Archive for the ‘candle wax’ Category

Easy Soy Candle

Friday, March 14th, 2014

first soy candleHello everyone! My name is Cindy and I am the new Marketing Rep for Natures Garden.

Although I am not new to the candle scene; I used to sell paraffin candles for Deborah back in 1997, I am new to the making homemade products world.  After working for Natures Garden a few days, I quickly realized that one of the most important aspects of my position is that I know all of these products in and out.  Since I am a hands on learner, the best way for me to understand these products is to put myself in your shoes and become a candle and soap artisan.  And, today I did just that.

Since I already have some knowledge in the candle market, I decided to start my venture with soy wax.  Now, I want to shout it from the roof tops, “I made my first candle….ever….in my whole life”.  It was super easy too!

Although secretly, I do have to admit I was a little concerned at first.  I actually thought I might burn down the test kitchen, a common fear that I assume many new crafters have.

Realizing it is now or never, I stood up straight and pulled myself together.  You will never learn if you never try, right?  So, I gathered all of my ingredients and supplies, and went to work.  The step by step instruction I used to make my candle came from the How To Make A Pure Soy Wax Candle Recipe.   This recipe as well as hundreds of others are offered in the free recipes and classes section of Natures Gardens website.    I now understand that every recipe created by Natures Garden came from the trial and error process.  A process that is done to put forth the BEST end product.  Natures Gardens creative team makes all the mistakes so you don’t have to (I think I hear a commercial in there).

Anyway, I worked through the easy to follow steps and before I knew it (about 30 minutes later), I was standing before my first candle creation.  A beautiful purple colored, Lavender Sage scented candle.  I could not believe my eyes.  I actually thought to myself….well, that was easy.  Who knew?  I then realized I could have been doing this for years, guaranteeing the candles I burned in my home had the best scent throw and longest burn time.

Now that I know just how easy it is to make candles, the possibilities are endless.  Guess what kind of gifts I’ll be giving this year…lol?  Overall I really enjoyed my experience; that is after I got over the initial fear.  A word of advice for anyone that wants to give candle making a try… I strongly encourage you to do it!  Candle making is easy, fun, and the accomplishment of your creation is inspiring.

Well kids, until my next adventure, have a FABULOUS day!
Cindy

Soy Candle Recipe

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

how to make a soy candle Soy candles always seem to be the craze.  The soy wax 415 that Natures Garden carries is a 100% all natural vegetable wax.  This also means that this soy wax is biodegradable, and is made from a renewable resource.  When used to make candles; soy wax provides a nice, clean and long burn.

For this recipe, we have figured everything out for you (measurements, temperatures, color, and scent).  We are also presenting it to you in an easy to follow step by step form (with photos).  This recipe will make (1) 16oz apothecary jar candle.

Your finished soy candle will be colored in a light red hue, and scented in with a matching apple orchard fragrance.

We will be double wicking our apothecary jar with (2) CD-10 wicks.  This wicking will provide the candle with a nice hot burn, and allow the scent to travel nicely through the wick; guaranteeing a wonderful hot scent throw.

Besides the ingredients hyper linked above, you will also need some other candle making equipment.  This includes: Thermometer, POURING POT, Warning Labels, Glass Apothecary Jar (16oz), Hot Glue Gun with Gun, Scale, Pot, A cookie sheet, and a Stirring Spoon.

Now, normally prior to making a soy wax candle, you must first check the flashpoint of the scent.  This is important because the flashpoint will indicate the temperature at which you will add the fragrance oil.  However, for this recipe, we have already figured out this information.  Apple Orchard has a flashpoint of 155 degrees Fahrenheit.  What this means is that the temperature at which we will be adding the fragrance oil to the soy wax is 155 degrees Fahrenheit.  Our rule of thumb is:  If a fragrance flash point is below 130F, then add it to wax at 130F.  If the fragrance oil flash point is between 130-185F, then add the fragrance to the wax at its flash point.  If a fragrance oil has a flash point above 185F, then add the fragrance to the wax at 185F.

So now, before we get started making our soy candle; it is important to get all of the supplies and equipment ready that we will be using.  Most of these supplies can be purchased at Natures Garden.  Once you have all of this ready to go; lets get started!

supplies for making a soy candle

Step 1:  Get your pot.  Into the pot, place several inches of tap water.  Next you are going to put the pot on to the stove top and set the heat setting on medium.

prepping for double boiler method

Step 2:  Now get your pouring pot.  Inside the pot, weigh out 440 grams of the 100% soy wax flakes.  Once you have the amount, place the pouring pot into the water pot.  This will be how we melt the soy flakes.  This process is known as the double boiler method.

the double boiler process

Step 3:  Set your oven to 170 degrees Fahrenheit.  Next, place your apothecary jar on your cookie sheet.  Then, place the cookie sheet inside the oven.  Allow the jar to warm for 10-15 minutes, then remove.  Also, plug in your hot glue gun now.

warming your apothecary jar

Step 4:  Now, place your thermometer into the wax.  This is important because you will want to monitor the temperature of the wax while it is melting.  Never let the temperature go higher than 200 degrees Fahrenheit.  This will burn and discolor the wax.  As the wax melts, stir it occasionally.  Also, keeping melting until all the wax is in a liquid state.

melting soy wax

Step 5:  Once the wax is all melted, remove it from heat.  When the temperature reaches 185 degrees Fahrenheit, add the 4 drops of Spectrum Red Candle Dye.  Stir.

coloring soy wax

Step 6:  After the wax has been colored, check your temperature again.  When the temperature reaches 155 degrees Fahrenheit, add your 35 grams of Apple Orchard fragrance oil.  Stir again for a full 2 minutes.  This thorough stir will help the wax, fragrance, and color adhere.  Then, place your thermometer back into the wax.

scenting the soy wax

Step 7:  Next, grab your hot glue gun and place a small amount of glue on the bottom of your wick tabs.  Then, center and secure your candle wicks.

center and secure your wicks

Step 8:  Now, stick your warning label to the bottom of your jar.

applying your warning label

Step 9:  Check the temperature of the wax, you will be looking for it to reach 110 degrees Fahrenheit.  Once it does, give your wax one final stir.

checking for the pour temp
Step 10:  Then, slowly start to pour your candle.  You will want to stop your pour once the wax reaches where the jar changes shape.  Then, straighten your wicks.

pouring your soy candle
Step 11: 
Now, allow your candle to fully set up undisturbed.

allowing your candle to set up

Step 12:  Once the candle has hardened, trim your wicks, and lid your jar.  Allow your candle to cure for 24-48 hours.

Congratulations, you just made a soy candle.  Your 100% Soy Wax Candle is now finished and ready to burn.  Enjoy the sweet apple scent that will fill your home and make your house smell good!

Homemade Zebra Candle

Friday, February 7th, 2014

make your own zebra candleHow to make your very own homemade Zebra Candle!

This easy to make project is even fun to create.  Besides the standard candle making supplies such as: soy wax, wicks, scent, color, and jars; you will also need beeswax.  We will be using the beeswax to make the zebra stripes in the candle.  Because of the pliability of beeswax, it has the capability of being shaped easily into stripes.  Plus, due to the high melt point it has, beeswax can withstand a pour of another wax (soy), as long as the temperature isn’t too extreme.

Although for this project, the scent that was selected was Hot Pink Pomegranate Fragrance Oil, when you make your own zebra candle you can scent it to your pleasing.  The same is true for the candle color.  Since our fragrance oil has the name hot pink in it, the decision was made to make the zebra candle stripes pink on a white (or uncolored) background.

To see the full list of possible candle scents, please click on this link.  There are over 800 different fragrances to choose from!

Here are your total recipe weights to make (2) 16oz. Zebra Candles:
190 grams beeswax
2 drops candle dye (if making the candle like pictured)
About 4 oz.  of candle scent
1100 grams of soy wax (Golden Foods 444 soy wax)

Other items that you will need for this recipe are:
wax paper
pencil
knife
9×13 cake pan
2- 16 oz candle jars
4 wicks (we used 2- cd10 wicks per candle)
scale
2 pots (for double boiler method)
stirring spoon
cutting board
thermometer

Below are the steps to make your very own zebra candle (pictures included):

Step 1:  Using the double boiler method, weigh out and melt 190 grams of beeswax.  You will want to set the temperature of your stove top between medium and low heat while melting.  Stir the beeswax occasionally as it melts.

steps to make a zebra candle

Step 2:   This step is the colorant of your zebra stripes:  Once the beeswax is melted, now you will add 2 drops of your candle colorant, and stir.  Once you are done, place your pouring pot back into the heat source.

color for the zebra candle

Step 3:  To make the zebra stripes, you will need to concentrate your beeswax in a portion of the area in your cake pan.  To do this, lay out your cake pan on a flat surface.  Next, roughly measure out at least 9 inches in length.  Hold this place by setting your knife across the pan.  Finally, lay the wax paper over the cake pan and knife.  Carefully, tuck the corners of the wax paper down.

how to make zebra stripes

Step 4:  Now it is time to scent your beeswax:  Remove your beeswax from the heat source.  Weigh out about 19 grams of your candle fragrance oil.  Then, add the fragrance and stir to incorporate it throughout the wax.

zebra candle scent

Step 5:  Now, take your beeswax and slowly start to pour it over the flat portion of the wax paper.  Allow this to fully set up.  Do not try to rush this step.  Cooling beeswax too quickly, may cause it to crack!

making the zebra candle stripes

Step 6:  Once the beeswax has hardened, and is cool to the touch; gently remove it from the cake pan.  Carefully stand the square on one end and starting in one corner, peel away the wax paper.  Then, place the beeswax on your cutting board.  Finally, cut off any jagged edges using your knife.

zebra candle recipe

Step 7:  For the background of your zebra candle, you will be using soy wax.  In order to have enough wax for 2 candles, weigh out and melt 1100 grams of soy wax.  Melt this wax using the double boiler method.  While the wax is melting, stir occasionally.

soy wax zebra candle

Step 8:  You will create the zebra stripe pattern using the tip of a pencil.  Trace this lightly into the beeswax.  The shape that you will want to draw will be various sized long and irregular lines similar to tree branches.  When you are finished, cut these lines out.

making zebra stripes in beeswax

Step 9:  Once you have a few of your stripes cut out, carefully begin to place them individually against the inside wall of your candle jar.  It is best to start at the bottom of your jar and work in an angular direction.  Apply slight and even pressure until the stripes stick.  Repeat this step until you have the zebra design you are looking for.  Then, do it again for your second candle.

zebra candle pattern

Step 10:  Center and secure your wicks to the bottom of your candle jars.  Then, set aside.

centering your wicks

Step 11:  When your soy wax is in a completely liquid state, remove it from the heat source.  If you are adding color to the background of the zebra candle, do this now.  Then, add 110 grams of fragrance Oil.  Stir again.

Step 12:  Using your thermometer, wait until the soy wax reaches 115 degrees Fahrenheit; this temperature will not melt your zebra stripes.  Pour the soy wax into your candle jars.  Don’t forget to straighten your wicks. Allow the candles to fully set up undisturbed.

pouring a zebra candle

Now it is time to celebrate, your Zebra candles are now ready to use.  Simply trim your wick, light, and enjoy your new awesome candle.

Beeswax Candles

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

beeswax candles
Air Purifying Candles

Many people burn candles as a way of relaxing with a soft light, or too add subtle scenting to the air, or as a means of setting the mood.  But, burning a beeswax candle may actually do more than this.

Let’s get a little scientific
The air that surrounds us is positively charged.  In fact, many of the items in our own homes emit a plethora of additional positively charged ions; jam packing our already filled surroundings with more and more positively charged ions.  But, all of these positively charged ions are not good for us. Recalling any lightning storm you have experienced, you will better understand this explanation.  Generally, after one of these storms, people feel stimulated, rejuvenated, and replenished.  The reason for this is that electrical storms produce a superabundance of negative ions that actually balance out the positive ions that dominate our surroundings.  This is why some of the most relaxing and renewed places for our bodies are be by waterfalls, beaches, forests, and mountain scenes.  These types of landscapes provide extra negative ions in the air that restore a natural balance of the charged ions.  Not only can you smell the difference in the air, but you can also feel it in your body too.

Positive Ions in our Homes
Many of the pollutants floating in the air of our homes like pollen, dirt, and dust all have a positive charge.  They get this charge from the static electricity that occurs in our home from daily routines.  Introducing negative ions into the air; combats these allergens. It has actually been scientifically proven to reduce many allergic issues like hay fever and asthma.  Negative ions can even help you sleep better too. Harmonizing the ions in your surrounding can help make you feel healthier and actually distress you.  Releasing additional negative ions can help with depression (SAD), headaches, and can even help you stay focused. Negatively charged ions work to make you healthier too.  Negative ions can help to boost your body’s immunity as well as help to build a resistance to many illnesses. Your body’s metabolism also benefits from negative ions making it more efficient.

Introduction of Negative Ions to our Homes
Beeswax can be considered an air purifier.  Beeswax candles are the only candles that emit negative ions into the air when lit.  Since opposites attract; these negative ions attach themselves to the positive ones.  This therefore balances the charge. Once the ions are bound together, the charge is now neutralized, and the molecule is complete.  The heavier mass causes these ions to fall to the ground, and they are no longer suspended in the air as contaminants.  This process of stabilizing, removes the ions, and cleans the air we breathe. The negative ions emitted by beeswax candles can even clean the air to eliminate smells like second hand smoke and many common household odors. Beeswax candles can be scented and colored just like other candle waxes.  Beeswax candles produce very little soot and burn very slowly.  These candles will provide your home with hours of purer, crisper, and fresher quality air.

Attention:  Natures Garden provides this information for educational purposes only.  We do not intend for this information to be misconstrued as medical advice or for treatment of any ailments.  If selling beeswax candles, refrain from making medical claims on your labels and/or advertising.   Promoting this way could make your candles considered a “drug” by the FDA.

Beeswax Uses

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

beeswaxBeeswax Uses

Beeswax is a natural wax made from honeybees.  The honeybees use beeswax in their hives to house their young and store honey and pollen.  When the honeycombs are removed from the hive, the beeswax is placed in hot water and skimmed out.  Many times the beeswax must be rendered to remove impurities before use.

There are three different types of beeswax.  Yellow beeswax is raw beeswax.  White beeswax is yellow beeswax that has been bleached.  Beeswax absolute is yellow beeswax that has been treated with alcohol.

Beeswax is a fabulous wax to use for candle making.  Candles made from this wax work as air purifiers.  The long lasting and clean burn of a beeswax candle produces little to no smoke when lit.

Beeswax is also an excellent ingredient to add to any of your bath and body formulations.  Providing wonderful benefits like skin softening and moisturizing, this wax can seal the deal when it comes to ending cracked and dry skin.

Because beeswax contains Vitamin A, beeswax can work with your damaged skin to promote cell repair.  Its humectant like property provides a barrier for your skin; not only locking the moisture in but concurrently allowing your skin to breathe.  As an emollient, beeswax helps to soothe irritated skin and advocates a soft and supple feel.  Beeswax can also be used in formulations to help thicken consistencies for products like body creams and lotions.

For dry and cracked lips when the cold weather hits, beeswax it a go to ingredient for lip balms and other lip care products.  Not only will beeswax help to heal your lips, it also aids in the prevention of dry and cracked lips.  The natural thin layer that beeswax creates keeps your lip protected from the elements, and keeps them moisturized too.

Within the realm of hair care products, beeswax can be used to create wonderful pomades and waxes.  The end result of its use will leave hair shiny and sleek.

For soap making purposes, beeswax adds elements of anti irritant, anti bacterial, and anti viral benefits.  It is an incredible ingredient to add extra moisturizing elements to your bars, which will leave your skin with a silky soft feel.  Plus, the effects are long lasting.

To read the full class on beeswax including some interesting beeswax facts, how beeswax is made, and additional uses, please click on this link.

To try your hand at some wonderful beeswax recipes please check out these links:

beeswax in body productsBody Products:
Solid Lotion Bar Recipe
Girly Girl Salve Recipe
Soothing Baby Non Petroleum Recipe
Hydrating Hand Stick Recipe
Rejuvenating Foot Balm Recipe
Natural Deodorant Recipe

beeswax in soapsSoaps, Scrubs, and Melts:
Royal Honey Bee Cold Process Soap Recipe
Cold Fashioned Lemonade Soap Recipe
Gourmet Chocolate Bath Melts Recipe
Lemon Lavender Bath Melts Recipe
Cotton Candy Emulsified Sugar Scrub Recipe
Emulsified Beet Sugar Scrub Recipe

beeswax in lip productsLip Products:
Lip Stick from Scratch Recipe
Natural Beet Root Lip Gloss Recipe
Silky Lip Butter Recipe
Strawberry Cheesecake Lip Balm Recipe
White Chocolate Lavender Lip Balm Recipe
Crazy for Coconuts Lip Balm Recipe

Candle Instructions

Monday, January 6th, 2014

triple layer candleCandle Instructions

Burning candles in your home can be very enjoyable.  Candles are relaxing, soothing, and can fill your home with the most pleasurable aromas.  But, since burning a candle does involve an open flame, you must always burn candles with caution.

Here are some candle instructions to ensure candle safety when burning a candle.

Where to Burn a Candle:

Some things to consider when selecting the right candle holder for your candle are the material it is made of, size, and design.  You want to make sure the candle holder is made of sturdy and heat resistant material that can endure the high heat that some candles may give off.  Size is another factor because you want to ensure that your candle holder is large enough to hold your candle and also to prevent your candle from tipping over anytime that it is lit.

Never place your candle on a surface that cannot withstand heat, these types of surfaces may become damaged if the candle becomes too hot, or the candle holder breaks.

Never move a lit candle.  If you need to move your candle once it has been lit, extinguish the flame and allow the wax to set up before attempting to move it.  If a candle has been burning for an extended period of time, the container will be hot.

Always burn candles where they are out of reach to children and pets.  A flame can be very captivating to a small child.  You also do not want to burn a candle where it can easily be knocked over by an excited dog’s tail, or places where indoor cats frequent.

Never burn a candle by any object that is flammable.  Never burn candles near paperwork; especially on desks.  Draperies can also easily catch fire so avoid window sills and end tables near windows.

Never burn candles where they will be left unattended.  You only want to leave candles lit where an adult is in the room to monitor it.  Also, before going to sleep, extinguish all candles in the house.  You will want to ensure that your wick is completely out and no longer “glowing”.  Never use candles as nightlights.

When burning candles, make sure they are placed somewhere away from drafts.  Be wary of burning a candle in a room that has a ceiling fan going; you want to place the burning candle where it will not be affected by the breeze.

When burning multiple candles in one room, make sure they are at least 3 inches apart.  This is especially true for pillar or votive candles.  Burning candles too close to one another may result in the candles melting one another.  This can also create a draft situation where your candles will flare.

If you are interested in viewing other tips and tricks of candle making, or the homemade candle making process, please click on this link.  Natures Garden also provides free recipes and classes for candle making.

Candle Burning

Friday, January 3rd, 2014

candle burn Candle Burning

Regardless of whether you are making candles for personal use, gifts, or to earn extra income; candles are flammable.  You always want to make sure that you have taken all the right measures to ensure the safest candle possible.  Not only is candle safety important to the crafter, but it is also just as important to the person that burns the candle.

Here are some great tips for burning candles, the best way to extinguish a candle, and what to do if your candle wax is on fire.

Candle Burning and Maintenance:

Always before lighting your candle; trim the wick!  You never want your wick to be longer than ¼ inch.  Also, when lighting your candle, do not throw the wick trimming into the candle.  You want to keep your candle free of any and all debris such as:  dust, wick trimmings, matches, ect.  You want your candle pool to be scented wax only.

Keep your wick straight.  Once your wick has been trimmed, you will want to pull it straight.  If your wick is bent, your wick will burn hotter than regular.  This will result in a quicker burn time of your candle.

When it is time to extinguish your candle, always use a snuffer.  A candle snuffer is the easiest and safest way to put out a flame.  Using a snuffer will prevent hot wax splatter.  Candle wax is hot, you never want to touch it, or get wax splatter on you or surfaces in your home.

Never put a candle flame out with water.  Water can cause the hot wax in your candles to splatter.  There is also a chance that the glass container of your candle may also break.

If after lighting your candle, you notice the wick flickering, smoking, or the flame of your candle becomes too large; the candle is not functioning properly.  Extinguish the flame, let the candle cool, trim your wick to ¼ inch, check the rooms for drafts, and then re-light.

After a candle has been burned to the point where there is only 1/2 inch of wax left in the bottom of the container, stop burning.  The candle is now finished.  Never burn a candle all the way down.

For Candle Making Purposes: 

For your candle making area, it is wise to purchase a dry chemical fire extinguisher in case of any fires.  If you do have a wax fire, the dry chemical extinguisher or baking soda should be used to suffocate the flames.  Never use water to put out a wax fire.

Oil in Candle

Thursday, January 2nd, 2014

candle making questionsCandle Making Questions:

Why is there excess oil in candle?  Sometimes when making candles, your finished product may have excess oil in it.   This oil slick may be along the edges, on the top, or at the bottom of your candle.  This oil is actually fragrance oil.  Excess fragrance oil in the candle containers is a tell tale sign that too much fragrance oil was used in the candle making process.

How to Solve It!  Sticking to the recommended usage suggestion for fragrance oil per type of wax is the smartest move, especially if you are new to candle making.  Another early warning sign to prevent oil in your finished candle happens during the pour steps.  When pouring the wax into the containers, if you notice an “oil slick” in the bottom of your pouring pot, stop the pour before the oil comes out.  If there is any leftover fragrance oil that the wax did not absorb initially, the wax will not absorb it in your container either.

To view other candle making questions and common troubleshooting tips for candle making, please click on this link to see the full Natures Garden’s Common Candle Making Mistakes Guide.

Gel Wax

Thursday, December 19th, 2013

Natures Garden Gel WaxThere are many different kinds of candle waxes available in the industry; gel wax stands out for some of its own very unique reasons.

What is Gel Wax

Consisting of 95% mineral oil and 5% polymer resin, gel wax is a rubbery and clear mixture.  The polymer resin is used to thicken the mineral oil to add the properties true to gel wax; long burn time and clear look.  This wax, unique in its form; is able to extend burn time by double (compared to paraffin).  That is one of the biggest selling points to gel wax.  Just as important is the special aesthetic aspect to gel wax; its transparency.

Candles crafters that work with gel wax are able to manipulate it by embedding, shaping, and pairing the wax to achieve specific looks.  Some of the more popular finished products of these techniques would be sand candles, fruit pie candles, or beverage candles.

Embeds are inserts that are positioned into the gel wax before it completely solidifies.  These non flammable items are then suspended in the hardened wax.  This gives gel wax candles a very rare look.  Some examples of embeds you can use in this wax would be: sea shells, glass or wax embeds, or glitter. Never use plastic embeds for gel wax candles.

Another notable advantage of working with gel wax is how forgiving it is.  Any corrections that you want to touch up in the finished candle can be done.  It is as simple as remelting, rescenting, recoloring, and repouring.

How to Melt Gel Wax

The process of melting gel is slightly different than your other waxes.  With this one, there is no specific temperature to heat in order to liquefy.  This wax, as it melts; only thins.  Stirring is key with gel wax.

It is also important to keep a watchful eye on gel wax as it thins.  Stirring frequently and monitoring will ensure the correct melting process.  Gel wax does not thin quicker by heating at a higher temperature; gel wax will only smoke.

Tips on Gel Candles

Never try to move a gel wax candle while it is burning or was just lit.  Liquid gel wax is extremely hot and will cause severe burns if splashed onto the skin.

The top layer of a gel wax candle is very sticky.  This is just the nature of gel wax.  You always want to keep your gel wax candle cover in between uses.   This will prevent the wax from collecting dust and debris on that sticky layer.

Gel wax is strictly a container wax.  Due to its makeup, the wax is not strong enough to be a pillar wax.  This should be noted especially for shipping and storage reasons.  If your candle is placed on its side or upside down, the wax will start to slide/pour out.

If you are interested in making a gel wax Beer Candle, click on this link; if you would like to try a gel wax Wine Candle, click on this link.  There are many other homemade recipes that can be found at Natures Garden’s Free Recipes and Classes area of their website.

No Candle Scent?

Monday, December 16th, 2013

Candle waxesWhen it comes to candle scent, there are only two kinds.  The hot throw of a candle, and the cold throw.

The hot throw in candles is when the wick of the candle has been lit.  The aroma of a well made candle will fill a averaged sized room fairly quickly.  This scented aroma will linger the whole time the candle remains lit.  This is the fragrance oil being released into the air from the wax that is heated by the lit wick.

On the end of the spectrum and not requiring any heat is the cold scent throw.  This is the scent a candle gives off when it is just sitting there unlit.  Cold throw is very important in candles because it is the first impression that a person gets on how the candle is going to smell.  This aroma is solely based off the fragrances aromatic quality in the wax.   

Why does my candle not smell?

The best way to guarantee that you are producing a high quality candle is to know you have good quality supplies.   There is a lot of various fragrance or scent suppliers in the market, buying from a reputable supply company ensures your candles are high quality, provide strong hot and cold throw, as well as a clean burn.  All three qualities mentioned are expectations for candles.

It is possible that a fragrance that is very evident in the cold throw of a candle will not perform the in the hot throw of the candle (this is known to occur in soy wax).  Using an additive like vybar will help to extend the scent throw.   However, if using vybar be careful not to add too much.

In the candle making process, never leave your wax on the heat source longer than needed.  Once the color and scent have been added to the wax, pay attention for when it is time to pour.  Leaving scented and melted wax on the heat source too long can burn off notes in the fragrance oil prematurely.  This lack of notes has a direct effect on your candles smell.  You especially do not want to risk this happening to your candle wax if you are using lighter fragrance oils with low flashpoints like citruses for example.

When making candles with veggie waxes such as soy wax, you will need to use a hotter burning wick to allow fragrance to travel up the wick and escape into the air.  You may also want to consider “wicking-up” when you are making candles with fragrance that contains heavy base notes.

How to Solve It!

Before you buy from an online supplier check out their credentials; you can easily do this by reading the customer reviews on their website and their social media pages.  There you will be able to find out a lot about a company.  Lastly, candle making forums are also a great way to see if a company is reputable and has good quality products, fast shipping, and customer service.

For most fragrance oils, in order to get the best hot and cold throw in a candle you use 1  to 1.5 ounces of fragrance oil per pound of wax.  If you have decided to use vybar to help increase scent throw, only add ½ tsp for every pound of wax.  Also, adding more than the recommended amount of vybar to your wax may bind your scent without allowing the wax to release it properly, so do not overdo it.

A key step to remember in the candle making process is to pour your candle wax immediately once it has been scented and mixed, or hit the proper temperature.  Using additional heat once the melted wax has been scented will allow for some of the fragrance oil to evaporate into the air releasing aromatic components of the fragrance oil before their time.  This will permanently alter the way the fragrance oil will smell in your lit candle, and may be the reason why the candle has no smell at all.

Remember, when you are making candles with veggie waxes, or you are using fragrances with heavy base notes like musk, amber, patchouli, vanilla, woods, you will want to use a bigger, hotter-burning wick.