pouring temperature to adjust for jump lines.  This is where testing and note taking will come into play.  As always, it is of the utmost importance for candle making that your jars and/or pillars are room temperature.  The second measure you can take is to heat your jars at the lowest setting on a cookie sheet in the oven for twenty minutes prior to filling them.

Another important factor in combating jump lines is your pouring rate.  Obviously, you do not want to pour fast, this will result in wax splashing everywhere.  And, adversely, you do not want to pour so slowly that you can actually see the jump lines establishing themselves in the candle.  Find your pouring medium.  If you are seeking a fool proof way to prevent jump lines from the pouring stage, try counting seconds or singing a lyric of a song.  These tricks will help you stay uniform with your pour.

How to correct jump lines?

Although all of the steps mentioned earlier are great ways to prevent jump lines, once they have occurred in your candles you really only have a one option.  Using a heat gun or hair dryer to heat the outside of the candle will remelt the outside layer of the wax, this will mask the jump lines from visible view, but once again, jump lines have no direct effect on a candle.

My Candles Have No Scent Throw

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013

scent throw candlesWhy do I Have No Scent Throw in My Candles?

If there is one thing that candles are known for is their scent.  In fact, the majority of candle sales are based on the scent given off from the candle.  This is true for both first time sales as well as repeat customers.  When a candle has never been lit, the aromatic aroma that the wax gives off is called the cold scent throw.  Adversely, when the wick of the candle is lit, the fragrant smell that is released from the candle is called the hot scent throw.  Both the hot and cold scent throw are very important to candles.

Obviously, when it comes to scent issues, your first thought is to turn to the fragrance oil used.  However, as long as you are purchasing your candle making supplies from a reputable company, the fragrance oil that you use is not the culprit.  There are actually several different things that can inhibit your scent throw.

Soy Wax- If you have been in the candle making market long enough, you already know that soy wax is considered to be one of the hardest of the waxes to attain a good scent throw from.  On the molecular level of how soy wax is structured, there are many different types of chemical bonds.  These chemical bonds trap the fragrance oil instead of allowing the fragrance oil to be readily evaporated (like paraffin wax allows).  Many people suggest that when using soy wax to make it a blend with Paraffin. This is referred to as a para-soy blend.  There are a variety of different para-soy blends on the market.  If you would like to blend your own para-soy blend, massive testing is involved to find the perfect candle you are seeking.  However, Natures Garden offers one of the best para-soy blends on the market.  Using Joy Wax as your candle wax will allow you the best of both worlds; clean burning candles with amazing scent throw both hot and cold, without having to recreate the wax wheel.

Wick- Soy wax requires a hotter burning wick.  This is because of the chemical bonds.  These chemical bonds take more heat to break them down.  To solve this dilemma, increase your wick size.  This will ensure that your candle wick is doing its proper job of breaking down the chemical bonds, allowing the trapped fragrance oil to become volatile and release the scent into the air.  No matter what type of wax you are using, always make sure that your wick size is large enough to provide ample hot scent throw, but not too large to create a fire hazard.

Candle Colorant- You must remember when crafting your candles, use precaution when adding any colorant.  When you add too much colorant to your wax, you risk both clogging your wick, as well as, affecting the overall scent of the candle.  Specific candle dyes formulated for candle making should be used when making candles.  Never use pigments to color the interior of your candles; pigments should be used only for dipping the exterior of candles.

Vybar-  Yes, it is true that the addition of this candle additive will increase your candles scent throw.  However, adding too much vybar to your candle wax will inhibit your candle throw as well.  The proper amount of vybar to add per pound of wax is ¼ tsp to ½ tsp.

Temperature-  Depending on the flashpoint of the fragrance oil being used, adding your fragrance oil at too high of a melted wax temperature will directly affect your scent throw of the finished candle.  It is completely possible to burn off the majority of your fragrance oil before it even has a chance to be a candle, when the fragrance oil is added at too hot of a temperature.

Cure Time-  Cure time is one key step to ensuring a wonderfully strong scent to your candles.  You want to allow ample time for your wax and your fragrance to bind together.  You truly want these two components to be integrated into each other.   At the minimum, cure time with candles is 3-4 days.

Fragrance Oils-  When making candles, make sure that the fragrance oils you are using were formulated for candle making.  You never want to use a fragrance oil that has been diluted with diluents like DPG (di propylene glycol).  DPG will directly affect the strength of your fragrance, and will inhibit the ability of your candle to burn.  On the other hand, some essential oils will need to have diluents added to them to allow them to travel up the wick and release scent (but never use DPG as your diluent in candles).  Natures Garden was voted the #1 Favorite Fragrance Oil Supplier by candle makers and soap makers in 2012 due to the quality of our fragrance oils.  With 16 years of expertise in the fragrance oil market, you can rely on Natures Garden to provide you with the finest, most unique fragrances.

Can You Use Crayons to Color Candles

Thursday, June 27th, 2013
fragrance oils

In order for your candles to achieve the most vibrant colors or pleasing pastels possible, a candle dye or candle colorant must be used. Using other forms of colorant may result in an nonfunctional candle.

Can you use crayons to color candles?

Although, staring at a beautiful stack of wonderfully vibrant crayons, we can understand why there would be an urge to use crayons as a colorant for candles.  I mean, let’s look at what a crayon is…a stick of colored wax, right?  Logically, they should work.  However, this is absolutely not the case.

You should never use crayons to color your candles.  The reasoning behind this is the actual colorant of the crayon.  These colors are achieved with the use of pigments, and pigments unfortunately are not soluble.  What this means is that when a crayon is melted, the color of the crayon breaks down into small pigment particles that exist in a dispersed manner among the melted wax.  These pigments appear as if they had changed the color of the wax; like candle dyes do because dyes dissolve into the candle wax, but remember the pigments are simply dispersed.

Now, due to the way that a wick works in candles, there must be a melt pool apparent to keep a candle flame going.  As the wick continues to burn, the melted wax from the wet pool is pulled through the wick.  This is how the fragrance (or hot scent throw) of the candle is released into the air.  The problem that coloring with crayons in candles presents is that since the pigments and the wax never combine, the pigments are also pulled up through the wick.  But, these pigments will not, unlike the melted wax, flow properly through the wick.  These pigments will in fact clog your wick.

The results of a clogged wick prevent your candles from burning properly, inhibit your candles hot scent throw, and will even cause your candles to smoke.

So, in summary no matter how tempting that box of 64 crayons look, never use crayons to color your candles. You will want to stick with dyes specifically formulated for candle making;  Natures Garden offers liquid candle dyes and color block dyes in an array of vibrant colors.

When Does Wick Size Matter

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013
wick size

We purposely created a “problem” candle to demonstrate when wick size does matter. In this example, the wick is not centered, and there is a lack of a full melt pool. A smaller melt pool is one sign that the wick size clearly needs to be larger.

When does wick size matter?

Knowing when to move up to the next size wick for candles is one of the trickiest aspects to candle making.  There is a fine line with wicking a candle.  You want to find that perfect balance between a sensational hot throw and long burn time.  Wicks, are the vessels to ensuring you have made the best possible candle.  You want your candle to burn slowly and evenly all the way to the bottom, leaving nothing but the wick tab behind.  The right wick has the capability of doing this, but they also have a direct effect on the hot scent throw.  And when it comes to scent throw, this is one feature of candles that is extremely significant.

There are many different kinds of wicks available; HTP, CD, Hemp, Zinc, or Wooden.  Each wick has different qualities associated with them, and that is why testing for your perfect wick size is vital to your candle crafting. Usually, within the wick selection process there are a few factors to consider.  First, wick selection will differ depending on which fragrance oil you use in your candle wax.  Second, wick size is determined by the diameter of your candle container/mold.  Third, wick size is determined by the type of wax you are using to make your candles.  Fourth, wick size is determined by how much colorant you use in your candles.

Now, it could be possible that your candle will need a double or maybe even a triple wick.  This is not unheard of.  Sometimes, especially with the larger candles or with candles that are shaped differently (such as star), you need the addition of extra wicks to make sure that your candle has an excellent wet pool touching all sides of your container.

Once you know the type and size of the wick that works best for your candle needs, the next step is to familiarize yourself with the term “wick up”.  Wick up in candle making is when you purposely use a larger wick.   This generally comes into play for a few reasons.  If you notice in your testing that you have a poor melt pool, you might want to consider a wick up.  Wicking up in this situation will allow for a hotter burn, therefore reaching more wax to allow for a fuller melt pool.

Another reason to wick up is if you are struggling to smell the hot throw of the candle.  In order for scent throw to be possible in melted wax, the fragrance oil needs to be in a volatile state- meaning ready to evaporate quickly.  The best way to ensure this is a hot burning wick.  As the melted wax pool is pulled throw the wick, the fragrance (or scent) is released into the air.

Another aspect to consider is the fragrance oil itself.  There are certain fragrance oils such as Vanilla ones that almost always require a wick up.  This is because Vanilla fragrance oils are thicker and using a slightly larger wick will prevent your wick from clogging and/or possibly drowning out.  Fragrances with heavy base notes, such as patchouli, vetiver, amber, and musk will also likely require a larger wick.

The wax that you are using for candle making can also come into play for a wick up situation.  Any time you use a vegetable wax, you will want to wick up to the next size wick for your candle.  Whenever you use a vegetable wax, which requires a hotter burn, you want to make sure that the wick when lit, will be hot enough to melt the wax properly, and release the fragrance into the air.

The other factor that will require a larger wick size in candles is the use of heavy amounts of candle dye in your candles.  Candle dye slows down the capillary action of the wicks, and thus reduces the burn of the wick.  Increasing your wick size will help you combat this issue.

If you are interested in seeing Natures Garden’s suggestions for wicks, please check out candle wick chart.  However, please note that this information should never replace your testing process.

What is a Memory Burn in Candles

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

memory burnWhat is a Memory Burn in Candles

The most crucial burn to your new candle is its first one.  This is what is known as a memory burn.  The initial burn is the one that is most vital to a complete melt pool.  And, even more importantly a memory burn in the candle is the one that sets the boundaries and scent throw for every burn after that.

Preparing for your Memory Burn

Never leave a burning candle unattended.  A good rule of thumb to prepare for your memory burn is to know the diameter of your candle.  For every inch in diameter that your candle is wide, you need to gauge one hour of burn time.  So, if your candle is 3 inches wide; you need to be able to burn your candle the first time for at least 3 hours.  So, for the memory burn, it is important to start it when you know that you will be able to keep an eye on it for the allotted time necessary.

Although lighting candles definitely adds to the ambiance of a room, certain precautions do need to be in place for the open flame of a candle.  Never burn a candle where small children or pets are within reach.  The wax of a melting candle is very hot and can cause severe burns.

Before you light your candle, make sure that the wick is no longer than ¼” high.  Be careful not to cut your wick too low, this is a sure fire way to drown your wick out in the melted wax.  This is a key tip to remember each time that you light your candle.  Recalling this simple step each time will lessen the amount of soot and smoking from your candle.

Always keep your candle free of wick trimmings, matches, and any other debris.  Any of these items could be flammable.  Hello Fire Department!

Why a Memory Burn is Important

All candle waxes retain a memory.  In order to have a full melt pool, where liquid wax is touching every side of the container, the candle has to have a memory of that.  If the first time you burn a 4” wide candle, and only get a 2 inch wide melt pool before you extinguish the candle, you have already inhibited your candle.  If you prevent the full memory burn from occurring the result is never being able to achieve a clean, full melt pool all the way down to the bottom.  The melt pool will follow the boundaries already established from the memory burn and will only ever reach 2 inches wide.

Besides getting the most out of your candle time with a full memory burn, there is another reason why memory burns are so important.  With a full melt pool on your candle, you will notice a stronger scent throw from your candle.

For the Love of Candles and Scents

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

Fragrance OilsWhat’s your name & Your Company Name:  My name is Melissa Love and my company name is Scandalicious Candle Melts.

I love candles and I just got tired of the same old candle in the jar that you would find at local stores. I wanted candles that not only look different, but they also have to smell awesome. It wasn’t until the summer of last year that I started my research into creating my own candles and I did just that. I started making my own and giving some away to friends and co-worker as a gift. I had such a positive feedback that I decided to turn my love of candles making into a business. So finally in December of 2012, I open my Etsy store. In addition to my online store, I have my products in 3 boutiques and I am a member of the Michigan Association for Female Entrepreneurs.

I make fun shaped candles tarts and free-standing Shape Candles.

My goal is to have my own store and to have my products in as many homes and offices as possible.

I know with Nature Garden’s awesome products and their fabulous high quality fragrance oils, I will accomplish my goal.

Your Website: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ScandaliciousCandle

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/scandaliciouscandlemelts

Twitter: @candliciousmelt

Blog: http://scandaliciouscandlemelt.blogspot.com

Candle Starter Kit Starts It All

Tuesday, May 28th, 2013

Fragrance OilsWhat’s your name & Your Company Name: Just my Scent Homemade Soy Candles, Tarts & More

In 2008 I needed Christmas gifts for my family members , so I ordered a starter candle kit. After giving them as gifts others around my candles enjoyed them so much they asked if I could make more. I now have my candles in 3 locations including the local farmers market. I have been asked to be the candle supplier for a new farmers market opening soon. I do local craft shows, fundraisers and have a yearly fall open house at my home.  I have been overwhelmed with the turn out of the open house. Everyone always looks forward to it in November. Next month I am having my very first Candle/Tart party where I will have cash & carry items, and will take orders. I will also be booking future parties with great gifts to the hostess. I sell Candles in jars, crocks and an apple shape jar, I live in apple country and our local high school’s mascot is an apple. The apple jar is only filled with apple scents to go with the theme. I also make tarts, I have them at a local hair salon and they are flying off the rack. I owe a lot of my success to Nature’s Garden for their wonderful products. I receive so many compliments on the scents that I use and they all come from Nature’s Garden. I recently visited my daughter who lives in another state and took her a starter kit and now she has her own business of Soy Melts using all Nature’s Garden supplies. Her first few weeks she sold over $400.00 in Soy Melts to neighbors and co workers, she is excited to do her first home party. Thank You Nature’s Garden for helping my daughter and me with our business, we love it!

Red Delicious Apple, Red Hot Cinnamon, Apple Cinnamon and Black Raspberry Vanilla

Your Website: justmyscent.com

Facebook page: www.facebook.com/JustmyScent

Twitter: https://twitter.com/JustmyScent

Handmade Candles

Saturday, May 25th, 2013

fragrance oilsWhat’s your name & Your Company Name: My name is Lance Smith. Owner of LantzWicks

Born and raised in Sharon Pennsylvania, I’ve always been drawn to the arts. From learning how to play guitar from my grandfather, learning crochet from my great grandmother, and learning needlepoint from my mother, I really just wanted to be creative with my life. But living in such a cultural deprived area, I had to work jobs in factories, but I always had a creative approach to doing them, but all ended with being dead ends.

I started making soy candles in single poured glass jars, and metal containers as a hobby for myself, a few friends, and some relatives. After a couple years, I started learning more processes with different waxes, and found that I was honing a craft I enjoyed doing! This was making shopping for gifts alot easier for the people I love in my life. Having some moral support from some friends, they encouraged me that I should start making and selling them for a living since I was really enjoying the work, including a friend that I work for doing pottery, assisting with selling at art shows.

My friend who runs a printing business, where during the winter of 2011 allowed me to use her garage for making, but was too drafty for proper cooling. In January of 2012, I completely emptied a walk-in closet in my old bedroom for my workspace back home at my mother’s house, and still use it today! My friend helped me with making business cards that are also still used today as well.

I started only with just one Faberware electric pot with only one pouring pitcher, and one electrical outlet. Since March of this year, I’ve had two more outlets installed, and acquired another electric pot and pouring pitcher to increase my production!

Since this time, my pouring is now very easy, my scent throw has increased, and feedback has been very positive! I’ve even learned more from reading the manuals in Nature’s Garden site in the Free Support section.  My goal is to produce a great product, for a great price.

GW 444 Soy Wax, Jelly Bean Fragrance Oil. The jelly beans are made of some old paraffin I bought at garage sale.

Your Website: http://www.etsy.com/shop/LantzWicks

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/LantzWicks

Increasing Income with Candle Making

Saturday, May 11th, 2013

fragrance oils1. What’s your name & Your Company Name:     Candles By Sheila

2. Why did you decide to go into business? I was having fun making candles for my friends. What was your motivation?  My friends said I need to start selling them. They were the nicest ones they had in a long time.  How long have you been in business? I started selling them about 5 years ago.

3. What products do you make and sell? I make a half of a coconut shell. I also make a spiral pillar and a square pillar one.

4. What are your business goals? Since I have retired I would like to increase my income and have something that my family could keep doing.

5. What are some products you use from Natures Garden; what are your favorite products from Natures Garden?   I only use the fragrances oils for my candles from your company. My wax, wicks and colors also come from you.  It would have to be the Joy wax.

Facebook page: Sheila Holland