Category Archives: candle dye

Mar
14

Easy Soy Candle

This entry was posted in candle colorants, candle dye, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle scents, candle wax, candle wicks, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Fragrance Oils, soy candles, soy wax and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

first soy candleHello everyone! My name is Cindy and I am the new Marketing Rep for Natures Garden.

Although I am not new to the candle scene; I used to sell paraffin candles for Deborah back in 1997, I am new to the making homemade products world.  After working for Natures Garden a few days, I quickly realized that one of the most important aspects of my position is that I know all of these products in and out.  Since I am a hands on learner, the best way for me to understand these products is to put myself in your shoes and become a candle and soap artisan.  And, today I did just that.

Since I already have some knowledge in the candle market, I decided to start my venture with soy wax.  Now, I want to shout it from the roof tops, “I made my first candle….ever….in my whole life”.  It was super easy too!

Although secretly, I do have to admit I was a little concerned at first.  I actually thought I might burn down the test kitchen, a common fear that I assume many new crafters have.

Realizing it is now or never, I stood up straight and pulled myself together.  You will never learn if you never try, right?  So, I gathered all of my ingredients and supplies, and went to work.  The step by step instruction I used to make my candle came from the How To Make A Pure Soy Wax Candle Recipe.   This recipe as well as hundreds of others are offered in the free recipes and classes section of Natures Gardens website.    I now understand that every recipe created by Natures Garden came from the trial and error process.  A process that is done to put forth the BEST end product.  Natures Gardens creative team makes all the mistakes so you don’t have to (I think I hear a commercial in there).

Anyway, I worked through the easy to follow steps and before I knew it (about 30 minutes later), I was standing before my first candle creation.  A beautiful purple colored, Lavender Sage scented candle.  I could not believe my eyes.  I actually thought to myself….well, that was easy.  Who knew?  I then realized I could have been doing this for years, guaranteeing the candles I burned in my home had the best scent throw and longest burn time.

Now that I know just how easy it is to make candles, the possibilities are endless.  Guess what kind of gifts I’ll be giving this year…lol?  Overall I really enjoyed my experience; that is after I got over the initial fear.  A word of advice for anyone that wants to give candle making a try… I strongly encourage you to do it!  Candle making is easy, fun, and the accomplishment of your creation is inspiring.

Well kids, until my next adventure, have a FABULOUS day!
Cindy

Mar
13

Soy Candle Recipe

This entry was posted in candle colorants, candle dye, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle recipe, candle scents, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, candles, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

how to make a soy candle Soy candles always seem to be the craze.  The soy wax 415 that Natures Garden carries is a 100% all natural vegetable wax.  This also means that this soy wax is biodegradable, and is made from a renewable resource.  When used to make candles; soy wax provides a nice, clean and long burn.

For this recipe, we have figured everything out for you (measurements, temperatures, color, and scent).  We are also presenting it to you in an easy to follow step by step form (with photos).  This recipe will make (1) 16oz apothecary jar candle.

Your finished soy candle will be colored in a light red hue, and scented in with a matching apple orchard fragrance.

We will be double wicking our apothecary jar with (2) CD-10 wicks.  This wicking will provide the candle with a nice hot burn, and allow the scent to travel nicely through the wick; guaranteeing a wonderful hot scent throw.

Besides the ingredients hyper linked above, you will also need some other candle making equipment.  This includes: Thermometer, POURING POT, Warning Labels, Glass Apothecary Jar (16oz), Hot Glue Gun with Gun, Scale, Pot, A cookie sheet, and a Stirring Spoon.

Now, normally prior to making a soy wax candle, you must first check the flashpoint of the scent.  This is important because the flashpoint will indicate the temperature at which you will add the fragrance oil.  However, for this recipe, we have already figured out this information.  Apple Orchard has a flashpoint of 155 degrees Fahrenheit.  What this means is that the temperature at which we will be adding the fragrance oil to the soy wax is 155 degrees Fahrenheit.  Our rule of thumb is:  If a fragrance flash point is below 130F, then add it to wax at 130F.  If the fragrance oil flash point is between 130-185F, then add the fragrance to the wax at its flash point.  If a fragrance oil has a flash point above 185F, then add the fragrance to the wax at 185F.

So now, before we get started making our soy candle; it is important to get all of the supplies and equipment ready that we will be using.  Most of these supplies can be purchased at Natures Garden.  Once you have all of this ready to go; lets get started!

supplies for making a soy candle

Step 1:  Get your pot.  Into the pot, place several inches of tap water.  Next you are going to put the pot on to the stove top and set the heat setting on medium.

prepping for double boiler method

Step 2:  Now get your pouring pot.  Inside the pot, weigh out 440 grams of the 100% soy wax flakes.  Once you have the amount, place the pouring pot into the water pot.  This will be how we melt the soy flakes.  This process is known as the double boiler method.

the double boiler process

Step 3:  Set your oven to 170 degrees Fahrenheit.  Next, place your apothecary jar on your cookie sheet.  Then, place the cookie sheet inside the oven.  Allow the jar to warm for 10-15 minutes, then remove.  Also, plug in your hot glue gun now.

warming your apothecary jar

Step 4:  Now, place your thermometer into the wax.  This is important because you will want to monitor the temperature of the wax while it is melting.  Never let the temperature go higher than 200 degrees Fahrenheit.  This will burn and discolor the wax.  As the wax melts, stir it occasionally.  Also, keeping melting until all the wax is in a liquid state.

melting soy wax

Step 5:  Once the wax is all melted, remove it from heat.  When the temperature reaches 185 degrees Fahrenheit, add the 4 drops of Spectrum Red Candle Dye.  Stir.

coloring soy wax

Step 6:  After the wax has been colored, check your temperature again.  When the temperature reaches 155 degrees Fahrenheit, add your 35 grams of Apple Orchard fragrance oil.  Stir again for a full 2 minutes.  This thorough stir will help the wax, fragrance, and color adhere.  Then, place your thermometer back into the wax.

scenting the soy wax

Step 7:  Next, grab your hot glue gun and place a small amount of glue on the bottom of your wick tabs.  Then, center and secure your candle wicks.

center and secure your wicks

Step 8:  Now, stick your warning label to the bottom of your jar.

applying your warning label

Step 9:  Check the temperature of the wax, you will be looking for it to reach 110 degrees Fahrenheit.  Once it does, give your wax one final stir.

checking for the pour temp
Step 10:  Then, slowly start to pour your candle.  You will want to stop your pour once the wax reaches where the jar changes shape.  Then, straighten your wicks.

pouring your soy candle
Step 11: 
Now, allow your candle to fully set up undisturbed.

allowing your candle to set up

Step 12:  Once the candle has hardened, trim your wicks, and lid your jar.  Allow your candle to cure for 24-48 hours.

Congratulations, you just made a soy candle.  Your 100% Soy Wax Candle is now finished and ready to burn.  Enjoy the sweet apple scent that will fill your home and make your house smell good!

Feb
07

Homemade Zebra Candle

This entry was posted in candle colorants, candle dye, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle recipe, candle scents, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, creative, Fragrance Oils and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

make your own zebra candleHow to make your very own homemade Zebra Candle!

This easy to make project is even fun to create.  Besides the standard candle making supplies such as: soy wax, wicks, scent, color, and jars; you will also need beeswax.  We will be using the beeswax to make the zebra stripes in the candle.  Because of the pliability of beeswax, it has the capability of being shaped easily into stripes.  Plus, due to the high melt point it has, beeswax can withstand a pour of another wax (soy), as long as the temperature isn’t too extreme.

Although for this project, the scent that was selected was Hot Pink Pomegranate Fragrance Oil, when you make your own zebra candle you can scent it to your pleasing.  The same is true for the candle color.  Since our fragrance oil has the name hot pink in it, the decision was made to make the zebra candle stripes pink on a white (or uncolored) background.

To see the full list of possible candle scents, please click on this link.  There are over 800 different fragrances to choose from!

Here are your total recipe weights to make (2) 16oz. Zebra Candles:
190 grams beeswax
2 drops candle dye (if making the candle like pictured)
About 4 oz.  of candle scent
1100 grams of soy wax (Golden Foods 444 soy wax)

Other items that you will need for this recipe are:
wax paper
pencil
knife
9×13 cake pan
2- 16 oz candle jars
4 wicks (we used 2- cd10 wicks per candle)
scale
2 pots (for double boiler method)
stirring spoon
cutting board
thermometer

Below are the steps to make your very own zebra candle (pictures included):

Step 1:  Using the double boiler method, weigh out and melt 190 grams of beeswax.  You will want to set the temperature of your stove top between medium and low heat while melting.  Stir the beeswax occasionally as it melts.

steps to make a zebra candle

Step 2:   This step is the colorant of your zebra stripes:  Once the beeswax is melted, now you will add 2 drops of your candle colorant, and stir.  Once you are done, place your pouring pot back into the heat source.

color for the zebra candle

Step 3:  To make the zebra stripes, you will need to concentrate your beeswax in a portion of the area in your cake pan.  To do this, lay out your cake pan on a flat surface.  Next, roughly measure out at least 9 inches in length.  Hold this place by setting your knife across the pan.  Finally, lay the wax paper over the cake pan and knife.  Carefully, tuck the corners of the wax paper down.

how to make zebra stripes

Step 4:  Now it is time to scent your beeswax:  Remove your beeswax from the heat source.  Weigh out about 19 grams of your candle fragrance oil.  Then, add the fragrance and stir to incorporate it throughout the wax.

zebra candle scent

Step 5:  Now, take your beeswax and slowly start to pour it over the flat portion of the wax paper.  Allow this to fully set up.  Do not try to rush this step.  Cooling beeswax too quickly, may cause it to crack!

making the zebra candle stripes

Step 6:  Once the beeswax has hardened, and is cool to the touch; gently remove it from the cake pan.  Carefully stand the square on one end and starting in one corner, peel away the wax paper.  Then, place the beeswax on your cutting board.  Finally, cut off any jagged edges using your knife.

zebra candle recipe

Step 7:  For the background of your zebra candle, you will be using soy wax.  In order to have enough wax for 2 candles, weigh out and melt 1100 grams of soy wax.  Melt this wax using the double boiler method.  While the wax is melting, stir occasionally.

soy wax zebra candle

Step 8:  You will create the zebra stripe pattern using the tip of a pencil.  Trace this lightly into the beeswax.  The shape that you will want to draw will be various sized long and irregular lines similar to tree branches.  When you are finished, cut these lines out.

making zebra stripes in beeswax

Step 9:  Once you have a few of your stripes cut out, carefully begin to place them individually against the inside wall of your candle jar.  It is best to start at the bottom of your jar and work in an angular direction.  Apply slight and even pressure until the stripes stick.  Repeat this step until you have the zebra design you are looking for.  Then, do it again for your second candle.

zebra candle pattern

Step 10:  Center and secure your wicks to the bottom of your candle jars.  Then, set aside.

centering your wicks

Step 11:  When your soy wax is in a completely liquid state, remove it from the heat source.  If you are adding color to the background of the zebra candle, do this now.  Then, add 110 grams of fragrance Oil.  Stir again.

Step 12:  Using your thermometer, wait until the soy wax reaches 115 degrees Fahrenheit; this temperature will not melt your zebra stripes.  Pour the soy wax into your candle jars.  Don’t forget to straighten your wicks. Allow the candles to fully set up undisturbed.

pouring a zebra candle

Now it is time to celebrate, your Zebra candles are now ready to use.  Simply trim your wick, light, and enjoy your new awesome candle.

Feb
06

Realistic Gel Candle

This entry was posted in beeswax, candle colorants, candle dye, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle recipe, Fragrance Oils, gel wax, gel wax scents and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

honeycomb candleGel wax is a great candle wax for embedding items in candles.  This translucent wax also provides the opportunity to make realistic gel candles.  Sea or ocean themed gel candles are perfect examples of this, right down to the air bubbles.

We at Natures Garden however, wanted to take the realistic gel candle concept and kick it up a notch.  Using the fragrance oil Honey, which is gel safe; we arrived at a notion of somehow adding the look of an embedded honeycomb.  Trying to stick with items we already had in house, we creatively used bubble wrap and beeswax (because of it’s high melting point); to make our very own spin on embeds.  Through several trails and errors, we found the perfect look, scent, and color for this Honeycomb Candle Recipe.

Here is a List of the Items You Will Need:
Gel Wax- to emulate the look of delicious honey
Beeswax
White Pastilles- to make the embed of a honeycomb
Honey Fragrance Oil- a gel safe scent to match the realistic gel candle theme
Zinc Core Wicking- to make your candle more than just a decoration (4)  51-32-18z wicks  (2 in each candle)
Spectrum Candle Dye- Yellow- the color of the honeycomb
Spectrum Candle Dye- Orange- this color lightly added to the yellow makes the perfect golden honey hue
Thermometer- to monitor the temperature of the gel wax

Other Items and Supplies Needed: 
Stirring Spoon- to fully incorporate the color and scent to the wax
Stove- for the double boiler method
Scale- to be dead on for your measurements
Knife- to cut the beeswax
Toothpick- to add a touch of orange to the gel wax
9 x 13 cake pan- to make the honeycomb
bubble wrap- to make the honeycomb shape
(2) Pots- for double boiler method
Apothecary Jars- this recipe below will make a total of (2) 16oz jars.  Any shape or size jar will work, you will just need to adjust the measurements accordingly

And finally, here are the steps with pictures included:

Step 1:  Using the double boiler method, set the temperature of your stove top between medium and low heat.  Next, weigh out and melt 230 grams of beeswax.  You will want to stir this occasionally as it melts.

Step 2:   When the beeswax is in a liquid state, place 2 drops of Spectrum Yellow Candle Dye in it and stir. After the color is incorporated, place the pot back into the heat source.

coloring beeswax
Step 3:
  Next, lay your cake pan on a flat surface, this will ensure that your honeycomb has an even thickness.  Measure out 7 inches of length in your pan.  Mark this length by placing your knife across the pan.  If your knife is not long enough, you can use any kitchen utensil that will lay across the pan.  Next, with the bubble side up, place the bubble wrap over your knife and cake pan.

how to get honeycomb look

Step 4: Now, weigh out 23 grams of Honey Fragrance Oil.  Remove your beeswax from the heat source, add the fragrance.  Stir.

Step 5:  Slowly pour the beeswax over the bubble wrap.  Allow this to fully set up. Please Note:  Do not rush the set up of beeswax or it may crack.

making beeswax look like honeycomb

Step 6:  When the beeswax has cooled, gently remove it from the cake pan. Now, taking your time, carefully peel away the bubble wrap.

honeycomb beeswax

Step 7:  Next, weigh out 1000 grams of gel wax.  Place this into the double boiler and allow it to melt, stirring occasionally.  This will resemble to a thick syrup.

Step 8:  Now, lay your beeswax on a flat surface.  Place one of your candle jars on its side.  Using your knife, mark the width of the jar (before it changes shape).  Next, subtract 1/2″ from your marking.  Finally, make a line and cut it with your knife.

honeycomb candle

Step 9:  Gently roll your beeswax into a loose circle.  Place one roll in each of your jars.  Make sure the beeswax roll is at least 1/2 inch away from the walls of the jar.  Then, set aside.

how to make a honeycomb candle

Step 10:  Now, secure your wicks to the bottom of your candle jars.  Make sure they are centered.

Step 11:  Once the gel wax is melted, place 4 drops of Spectrum Yellow Candle Dye into the gel wax.  Next, add 1 toothpick tip of Spectrum Orange Dye.  Stir.  Finally, add 100 grams of Honey Fragrance Oil.  Stir again.

how to make a honey color

Step 12:  Place your thermometer into the gel wax.  Then, begin to slowly stir the gel wax.  Do not stir to quickly or you will have an excess of air bubbles.  Keep stirring and scrapping the sides until the gel wax temperature hits 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step 13:  Now, slowly pour the gel wax into the containers until your honeycomb is covered.  Then, straighten your wicks.  Finally, allow the candles to fully set up.

pouring honeycomb candle

Your honeycomb candles are now ready.  Simply trim your wick, light, and enjoy!

With this realistic gel candle, there are two crucial steps that come into play.  The first is the thickness of the beeswax.  You want your beeswax to be nice and thick so it can withstand the temperature of the melted gel wax.  However, making the beeswax too thick may make it more difficult to curl, therefore complicating the honeycomb shape that can be achieved.  Lastly, the temperature of the melted gel wax is everything for this recipe.  Pouring over the 165 degree Fahrenheit point, will melt and warp your honeycomb.

Happy Crafting!

Dec
06

Candle Making Equipment

This entry was posted in candle additives, candle colorants, candle dye, candle making, candle making supplies, candle supplies, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

candle making equipmentWhen it comes to candle making there are a few tried and true items that you are going to need in order to create beautiful hand poured candles.  This blog will focus on possible heat sources you will want to use.

Heat Sources

Turkey Roasters- Turkey roasters work great for melting slabs of candle wax.  On average, turkey roasters can hold 20-25 pounds of candle wax at a time, so this is a great solution if you are making big batches of candles.  The average cost of a turkey roaster is anywhere from $40-$100. But, keep in mind that these turkey roasters do go on sale around the holidays, so you might be able to find a bargain.  When melting wax in a turkey roaster you will want to keep the temperature set at 175 degrees Fahrenheit.  You will also want to make sure that you have the bottom portion of the pan filled with about ¼” water.  If you do not fill this area with water, you will notice that the wax will not melt properly.  Also, you will risk burning up your turkey roaster and rearing it useless.  But, remember ¼” is the magic amount.  Using more than this amount will result in having water bubble up and entering your work space.  Try not to let any water enter the melting wax.  Water is waxes worst enemy, and water in your melted wax will result with holes in your finished candles.

If you do get water in your wax, or you notice water in wax; put your turkey roaster on the low setting and keep it uncovered.  This will allow the water to evaporate out.  When wax is made into slabs, the manufacturer uses water to cool the wax.  Sometimes, water can get trapped in the wax as it cools, and this creates water pockets.   The water will evaporate; just keep an eye on the wax.

Besides working with a single pour wax, if you choose to also make votives and or pillars, you will want to have a second turkey roaster for this wax.  It is very important that you keep the waxes separated.  If you do not, chances are your single wax will require a second pour.  But, do not stress too much if a small amount of votive/pillar wax gets into your single pour wax.  A little bit of the waxes mixing should not give you any major issues.

Stove/Hot Plate- Besides the turkey roaster, you will also need a secondary heat source.  This is because you will need to maintain your melted wax temperature (or pouring temperature) as you add colorants, additives, or fragrance oils.  A stove or hot plate are great secondary heat sources.

By using a 13” x 9” cake pan you can create the same double boiler situation like you have in your turkey roaster.  This time fill the bottom of the cake pan ½” with water.  Then, set the stove or hot plate to a low to medium heat setting.  Place the cake pan with water on top of the burner and allow the water to heat.

Ideally, a stove works best for this situation, especially if you also warm your candle containers before pouring the hot candle wax into them.  Warming your containers will help to prevent jump lines from occurring in your candles.  Jump lines occur when the melted wax cools too quickly in your jars.  Warming your candle jars levels the “temperature playing field” if you will, allowing the wax to cool in its own natural time by decreasing the gap in temperature between the hot wax and warmed jars.

Nov
06

Candle Making- Soy Candles

This entry was posted in candle dye, candle making, candle making supplies, candle scents, candle supplies, candle wax, candle wicks, candles, fragrance oil, Fragrance Oils, Natures Garden and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Soy wax Candles When it comes to candle making, the wax you use is really up to personal choice.

There are quite a few reasons why candle makers select soy wax for their candles.  Some like it due to the fact that soy wax is 100% natural (it is a pure vegetable wax) and it is biodegradable.  Many prefer soy wax because of the long, even, and clean burn the wax provides with less soot.  And, even still, many candle crafters like soy wax because it is an environmentally friendly, renewable resource that American farmers can plant and harvest; also helping the economy too. Some other reasons for why some people prefer using soy wax for their candles are ease of use.  Since this wax is in flake form, it is a breeze to weigh out, work with, and clean up.  And, soy wax is a single pour wax, requiring no repours.

Soy wax is for container candles.  Due to the nature of this natural wax, the finished candle will have a mottled (or frosted) appearance on top.  However, if you do not like this appearance, you can always apply heat to the finished candle with a hot hair dryer or heat gun.

Supplies and Equipment Needed: 
NG 100% Soy Wax
Fragrance Oil
Spectrum Candle Dye or Color Block
Pouring Pot
Thermometer
Glassware
Wicks
Scale
Stainless steel mixing utensil
Cookie Sheet
Hot Glue Gun
Glue Sticks
Stove
Pot

A little behind the scenes knowledge: 

For this candle making process we are going to suggest the double boiler system for melting the wax.  Fill a large pot half way full with tap water.  Place the filled pot onto the stove top burner.  Turn the appropriate burner on medium heat.  Once you have the pouring pot filled with the correct amount of soy wax, place the pouring pot into the water filled pot.  Once the water starts to boil, you will notice that the soy wax is beginning to melt.  As this occurs, you want to occasionally stir the wax to ensure an even temperature.

Carefully place your glassware on a cookie sheet.  Preheat your oven to the lowest temperature possible.  Once the oven is heated, place the cookie sheet with the glassware into the oven.  Allow your glassware to warm in the oven for 10-15 minutes.  Once the allotted time has passed, carefully remove the cookie sheet using oven mitts.  Set these aside. 

The standard fragrance percent for soy candles is 1-1 ½ ounces of fragrance oil per pound of wax.

For measuring purposes, 20 ounces (weight) of soy wax is equivalent to 16 ounces of fluid volume.

Directions for making a soy candle: 

1.  Weigh out the correct amount of soy wax with your scale.
2.  Place your soy wax into your pouring pot and using the double boiler system, heat the wax to 185 degrees Fahrenheit.  Monitor this by using your thermometer.  Please Note:  Heating soy wax hotter than 200 degrees Fahrenheit will discolor the wax, so proper monitoring of the temperature is advised.
3.  While you are waiting on the wax, plug in your hot glue gun.
4.  Once the wax is in a liquid state, add your candle colorant.
5.  Next, add your Natures Garden’s fragrance oil of choice and stir well to incorporate throughout the wax.  The information we provide below about flash point and burnoff is information we have learned over the years that will help make the best soy wax candles.  When making candles, it is important to understand that ingredients affect the end result.  Testing needs to be done by the candle maker for every fragrance that you decide to use.  We provide the information as a guide, but you will still need to do the testing yourself.
      a.  For this step you will need to know the flashpoint of the fragrance oil you selected.  The right temperature is extremely important to ensure that the fragrance oil binds properly with the soy wax.  You also do not want to risk “burnoff”.  Burnoff is the adding of a fragrance oil at too hot of a wax temperature.  Because a flashpoint on a fragrance oil is the highest temperature the fragrance can handle before breaking down, burnoff can affect the scent in the finished candle.  That is why you want to know the proper temperature to add the fragrance oil.  You can find this information right on the label of the Natures Garden fragrance oil.  This information is also in the Important Fragrance Specifics area on the website under each fragrance oil listing.
b. Fragrance Flashpoints give you the answer as to when you add your fragrance oil to the hot wax.  Any flashpoint that is higher than 185 degrees Fahrenheit is added at 185 degrees.  For any flashpoints that are below 185 degrees, they should be added at or below the flashpoint degree.  The key to remember is try not to add the fragrance oil at a temperature that is hotter than its flashpoint.
c.  Some fragrance oils have a very low flashpoint.  In these cases, testing comes into play.  You are balancing flashpoint temperatures with the fact that the wax needs heat in order to bind the scent with the wax.
6.  Once the soy wax has been scented and colored, you will want to stir your wax thoroughly.  Doing this step will help the mixing and binding of the color and scent throughout the wax.
7.  The next step is allow your soy wax to cool at room temperature.  Place your thermometer into the pouring pot and wait until the wax reaches 110 degrees Fahrenheit.  Pouring at this temperature will allow for a smoother surface in your finished candle.  While you are waiting, prep your containers for the pour.
8.  Using your hot glue gun, place a little amount of glue to the bottom of the wick tab.  Then, carefully center the wick to the bottom of the glassware.  Gently, straighten your wick in each glass.
9.  Once your wax is the appropriate temperature (110 degrees F), you will notice the physical appearance of the wax will be slushy like.  At this point, you are now ready to pour your wax.  Slowly, fill each glass to the point where the jar changes shape.  Filling a jar surpassed the point where the jar changes shape will increase your chance of a sink hole in the finished candle.
10.  Once all containers have been poured, allow them to set up and undisturbed at room temperature.
11.   When all candles have completely set up, lid each container to allow for the fragrance to be absorbed by the wax.  This is known as the “cure time.”  For best results, allow your candles to cure for 24-48 hours.
12.  Once the cure time has elapsed, it is now time to trim your wick, and light your homemade soy candle.  Enjoy!

On a Final Note: 

Anytime you burn a candle for the first time, you want to establish a “memory burn.”  A memory burn is a complete wet pool of hot, melted wax over the entire top portion of the candle.  If the first burn is a memory burn, this ensures that every time you burn your candle, you will not have tunneling around the wick or an excess of unmelted wax adhered to the candle jar.  A memory burn also guarantees that the scent throw of your candle will be the best possible since every gram of scented wax is being used.

If you are interested in making your very own soy wax candles, Natures Garden offers a Soy Wax Kit with all the ingredients you need to make soy candles. 

 

 

Jul
06

Where can I buy Candle Making Supplies

This entry was posted in candle dye, candle fragrance oils, candle making, candle making supplies, candle scents, candle wicks and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , on by .
where can I buy candle making supplies

Where can I buy candle making supplies?

 

Where can I buy candle making supplies?

Have you been asking yourself this question?  Well, we have the answer:  Natures Garden Candle Making Supplies!  Natures Garden has supplied the candle making market with ingredients to make candles for 13+ years; both hobbyists and small business owners.  We offer an array of candle waxes including soy wax, palm wax, paraffin wax, parasoy wax, and gel wax.  We offer a fabulously, vivid line of candle colorants in the form of liquid candle dyes and color blocks.  Wicks…you say you need candle wicks?  We not only carry a wide variety of candle wicks, we also provide candle wick sampler packs that allow you to test wicks at a very low price.  Candle additives such as vybar, stearic acid, and UV light protector, we carry those too.

What Natures Garden is truly known for is our candle fragrances!  We offer 800+ fragrance oils for making candles, and our list just keeps on growing and growing.  In fact, in 2012, we were voted the Favorite Fragrance Oil Supplier by candle makers and soap makers.  Our quality is exceptional.  Our prices are very reasonable.  Our service is impeccable.

So, give Natures Garden candle supplies a try!  More than 100,000 customers worldwide have answered the question:  Where can I buy candle making supplies by responding:  Natures Garden.

Jul
03

My Candles Have No Scent Throw

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scent throw candlesWhy do I Have No Scent Throw in My Candles?

If there is one thing that candles are known for is their scent.  In fact, the majority of candle sales are based on the scent given off from the candle.  This is true for both first time sales as well as repeat customers.  When a candle has never been lit, the aromatic aroma that the wax gives off is called the cold scent throw.  Adversely, when the wick of the candle is lit, the fragrant smell that is released from the candle is called the hot scent throw.  Both the hot and cold scent throw are very important to candles.

Obviously, when it comes to scent issues, your first thought is to turn to the fragrance oil used.  However, as long as you are purchasing your candle making supplies from a reputable company, the fragrance oil that you use is not the culprit.  There are actually several different things that can inhibit your scent throw.

Soy Wax- If you have been in the candle making market long enough, you already know that soy wax is considered to be one of the hardest of the waxes to attain a good scent throw from.  On the molecular level of how soy wax is structured, there are many different types of chemical bonds.  These chemical bonds trap the fragrance oil instead of allowing the fragrance oil to be readily evaporated (like paraffin wax allows).  Many people suggest that when using soy wax to make it a blend with Paraffin. This is referred to as a para-soy blend.  There are a variety of different para-soy blends on the market.  If you would like to blend your own para-soy blend, massive testing is involved to find the perfect candle you are seeking.  However, Natures Garden offers one of the best para-soy blends on the market.  Using Joy Wax as your candle wax will allow you the best of both worlds; clean burning candles with amazing scent throw both hot and cold, without having to recreate the wax wheel.

Wick- Soy wax requires a hotter burning wick.  This is because of the chemical bonds.  These chemical bonds take more heat to break them down.  To solve this dilemma, increase your wick size.  This will ensure that your candle wick is doing its proper job of breaking down the chemical bonds, allowing the trapped fragrance oil to become volatile and release the scent into the air.  No matter what type of wax you are using, always make sure that your wick size is large enough to provide ample hot scent throw, but not too large to create a fire hazard.

Candle Colorant- You must remember when crafting your candles, use precaution when adding any colorant.  When you add too much colorant to your wax, you risk both clogging your wick, as well as, affecting the overall scent of the candle.  Specific candle dyes formulated for candle making should be used when making candles.  Never use pigments to color the interior of your candles; pigments should be used only for dipping the exterior of candles.

Vybar-  Yes, it is true that the addition of this candle additive will increase your candles scent throw.  However, adding too much vybar to your candle wax will inhibit your candle throw as well.  The proper amount of vybar to add per pound of wax is ¼ tsp to ½ tsp.

Temperature-  Depending on the flashpoint of the fragrance oil being used, adding your fragrance oil at too high of a melted wax temperature will directly affect your scent throw of the finished candle.  It is completely possible to burn off the majority of your fragrance oil before it even has a chance to be a candle, when the fragrance oil is added at too hot of a temperature.

Cure Time-  Cure time is one key step to ensuring a wonderfully strong scent to your candles.  You want to allow ample time for your wax and your fragrance to bind together.  You truly want these two components to be integrated into each other.   At the minimum, cure time with candles is 3-4 days.

Fragrance Oils-  When making candles, make sure that the fragrance oils you are using were formulated for candle making.  You never want to use a fragrance oil that has been diluted with diluents like DPG (di propylene glycol).  DPG will directly affect the strength of your fragrance, and will inhibit the ability of your candle to burn.  On the other hand, some essential oils will need to have diluents added to them to allow them to travel up the wick and release scent (but never use DPG as your diluent in candles).  Natures Garden was voted the #1 Favorite Fragrance Oil Supplier by candle makers and soap makers in 2012 due to the quality of our fragrance oils.  With 16 years of expertise in the fragrance oil market, you can rely on Natures Garden to provide you with the finest, most unique fragrances.