Category Archives: candle making

Dec
06

Candle Making Equipment Continued

This entry was posted in candle additives, candle colorants, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle molds, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

candle making equipmentThis is a list of candle making equipment.  Whether you are just making a few candles as gifts for loved ones, or possibly venturing into the candle making industry; this is the equipment you will need to get started.  Please note:  Once this equipment has been used to make fragranced candles, it cannot be used again for food purposes.

Other Equipment

Pouring Pots- Coffee cans used to be perfect pouring pots when they were made of metal.  By simply bending the lip on one side of the coffee can, you could make a perfect spout to pour candles.  Metal coffee cans still exist, they are just harder to come by now.  If you do choose to use metal coffee cans as pouring pots, remember to have plenty of heat resistant safety gloves or pot holders available to assist you in holding the hot can.  This only works for metal coffee cans; most companies that sell coffee use plastic cans now.  Unfortunately, these types of cans cannot handle the heat from the melted wax and they will melt; compromising your candle wax and making a big mess to clean up.

Pouring pots, however, are great for candle making.  Not only can they hold up to 4 pounds of melted wax, but they also have a plastic handle on them so there is less chance of burning your hand.

In an ideal situation, you will have a pouring pot for each fragrance that you use to make candles.  For example, if you carry Apple Cinnamon (red), Blueberry Muffin (blue), Fresh Bamboo (green), and Vanilla Silk (no color), that would equate to 4 total pouring pots.  This works because you would never have to worry about jeopardizing your color accuracy or fragrance aromas in finished candles.  But, this is only ideally.  If you are just starting out, one pouring pot will work.  You just have to make sure you thoroughly clean your pouring pot after each use.  You also want to make sure you clean the outside and underneath portion of the pouring pot.  Having debris or wax on the bottom of your pouring pot could result in splatter when the pouring pot is placed in the water to maintain wax temperature.  The hot splatter can be painful.  This splatter is also a reason why wearing safety glasses while making candles is a very good idea.

Candy Thermometer- Wax temperature is everything when making candles.  Usually, if there are problems with your finished candles, temperature has something to do with what went wrong.  Using a thermometer to monitor your temperature in wax is one way to prevent these problems from occurring.  For best results in candle making, pour any single pour waxes at 145-150 degrees Fahrenheit, and any votive or pillar wax at 160-165 degrees Fahrenheit.

Votive and Candle Molds- After purchasing multiple votive molds, you will notice when you receive them, they will be stacked together.  Make sure when you try to pull them apart you are wearing heavy duty gloves.  The edges of stainless steel votives are extremely sharp.  Attempting to pull them apart without gloves will cause cuts on your fingers.

When working with candle molds or votive molds, you always want to make sure that before you pour the hot candle wax into the mold that they are at room temperature.  Completing this one little step will save you the headache of trying to release the candle later.

As for the cleaning process for these types of molds, rub a small amount of shortening in the inside and outside of the molds.  Then, place the molds on a cookie sheet upside down.  Once the cookie sheet has been carefully placed inside the oven, bake at 150 degrees Fahrenheit for 10-15 minutes.  Once the time has elapsed, simply remove the cookie sheet and wipe the individual molds clean.  Caution:  The molds will be hot when taken out of the oven, so you may want to use pot holders.  Please Note:  Never use water with your metal molds.

Work Environment-  Having a favorable work environment for candle making is a must.  Once again, it is all about temperature, and having a room that is 70 degrees Fahrenheit is optimal for the best candle making situation.  Proper ventilation in the room is necessary, but you also have to remember rooms that have drafts will not work for the natural cooling stages of your candles.  Candles that cool too quickly will give you problems with your finished candles aesthetic look or functionality.

Work Clothes- These items may sound silly, but you never want to risk wearing one of your favorite outfits while making candles.  No matter how neat and careful you are, candle dye is permanent, and getting wax, even the smallest amount, on your clothing will ruin them.

Floor Protection-  When making candles, a small spill can have detrimental affects to your work area.  Besides the facts that candle dyes are permanent, wax messes are not the easiest to clean up, and spilled fragrance oil on a floor is super slippery, you do not want to take any chances especially if your work environment is your kitchen.  By purchasing floor mats, or simply placing cardboard on the floor in your work area, you can prevent havoc from occurring.  For you own personal safety, this is one perfect work environment step you do not want to skip.

Stainless Steel Measuring Cups and Spoons- When it comes to measurements for colorants, additives, and fragrance oils, you will want to have your very own candle making stainless steel tools for this portion of the job.  Fragrance oils will dissolve certain plastics, stainless steel measurers will not dissolve and can be cleaned time and time again without staining or scent memory.

Dec
06

Candle Making Equipment

This entry was posted in candle additives, candle colorants, candle dye, candle making, candle making supplies, candle supplies, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

candle making equipmentWhen it comes to candle making there are a few tried and true items that you are going to need in order to create beautiful hand poured candles.  This blog will focus on possible heat sources you will want to use.

Heat Sources

Turkey Roasters- Turkey roasters work great for melting slabs of candle wax.  On average, turkey roasters can hold 20-25 pounds of candle wax at a time, so this is a great solution if you are making big batches of candles.  The average cost of a turkey roaster is anywhere from $40-$100. But, keep in mind that these turkey roasters do go on sale around the holidays, so you might be able to find a bargain.  When melting wax in a turkey roaster you will want to keep the temperature set at 175 degrees Fahrenheit.  You will also want to make sure that you have the bottom portion of the pan filled with about ¼” water.  If you do not fill this area with water, you will notice that the wax will not melt properly.  Also, you will risk burning up your turkey roaster and rearing it useless.  But, remember ¼” is the magic amount.  Using more than this amount will result in having water bubble up and entering your work space.  Try not to let any water enter the melting wax.  Water is waxes worst enemy, and water in your melted wax will result with holes in your finished candles.

If you do get water in your wax, or you notice water in wax; put your turkey roaster on the low setting and keep it uncovered.  This will allow the water to evaporate out.  When wax is made into slabs, the manufacturer uses water to cool the wax.  Sometimes, water can get trapped in the wax as it cools, and this creates water pockets.   The water will evaporate; just keep an eye on the wax.

Besides working with a single pour wax, if you choose to also make votives and or pillars, you will want to have a second turkey roaster for this wax.  It is very important that you keep the waxes separated.  If you do not, chances are your single wax will require a second pour.  But, do not stress too much if a small amount of votive/pillar wax gets into your single pour wax.  A little bit of the waxes mixing should not give you any major issues.

Stove/Hot Plate- Besides the turkey roaster, you will also need a secondary heat source.  This is because you will need to maintain your melted wax temperature (or pouring temperature) as you add colorants, additives, or fragrance oils.  A stove or hot plate are great secondary heat sources.

By using a 13” x 9” cake pan you can create the same double boiler situation like you have in your turkey roaster.  This time fill the bottom of the cake pan ½” with water.  Then, set the stove or hot plate to a low to medium heat setting.  Place the cake pan with water on top of the burner and allow the water to heat.

Ideally, a stove works best for this situation, especially if you also warm your candle containers before pouring the hot candle wax into them.  Warming your containers will help to prevent jump lines from occurring in your candles.  Jump lines occur when the melted wax cools too quickly in your jars.  Warming your candle jars levels the “temperature playing field” if you will, allowing the wax to cool in its own natural time by decreasing the gap in temperature between the hot wax and warmed jars.

Nov
06

Candle Making- Soy Candles

This entry was posted in candle dye, candle making, candle making supplies, candle scents, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, candles, fragrance oil, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Soy wax Candles When it comes to candle making, the wax you use is really up to personal choice.

There are quite a few reasons why candle makers select soy wax for their candles.  Some like it due to the fact that soy wax is 100% natural (it is a pure vegetable wax) and it is biodegradable.  Many prefer soy wax because of the long, even, and clean burn the wax provides with less soot.  And, even still, many candle crafters like soy wax because it is an environmentally friendly, renewable resource that American farmers can plant and harvest; also helping the economy too. Some other reasons for why some people prefer using soy wax for their candles are ease of use.  Since this wax is in flake form, it is a breeze to weigh out, work with, and clean up.  And, soy wax is a single pour wax, requiring no repours.

Soy wax is for container candles.  Due to the nature of this natural wax, the finished candle will have a mottled (or frosted) appearance on top.  However, if you do not like this appearance, you can always apply heat to the finished candle with a hot hair dryer or heat gun.

Supplies and Equipment Needed: 
NG 100% Soy Wax
Fragrance Oil
Spectrum Candle Dye or Color Block
Pouring Pot
Thermometer
Glassware
Wicks
Scale
Stainless steel mixing utensil
Cookie Sheet
Hot Glue Gun
Glue Sticks
Stove
Pot

A little behind the scenes knowledge: 

For this candle making process we are going to suggest the double boiler system for melting the wax.  Fill a large pot half way full with tap water.  Place the filled pot onto the stove top burner.  Turn the appropriate burner on medium heat.  Once you have the pouring pot filled with the correct amount of soy wax, place the pouring pot into the water filled pot.  Once the water starts to boil, you will notice that the soy wax is beginning to melt.  As this occurs, you want to occasionally stir the wax to ensure an even temperature.

Carefully place your glassware on a cookie sheet.  Preheat your oven to the lowest temperature possible.  Once the oven is heated, place the cookie sheet with the glassware into the oven.  Allow your glassware to warm in the oven for 10-15 minutes.  Once the allotted time has passed, carefully remove the cookie sheet using oven mitts.  Set these aside. 

The standard fragrance percent for soy candles is 1-1 ½ ounces of fragrance oil per pound of wax.

For measuring purposes, 20 ounces (weight) of soy wax is equivalent to 16 ounces of fluid volume.

Directions for making a soy candle: 

1.  Weigh out the correct amount of soy wax with your scale.
2.  Place your soy wax into your pouring pot and using the double boiler system, heat the wax to 185 degrees Fahrenheit.  Monitor this by using your thermometer.  Please Note:  Heating soy wax hotter than 200 degrees Fahrenheit will discolor the wax, so proper monitoring of the temperature is advised.
3.  While you are waiting on the wax, plug in your hot glue gun.
4.  Once the wax is in a liquid state, add your candle colorant.
5.  Next, add your Natures Garden’s fragrance oil of choice and stir well to incorporate throughout the wax.  The information we provide below about flash point and burnoff is information we have learned over the years that will help make the best soy wax candles.  When making candles, it is important to understand that ingredients affect the end result.  Testing needs to be done by the candle maker for every fragrance that you decide to use.  We provide the information as a guide, but you will still need to do the testing yourself.
      a.  For this step you will need to know the flashpoint of the fragrance oil you selected.  The right temperature is extremely important to ensure that the fragrance oil binds properly with the soy wax.  You also do not want to risk “burnoff”.  Burnoff is the adding of a fragrance oil at too hot of a wax temperature.  Because a flashpoint on a fragrance oil is the highest temperature the fragrance can handle before breaking down, burnoff can affect the scent in the finished candle.  That is why you want to know the proper temperature to add the fragrance oil.  You can find this information right on the label of the Natures Garden fragrance oil.  This information is also in the Important Fragrance Specifics area on the website under each fragrance oil listing.
b. Fragrance Flashpoints give you the answer as to when you add your fragrance oil to the hot wax.  Any flashpoint that is higher than 185 degrees Fahrenheit is added at 185 degrees.  For any flashpoints that are below 185 degrees, they should be added at or below the flashpoint degree.  The key to remember is try not to add the fragrance oil at a temperature that is hotter than its flashpoint.
c.  Some fragrance oils have a very low flashpoint.  In these cases, testing comes into play.  You are balancing flashpoint temperatures with the fact that the wax needs heat in order to bind the scent with the wax.
6.  Once the soy wax has been scented and colored, you will want to stir your wax thoroughly.  Doing this step will help the mixing and binding of the color and scent throughout the wax.
7.  The next step is allow your soy wax to cool at room temperature.  Place your thermometer into the pouring pot and wait until the wax reaches 110 degrees Fahrenheit.  Pouring at this temperature will allow for a smoother surface in your finished candle.  While you are waiting, prep your containers for the pour.
8.  Using your hot glue gun, place a little amount of glue to the bottom of the wick tab.  Then, carefully center the wick to the bottom of the glassware.  Gently, straighten your wick in each glass.
9.  Once your wax is the appropriate temperature (110 degrees F), you will notice the physical appearance of the wax will be slushy like.  At this point, you are now ready to pour your wax.  Slowly, fill each glass to the point where the jar changes shape.  Filling a jar surpassed the point where the jar changes shape will increase your chance of a sink hole in the finished candle.
10.  Once all containers have been poured, allow them to set up and undisturbed at room temperature.
11.   When all candles have completely set up, lid each container to allow for the fragrance to be absorbed by the wax.  This is known as the “cure time.”  For best results, allow your candles to cure for 24-48 hours.
12.  Once the cure time has elapsed, it is now time to trim your wick, and light your homemade soy candle.  Enjoy!

On a Final Note: 

Anytime you burn a candle for the first time, you want to establish a “memory burn.”  A memory burn is a complete wet pool of hot, melted wax over the entire top portion of the candle.  If the first burn is a memory burn, this ensures that every time you burn your candle, you will not have tunneling around the wick or an excess of unmelted wax adhered to the candle jar.  A memory burn also guarantees that the scent throw of your candle will be the best possible since every gram of scented wax is being used.

If you are interested in making your very own soy wax candles, Natures Garden offers a Soy Wax Kit with all the ingredients you need to make soy candles. 

 

 

Oct
18

Football Field Candle Loaf Recipe

This entry was posted in candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle molds, candle recipe, candle wicks, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .
bonnie-pic1

This is Bonnie of Natures Garden.

It is time to get excited!  Another Thursday has passed which means that we have another employee spotlight creation to share.  We are currently in week 10 of the Natures Garden Employee Challenge.  Each week we ask one of the employees to share their spotlight creation- a project/recipe that they create using Natures Garden’s supplies and one of their personal favorite fragrance oils.  Creativity is highly encouraged!  This week’s spotlight creation was done by Bonnie, one of our newer employees at Natures Garden.  Her project is tactfully named Football Field Candle Loaf.

Bonnie was inspired by the theme of football since she has several family members that are football fans.  She also wanted to produce an item that men can make and use in their own “man caves”.  So, considering all of this Bonnie decided that she would make a loaf candle that would resemble a football field.  The two fragrance oils that she selected for this were Fresh Cut Grass (for the field) and Leather Jacket (for the football).

football-candle1

A image of the finished Football Field Candle Loaf and football melt and pour soaps.

Besides the football loaf candle, Bonnie also brought another unique idea to share with everyone.  One night while she was figuring out the specifics of her project, she had ordered pizza for dinner.  When it arrived, and she opened the box; a light bulb went off.  She saved and washed the pizza saver.  (If you do not know what this is, it is the small plastic table that the pizza companies place in the center of the pizza to prevent the cardboard from falling in.)  She was inspired.  Bonnie thought that this would be a perfect kicking tee; just like the professional punters use.

She was right.  After making her Football Field Loaf Candle, Bonnie made a small second project-  Football Soaps.  Using the same Silicone Football Mold from her candle, she melted Goat’s Milk Melt and Pour Soap.  Using Fun Brown Oxide, she colored the soap.  Then, she selected a manly scent- The Perfect Man Fragrance Oil.  Once the soap hardened, she popped it out of the mold, and the football fit perfectly right in the pizza saver.  An adorable bathroom soap concept for any football lover who occasionally orders pizza too.

Besides football, Bonnie also enjoys spending time with her family.  She is a big pet lover and has 2 Dachshunds (wiener dogs).  Their names are Oscar Myer and Roxie and they love going for walks.  Because she and her husband have an RV, they enjoy camping and the outdoors whenever they can.

Bonnie also enjoys attending Zumba Fitness, and used to be an instructor of Zumba as well.

In her daily spare time, Bonnie listens to and enjoys all music types from Metallica to Miranda Lambert to Glee.  She is also very into the Candy Crush Saga Game.

When it comes to Bonnie’s Moto for life, she lives by words her mother always said:  “Listen to people’s advice, but do what you feel is right.”

To view the complete instructions for Bonnie’s Spotlight Creation Football Field Candle Loaf, you can simply click on the link.  The recipe is also available in the free recipes and classes section of the Natures Garden website.

Sep
20

Beer Candle Recipe

This entry was posted in beer candle recipe, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, gel wax, whipped soy wax, whipped wax and tagged , , , , , , , , , , on by .

an NG originalThe Natures Garden’s staff is at it again.  This week, Zack made a realistic beer candle; foam and all!  Would you look at the froth on that beer!  It is even frothing over the side.  This project involved working with gel wax for the beer, and whipped soy wax for the froth.  Zack looks oh so proud to be posing with his creation.  He said he is going to take it home and show all of his friends.

Zack has worked in the fragrance department of Natures Garden for a very very long time!  You could say Zack himself is an “NG Original”.  Zack says the beer scent is so realistic he just cannot believe it, and he has downed a beer or two in his time, so this is coming from a professional.  beer candle

Zack plays on a soccer team two nights a week.   He has real passion for the game of soccer, and has been playing the game since he was a young boy.  I asked Zack what else he does in his spare time, and Zack just laughed.

Zack is an exceptional staff member, rarely missing work, always in an upbeat, humorous, playful mood, and has a fine-tuned fragrance nose!  Hang out with Zack for just a few minutes and you are laughing your butt off!  Click here to see the Beer Candle Recipe that Zack created. 

Zack’s life motto is:  “Have Fun”.

Aug
22

What should I charge for my candles?

This entry was posted in candle making, candle making questions, candle making supplies, candle scents, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, candles, fragrance oil, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Wholesale and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

candle price

Customers frequently ask us this question:  What should I charge my customers for my candles? 

This is a question that many candle makers often ask.  Knowing what to charge for your candles is a pivotal point in your business.  You want your price of the candles that you sell to be competitive.  You also want to remember that the candle price should also reflect not only your cost but the time that you put into your candle making procedure as well.

What to charge for my candles?  When I made and sold finished candles, I had an easy equation that I used to figure out the price I would charge my customers for my candles.  First, I added up all of my expenses.  This told me how much it cost me to make the candle I was going to sell.  When I sold my candles at wholesale prices to stores, I charged the customer double what I paid to make the candle.  When I sold directly to retail customers myself (without sales reps involved), I charged the customer triple what I paid to make the candle.

After I was in business a while, I realized that in order to sell more products, I would need to get help from other people.  That is where Independent Sales Reps were introduced in my candle company.  When a candle sale was made by a sales rep, the sales rep received 1/3 of every sale, 1/3 went to cover the cost of making the candle, and 1/3 was my profit.

Fundraisers were conducted the very same way:  1/3 of the sale went to the non-profit organization, 1/3 went to cover the cost of making the products, and 1/3 went to me as profit.

To view how hiring an independent sales rep for your business can help to increase your sales, please click on this link.

I hope this helps you when you price out your candles.

Happy Candle Making!

Deborah of Natures Garden

Aug
21

How much candle wax do I need to fill my jars?

This entry was posted in candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making questions, candle making supplies, candle recipe, candle supplies, candle wax, candles, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

candle wax

 

How much candle wax do I need to fill my jars? 

One of the most frequent questions we are asked by new candle makers is:  How much candle wax will I need to fill my jars?  And, the solution is really simple to find out with this equation.

Basically, you will find that 1 pound (by weight) of candle wax will equal 20 ounces (in volume) when pouring into containers or molds.  With this knowledge, you can use simple math to figure out how much candle wax you will need to fill your containers or molds.

Take for example that you are making 6 oz. hexagon container candles for a wedding.  For this order, you have to make a total of 200 wedding candles.  The question you are asking yourself is, “how much candle wax will you need to fill all 200- 6oz. jars”?  Here is the equation to figure it out:  Take 200 x 6 to come up with your total weighted ounces.  For this example, the answer is equal to 1200 ounces.  Now, you must divide your total weighted ounces (1200 ounces) by 20 (volume ounces) to find out the total pounds of wax you will need for your wedding (60 pounds of wax).

Let’s try one more example since the 16oz. jar size is one of the most popular sized jars that candle makers sell.  Now, you want to make 24 candles, all of which will be poured into 16 oz. jars.  This equation would compute to:  24 (the amount you have to make) x 16 (the ounce size of the jar)= 384 (the total number of ounces).  Now take 384 and divide this by 20 (the volume) and the answer you get is 19.2 pounds of wax (thus you should likely get 20 pounds of wax to cover yourself.

Remember the equation:  Number of Candles you want to make  (multiplied by)  Volume of your containers  (divided by)  20 = Total number of pounds of wax you will need to do your project.

We hope that this simple equation will help you figure out how much wax you will need in the future.

Happy Candle Making!

Deborah of Natures Garden

Jul
29

What Are Wet Spots in Candles?

This entry was posted in candle making, candle making supplies, candle wax, candles, Fragrance Oils, homemade candles, Natures Garden, scent throw, wet spots and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .
soy464

Using a wax like Golden Foods Soy Wax 464, and a few preventative measures can help eliminate wet spots from your candles.

 

What are Wet Spots in Candles?

The term “wet spots” in candle making refers to the spots or patches in container candles that appear to have air, or a wet spot showing through the glass or transparent container and the candle wax.  Wet spots are extremely common and are one of the most common complaints among candle makers.   However, wet spots will not inhibit the functionality of your candle, just the aesthetic appeal.

What causes Wet Spots?

1.  Pouring hot candle wax into too cold of a container.
2.  Pouring your melted candle wax at a temperature much cooler than what is suggested.
3.  Using a pillar/votive wax for container candles instead of a container wax that is formulated for that purpose.
4.  Cooling your candles too fast; subjecting your candles to an environment which has drafts or is lower than 70-72 degrees.
5.  Pouring candle wax into dirty containers.

How to Avoid Wet Spots?

1.  Try to eliminate or prevent wet spots by thoroughly washing and drying your containers before using.  This will get any dust or debris out that may have fallen into your jars.

2.  Be sure to use a container wax so that your wax adheres properly to your container.  Votive/pillar waxes are not suggested for container candles.  Wax like Golden Foods Soy Wax 464, is a great start.  This type of soy wax has a wonderful adhesion to glass containers, therefore minimizing the chances of getting wet spots.

3.  Heat your jars/containers at the lowest setting on a cookie sheet in the oven for twenty minutes prior to filling them.  This also allows for the candle wax to cool slowly which allows for better adhesion to the container.

4.  Another thing that tends to reduce the occurrence of wet spots is pouring your candles inside the box the candle jars came in.  This helps to insulate your candles while they cool slowly.  Allow your candles to set up at room temperature, in a room that has no drafts.

5.  If you start to see the wet spots taking place as the candle is cooling, this means you should consider increasing your pour temperature.  Testing with a thermometer is key here.  Follow the manufacturer’s recommended pour temperature.

 

Jul
16

NG Aqua Di Gio Type Fragrance Oil

This entry was posted in bath bombs, body butter, body spray, candle making, Fragrance Oils, homemade soap, lotion, lotion bars, Natures Garden, perfumes and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .
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NG Aqua Di Gio Type Fragrance Oil is one of the best selling fragrance oils in the masculine category since its introduction to the Natures Garden fragrance family

NG Aqua Di Gio Type Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Sometimes in the fragrance industry, creating duplications of perfumes and colognes in the market can be quite the task.  Since many people know what the fragrance smells like, the duplication has to be dead on.  NG Aqua Di Gio Type fragrance oil could be the original scent’s identical twin.  But, this did not come easily at first.  It actually took numerous versions to be created before we finally had one that was perfect.  This fragrance oil is super sexy and is one of our top sellers.  Not only do the women love this scent on their man, but men love to smell this good too!  And, all bath and body items of this fragrance can be made at a fraction of the cost compared to many retail stores; making both men and women happy, happy, happy.

What does NG Aqua Di Gio Type Smell Like?

If you have not had the pleasure of smelling this unbelievable scent, it is described as such:  A sexy, fresh, aquatic aroma with bergamot, neroli, and tangerine; flowing into mid notes of rosemary, jasmine, and persimmon; all sitting on a woodsy base note of essential oil of patchouli.   In fact, one of our customers refers to this scent as “a fresh just want to attack your husband scent.”

How Do Our Customers Use NG Aqua Di Gio Type Fragrance Oil?

NG Aqua Di Gio Type Fragrance Oil is considered to be a MUST HAVE fragrance by many of our customers. 

For those of you that are candle crafters; our customers use this fragrance oil in their soy, pillar, ecosoya, and Joy wax candles.  The scent is amazingly strong in the hot throw.  Some of our customers even use NG Aqua Di Gio Type Fragrance Oil in their oil burners and also make aroma beads with it too.

On the bath and body end, the possibilities for this fragrance oil are endless.  The usage percent for this fragrance oil is 5%, and is used to make:  Melt and pour soaps, body butters, homemade lotions, after shave butters, shower gels, perfume oils, body splashes, lotions bars, and bubble bombs.  Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance received awesome reviews, and is a dream to soap.  Here are the official results:  Perfect Pour, no ricing, no acceleration, discolors to a butterscotch.  Awesome smell!

Fragrance & Fun for Everyone

Inspire, Create, and Dominate!

Sparkles!!! Nicole

(Corporate Manager of Natures Garden Candle Supplies)

www.naturesgardencandles.com