Category Archives: candle supplies

Mar
11

Country Bumpkin Fragrance Oil


This entry was posted in candle scents, candle supplies, cold process soap scents, fragrance oil spotlight, Fragrance Oils, fragrances, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Country Bumpkin Fragrance OilCountry Bumpkin Fragrance Oil– Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Country Bumpkin Fragrance Oil is not only a Nature’s Garden original scent, but it’s a bestseller as well! Which makes a lot of  sense, because this delicious fragrance is decadent enough to get my mouth watering. It has me wishing for the taste of those warm apples fresh from the orchard and smothered in warm, gooey goodness in a place where nothing matters, but good times, great food, and a beautiful scenery.

What Does Country Bumpkin Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

This fragrance oil by Natures Garden is a wonderful complex blend of apples, candied yams, marshmallows, sweet cream butter, brown sugar, nutmeg, crushed cinnamon bark and fresh cloves.  Bring the country home to you.  An NG Original!  A Best Seller!

Top Notes: apples
Mid Notes:  candied yams, cinnamon bark, clove, nutmeg
Base Notes:  marshmallow, sweet cream butter, brown sugar

How Do Our Customers Use Country Bumpkin Fragrance Oil?

Candle crafters can use up to 10% in either vegetable of paraffin wax. This fragrance has shown to perform perfectly in joy wax and wow wax. Also, it is nice and strong in soy wax. For this scent we suggest using four drops of orange plus one drop of brown liquid candle dye per four pounds of wax or shred a small amount of an orange color block and brown color block into your melted wax. Make sure not to use crayons to color your candles as they will clog your wick.

Room scenters can include up to 50% of this fragrance oil in potpourri and incense. Also, this scent is nice and strong in aroma beads. However, gel wax is not compatible with this scent.

If you intend to create bath and body products, then please note that the body safe percentage is lower for our Country Bumpkin fragrance oil. Bath gels, bath oils, and lotions can have a maximum of 0.05% to be considered body safe. Perfumes have performed perfectly with 0.05% of this fragrance. Also, cleaners can be created using the body safe percentage of 0.05%.

Homemade soap crafters can also use 0.05% at the absolute most. Although you are able to incorporate 0.05% of this fragrance into cold process soap, we did not test this fragrance due to its low body safe percentage. Since this fragrance is so popular, I’d like to mention that just because we didn’t test this bar doesn’t mean you can’t use this spicy scent if you enjoy it. You may want to do a test batch before you commit to a large batch to make sure the bar turns out right for you. We are unsure whether this bar would discolor. If the 1% vanillin content does discolor the bar at all, then you can try to use vanilla white stabilizer to counter act its effect. We recommend using orange soap colorant and brown soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you. Remember that you should never use candle dye in any body products as they are not body safe.

So, why not take a little break to make yourself something great and indulge in a delectable scent?

Dec
23

How to Color Candles


This entry was posted in candle dye, candle making, candle making supplies, candle supplies, candles, color blocks, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

how to color candlesHow to Color Candles

Hi everyone! Are you just starting out making your own candles? Wondering how to color candles? Here at Nature’s Garden, we actually have many wonderful products that are used specifically for the candle coloring process. We offer only the best candle coloring products out there, with each item having its own vibrant personality! We offer so many different dye products, each having their own different specifications when used in your candles. We have liquid candle dye options as well as color block dye. We even have mica dust that you can sprinkle on the outside of you pillar candles to give them the effect of sparkling!

For liquid candle dyes, we offer various Spectrum Liquid Candle Dyes ranging in color. The colors of liquid dyes we offer here at Nature’s Garden are brown, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, black, burgundy, purple, and teal. (However, when using these liquid dyes, please just note that they are very concentrated!) To use the liquid dyes, just put a few drops of the liquid into your melted wax.  If you are in the mood for more of a pastel color (or if you are doing a very small batch) for your candle, all you have to do to the dye is dilute it using vegetable oil with the ratio of 1:1. Be careful with the amount of dye you use as well. When you use liquid dye, it allows you to create more consistent coloring in your candles since you count how any drops are put in. But be careful not use more than 10 drops per pound of wax, or else your candles may have a chemical smell to them.

For our color block dyes, the colors we offer are red, burgundy, yellow, blue, green, purple, brown, cinnamon, teal, cranberry, and a coral/peach. To use a color block to color your candle, simply shave off the desired amount and place it into your melted wax.  One color block is actually enough to easily deeply dye 15 pounds of wax. When using color blocks, they actually do not produce colors as vibrant as the liquid dyes, so they are better when trying to attain more subtle colors. However, when using color blocks, make sure that the block is fully incorporated before pouring your candle! They can tend to produce little specks of colors on the bottoms of your candles if they are not fully melted and mixed into the wax.

Want to give your pillar some sparkle to bling it up a little bit? Use some of our Gold Pigment Mica or our Diamond Dust Mica to dust the outside of your pillars! This will give your pillars a beautiful shimmer! Have you ever thoughts of using crayons to color your candles? Well, please don’t! Using crayons for coloring can actually cause the candle to start smoking and may even clog your wicks! Crayons are not alone in this predicament. When dying your candles, be sure not to use too much color as this can cause the wick to become clogged and it may cause your candle to smoke more than it should be. It can even inhibit the throw of your chosen scent and reduce the melt pool of the candle. Candle dyes are not for cosmetic use either! Check out all of our free recipes and classes, we offer many free candle recipes, and even a Candle Coloring Class that tells all about our candle coloring products! If you click on candle supplies then candle colorants on our website, that will show you all of the candle colorants we offer. Our Candle Coloring class even tells how to mix your own colors to achieve the colors you want. Enjoy these wonderful products and watch out for more Enlightened by Layla!

 

enlightened-by-layla (1)

Sep
06

Breaking Into the Candle Making Business


This entry was posted in candle company advice, candle fragrance oils, candle making supplies, candle recipe, candle supplies, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

joy wax kit

Breaking Into the Candle Making Business

Hello again everyone! For all you new crafters out there, are you looking for an easy way to get yourself into the candle business? Or maybe you’re a recent college graduate looking to get into candle making on the side as a way to help pay off those hefty loans? Well here at Nature’s Garden, we are always trying our best to make everything as easy as possible for our customers! We want all of you to be able to let your creativity shine, not just sitting at your computer wondering how in the world to get started.

First, let me explain a little bit about how our website works to make it all the more easier for you. On the top left corner of our homepage, it says Candle Supplies. Go to Candle Supplies and that will show you the categories for all of our candle making supplies. One of the easiest ways for beginners to break into the business is by purchasing our candle making kits. Candle Making Kits is one of the categories included in Candle Supplies. Almost if not all of the products you will need and a complete set of instructions are included in each kit. How awesome is that?! Our goal is to do whatever it takes to help you succeed in your business, and it doesn’t get any easier than complete kits! You also have the option to go through all of the categories in Candle Supplies and purchase all of the items separately from each other.

Now it’s time to get down to business and start making those candles, people! If you scroll down a little bit on our Homepage, you will see a section that is titled Free Support. There we offer FREE candle making classes as well as a free candle making manual that Debbie wrote herself! If you did not purchase a kit and bought your products separately, we offer free candle making recipes as well! There is plenty of variety there, from Christmas candle recipes to animal print candle recipes. We want you to be successful at any and everything! On top of all that awesomeness, we also offer free marketing help! While you are starting your business, you should definitely take the time to check that out!

When you feel you are ready to begin selling your candles, please don’t hesitate to come to us with any questions you may have! I hope that everything on our site has made it easy as pie to help you start your own business! Or if you’re that recent grad I talked about earlier, it is such an easy and fun way to help you make extra cash to start paying off those loans! We feel you are a huge part of our family, which is why at Nature’s Garden we specifically sell ingredients only because we want our customers to be successful in selling their finished product. See how easy it is to break into the candle making business? Easy as 1, 2, 3! If you want to get started right this moment, make sure to check out those candle making kits first! And don’t forget to keep checking the blog for more Enlightened by Layla postings!

enlightened-by-layla (1)

Mar
13

Soy Candle Recipe


This entry was posted in candle colorants, candle dye, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle recipe, candle scents, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, candles, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

how to make a soy candle Soy candles always seem to be the craze.  The soy wax 415 that Natures Garden carries is a 100% all natural vegetable wax.  This also means that this soy wax is biodegradable, and is made from a renewable resource.  When used to make candles; soy wax provides a nice, clean and long burn.

For this recipe, we have figured everything out for you (measurements, temperatures, color, and scent).  We are also presenting it to you in an easy to follow step by step form (with photos).  This recipe will make (1) 16oz apothecary jar candle.

Your finished soy candle will be colored in a light red hue, and scented in with a matching apple orchard fragrance.

We will be double wicking our apothecary jar with (2) CD-10 wicks.  This wicking will provide the candle with a nice hot burn, and allow the scent to travel nicely through the wick; guaranteeing a wonderful hot scent throw.

Besides the ingredients hyper linked above, you will also need some other candle making equipment.  This includes: Thermometer, POURING POT, Warning Labels, Glass Apothecary Jar (16oz), Hot Glue Gun with Gun, Scale, Pot, A cookie sheet, and a Stirring Spoon.

Now, normally prior to making a soy wax candle, you must first check the flashpoint of the scent.  This is important because the flashpoint will indicate the temperature at which you will add the fragrance oil.  However, for this recipe, we have already figured out this information.  Apple Orchard has a flashpoint of 155 degrees Fahrenheit.  What this means is that the temperature at which we will be adding the fragrance oil to the soy wax is 155 degrees Fahrenheit.  Our rule of thumb is:  If a fragrance flash point is below 130F, then add it to wax at 130F.  If the fragrance oil flash point is between 130-185F, then add the fragrance to the wax at its flash point.  If a fragrance oil has a flash point above 185F, then add the fragrance to the wax at 185F.

So now, before we get started making our soy candle; it is important to get all of the supplies and equipment ready that we will be using.  Most of these supplies can be purchased at Natures Garden.  Once you have all of this ready to go; lets get started!

supplies for making a soy candle

Step 1:  Get your pot.  Into the pot, place several inches of tap water.  Next you are going to put the pot on to the stove top and set the heat setting on medium.

prepping for double boiler method

Step 2:  Now get your pouring pot.  Inside the pot, weigh out 440 grams of the 100% soy wax flakes.  Once you have the amount, place the pouring pot into the water pot.  This will be how we melt the soy flakes.  This process is known as the double boiler method.

the double boiler process

Step 3:  Set your oven to 170 degrees Fahrenheit.  Next, place your apothecary jar on your cookie sheet.  Then, place the cookie sheet inside the oven.  Allow the jar to warm for 10-15 minutes, then remove.  Also, plug in your hot glue gun now.

warming your apothecary jar

Step 4:  Now, place your thermometer into the wax.  This is important because you will want to monitor the temperature of the wax while it is melting.  Never let the temperature go higher than 200 degrees Fahrenheit.  This will burn and discolor the wax.  As the wax melts, stir it occasionally.  Also, keeping melting until all the wax is in a liquid state.

melting soy wax

Step 5:  Once the wax is all melted, remove it from heat.  When the temperature reaches 185 degrees Fahrenheit, add the 4 drops of Spectrum Red Candle Dye.  Stir.

coloring soy wax

Step 6:  After the wax has been colored, check your temperature again.  When the temperature reaches 155 degrees Fahrenheit, add your 35 grams of Apple Orchard fragrance oil.  Stir again for a full 2 minutes.  This thorough stir will help the wax, fragrance, and color adhere.  Then, place your thermometer back into the wax.

scenting the soy wax

Step 7:  Next, grab your hot glue gun and place a small amount of glue on the bottom of your wick tabs.  Then, center and secure your candle wicks.

center and secure your wicks

Step 8:  Now, stick your warning label to the bottom of your jar.

applying your warning label

Step 9:  Check the temperature of the wax, you will be looking for it to reach 110 degrees Fahrenheit.  Once it does, give your wax one final stir.

checking for the pour temp
Step 10:  Then, slowly start to pour your candle.  You will want to stop your pour once the wax reaches where the jar changes shape.  Then, straighten your wicks.

pouring your soy candle
Step 11: 
Now, allow your candle to fully set up undisturbed.

allowing your candle to set up

Step 12:  Once the candle has hardened, trim your wicks, and lid your jar.  Allow your candle to cure for 24-48 hours.

Congratulations, you just made a soy candle.  Your 100% Soy Wax Candle is now finished and ready to burn.  Enjoy the sweet apple scent that will fill your home and make your house smell good!

Feb
07

Homemade Zebra Candle


This entry was posted in candle colorants, candle dye, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle recipe, candle scents, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, creative, Fragrance Oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

make your own zebra candleHow to make your very own homemade Zebra Candle!

This easy to make project is even fun to create.  Besides the standard candle making supplies such as: soy wax, wicks, scent, color, and jars; you will also need beeswax.  We will be using the beeswax to make the zebra stripes in the candle.  Because of the pliability of beeswax, it has the capability of being shaped easily into stripes.  Plus, due to the high melt point it has, beeswax can withstand a pour of another wax (soy), as long as the temperature isn’t too extreme.

Although for this project, the scent that was selected was Hot Pink Pomegranate Fragrance Oil, when you make your own zebra candle you can scent it to your pleasing.  The same is true for the candle color.  Since our fragrance oil has the name hot pink in it, the decision was made to make the zebra candle stripes pink on a white (or uncolored) background.

To see the full list of possible candle scents, please click on this link.  There are over 800 different fragrances to choose from!

Here are your total recipe weights to make (2) 16oz. Zebra Candles:
190 grams beeswax
2 drops candle dye (if making the candle like pictured)
About 4 oz.  of candle scent
1100 grams of soy wax (Golden Foods 444 soy wax)

Other items that you will need for this recipe are:
wax paper
pencil
knife
9×13 cake pan
2- 16 oz candle jars
4 wicks (we used 2- cd10 wicks per candle)
scale
2 pots (for double boiler method)
stirring spoon
cutting board
thermometer

Below are the steps to make your very own zebra candle (pictures included):

Step 1:  Using the double boiler method, weigh out and melt 190 grams of beeswax.  You will want to set the temperature of your stove top between medium and low heat while melting.  Stir the beeswax occasionally as it melts.

steps to make a zebra candle

Step 2:   This step is the colorant of your zebra stripes:  Once the beeswax is melted, now you will add 2 drops of your candle colorant, and stir.  Once you are done, place your pouring pot back into the heat source.

color for the zebra candle

Step 3:  To make the zebra stripes, you will need to concentrate your beeswax in a portion of the area in your cake pan.  To do this, lay out your cake pan on a flat surface.  Next, roughly measure out at least 9 inches in length.  Hold this place by setting your knife across the pan.  Finally, lay the wax paper over the cake pan and knife.  Carefully, tuck the corners of the wax paper down.

how to make zebra stripes

Step 4:  Now it is time to scent your beeswax:  Remove your beeswax from the heat source.  Weigh out about 19 grams of your candle fragrance oil.  Then, add the fragrance and stir to incorporate it throughout the wax.

zebra candle scent

Step 5:  Now, take your beeswax and slowly start to pour it over the flat portion of the wax paper.  Allow this to fully set up.  Do not try to rush this step.  Cooling beeswax too quickly, may cause it to crack!

making the zebra candle stripes

Step 6:  Once the beeswax has hardened, and is cool to the touch; gently remove it from the cake pan.  Carefully stand the square on one end and starting in one corner, peel away the wax paper.  Then, place the beeswax on your cutting board.  Finally, cut off any jagged edges using your knife.

zebra candle recipe

Step 7:  For the background of your zebra candle, you will be using soy wax.  In order to have enough wax for 2 candles, weigh out and melt 1100 grams of soy wax.  Melt this wax using the double boiler method.  While the wax is melting, stir occasionally.

soy wax zebra candle

Step 8:  You will create the zebra stripe pattern using the tip of a pencil.  Trace this lightly into the beeswax.  The shape that you will want to draw will be various sized long and irregular lines similar to tree branches.  When you are finished, cut these lines out.

making zebra stripes in beeswax

Step 9:  Once you have a few of your stripes cut out, carefully begin to place them individually against the inside wall of your candle jar.  It is best to start at the bottom of your jar and work in an angular direction.  Apply slight and even pressure until the stripes stick.  Repeat this step until you have the zebra design you are looking for.  Then, do it again for your second candle.

zebra candle pattern

Step 10:  Center and secure your wicks to the bottom of your candle jars.  Then, set aside.

centering your wicks

Step 11:  When your soy wax is in a completely liquid state, remove it from the heat source.  If you are adding color to the background of the zebra candle, do this now.  Then, add 110 grams of fragrance Oil.  Stir again.

Step 12:  Using your thermometer, wait until the soy wax reaches 115 degrees Fahrenheit; this temperature will not melt your zebra stripes.  Pour the soy wax into your candle jars.  Don’t forget to straighten your wicks. Allow the candles to fully set up undisturbed.

pouring a zebra candle

Now it is time to celebrate, your Zebra candles are now ready to use.  Simply trim your wick, light, and enjoy your new awesome candle.

Feb
04

Beeswax Candles


This entry was posted in Air Fresheners, all natural, beeswax, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making questions, candle making supplies, candle supplies, candle wax, candles, cleansing, homemade candles, make candles, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

beeswax candles
Air Purifying Candles

Many people burn candles as a way of relaxing with a soft light, or too add subtle scenting to the air, or as a means of setting the mood.  But, burning a beeswax candle may actually do more than this.

Let’s get a little scientific
The air that surrounds us is positively charged.  In fact, many of the items in our own homes emit a plethora of additional positively charged ions; jam packing our already filled surroundings with more and more positively charged ions.  But, all of these positively charged ions are not good for us. Recalling any lightning storm you have experienced, you will better understand this explanation.  Generally, after one of these storms, people feel stimulated, rejuvenated, and replenished.  The reason for this is that electrical storms produce a superabundance of negative ions that actually balance out the positive ions that dominate our surroundings.  This is why some of the most relaxing and renewed places for our bodies are be by waterfalls, beaches, forests, and mountain scenes.  These types of landscapes provide extra negative ions in the air that restore a natural balance of the charged ions.  Not only can you smell the difference in the air, but you can also feel it in your body too.

Positive Ions in our Homes
Many of the pollutants floating in the air of our homes like pollen, dirt, and dust all have a positive charge.  They get this charge from the static electricity that occurs in our home from daily routines.  Introducing negative ions into the air; combats these allergens. It has actually been scientifically proven to reduce many allergic issues like hay fever and asthma.  Negative ions can even help you sleep better too. Harmonizing the ions in your surrounding can help make you feel healthier and actually distress you.  Releasing additional negative ions can help with depression (SAD), headaches, and can even help you stay focused. Negatively charged ions work to make you healthier too.  Negative ions can help to boost your body’s immunity as well as help to build a resistance to many illnesses. Your body’s metabolism also benefits from negative ions making it more efficient.

Introduction of Negative Ions to our Homes
Beeswax can be considered an air purifier.  Beeswax candles are the only candles that emit negative ions into the air when lit.  Since opposites attract; these negative ions attach themselves to the positive ones.  This therefore balances the charge. Once the ions are bound together, the charge is now neutralized, and the molecule is complete.  The heavier mass causes these ions to fall to the ground, and they are no longer suspended in the air as contaminants.  This process of stabilizing, removes the ions, and cleans the air we breathe. The negative ions emitted by beeswax candles can even clean the air to eliminate smells like second hand smoke and many common household odors. Beeswax candles can be scented and colored just like other candle waxes.  Beeswax candles produce very little soot and burn very slowly.  These candles will provide your home with hours of purer, crisper, and fresher quality air.

Attention:  Natures Garden provides this information for educational purposes only.  We do not intend for this information to be misconstrued as medical advice or for treatment of any ailments.  If selling beeswax candles, refrain from making medical claims on your labels and/or advertising.   Promoting this way could make your candles considered a “drug” by the FDA.

Jan
06

Candle Instructions


This entry was posted in candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making questions, candle making supplies, candle scents, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, candles, Fragrance Oils, homemade candles, how does a candle burn, make candles, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

triple layer candleCandle Instructions

Burning candles in your home can be very enjoyable.  Candles are relaxing, soothing, and can fill your home with the most pleasurable aromas.  But, since burning a candle does involve an open flame, you must always burn candles with caution.

Here are some candle instructions to ensure candle safety when burning a candle.

Where to Burn a Candle:

Some things to consider when selecting the right candle holder for your candle are the material it is made of, size, and design.  You want to make sure the candle holder is made of sturdy and heat resistant material that can endure the high heat that some candles may give off.  Size is another factor because you want to ensure that your candle holder is large enough to hold your candle and also to prevent your candle from tipping over anytime that it is lit.

Never place your candle on a surface that cannot withstand heat, these types of surfaces may become damaged if the candle becomes too hot, or the candle holder breaks.

Never move a lit candle.  If you need to move your candle once it has been lit, extinguish the flame and allow the wax to set up before attempting to move it.  If a candle has been burning for an extended period of time, the container will be hot.

Always burn candles where they are out of reach to children and pets.  A flame can be very captivating to a small child.  You also do not want to burn a candle where it can easily be knocked over by an excited dog’s tail, or places where indoor cats frequent.

Never burn a candle by any object that is flammable.  Never burn candles near paperwork; especially on desks.  Draperies can also easily catch fire so avoid window sills and end tables near windows.

Never burn candles where they will be left unattended.  You only want to leave candles lit where an adult is in the room to monitor it.  Also, before going to sleep, extinguish all candles in the house.  You will want to ensure that your wick is completely out and no longer “glowing”.  Never use candles as nightlights.

When burning candles, make sure they are placed somewhere away from drafts.  Be wary of burning a candle in a room that has a ceiling fan going; you want to place the burning candle where it will not be affected by the breeze.

When burning multiple candles in one room, make sure they are at least 3 inches apart.  This is especially true for pillar or votive candles.  Burning candles too close to one another may result in the candles melting one another.  This can also create a draft situation where your candles will flare.

If you are interested in viewing other tips and tricks of candle making, or the homemade candle making process, please click on this link.  Natures Garden also provides free recipes and classes for candle making.

Jan
03

Candle Burning


This entry was posted in candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making questions, candle making supplies, candle scents, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

candle burn Candle Burning

Regardless of whether you are making candles for personal use, gifts, or to earn extra income; candles are flammable.  You always want to make sure that you have taken all the right measures to ensure the safest candle possible.  Not only is candle safety important to the crafter, but it is also just as important to the person that burns the candle.

Here are some great tips for burning candles, the best way to extinguish a candle, and what to do if your candle wax is on fire.

Candle Burning and Maintenance:

Always before lighting your candle; trim the wick!  You never want your wick to be longer than ¼ inch.  Also, when lighting your candle, do not throw the wick trimming into the candle.  You want to keep your candle free of any and all debris such as:  dust, wick trimmings, matches, ect.  You want your candle pool to be scented wax only.

Keep your wick straight.  Once your wick has been trimmed, you will want to pull it straight.  If your wick is bent, your wick will burn hotter than regular.  This will result in a quicker burn time of your candle.

When it is time to extinguish your candle, always use a snuffer.  A candle snuffer is the easiest and safest way to put out a flame.  Using a snuffer will prevent hot wax splatter.  Candle wax is hot, you never want to touch it, or get wax splatter on you or surfaces in your home.

Never put a candle flame out with water.  Water can cause the hot wax in your candles to splatter.  There is also a chance that the glass container of your candle may also break.

If after lighting your candle, you notice the wick flickering, smoking, or the flame of your candle becomes too large; the candle is not functioning properly.  Extinguish the flame, let the candle cool, trim your wick to ¼ inch, check the rooms for drafts, and then re-light.

After a candle has been burned to the point where there is only 1/2 inch of wax left in the bottom of the container, stop burning.  The candle is now finished.  Never burn a candle all the way down.

For Candle Making Purposes: 

For your candle making area, it is wise to purchase a dry chemical fire extinguisher in case of any fires.  If you do have a wax fire, the dry chemical extinguisher or baking soda should be used to suffocate the flames.  Never use water to put out a wax fire.

Jan
02

Oil in Candle


This entry was posted in candle making, candle making questions, candle making supplies, candle scents, candle supplies, candle wax, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

candle making questionsCandle Making Questions:

Why is there excess oil in candle?  Sometimes when making candles, your finished product may have excess oil in it.   This oil slick may be along the edges, on the top, or at the bottom of your candle.  This oil is actually fragrance oil.  Excess fragrance oil in the candle containers is a tell tale sign that too much fragrance oil was used in the candle making process.

How to Solve It!  Sticking to the recommended usage suggestion for fragrance oil per type of wax is the smartest move, especially if you are new to candle making.  Another early warning sign to prevent oil in your finished candle happens during the pour steps.  When pouring the wax into the containers, if you notice an “oil slick” in the bottom of your pouring pot, stop the pour before the oil comes out.  If there is any leftover fragrance oil that the wax did not absorb initially, the wax will not absorb it in your container either.

To view other candle making questions and common troubleshooting tips for candle making, please click on this link to see the full Natures Garden’s Common Candle Making Mistakes Guide.

Dec
11

Candle Wax Tips


This entry was posted in candle additives, candle making, candle making supplies, candle supplies, candle wax, candles, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , on by .

soy wax candlesThe type of wax that you select for candle making is very important to your end product.  Wax has a direct affect on the overall quality of the finished candle.  This is the secret to making the perfect candle; you have to have a good, high quality wax.  The novice belief in candle making is that as long as they add more fragrance, it can compensate for a lower quality wax, and still produce a strong candle.  This is absolutely not true.

To help you understand the importance of wax in candles, let’s think of wax as a sponge and fragrance as water.   Sponges are very porous.  And, when you pour water over a sponge, the sponge fills each pore with water.  The sponge will swell as it fills.  However, as you will notice eventually when the sponge is filled, it can no longer hold any more water.  What then results is an overflow of water and the water will start leaking out from the sponge.  The same concept is true for wax.  Once the pores of the wax have been filled with their maximum capacity of fragrance oil, any additional fragrance oil that is added will settle out of the wax.

What you are left with in this scenario is wasted fragrance oil in the bottom of your pouring pot and a candle that is possibly a fire hazard.  You should never use more than 1.5 ounces of fragrance oil per pound of wax.  Adding additional scent to your candle wax will not increase your scent, instead it is nothing but money down the drain.  That is why the quality of wax that you select for your candle making endeavor is so important.

Pre-blended waxes

Yes, it is true that there are a variety of wax additives that you can include in your candle recipe to manipulate certain qualities in your candles.  But, in our experience, we have found that purchasing a pre-blended candle wax that already includes these additives is the best route to go.  Not only are you saving time, money, and the hassle of testing, but your end product will be exactly what you are looking for in a candle.  Analyzing it, by the time you purchase all of the extra ingredients you need to make a low quality wax into a high quality wax, you will spend more money than if you just purchase the high quality pre-blended wax (like JOY wax) to begin your candle making venture.  Not to mention all the time you just saved yourself too.

Temperature

Another key factor to remember in candle making is that temperature is extremely important.  Anytime that you are working with wax, it is crucial to know the directions for use.  The temperature of waxes varies according to the wax you are using.  And, in candle making temperatures are vital to the process.  Never heat any of your waxes above 250 degrees Fahrenheit.  On a molecular level, heating wax to this extreme temperature will start to break down the wax on a molecular level.  You will also notice if you get wax too hot (above the instructed degrees) the wax may burn, resulting in discoloration of the wax, as well as a burnt smell.  If this does occur, the wax is done.  It cannot be used for candle making any longer.  DO NOT attempt to scent the wax, or over scent the wax to compensate for the burnt smell.