Archive for the ‘candle making questions’ Category

Beeswax Candles

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

beeswax candles
Air Purifying Candles

Many people burn candles as a way of relaxing with a soft light, or too add subtle scenting to the air, or as a means of setting the mood.  But, burning a beeswax candle may actually do more than this.

Let’s get a little scientific
The air that surrounds us is positively charged.  In fact, many of the items in our own homes emit a plethora of additional positively charged ions; jam packing our already filled surroundings with more and more positively charged ions.  But, all of these positively charged ions are not good for us. Recalling any lightning storm you have experienced, you will better understand this explanation.  Generally, after one of these storms, people feel stimulated, rejuvenated, and replenished.  The reason for this is that electrical storms produce a superabundance of negative ions that actually balance out the positive ions that dominate our surroundings.  This is why some of the most relaxing and renewed places for our bodies are be by waterfalls, beaches, forests, and mountain scenes.  These types of landscapes provide extra negative ions in the air that restore a natural balance of the charged ions.  Not only can you smell the difference in the air, but you can also feel it in your body too.

Positive Ions in our Homes
Many of the pollutants floating in the air of our homes like pollen, dirt, and dust all have a positive charge.  They get this charge from the static electricity that occurs in our home from daily routines.  Introducing negative ions into the air; combats these allergens. It has actually been scientifically proven to reduce many allergic issues like hay fever and asthma.  Negative ions can even help you sleep better too. Harmonizing the ions in your surrounding can help make you feel healthier and actually distress you.  Releasing additional negative ions can help with depression (SAD), headaches, and can even help you stay focused. Negatively charged ions work to make you healthier too.  Negative ions can help to boost your body’s immunity as well as help to build a resistance to many illnesses. Your body’s metabolism also benefits from negative ions making it more efficient.

Introduction of Negative Ions to our Homes
Beeswax can be considered an air purifier.  Beeswax candles are the only candles that emit negative ions into the air when lit.  Since opposites attract; these negative ions attach themselves to the positive ones.  This therefore balances the charge. Once the ions are bound together, the charge is now neutralized, and the molecule is complete.  The heavier mass causes these ions to fall to the ground, and they are no longer suspended in the air as contaminants.  This process of stabilizing, removes the ions, and cleans the air we breathe. The negative ions emitted by beeswax candles can even clean the air to eliminate smells like second hand smoke and many common household odors. Beeswax candles can be scented and colored just like other candle waxes.  Beeswax candles produce very little soot and burn very slowly.  These candles will provide your home with hours of purer, crisper, and fresher quality air.

Attention:  Natures Garden provides this information for educational purposes only.  We do not intend for this information to be misconstrued as medical advice or for treatment of any ailments.  If selling beeswax candles, refrain from making medical claims on your labels and/or advertising.   Promoting this way could make your candles considered a “drug” by the FDA.

Best Candle Scents

Tuesday, January 21st, 2014

best candle scentsBest Candle Scents

Recently a great question was posted on Natures Garden’s Facebook Page.  We thought that this was such a good question that we wanted to make a blog post about it.

The question was, “What scents work best in candles?”  Looking for the best candle scents can be quite a task.  You want to ensure that the candle has both a great cold throw (the smell of the candle when it is not lit) and hot throw (the smell of the candle when it it lit and has a wet pool.)  As always, testing is key.  However, to help in the quest for best candle scents, we turned to the pros.  We asked our candle making friends on Facebook to give us their suggestions and input on what they thought were the best candle scents.  The responses we received were plentiful and very helpful.  To all of the candle makers that shared your input, thank you very much.

After reviewing, researching, and calculating the information, we complied a list of the top 20 best candle scents.  These scents are listed in no particular order.  Complimenting each candle scent suggestion is a customer review on their personal experience with the fragrance oil in a candle.

1.  7 UP Pound Cake Scent- “This FO is soooo good. We use it in soy wax, and it is beautiful and strong. It is very popular with our customers. We are so in love with this fragrance!!”

2.  Apple Orchard Scent-  “Fantastic cold/hot throw in soy. Clean, crisp, classic red apple scent without the spice. I’m sure this one will be a favorite year-round.  Used 1 oz per lb of 100% soy.”

3.  Black Cherry Bomb Scent-  “This black cherry is definitely the bomb. I made a soy candle and was very pleased with the cold and hot throw of this fragrance.”

4.  Blueberry Cobbler Scent-  “I went out on a limb and bought a sample of this one. I didn’t like it right out of the bottle. Tried it in Natures Garden Soy Wax and it was LOVELY! Amazing scent throw with this one. Will buy again.”

5. Blueberry Muffin Scent-  “This fragrance is AMAZING. Really fills the room in a soy candle. Please do not ever stop making this fragrance.”

6.  Bite Me Scent-  “Wonderful cold and hot throw in soy. Cured for only 24 hours and it had an awesome throw. Love it!”

7.  Cashmere Type Scent-  “This Cashmere is awesome! I just love the floral and sweet notes in it. It’s very sensual. I used in soy wax. It has a great cold and hot throw. Love it!”

8.  Coco Mango Scent-“ This is a great summer scent! The coconut & mango in it have a strong throw in my soy candles. This fragrance has a stronger throw than most. I have many requests for it. This fragrance is a must have!”

9.  Country Bumpkin Scent-  “Really a great fall fragrance. Strong! Threw hot and cold. I swear you could smell all the wonderful layers to this fragrance. Used in a paraffin soy blend 1.5 oz.”

10.  Eucalyptus Spearmint Scent-  “I used this scent in candles. The scent is wonderful. Spearmint is a natural mood up lifter, burning this candle makes life easier.”

11.  Fresh Linen Scent-  “This is a best seller for me. If you are looking for a crisp, clean scent, then this is for you. Excellent cold and hot throw in 100% soy.”

12.  (NG) Island Fresh (Gain) Type Scent-  “The first day I debuted this fragrance my customers absolutely loved it! Smells just like the real thing and has a strong wonderfully fresh scent. I would highly recommend to all other candle makers.”

13.  Lick Me All Over Scent-  “It’s another “sleeper” It’s okay in the bottle, but once its in 100% soy its AWESOME! I used hot pink dye and its perfect. I’ve already had customers wanting this in everything from candles to bath and body products.”

14.  Lilac Scent-  “My customers can’t get enough of this. It is a true lilac scent. Excellent scent throw both hot and cold.”

15.  (NG) Loving Spell Scent-  “This is my number one seller of all. I purchase multiples of this scent each time. Scent throw is amazing and it smells just like V.S. Lovespell. If you don’t have this one you’re missing out!”

16.  Monkey Farts Scent-  “Monkey Farts fragrance is outstanding! Banana scent POPS! I used in Ecosoya CB Advanced Pure Soy, 1 Pound & 1 oz. Monkey Farts. 48 Hours cure time the cold throw was good. In 4 Days cure time, the Cold and Hot throw was AWESOME!!! Very Strong.”

17.  Peppermint Patty Scent-  “I was surprised on how this smelled the real thing. Love it. This is going into my collection. Used in 100% Soy wax. Great hot and cold scent throw.”

18.  Pink Sugar Type Scent-  “Amazing FO! Warm & sweet, but romantic and slightly feminine. Does smell of cotton candy, but so much more complex. Great throw in soy, both hot and cold. Love it, love it, love it!”

19.  Red Hot Cinnamon Scent-  “This is a must have. This is just like the candy. Used in soy wax. Excellent scent  throw.”

20.  Sweet Orange Chili Pepper Scent-  “This FO is really fantastic. Powerful orange citrus scent with a spicy kick. Very unique. I used this in soy 464 and a parasoy blend and both had outstanding cold and hot throws.”

Candle Instructions

Monday, January 6th, 2014

triple layer candleCandle Instructions

Burning candles in your home can be very enjoyable.  Candles are relaxing, soothing, and can fill your home with the most pleasurable aromas.  But, since burning a candle does involve an open flame, you must always burn candles with caution.

Here are some candle instructions to ensure candle safety when burning a candle.

Where to Burn a Candle:

Some things to consider when selecting the right candle holder for your candle are the material it is made of, size, and design.  You want to make sure the candle holder is made of sturdy and heat resistant material that can endure the high heat that some candles may give off.  Size is another factor because you want to ensure that your candle holder is large enough to hold your candle and also to prevent your candle from tipping over anytime that it is lit.

Never place your candle on a surface that cannot withstand heat, these types of surfaces may become damaged if the candle becomes too hot, or the candle holder breaks.

Never move a lit candle.  If you need to move your candle once it has been lit, extinguish the flame and allow the wax to set up before attempting to move it.  If a candle has been burning for an extended period of time, the container will be hot.

Always burn candles where they are out of reach to children and pets.  A flame can be very captivating to a small child.  You also do not want to burn a candle where it can easily be knocked over by an excited dog’s tail, or places where indoor cats frequent.

Never burn a candle by any object that is flammable.  Never burn candles near paperwork; especially on desks.  Draperies can also easily catch fire so avoid window sills and end tables near windows.

Never burn candles where they will be left unattended.  You only want to leave candles lit where an adult is in the room to monitor it.  Also, before going to sleep, extinguish all candles in the house.  You will want to ensure that your wick is completely out and no longer “glowing”.  Never use candles as nightlights.

When burning candles, make sure they are placed somewhere away from drafts.  Be wary of burning a candle in a room that has a ceiling fan going; you want to place the burning candle where it will not be affected by the breeze.

When burning multiple candles in one room, make sure they are at least 3 inches apart.  This is especially true for pillar or votive candles.  Burning candles too close to one another may result in the candles melting one another.  This can also create a draft situation where your candles will flare.

If you are interested in viewing other tips and tricks of candle making, or the homemade candle making process, please click on this link.  Natures Garden also provides free recipes and classes for candle making.

Candle Burning

Friday, January 3rd, 2014

candle burn Candle Burning

Regardless of whether you are making candles for personal use, gifts, or to earn extra income; candles are flammable.  You always want to make sure that you have taken all the right measures to ensure the safest candle possible.  Not only is candle safety important to the crafter, but it is also just as important to the person that burns the candle.

Here are some great tips for burning candles, the best way to extinguish a candle, and what to do if your candle wax is on fire.

Candle Burning and Maintenance:

Always before lighting your candle; trim the wick!  You never want your wick to be longer than ¼ inch.  Also, when lighting your candle, do not throw the wick trimming into the candle.  You want to keep your candle free of any and all debris such as:  dust, wick trimmings, matches, ect.  You want your candle pool to be scented wax only.

Keep your wick straight.  Once your wick has been trimmed, you will want to pull it straight.  If your wick is bent, your wick will burn hotter than regular.  This will result in a quicker burn time of your candle.

When it is time to extinguish your candle, always use a snuffer.  A candle snuffer is the easiest and safest way to put out a flame.  Using a snuffer will prevent hot wax splatter.  Candle wax is hot, you never want to touch it, or get wax splatter on you or surfaces in your home.

Never put a candle flame out with water.  Water can cause the hot wax in your candles to splatter.  There is also a chance that the glass container of your candle may also break.

If after lighting your candle, you notice the wick flickering, smoking, or the flame of your candle becomes too large; the candle is not functioning properly.  Extinguish the flame, let the candle cool, trim your wick to ¼ inch, check the rooms for drafts, and then re-light.

After a candle has been burned to the point where there is only 1/2 inch of wax left in the bottom of the container, stop burning.  The candle is now finished.  Never burn a candle all the way down.

For Candle Making Purposes: 

For your candle making area, it is wise to purchase a dry chemical fire extinguisher in case of any fires.  If you do have a wax fire, the dry chemical extinguisher or baking soda should be used to suffocate the flames.  Never use water to put out a wax fire.

Oil in Candle

Thursday, January 2nd, 2014

candle making questionsCandle Making Questions:

Why is there excess oil in candle?  Sometimes when making candles, your finished product may have excess oil in it.   This oil slick may be along the edges, on the top, or at the bottom of your candle.  This oil is actually fragrance oil.  Excess fragrance oil in the candle containers is a tell tale sign that too much fragrance oil was used in the candle making process.

How to Solve It!  Sticking to the recommended usage suggestion for fragrance oil per type of wax is the smartest move, especially if you are new to candle making.  Another early warning sign to prevent oil in your finished candle happens during the pour steps.  When pouring the wax into the containers, if you notice an “oil slick” in the bottom of your pouring pot, stop the pour before the oil comes out.  If there is any leftover fragrance oil that the wax did not absorb initially, the wax will not absorb it in your container either.

To view other candle making questions and common troubleshooting tips for candle making, please click on this link to see the full Natures Garden’s Common Candle Making Mistakes Guide.

Soy Candles

Sunday, December 29th, 2013

Soy wax Candles Anyone who works with soy wax knows that candles produced with this wax will have great cold throw.  Cold throw is the scent of the candle when it is not lit.  Typically with soy wax, this throw will always be strong.  However, when it comes to hot throw with soy wax you may be left desiring more.

Why does my candle not have hot throw?

When using soy wax to craft your candles, a lack of hot throw is just the nature of the wax.  However, it could be possible that there was not enough fragrance or scent added to the melted wax.  When it comes to adding the scent to the wax, temperature is everything; and be careful not to add the fragrance when the temperature is too high.  Finally, the last thing to consider is the wick.  This will also have a direct effect on the hot throw in your candle.

How to Solve It

If you are just not satisfied with the hot throw of your soy candles and have carefully examined all of the possible problems that may have inhibited your hot scent throw; you may want to consider changing your wax.   Paraffin based waxes have very strong hot throw.  You can also switch your wax to a blend of both soy and paraffin.  Natures Garden’s Joy Wax is a great example of this blend; providing candles with excellent hot and cold throw.

With soy wax, you are able to add up to 1.5 ounces of fragrance oil per pound of soy wax.  This fragrance load will provide the best possible scent for soy wax candles.  Also, if you are interested in seeing if a fragrance oil performs in soy wax, check out the fragrance oil’s customer reviews.  People often post what medium they used the fragrance oil in, especially if it works in soy wax.

Also, when making candles, waxes vary in the degree in which you can add the fragrance.  If you are noticing that your candles are not producing a strong enough hot throw, you may want to lower the temperature at which you add the fragrance oil.  It can be possible that some of the fragrance is burning off simply by the heat of the melted wax.  Adding your fragrance at too high of a temperature will do this.

Selecting a hotter burning wick for your candles will also help with a candle’s hot throw.  Some great hotter burning wicks to select from are Hemp or CD wicks.  But as always, testing is key.

Gel Wax

Thursday, December 19th, 2013

Natures Garden Gel WaxThere are many different kinds of candle waxes available in the industry; gel wax stands out for some of its own very unique reasons.

What is Gel Wax

Consisting of 95% mineral oil and 5% polymer resin, gel wax is a rubbery and clear mixture.  The polymer resin is used to thicken the mineral oil to add the properties true to gel wax; long burn time and clear look.  This wax, unique in its form; is able to extend burn time by double (compared to paraffin).  That is one of the biggest selling points to gel wax.  Just as important is the special aesthetic aspect to gel wax; its transparency.

Candles crafters that work with gel wax are able to manipulate it by embedding, shaping, and pairing the wax to achieve specific looks.  Some of the more popular finished products of these techniques would be sand candles, fruit pie candles, or beverage candles.

Embeds are inserts that are positioned into the gel wax before it completely solidifies.  These non flammable items are then suspended in the hardened wax.  This gives gel wax candles a very rare look.  Some examples of embeds you can use in this wax would be: sea shells, glass or wax embeds, or glitter. Never use plastic embeds for gel wax candles.

Another notable advantage of working with gel wax is how forgiving it is.  Any corrections that you want to touch up in the finished candle can be done.  It is as simple as remelting, rescenting, recoloring, and repouring.

How to Melt Gel Wax

The process of melting gel is slightly different than your other waxes.  With this one, there is no specific temperature to heat in order to liquefy.  This wax, as it melts; only thins.  Stirring is key with gel wax.

It is also important to keep a watchful eye on gel wax as it thins.  Stirring frequently and monitoring will ensure the correct melting process.  Gel wax does not thin quicker by heating at a higher temperature; gel wax will only smoke.

Tips on Gel Candles

Never try to move a gel wax candle while it is burning or was just lit.  Liquid gel wax is extremely hot and will cause severe burns if splashed onto the skin.

The top layer of a gel wax candle is very sticky.  This is just the nature of gel wax.  You always want to keep your gel wax candle cover in between uses.   This will prevent the wax from collecting dust and debris on that sticky layer.

Gel wax is strictly a container wax.  Due to its makeup, the wax is not strong enough to be a pillar wax.  This should be noted especially for shipping and storage reasons.  If your candle is placed on its side or upside down, the wax will start to slide/pour out.

If you are interested in making a gel wax Beer Candle, click on this link; if you would like to try a gel wax Wine Candle, click on this link.  There are many other homemade recipes that can be found at Natures Garden’s Free Recipes and Classes area of their website.

Candle Smoking?

Sunday, December 15th, 2013

candle smokingWhy is My Candle Smoking?

Whenever something is being burned, there will be some amount of smoke.  Naturally, when you limit the amount of oxygen, you will see more smoke than when ample oxygen is supplied.  However, you can prevent your homemade candles from excessively smoking by making your candles the right way in the first place.  There are a few reasons as to why a candle may smoke once lit.  The first check point to examine is whether or not the correct amount of fragrance oil was used in the process.  Using more than the recommended amount of fragrance oil per pound of wax may sound like it is a good idea to have extreme scent, but in the end it is only wasteful (and costly), and can cause your candles to smoke.  Wax has a fragrance load limit.  Since it is a porous object, once each and every pore has been filled, there is no more area for the fragrance to go.

The second reason your candle may be smoking is the wick.  Using the proper wick for the diameter size of the candle is the best way to ensure a clean and even burn in the candle.  Go here to read a very interesting blog post on the science of candle wicks.  A smoking wick will occur if the wick of the candle is too large for the container.  To view a wick suggestion chart for your sized candle container click here  for Natures Garden’s wick recommendations.  Avoid allowing the debris from wick clippings from entering into your melted wax, and keep your wicks trimmed to 1/4″.

Finally, your colorant may cause your candle to smoke.  It is important to know that pigments can clog your wick and can cause increased smoking when burning your candle.  That is why only candle dyes should be used to color the interior wax of candles.  Never use crayons to color your candles as they contain pigments instead of dyes.  When using candle dyes, understand that using alot of candle dye may also cause your candles to smoke more.

How to Solve It!

When it comes to fragrance oil percentage, never use more than the suggested amount of fragrance oil per pound of wax.  Remember, using more may result in a candle with a fragrance oil slick that is a fire hazard.

Do your research first.  In order to know which wick to use in candle making, you must first know your candle’s diameter.  You can figure this out by measuring the bottom of your candle container with a ruler.  You will want to measure horizontally across the center.  Once you have this information, simply look at the wick suggestion chart and select which kind of wick you need.  Keep wick trimmings out of your melted wax, and keep wicks trimmed to 1/4″.  Also, avoid burning your candles where there are fans or drafts.  This can cause your wick to move around and burn too quickly; potentially smoking more.

In candle making temperature is very important.  Many waxes offer a range in temperature for their key steps (melting temperature, scenting temperature, pouring temperature).   It is a very good idea to monitor these temperatures with the help of a testing notebook and thermometer.  Within a few times of making candles, you can have your temperatures down to a specific degree.  With well taken notes, it is possible to have your candle making process replicated exactly time and time again.

Lastly, you always want to avoid using pigments in the interior of your candle.  Only candle dyes should be used to color the interior of your candle wax.

What are Candle Additives

Sunday, December 8th, 2013

candle additivesCandle Additives are additional ingredients that you can add to candle wax to improve the quality of the finished product.  Candle wax can vary from batch to batch, so knowing how to adjust to these situations is key.  There are a variety of candle additives at your disposal, spanning an array of possibilities for your candles.  Some additives improve scent throw, some help with discoloration, there are even additives to help extend burn time.  The key to providing the best candle you can to the market is knowing what candle additives are available and what they can do for your products.

Stearic Acid

What is Stearic Acid:  The candle additive stearic acid helps the wax shrink as it cools.  This is key to remember especially if you are making candles in molds.  The addition of stearic acid will help release your candle smoothly.   Stearic Acid also boosts the opacity of candle wax.  If you are making candles and coloring them with powdered dye, the powdered dye can be melted in stearic acid before adding it to the melted wax to ensure an even dispersal of color throughout the candle.  Stearic Acid can also be used to make gel wax embeds by adding it to pillar or votive wax.

How Much To Use:  Stearic Acid is added to paraffin wax.  The correct percentage use for this additive is 10% of the total wax amount.  Therefore, for every pound (16oz) of paraffin wax you use, you will add 1.5 oz of stearic acid.  Stearic Acid can also be used at an additional 2% in your paraffin wax if you have selected to scent your candle with heavier fragrance oils like vanilla scents.  The extra added stearic acid in this case will help the candle wax with fragrance seepage.  A break down example for this is 2 tsp. for every 16oz of wax.

Vybar

What is Vybar:  The candle additive vybar is a substitute for stearic acid.  Vybar is also used to help extend the scent throw in your candles.   The addition of vybar to your candle wax will make the wax more opaque.  You will also notice a marbleized look to the top open portion in container candles.  Vybar will also increase your candles melt point and also slightly harden your wax consistency.  There are two different types of vybar depending of which type of candle you are making.  Vybar 103 is used in votive or pillar candles.  Vybar 260 is used in container candles.

How Much To Use:  If you are looking to get the best scent throw possible out of your candles, vybar can be added to your candle wax at ¼ to ½ tsp. for every 16oz. of wax.  This proportion provides the very best results.  There is a precaution when it comes to adding vybar to your wax.  Adding to much of this additive will result in trapped fragrance oil, directly meaning decreased scent throw.  If fragrance oil is trapped in wax, the scent will not evaporate correctly when the candle is lit.  Therefore, it is best to stick with the recommended use mentioned above.

Petrolatum

What is Petrolatum:  The candle additive Petrolatum is also known as petroleum jelly.  This additive is used in container wax only and works by increasing the number of pores in your wax.  Petrolatum will also increase the oil content in a wax therefore making it creamier and softer.  The addition of Petrolatum to your wax will also help the wax to adhere to the sides of its container as well as help to reduce shrinkage of the wax.  This candle additive will also aid in the reduction of the melting point resulting in an end product with a longer burn time.

How Much To Use:  With this candle additive, testing is key.  A good starting point is up to 5% of your total wax amount.  This percentage can range all the way up to 30%.  Please Note:  Using this candle additive may affect your clean burn resulting in some smoking from your candle.

Crisco Shortening

What is Crisco Shortening:  Crisco Shortening is commonly used in food recipes, but can also be used as a candle additive.  The addition of Crisco Shortening to a candle wax will help to extend the candles scent throw and decrease the chance of having wet spots.  A good alternative to Petrolatum, this additive even works better with certain container candle waxes then Petrolatum does.

How Much To Use:  Through our testing, we have found that the addition of Crisco Shortening at 1-2 oz. per pound of container wax provides your finished candle with a better scent throw.

Mineral Oil

What is Mineral Oil- Mineral oil is also known as paraffin oil.  Commonly used as an emollient agent for cosmetics, mineral oil can also be used as a candle additive.  The addition of mineral oil to your candle wax will provide for a mottled look in your end product.

How Much To Use:  To achieve a mottled look in candles, add 3 Tbs. of mineral oil per every pound of wax you are melting.   You will want to pour the candles at 160 degrees Fahrenheit.  When using this candle additive in your wax, you do not want to rush the cooling process of the candles with a water bath.

Beeswax

What is Beeswax:  The candle additive beeswax will improve a candles burn time and also provide your end product with a beautiful rich color if you choose to color the candles.  Now, the addition of beeswax to your candle recipes can be expensive, but well worth it if you choose to go that route.

How Much To Use:  Beeswax can be used as the only wax in a candle, or it can also be added at 5-10% of the total amount of paraffin wax.

Microcrystalline Wax

What is Microcrystalline Wax:  There are 2 different forms of Microcrystalline wax; hard and soft.  The candle additive hard Microcrystalline wax is added to paraffin wax to harden wax therefore providing the candle with an extended burn time.  The melt point for hard microcrystalline wax is over 200 degrees Fahrenheit.  This candle additive can also be used as a dip wax to make mottled candles.  The other type, Soft Microcrystalline wax has a lower melting wax point.  This wax is used with paraffin wax to make modeled wax.  The addition of this candle additive will also help the wax adhere to the containers as well.

How Much To Use:  For the Hard Microcrystalline wax, the usage suggestion is 1% of the total wax amount.  For the Soft Microcrystalline wax, the usage suggestion is about 10% of the total wax amount, or about 1.5 oz. per pound of wax.

UV Light Inhibitor

What is UV Light Inhibitor:  When coloring your candles, there are certain hues that have a tendency to discolor.  These colors are Blue, Burgundy, and Violet.  The same can be said about any variations of these colors as well.  UV Light Inhibitor is a candle additive that helps to prevent the sun’s affect of fading or discoloration in your candles.  However, it must be noted that if finished candles are set in direct sunlight, even with the addition of UV Light Inhibitor, fading will still occur.

How Much To Use:  The addition of this candle additive is added at a rate of 1/8 tsp per 16oz. of wax used.

What should I charge for my candles?

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

candle price

Customers frequently ask us this question:  What should I charge my customers for my candles? 

This is a question that many candle makers often ask.  Knowing what to charge for your candles is a pivotal point in your business.  You want your price of the candles that you sell to be competitive.  You also want to remember that the candle price should also reflect not only your cost but the time that you put into your candle making procedure as well.

What to charge for my candles?  When I made and sold finished candles, I had an easy equation that I used to figure out the price I would charge my customers for my candles.  First, I added up all of my expenses.  This told me how much it cost me to make the candle I was going to sell.  When I sold my candles at wholesale prices to stores, I charged the customer double what I paid to make the candle.  When I sold directly to retail customers myself (without sales reps involved), I charged the customer triple what I paid to make the candle.

After I was in business a while, I realized that in order to sell more products, I would need to get help from other people.  That is where Independent Sales Reps were introduced in my candle company.  When a candle sale was made by a sales rep, the sales rep received 1/3 of every sale, 1/3 went to cover the cost of making the candle, and 1/3 was my profit.

Fundraisers were conducted the very same way:  1/3 of the sale went to the non-profit organization, 1/3 went to cover the cost of making the products, and 1/3 went to me as profit.

To view how hiring an independent sales rep for your business can help to increase your sales, please click on this link.

I hope this helps you when you price out your candles.

Happy Candle Making!

Deborah of Natures Garden