Archive for the ‘candle recipe’ Category

Soy Candle Recipe

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

how to make a soy candle Soy candles always seem to be the craze.  The soy wax 415 that Natures Garden carries is a 100% all natural vegetable wax.  This also means that this soy wax is biodegradable, and is made from a renewable resource.  When used to make candles; soy wax provides a nice, clean and long burn.

For this recipe, we have figured everything out for you (measurements, temperatures, color, and scent).  We are also presenting it to you in an easy to follow step by step form (with photos).  This recipe will make (1) 16oz apothecary jar candle.

Your finished soy candle will be colored in a light red hue, and scented in with a matching apple orchard fragrance.

We will be double wicking our apothecary jar with (2) CD-10 wicks.  This wicking will provide the candle with a nice hot burn, and allow the scent to travel nicely through the wick; guaranteeing a wonderful hot scent throw.

Besides the ingredients hyper linked above, you will also need some other candle making equipment.  This includes: Thermometer, POURING POT, Warning Labels, Glass Apothecary Jar (16oz), Hot Glue Gun with Gun, Scale, Pot, A cookie sheet, and a Stirring Spoon.

Now, normally prior to making a soy wax candle, you must first check the flashpoint of the scent.  This is important because the flashpoint will indicate the temperature at which you will add the fragrance oil.  However, for this recipe, we have already figured out this information.  Apple Orchard has a flashpoint of 155 degrees Fahrenheit.  What this means is that the temperature at which we will be adding the fragrance oil to the soy wax is 155 degrees Fahrenheit.  Our rule of thumb is:  If a fragrance flash point is below 130F, then add it to wax at 130F.  If the fragrance oil flash point is between 130-185F, then add the fragrance to the wax at its flash point.  If a fragrance oil has a flash point above 185F, then add the fragrance to the wax at 185F.

So now, before we get started making our soy candle; it is important to get all of the supplies and equipment ready that we will be using.  Most of these supplies can be purchased at Natures Garden.  Once you have all of this ready to go; lets get started!

supplies for making a soy candle

Step 1:  Get your pot.  Into the pot, place several inches of tap water.  Next you are going to put the pot on to the stove top and set the heat setting on medium.

prepping for double boiler method

Step 2:  Now get your pouring pot.  Inside the pot, weigh out 440 grams of the 100% soy wax flakes.  Once you have the amount, place the pouring pot into the water pot.  This will be how we melt the soy flakes.  This process is known as the double boiler method.

the double boiler process

Step 3:  Set your oven to 170 degrees Fahrenheit.  Next, place your apothecary jar on your cookie sheet.  Then, place the cookie sheet inside the oven.  Allow the jar to warm for 10-15 minutes, then remove.  Also, plug in your hot glue gun now.

warming your apothecary jar

Step 4:  Now, place your thermometer into the wax.  This is important because you will want to monitor the temperature of the wax while it is melting.  Never let the temperature go higher than 200 degrees Fahrenheit.  This will burn and discolor the wax.  As the wax melts, stir it occasionally.  Also, keeping melting until all the wax is in a liquid state.

melting soy wax

Step 5:  Once the wax is all melted, remove it from heat.  When the temperature reaches 185 degrees Fahrenheit, add the 4 drops of Spectrum Red Candle Dye.  Stir.

coloring soy wax

Step 6:  After the wax has been colored, check your temperature again.  When the temperature reaches 155 degrees Fahrenheit, add your 35 grams of Apple Orchard fragrance oil.  Stir again for a full 2 minutes.  This thorough stir will help the wax, fragrance, and color adhere.  Then, place your thermometer back into the wax.

scenting the soy wax

Step 7:  Next, grab your hot glue gun and place a small amount of glue on the bottom of your wick tabs.  Then, center and secure your candle wicks.

center and secure your wicks

Step 8:  Now, stick your warning label to the bottom of your jar.

applying your warning label

Step 9:  Check the temperature of the wax, you will be looking for it to reach 110 degrees Fahrenheit.  Once it does, give your wax one final stir.

checking for the pour temp
Step 10:  Then, slowly start to pour your candle.  You will want to stop your pour once the wax reaches where the jar changes shape.  Then, straighten your wicks.

pouring your soy candle
Step 11: 
Now, allow your candle to fully set up undisturbed.

allowing your candle to set up

Step 12:  Once the candle has hardened, trim your wicks, and lid your jar.  Allow your candle to cure for 24-48 hours.

Congratulations, you just made a soy candle.  Your 100% Soy Wax Candle is now finished and ready to burn.  Enjoy the sweet apple scent that will fill your home and make your house smell good!

Homemade Zebra Candle

Friday, February 7th, 2014

make your own zebra candleHow to make your very own homemade Zebra Candle!

This easy to make project is even fun to create.  Besides the standard candle making supplies such as: soy wax, wicks, scent, color, and jars; you will also need beeswax.  We will be using the beeswax to make the zebra stripes in the candle.  Because of the pliability of beeswax, it has the capability of being shaped easily into stripes.  Plus, due to the high melt point it has, beeswax can withstand a pour of another wax (soy), as long as the temperature isn’t too extreme.

Although for this project, the scent that was selected was Hot Pink Pomegranate Fragrance Oil, when you make your own zebra candle you can scent it to your pleasing.  The same is true for the candle color.  Since our fragrance oil has the name hot pink in it, the decision was made to make the zebra candle stripes pink on a white (or uncolored) background.

To see the full list of possible candle scents, please click on this link.  There are over 800 different fragrances to choose from!

Here are your total recipe weights to make (2) 16oz. Zebra Candles:
190 grams beeswax
2 drops candle dye (if making the candle like pictured)
About 4 oz.  of candle scent
1100 grams of soy wax (Golden Foods 444 soy wax)

Other items that you will need for this recipe are:
wax paper
pencil
knife
9×13 cake pan
2- 16 oz candle jars
4 wicks (we used 2- cd10 wicks per candle)
scale
2 pots (for double boiler method)
stirring spoon
cutting board
thermometer

Below are the steps to make your very own zebra candle (pictures included):

Step 1:  Using the double boiler method, weigh out and melt 190 grams of beeswax.  You will want to set the temperature of your stove top between medium and low heat while melting.  Stir the beeswax occasionally as it melts.

steps to make a zebra candle

Step 2:   This step is the colorant of your zebra stripes:  Once the beeswax is melted, now you will add 2 drops of your candle colorant, and stir.  Once you are done, place your pouring pot back into the heat source.

color for the zebra candle

Step 3:  To make the zebra stripes, you will need to concentrate your beeswax in a portion of the area in your cake pan.  To do this, lay out your cake pan on a flat surface.  Next, roughly measure out at least 9 inches in length.  Hold this place by setting your knife across the pan.  Finally, lay the wax paper over the cake pan and knife.  Carefully, tuck the corners of the wax paper down.

how to make zebra stripes

Step 4:  Now it is time to scent your beeswax:  Remove your beeswax from the heat source.  Weigh out about 19 grams of your candle fragrance oil.  Then, add the fragrance and stir to incorporate it throughout the wax.

zebra candle scent

Step 5:  Now, take your beeswax and slowly start to pour it over the flat portion of the wax paper.  Allow this to fully set up.  Do not try to rush this step.  Cooling beeswax too quickly, may cause it to crack!

making the zebra candle stripes

Step 6:  Once the beeswax has hardened, and is cool to the touch; gently remove it from the cake pan.  Carefully stand the square on one end and starting in one corner, peel away the wax paper.  Then, place the beeswax on your cutting board.  Finally, cut off any jagged edges using your knife.

zebra candle recipe

Step 7:  For the background of your zebra candle, you will be using soy wax.  In order to have enough wax for 2 candles, weigh out and melt 1100 grams of soy wax.  Melt this wax using the double boiler method.  While the wax is melting, stir occasionally.

soy wax zebra candle

Step 8:  You will create the zebra stripe pattern using the tip of a pencil.  Trace this lightly into the beeswax.  The shape that you will want to draw will be various sized long and irregular lines similar to tree branches.  When you are finished, cut these lines out.

making zebra stripes in beeswax

Step 9:  Once you have a few of your stripes cut out, carefully begin to place them individually against the inside wall of your candle jar.  It is best to start at the bottom of your jar and work in an angular direction.  Apply slight and even pressure until the stripes stick.  Repeat this step until you have the zebra design you are looking for.  Then, do it again for your second candle.

zebra candle pattern

Step 10:  Center and secure your wicks to the bottom of your candle jars.  Then, set aside.

centering your wicks

Step 11:  When your soy wax is in a completely liquid state, remove it from the heat source.  If you are adding color to the background of the zebra candle, do this now.  Then, add 110 grams of fragrance Oil.  Stir again.

Step 12:  Using your thermometer, wait until the soy wax reaches 115 degrees Fahrenheit; this temperature will not melt your zebra stripes.  Pour the soy wax into your candle jars.  Don’t forget to straighten your wicks. Allow the candles to fully set up undisturbed.

pouring a zebra candle

Now it is time to celebrate, your Zebra candles are now ready to use.  Simply trim your wick, light, and enjoy your new awesome candle.

Realistic Gel Candle

Thursday, February 6th, 2014

honeycomb candleGel wax is a great candle wax for embedding items in candles.  This translucent wax also provides the opportunity to make realistic gel candles.  Sea or ocean themed gel candles are perfect examples of this, right down to the air bubbles.

We at Natures Garden however, wanted to take the realistic gel candle concept and kick it up a notch.  Using the fragrance oil Honey, which is gel safe; we arrived at a notion of somehow adding the look of an embedded honeycomb.  Trying to stick with items we already had in house, we creatively used bubble wrap and beeswax (because of it’s high melting point); to make our very own spin on embeds.  Through several trails and errors, we found the perfect look, scent, and color for this Honeycomb Candle Recipe.

Here is a List of the Items You Will Need:
Gel Wax- to emulate the look of delicious honey
Beeswax
White Pastilles- to make the embed of a honeycomb
Honey Fragrance Oil- a gel safe scent to match the realistic gel candle theme
Zinc Core Wicking- to make your candle more than just a decoration (4)  51-32-18z wicks  (2 in each candle)
Spectrum Candle Dye- Yellow- the color of the honeycomb
Spectrum Candle Dye- Orange- this color lightly added to the yellow makes the perfect golden honey hue
Thermometer- to monitor the temperature of the gel wax

Other Items and Supplies Needed: 
Stirring Spoon- to fully incorporate the color and scent to the wax
Stove- for the double boiler method
Scale- to be dead on for your measurements
Knife- to cut the beeswax
Toothpick- to add a touch of orange to the gel wax
9 x 13 cake pan- to make the honeycomb
bubble wrap- to make the honeycomb shape
(2) Pots- for double boiler method
Apothecary Jars- this recipe below will make a total of (2) 16oz jars.  Any shape or size jar will work, you will just need to adjust the measurements accordingly

And finally, here are the steps with pictures included:

Step 1:  Using the double boiler method, set the temperature of your stove top between medium and low heat.  Next, weigh out and melt 230 grams of beeswax.  You will want to stir this occasionally as it melts.

Step 2:   When the beeswax is in a liquid state, place 2 drops of Spectrum Yellow Candle Dye in it and stir. After the color is incorporated, place the pot back into the heat source.

coloring beeswax
Step 3:
  Next, lay your cake pan on a flat surface, this will ensure that your honeycomb has an even thickness.  Measure out 7 inches of length in your pan.  Mark this length by placing your knife across the pan.  If your knife is not long enough, you can use any kitchen utensil that will lay across the pan.  Next, with the bubble side up, place the bubble wrap over your knife and cake pan.

how to get honeycomb look

Step 4: Now, weigh out 23 grams of Honey Fragrance Oil.  Remove your beeswax from the heat source, add the fragrance.  Stir.

Step 5:  Slowly pour the beeswax over the bubble wrap.  Allow this to fully set up. Please Note:  Do not rush the set up of beeswax or it may crack.

making beeswax look like honeycomb

Step 6:  When the beeswax has cooled, gently remove it from the cake pan. Now, taking your time, carefully peel away the bubble wrap.

honeycomb beeswax

Step 7:  Next, weigh out 1000 grams of gel wax.  Place this into the double boiler and allow it to melt, stirring occasionally.  This will resemble to a thick syrup.

Step 8:  Now, lay your beeswax on a flat surface.  Place one of your candle jars on its side.  Using your knife, mark the width of the jar (before it changes shape).  Next, subtract 1/2″ from your marking.  Finally, make a line and cut it with your knife.

honeycomb candle

Step 9:  Gently roll your beeswax into a loose circle.  Place one roll in each of your jars.  Make sure the beeswax roll is at least 1/2 inch away from the walls of the jar.  Then, set aside.

how to make a honeycomb candle

Step 10:  Now, secure your wicks to the bottom of your candle jars.  Make sure they are centered.

Step 11:  Once the gel wax is melted, place 4 drops of Spectrum Yellow Candle Dye into the gel wax.  Next, add 1 toothpick tip of Spectrum Orange Dye.  Stir.  Finally, add 100 grams of Honey Fragrance Oil.  Stir again.

how to make a honey color

Step 12:  Place your thermometer into the gel wax.  Then, begin to slowly stir the gel wax.  Do not stir to quickly or you will have an excess of air bubbles.  Keep stirring and scrapping the sides until the gel wax temperature hits 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step 13:  Now, slowly pour the gel wax into the containers until your honeycomb is covered.  Then, straighten your wicks.  Finally, allow the candles to fully set up.

pouring honeycomb candle

Your honeycomb candles are now ready.  Simply trim your wick, light, and enjoy!

With this realistic gel candle, there are two crucial steps that come into play.  The first is the thickness of the beeswax.  You want your beeswax to be nice and thick so it can withstand the temperature of the melted gel wax.  However, making the beeswax too thick may make it more difficult to curl, therefore complicating the honeycomb shape that can be achieved.  Lastly, the temperature of the melted gel wax is everything for this recipe.  Pouring over the 165 degree Fahrenheit point, will melt and warp your honeycomb.

Happy Crafting!

No Candle Scent?

Monday, December 16th, 2013

Candle waxesWhen it comes to candle scent, there are only two kinds.  The hot throw of a candle, and the cold throw.

The hot throw in candles is when the wick of the candle has been lit.  The aroma of a well made candle will fill a averaged sized room fairly quickly.  This scented aroma will linger the whole time the candle remains lit.  This is the fragrance oil being released into the air from the wax that is heated by the lit wick.

On the end of the spectrum and not requiring any heat is the cold scent throw.  This is the scent a candle gives off when it is just sitting there unlit.  Cold throw is very important in candles because it is the first impression that a person gets on how the candle is going to smell.  This aroma is solely based off the fragrances aromatic quality in the wax.   

Why does my candle not smell?

The best way to guarantee that you are producing a high quality candle is to know you have good quality supplies.   There is a lot of various fragrance or scent suppliers in the market, buying from a reputable supply company ensures your candles are high quality, provide strong hot and cold throw, as well as a clean burn.  All three qualities mentioned are expectations for candles.

It is possible that a fragrance that is very evident in the cold throw of a candle will not perform the in the hot throw of the candle (this is known to occur in soy wax).  Using an additive like vybar will help to extend the scent throw.   However, if using vybar be careful not to add too much.

In the candle making process, never leave your wax on the heat source longer than needed.  Once the color and scent have been added to the wax, pay attention for when it is time to pour.  Leaving scented and melted wax on the heat source too long can burn off notes in the fragrance oil prematurely.  This lack of notes has a direct effect on your candles smell.  You especially do not want to risk this happening to your candle wax if you are using lighter fragrance oils with low flashpoints like citruses for example.

When making candles with veggie waxes such as soy wax, you will need to use a hotter burning wick to allow fragrance to travel up the wick and escape into the air.  You may also want to consider “wicking-up” when you are making candles with fragrance that contains heavy base notes.

How to Solve It!

Before you buy from an online supplier check out their credentials; you can easily do this by reading the customer reviews on their website and their social media pages.  There you will be able to find out a lot about a company.  Lastly, candle making forums are also a great way to see if a company is reputable and has good quality products, fast shipping, and customer service.

For most fragrance oils, in order to get the best hot and cold throw in a candle you use 1  to 1.5 ounces of fragrance oil per pound of wax.  If you have decided to use vybar to help increase scent throw, only add ½ tsp for every pound of wax.  Also, adding more than the recommended amount of vybar to your wax may bind your scent without allowing the wax to release it properly, so do not overdo it.

A key step to remember in the candle making process is to pour your candle wax immediately once it has been scented and mixed, or hit the proper temperature.  Using additional heat once the melted wax has been scented will allow for some of the fragrance oil to evaporate into the air releasing aromatic components of the fragrance oil before their time.  This will permanently alter the way the fragrance oil will smell in your lit candle, and may be the reason why the candle has no smell at all.

Remember, when you are making candles with veggie waxes, or you are using fragrances with heavy base notes like musk, amber, patchouli, vanilla, woods, you will want to use a bigger, hotter-burning wick.

Football Field Candle Loaf Recipe

Friday, October 18th, 2013
bonnie-pic1

This is Bonnie of Natures Garden.

It is time to get excited!  Another Thursday has passed which means that we have another employee spotlight creation to share.  We are currently in week 10 of the Natures Garden Employee Challenge.  Each week we ask one of the employees to share their spotlight creation- a project/recipe that they create using Natures Garden’s supplies and one of their personal favorite fragrance oils.  Creativity is highly encouraged!  This week’s spotlight creation was done by Bonnie, one of our newer employees at Natures Garden.  Her project is tactfully named Football Field Candle Loaf.

Bonnie was inspired by the theme of football since she has several family members that are football fans.  She also wanted to produce an item that men can make and use in their own “man caves”.  So, considering all of this Bonnie decided that she would make a loaf candle that would resemble a football field.  The two fragrance oils that she selected for this were Fresh Cut Grass (for the field) and Leather Jacket (for the football).

football-candle1

A image of the finished Football Field Candle Loaf and football melt and pour soaps.

Besides the football loaf candle, Bonnie also brought another unique idea to share with everyone.  One night while she was figuring out the specifics of her project, she had ordered pizza for dinner.  When it arrived, and she opened the box; a light bulb went off.  She saved and washed the pizza saver.  (If you do not know what this is, it is the small plastic table that the pizza companies place in the center of the pizza to prevent the cardboard from falling in.)  She was inspired.  Bonnie thought that this would be a perfect kicking tee; just like the professional punters use.

She was right.  After making her Football Field Loaf Candle, Bonnie made a small second project-  Football Soaps.  Using the same Silicone Football Mold from her candle, she melted Goat’s Milk Melt and Pour Soap.  Using Fun Brown Oxide, she colored the soap.  Then, she selected a manly scent- The Perfect Man Fragrance Oil.  Once the soap hardened, she popped it out of the mold, and the football fit perfectly right in the pizza saver.  An adorable bathroom soap concept for any football lover who occasionally orders pizza too.

Besides football, Bonnie also enjoys spending time with her family.  She is a big pet lover and has 2 Dachshunds (wiener dogs).  Their names are Oscar Myer and Roxie and they love going for walks.  Because she and her husband have an RV, they enjoy camping and the outdoors whenever they can.

Bonnie also enjoys attending Zumba Fitness, and used to be an instructor of Zumba as well.

In her daily spare time, Bonnie listens to and enjoys all music types from Metallica to Miranda Lambert to Glee.  She is also very into the Candy Crush Saga Game.

When it comes to Bonnie’s Moto for life, she lives by words her mother always said:  “Listen to people’s advice, but do what you feel is right.”

To view the complete instructions for Bonnie’s Spotlight Creation Football Field Candle Loaf, you can simply click on the link.  The recipe is also available in the free recipes and classes section of the Natures Garden website.

Smores Candle Recipe

Saturday, August 24th, 2013

lynn1

Smores Candle Recipe brought to you by Lynn of Natures Garden

As many of you know, we are currently having a Natures Garden’s staff challenge.  Our staff members are challenged to choose some of their favorite fragrances and create a product with them. smores-candle-big This challenge allows staff members to have hands-on experience with our products, and it has the potential to provide inspirational ideas for our customers.  WIN-WIN!

Lynn has been with Natures Garden many years, and she has years of experience making candles.  In her spare time, she sells her finished candles at craft bazaars.  Lynn said that she is always trying to come up with new and exciting candles to sell at bazaars.  She came up with the smores candle idea, and I was excited to see the end result.  She nailed it!  Her candles made we want to make real smores to eat!

For those of you who do not know Lynn, she is hard-working, creative, and she said that her motto in life is:  “Live life to its fullest” and “Never give up on your dreams”.  We are quite honored to have her as part of our staff.  Thank you Lynn!

For complete instructions on how to make Lynn’s Smores Candle, please click here.

www.naturesgardencandles.com

Hydrangea Candle Butterfly Tarts

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

crystal1

Hydrangea Candle with Butterfly Wax Tarts

We are having a staff challenge at Natures Garden where we have asked each staff member to choose one of their favorite Natures Garden fragrance oils and create a project pertaining to that fragrance.  Staff members are encouraged to be as creative as possible, using the knowledge they have learned while working at Natures Garden.  This week’s staff challenge was done by Crystal!  Crystal has only worked at Natures Garden for 1 month, and we were blown away by the creativity she used when creating her Hydrangea Candle with butterfly wax tarts.hydragnea candle

Crystal loves floral scents, she loves the colors blue and purple, and she loves butterflies.  Her project depicts a contemporary spin on the various colors found in a hydrangea bush.  She made the candle come alive by adding butterfly tarts.  Very creative, and like nothing we have seen before.  To make the candle, she used Natures Garden’s Pillar of Bliss wax that comes in granulated form.  She melted the very same wax to create her butterfly tarts.  For full instructions on how to make Crystal’s Project, please visit this page.

www.naturesgardencandles.com

How much candle wax do I need to fill my jars?

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

candle wax

 

How much candle wax do I need to fill my jars? 

One of the most frequent questions we are asked by new candle makers is:  How much candle wax will I need to fill my jars?  And, the solution is really simple to find out with this equation.

Basically, you will find that 1 pound (by weight) of candle wax will equal 20 ounces (in volume) when pouring into containers or molds.  With this knowledge, you can use simple math to figure out how much candle wax you will need to fill your containers or molds.

Take for example that you are making 6 oz. hexagon container candles for a wedding.  For this order, you have to make a total of 200 wedding candles.  The question you are asking yourself is, “how much candle wax will you need to fill all 200- 6oz. jars”?  Here is the equation to figure it out:  Take 200 x 6 to come up with your total weighted ounces.  For this example, the answer is equal to 1200 ounces.  Now, you must divide your total weighted ounces (1200 ounces) by 20 (volume ounces) to find out the total pounds of wax you will need for your wedding (60 pounds of wax).

Let’s try one more example since the 16oz. jar size is one of the most popular sized jars that candle makers sell.  Now, you want to make 24 candles, all of which will be poured into 16 oz. jars.  This equation would compute to:  24 (the amount you have to make) x 16 (the ounce size of the jar)= 384 (the total number of ounces).  Now take 384 and divide this by 20 (the volume) and the answer you get is 19.2 pounds of wax (thus you should likely get 20 pounds of wax to cover yourself.

Remember the equation:  Number of Candles you want to make  (multiplied by)  Volume of your containers  (divided by)  20 = Total number of pounds of wax you will need to do your project.

We hope that this simple equation will help you figure out how much wax you will need in the future.

Happy Candle Making!

Deborah of Natures Garden

How to Make Clamshell Tarts

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013
clamkit

If you are on the fence about possibly making your own clamshell wax tarts, this clamshell wax tart kit will show you just how easy it is!

 

 

How to Make Clamshell Tarts

Everybody knows someone who just loves to burn tarts in their oil burner.  I have a sister that pays top dollar for those tarts, and swears that they are the only tarts she will use.  I took on this challenge at least that is what I thought it was, and have now successfully changed her over to making her own custom tarts.

My sister has a  scent for every season type.  She had her go to fragrances.  A light floral for spring, a zesty citrus kick scent for summer, a mossy green outdoor scent for fall, and the tried and true Apple Cinnamon for winter.  This was one concept I could not grasp.  I felt compelled to show her the ways of the scenting world, and since I work for Natures Garden, I knew a few in and outs.

For anyone looking to start making their own tarts, Natures Garden offers a Clamshell Wax Tart Kit.  This was my starting place for her as well.  What is really admirable about this kit is just how easy it is.  The kit comes with everything that you would need to make your first time clamshell tarts.  Wax, Fragrance Oils, Candle Dyes, Clamshells, Pipettes, Instructions, in fact this kit is so easy, it practically makes itself.

For those of you who already have the supplies to make tarts at home, here is the list of ingredients you will need for this clamshell tart recipe:

1 Pound Pillar of Bliss Wax
1 oz. Apple Cinnamon Fragrance Oil
1 oz. Vanilla Bean Fragrance Oil
Red Liquid Candle Dye
Yellow Liquid Candle Dye
Pipettes
4 Clamshell Tart containers
Stainless Steel Spoon
Stove
Paper Bowls (2)
Toothpick
Melting Container

Step 1: Place 1 pound wax into your melting container.  Using the double boiler method, melt wax on low on the stove until the wax is completed melted. Get your four empty clamshells ready.

Step 2: Preparing the Apple Cinnamon Original Tarts: Pour 1/2 of the melted wax into a paper bowl.  Start by adding 1 drop of red liquid candle dye; add more if desired.

Step 3: Add 1 ounce of Apple Cinnamon Original fragrance oil to the melted wax. Stir. Keep remaining melted wax on stove at a low temp setting.

Step 4:  Bend the side of the paper bowl to make a pour spout, and quickly pour the melted wax into two clamshells. Do not move the clamshells until the wax has completely hardened and set up.

Step 5: Preparing the Vanilla Bean Tarts: Pour the other half of the melted wax into a paper bowl. Using a pipette, add 1 drop of yellow liquid candle dye.  Add more if desired.

Step 6: Add 1 ounce of Vanilla Bean fragrance oil to the melted wax.  Stir.

Step 7: Bend the side of the paper bowl to make a pour spout.  Quickly pour the melted wax into two clamshells. Do not move the clamshells until the wax has completely hardened and set up.

 Step 8: Break off chunks of the clamshell tart and place them into a potpourri burner and fill your room with the wonderful aromas of Apple Cinnamon and Vanilla Bean!

It is just as simple as that.  It did not take long to make these wonderful little clamshell tarts, and they smell amazing in your oil burners too.  Feel free to use any of Natures Gardens Fragrance Oils to make your own clamshell tarts.  My sister is super excited to get started on her own personal clamshell tart line, and I have a feeling I will be getting some homemade tarts for a gift very soon.

Fragrance & Fun for Everyone

Inspire, Create, and Dominate!

Sparkles!!! Nicole

(Corporate Manager of Natures Garden Candle Supplies)

www.naturesgardencandles.com

Natures Garden is not responsible for the performance of any of the recipes provided on our website. Testing is your responsibility. If you plan to resell any recipes we provide, it is your responsibility to adhere to all FDA regulations if applicable. If there are ingredients listed in a recipe that Natures Garden does not sell, we cannot offer any advice on where to purchase those ingredients. We also do not offer any advice on formulating or altering recipes.

When Does Wick Size Matter

Wednesday, June 26th, 2013
wick size

We purposely created a “problem” candle to demonstrate when wick size does matter. In this example, the wick is not centered, and there is a lack of a full melt pool. A smaller melt pool is one sign that the wick size clearly needs to be larger.

When does wick size matter?

Knowing when to move up to the next size wick for candles is one of the trickiest aspects to candle making.  There is a fine line with wicking a candle.  You want to find that perfect balance between a sensational hot throw and long burn time.  Wicks, are the vessels to ensuring you have made the best possible candle.  You want your candle to burn slowly and evenly all the way to the bottom, leaving nothing but the wick tab behind.  The right wick has the capability of doing this, but they also have a direct effect on the hot scent throw.  And when it comes to scent throw, this is one feature of candles that is extremely significant.

There are many different kinds of wicks available; HTP, CD, Hemp, Zinc, or Wooden.  Each wick has different qualities associated with them, and that is why testing for your perfect wick size is vital to your candle crafting. Usually, within the wick selection process there are a few factors to consider.  First, wick selection will differ depending on which fragrance oil you use in your candle wax.  Second, wick size is determined by the diameter of your candle container/mold.  Third, wick size is determined by the type of wax you are using to make your candles.  Fourth, wick size is determined by how much colorant you use in your candles.

Now, it could be possible that your candle will need a double or maybe even a triple wick.  This is not unheard of.  Sometimes, especially with the larger candles or with candles that are shaped differently (such as star), you need the addition of extra wicks to make sure that your candle has an excellent wet pool touching all sides of your container.

Once you know the type and size of the wick that works best for your candle needs, the next step is to familiarize yourself with the term “wick up”.  Wick up in candle making is when you purposely use a larger wick.   This generally comes into play for a few reasons.  If you notice in your testing that you have a poor melt pool, you might want to consider a wick up.  Wicking up in this situation will allow for a hotter burn, therefore reaching more wax to allow for a fuller melt pool.

Another reason to wick up is if you are struggling to smell the hot throw of the candle.  In order for scent throw to be possible in melted wax, the fragrance oil needs to be in a volatile state- meaning ready to evaporate quickly.  The best way to ensure this is a hot burning wick.  As the melted wax pool is pulled throw the wick, the fragrance (or scent) is released into the air.

Another aspect to consider is the fragrance oil itself.  There are certain fragrance oils such as Vanilla ones that almost always require a wick up.  This is because Vanilla fragrance oils are thicker and using a slightly larger wick will prevent your wick from clogging and/or possibly drowning out.  Fragrances with heavy base notes, such as patchouli, vetiver, amber, and musk will also likely require a larger wick.

The wax that you are using for candle making can also come into play for a wick up situation.  Any time you use a vegetable wax, you will want to wick up to the next size wick for your candle.  Whenever you use a vegetable wax, which requires a hotter burn, you want to make sure that the wick when lit, will be hot enough to melt the wax properly, and release the fragrance into the air.

The other factor that will require a larger wick size in candles is the use of heavy amounts of candle dye in your candles.  Candle dye slows down the capillary action of the wicks, and thus reduces the burn of the wick.  Increasing your wick size will help you combat this issue.

If you are interested in seeing Natures Garden’s suggestions for wicks, please check out candle wick chart.  However, please note that this information should never replace your testing process.