Archive for the ‘bath products’ Category

Rose Fragrance

Friday, April 25th, 2014

Rose FragranceFresh Cut Roses Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Roses come in a variety of beautiful colors and sizes, but the rose scent always stays true.  Roses have always been a very popular gift to both give and receive too.  In fact, the top two holidays for roses are Mother’s Day and Valentine’s Day.  So, why not use this scent in your products. If you are looking for the perfect rose fragrance to scent in your homemade items, you have got to try Fresh Cut Roses. This true to life rose fragrance is incredible in bath products and candles.

What does Fresh Cut Roses Fragrance Oil smell like?

After searching many years for a true, fresh-cut rose scent, we have accomplished it!  Natures Garden’s Fresh cut roses fragrance oil is the truest fresh cut rose on the market! NG Original Fragrance and a Best Seller!

How do our customers use Fresh Cut Roses Fragrance Oil?

For candle crafters and home scenters; it is time to think and scent spring with this fragrance. Many of our customers use Rose fragrance oil in their soy, Palm, parasoy blends, Joy, Gel and Pillar of Bliss waxes. But, not only is this scent fresh and clean, customers attest that Fresh Cut Rose fragrance has phenomenal hot and cold scent throw! As for the home scenting realm, this aroma is just terrific, making your house smell so good. The performance is remarkable in aroma beads, diffusers, oil burners, and incense.

On the bath and body end of products, celebrate because this beautiful scent is one great seller! With a recommended usage rate of 5%, this fabulous fragrance is used to make: lotions, perfume oils, foaming body butters, melt and pour soaps, body scrubs, and body sprays. In fact, many of our customers state that their customers simply adore this fresh cut rose fragrance in the finished products. Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance is very lovely. Here are the official results: Perfect Pour, no ricing, no acceleration, no discoloration, very strong scent retention. Soaped well.

Insulate Soap

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

insulate soap As soap crafters, there are hundreds of variances allotted to us that allow our soaps to be special. Maybe it is the combination of oils in your recipe, the process to which you soap, your unique scents, your particular decorating method, or really any number of things that makes your soap exclusive. Well, in this blog post, we are going to throw a new option into the mix.

To insulate or not to insulate that is the question.

As with many aspects of soap making; when it comes to insulation, it is really a personal preference.

Being new to soap making, a lot of research is involved. You read, read, and read some more in order to learn everything you can about soap making. Well, as many of us found, insulating is always advised.

The insulating step involves taking your freshly poured, molded soap, and surrounding it with layers. These layers help to keep the soap at an even heat while the batter goes through the saponification process. During the saponification process, as the lye reacts with the various soap making ingredients, soap (and glycerin) is produced. The process itself is an endothermic reaction, meaning that it absorbs heat from the surroundings.

This “heat stage” of soap making is commonly called the gel phase. During the gel phase, saponification works at an accelerated rate, hardening the fats of your recipe. This phase will also be the time where any discoloration of ingredients or colorants will occur from the heat.

Keeping the soap uniformly heated will prevent a partial gel from occurring. Not keeping the soap uniformly heated allows for the soap that is in the center of the mold to stay hot, while the soap on the outside loses heat rapidly. And, since the saponification process is endothermic, it needs to be able to draw heat from its surroundings. What this results in is an off colored look in the center of your soap, usually in an oval like shape. This shows that the center of the soap gelled, and the outside of the soap never reached gel phase.

Speaking in terms of soap, gel phase or not reaching gel phase does not harm the soap itself. The soap will still function after cure; it is only an aesthetic issue. So, it is for this reason that it is often believed that insulation is vital to an amazing looking bar of cold process soap. But, there is an alternative.

Lets look at the flip side.  If you do not want to insulate the heat in the soap, what would happen if you chilled the soap instead?

Chilling your molded soap would prevent the gel phase from occurring. This would be a handy trick of the trade for a few reasons. It should however, be noted though that in order for the gel phase prevention to occur, you need to be able to control the area. Operating out of a loaf mold for example, still allows enough soap in the middle for a partial gel to occur. You want to keep the size of the soap easily manageable for temperature reasons. Remember, because saponification deals with heat, while the lye and fats are reacting, heat will be present. To completely increase your chances of preventing the gel phase, you must minimize the area that needs chilled, aka use smaller molds.

Not insulating your soap, and instead placing your freshly molded soap into the fridge or freezer for 24 hours will help to prevent the gel phase from occurring. But, please note the size of your soap will directly determine whether the gel phase will occur or not.   This also rings true for the soaping ingredients that are in your recipe. Chilling your soap is not a guarantee, partial gelling can still transpire.

In closing, there is another option if you choose not to insulate your soap. There are benefits and drawbacks to chilling your soap. Stay tuned for a future blog posts discussing preventing gel phase and what the outcome will be.

 

Beach Fragrance

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

beach fragranceMermaid Kisses Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Mermaids are something of a folklore.  And it is said that if a sailor saw one it meant they would never see land again.  This bittersweet story told of sailors so memorized and taken by the mermaid’s beauty, that they would jump ship just to meet her.  Well, this myth explains the mystery behind why men love this scent.  Mermaid Kisses Fragrance oil is very clean and ozonic scent with a hint of exotic floral.  The perfect beach fragrance for many homemade items, mermaid kisses is a sure winner!

What does Mermaid Kisses Fragrance Oil smell like?

When ocean mist, sea salt, and feminine florals combine; you’ll experience Mermaid Kisses Fragrance Oil by Natures Garden.  This fragrance begins with top notes of ocean mist, sea moss, and dewy cyclamen petals; followed by middle notes of geranium flower, water mint, and coriander seed; sitting on base notes of white cedarwood and earthy vetiver.  An NG Original Fragrance!

How do our customers use Mermaid Kisses Fragrance Oil?

For candle makers and home scenters; our customers use this beach fragrance in their soy, palm, gel, pillar of bliss, and WOW wax candles.  And, this scent has a very nice throw both hot and cold in candles.  As for home scenting ideas for products; this beach fragrance has been used to make incense sticks, cones, aroma beads, smelly jellies, and potpourri.  Mermaid Kisses fragrance oil can even be used in oil burners and as odor eliminator sprays as well.

On the bath and body end of things, the usage rate for this beach fragrance is 5%.  This fabulous scent is used to make:  melt and pour soaps, homemade lotions, bath bombs, sugar scrubs, body butters, perfumes, and body sprays.  And, for those of you that are cold process soapers, here are the official results: Slight acceleration, riced, no discoloration, do not discount water.

Rebatching Soap

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

rebatching soap Whether you view rebatching as an art, a doorway for the addition of gentle ingredients, or a second chance for your soap, this method of soap making offers opportunity.

The term rebatching for soap simply means remaking soap.  This method would be very similar to melt and pour soap in that you are melting down soap that has already gone through the saponification process.  Rebatching is more intricate than melt and pour soap though.  Rebatching involves cold processed or hot processed soap bars that are melted down for specific reasons.

A common technique used in soap making, rebatching allows many soap making handcrafters the chance to rework their soap recipes, introduce delicate scents and herbs, as well as add ingredients or colors they may have missed the opportunity to add the first time.

Since rebatched soap has already gone through the saponification process, the rebatching steps do not involve lye.  This is why rebatching allows the opportunity to add those delicate soaping ingredients; without fear.  With the rebatching method, these ingredients; which normally would not survive the saponification process, now have the chance to add wonderful benefits to your finished bars of soap.

Although time consuming, the rebatch process is fairly easy to do.  To put it briefly, the rebatching process is finely grating the soap, then heating (sometimes with the addition of a liquid like water to help prevent burning).  There are a few different ways to introduce heat to the shredded soap.  These ways would include:  double boiler, microwave, and crock pot.  But, please advise: you must monitor the soap while it is heating because you never want to scorch the soap.  This may be slightly more difficult using the microwave approach.

Now, as the soap is heated and starts to liquefy; it will have a very thick gel like density.  Once the soap hits this consistency, any additives or scents are added and stirred in.  Once the soap is stirred well, it is then scooped into a mold, left to harden, and finally cut into slices.

So, now that you have an understanding as to what the method of rebatching is, we will shortly post a blog as to the various reasons to rebatch.  This post will also cover the benefits as well as the drawbacks of rebatching your soap.

Taurus Scents

Monday, April 21st, 2014

taurus scentsToday marks yet another changing of the zodiac sign.  Earlier this year, we decided we wanted to have a little fun; so we researched to find exactly what fragrance notes most likely correspond to a persons zodiac sign.  Through our exploration we were able to compile a list of various aromatic notes based on the common personality traits of the person born under the specific zodiac sign. 

Beginning April 20th, Taurus welcomes the limelight.  So, Natures Garden would like to be the first to express, Happy Birthday Taurus!  Now, we would like to invite everyone to the beautiful world of Taurus scents.

Taurus are considered people born between the dates of April 20th and May 20th.

We have four employees at Natures Garden that are under the sign of Taurus.  Mike, Josh, Kathy, and Bonnie all share this dependable and practical sign.  Typical of the Taurus, these four are the strong silent type of individuals.  Being able to deal with quite a lot, this group can bravely and calming handle difficulties with patience; that is until you have gone too far.  Then, people under the sign of Taurus become quite the force to be reckoned with.  Enjoying life’s simple treasures and natures natural beauties, our wonderful and compassionate co-workers lead by example in reminding us to stop and smell the roses.  

Taurus- Trustworthy, Loyal, Patient, Considerate

Symbol-  the Bull


Sign- 
Earth


This loving
and patient group is determined and reliable, but also quick tempered if agitated. People of this sign welcome true forms of

original beauty and love indulging their senses. Due to their sense of stability, well grounded earth scents is where their likes lie.


People that have the sign of Taurus really take to these fragrances notes:

Florals:  Rose, Violet

Spices:  Oriental, Balsamic, Black Pepper

Musks:  Amber, Vanilla


Fragrance Oil and Scent Suggestions:

scents for Taurus

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Cut Roses Scent by Natures Garden
Japanese Cherry Blossoms Scent by Natures Garden
Green Amber Scent by Natures Garden
Vanilla Blossoms Scent by Natures Garden

If you are interested in seeing other zodiac sign fragrance suggestions, please click on the link.

Baby Scent

Saturday, April 19th, 2014

baby scentBaby Clean Fragrance Oil-Fragrance Oil Spotlight

This is the fresh and clean aroma of a baby scent.  This scent is something every mother knows.  Baby Clean Fragrance Oil is unmistakably calming yet light with soft floral and sweet fruit throughout the aroma.  Many of our customers find that not only do they love this clean baby scent, but so do their customers.  In fact, Baby Clean Fragrance Oil is a bestselling scent in products.  This is one of the most fabulous baby scents, and everyone seems to agree on that.

What does Baby Clean Fragrance Oil smell like?

This unique and calming fragrance oil by Natures Garden takes baby powder to a higher level.  This wonderful scent has top notes of granny smith apple, lemon zest, and hints of mint, rounded out with blossoms of spring wildflowers, butterfly violets & honeysuckle.  You can actually smell hints of a new born baby.

How do our customers use Baby Clean Fragrance Oil?

For candle makers and home scent crafters, this baby scent is divine, especially in odor sprays for playrooms and bedrooms.  Baby Clean Fragrance Oil performed extremely well in soy, palm, pillar of bliss, Joy, and WOW waxes.  This fragrance oil scent is wonderful in both the hot and cold throw.  As for home scenting options, some of our customers use this baby scent for room sprays, aroma beads, oil burners, reed diffusers, and smelly jellies; with a performance that is absolutely loved.

On the bath and body end, this beautiful baby scent is used to scent an array of products.  The usage rate for this fragrance oil is 5%, and is used to make:  body sprays, melt and pour soaps, body butters, lotions, shampoos, conditioners, and bath bombs.  Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this clean baby scent is well worth it.  Here are the official results: Perfect Pour, no ricing, no acceleration, discolors to a light cream.

Why Rebatch

Friday, April 18th, 2014

rebatch soapRebatching your soap can literally be a “saving redo” for your soap recipe.

Sometimes your homemade soap bars are cracked, brittle, or just not performing like what you were hoping for. 

These are all perfect examples as to why you would rebatch your recipe.  But, it just doesn’t stop there. 

Soapers rebatch a soap recipe for a variety of reasons.  Below is a list of the benefits and key points you should know about rebatching a soap recipe.  Rebatching soap is essentially making the soap twice.  The first time you are completing the saponification process.  (Or, you may be using soap that has already been through the saponification process.)  Then, the second time you grate down the soap and melt it (for the reason you are rebatching). 

Benefits of a Rebatch
Rebatching a soap recipe for the addition of heat sensitive ingredients: 

Sometimes with homemade soap crafting, there are certain fragrances or essential oils that you really want to scent your soap bars; but worry that the scents cannot handle the high heat due to the saponification process.  Many times with low flash point fragrances or essential oils, there is scent burn off.  What results in your finished bars is soap that has little or no scent.  Rebatching soap will not only safely allow you to add these heat sensitive scents, but allow them to stay true to their scent (less burn off). 

Also, some fragrance oils may cause cold process soap to seize (turning your soap into a solid mass with no fluidity).  If you have your heart set on using one of these fragrances in your soap recipe, it can be done through the process of rebatching; without seizing your batch.  Usually fragrance oils that seize  your soap contain DPG.  None of the fragrance oils we carry at Natures Garden contain DPG. 

When it comes to coloring for cold process soap, it is very important to select ones that do not morph.  Through the process of rebatching, you do not need to worry about pH sensitive colorants.  And, sometimes this is just the answer to achieve that certain color.  With rebatch soap, the soap base that you are using has already completed the saponification process; therefore, the colorants that normally would discolor will not.   This is true for herbs that are used as natural soap colorants as well.  Although it should be stated that some herbs naturally discolor due to oxidation. 

Herbs not only offer color, but also wonderful and various benefits to your finished bars of soap.  The only problem is they can directly affect your soaping procedure.  Many herbs can speed up trace.  Even more so, some herbs cannot survive the saponification process and will discolor as a result.  With rebatching, this is not as big of an issue.  Herbs like lavender flowers, for example, can be added without worrying that those beautiful flowers will turn brown. 

Rebatch Opportunity
Rebatching allows for perfection:

Rebatching is also a wonderful method to use to correct a soap recipe.  Things can get a little chaotic when soaping, and it could be possible that you overlooked adding one of your soaping ingredients and did not realize it until after the soap was molded.  This resulted in your finished bars being too lye heavy.  A rebatch allows you the perfect opportunity to add that missing ingredient and balance out your soap.  This opportunity also allows for superfatting a recipe after saponification; or correcting soap bars that are too soft (made with too many fats or soft oils).

It is possible too that while making soap, your batter becomes too thick too quick for the addition of color or scent.  With rebatch, the soap can be scented and colored like you never missed a beat. 

Rebatch can also help correct a false trace recipe.
 
Rebatch, a Second Chance for Soaps
Sometimes, as a soaper, you will have pounds of soap scraps that you have on hand.  Rebatching the soap lets you make loaves (and bars) of them once more.  And will clear out all of that soaping space. 

Points to Know about Rebatch
Some soapers love to rebatch soap, others rebatch only when necessary, and some soapers just do not like to rebatch.  What ever your stance is on rebatch, it is a method that allows for many otherwise missed opportunities.   Here are some key points to know about rebatch. 

When making soap that is a rebatch, it will never completely liquefy.  Even after spending hours in the crock pot, or on the stove top (with the double boiler method), the best you will ever achieve is more of a thick gel like state.  Sometimes the soap may even be globby like.  This does not affect the soap being soap, but it will affect the finished look of your bars. 

When it comes to molding your rebatch soap, it is highly likely to get trapped air bubbles.  This is just the nature of the thick gel like globby beast.  It is extremely important to tap your mold as your fill it to prevent these pesky little buggers from being a problem in your finished soap bars.  You may also notice that it may be slightly more difficult to mold your soap while in this state.  This will be especially true if you are used to pouring it (like cold process soap batter).  With rebatch soap, you will need a ladle and scoop the rebatch soap into your mold. 

For the finished bars of rebatch soap, they will look very similar to hot process soap bars.  They have a very rustic look to them, and will not have the traditional smooth and creamy look that cold process has. 

On a final note, rebatching soap is truly a labor of love.  There will be lots of TLC (because of the time put in) and additional work to do this method.  But, if you are willing to put in the extra effort in (grating the soap), you will be able to rebatch your soap and have the end results that you are looking to achieve. 

Exotic Fragrance

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

exotic fragranceBlackened Amethyst Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Welcome to quite possibly one of the most alluring female fragrances that Natures Garden carries!  Blackened Amethyst Fragrance Oil is soft, sexy, and spicy.  This scent is one exotic fragrance.  It is very classy and intriguing.  Plus, this scent sells extremely well in bath and body products.  If you are looking to add a great complex scent to your feminine product line, this exotic fragrance oil is it.  Blackened Amethyst scent is sophistication at its finest!

What does Blackened Amethyst smell like?

This seductive fragrance oil by Natures Garden was created for chic, confident women who like to “live a little”.  This fragrance combine’s aquatic top notes with Italian bergamot, rare camellias, and lime; followed by notes of exotic sandalwood and vetiver.

How do our customers use Blackened Amethyst Fragrance Oil?

For all you candle crafters and home scenters, this exotic fragrance oil can be used in a variety of waxes.  These waxes would include:  Joy wax, soy wax, soy blends, pillar of bliss, Palm wax, WOW wax, and beeswax, all with great scent throw.  For home scenters, Blackened Amethyst Fragrance Oil works great in aroma beads, smelly jellies, odor eliminator sprays, potpourri, oil burners, diffusers, and hanging air fresheners.

For the bath and body market; this exotic fragrance oil has endless possibilities.  The usage rate for this fragrance oil in products is 5%.  Blackened Amethyst does contain a 1% vanillin content, so vanilla white color stabilizer is recommended to prevent discoloration in your finished products.  This alluring fragrance oil can be used to scent:  homemade lotions, bath fizzies, body creams, body sprays, shower gels, melt and pour soap, conditioners, and shampoos.  For anyone that is curious about this exotic fragrance oils performance in cold process soap, this scent scored phenomenally.  Here are the official testing results: Perfect Pour, no ricing, no acceleration.  Discolors to a taupe.  This one pops out nicely when added to the soap batter.  Very Nice!

How to Rebatch

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

rebatched soap How to Rebatch

Sometimes it is a hard pill to swallow, but when it comes to soaping, mistakes will be made, tears will fall, and you learn from your errors!

This week, we had a slight oversight.

All of our soaping ingredients were weighed out and ready for the combination and melt down.  We had the lye and water ready to make the lye mixture.  Everything else was prepped and ready to go.

We put on our safety gear and started the soap making procedure.  Everything seemed to be going flawlessly.  Our scent was perfect, the color combination was the spot on, and the soap batter poured beautifully into the mold.  It was soaping bliss.

Then, we started cleaning up.  That was when we found the sunflower oil.  It was still in its dish, waiting to be added to the soap recipe.  And, it was about 5% of our total soaping oils no less.

Devastated, it was now time to play the waiting game.  We had to wait for our beautiful soap to mold for at least 24 hours before it would be sturdy enough to remove it.

What resulted, after unmolding, was a gorgeous shade of green soap that broke into pieces when sliced.  Our soap was too lye heavy.  And, we knew this was because of the forgotten and overlooked sunflower oil.

One way to correct this soaping error was through rebatching.  Rebatching is almost like a do over for soap.  Although there are various reasons as to why you would rebatch, one of them is the fact that you can add an oil to your soap.  Our soaping oversight would be a perfect example to rebatch.

So, in order to save the 4 pound soap batch we had, we decided that we would take this opportunity to learn about rebatching and write a blog post on how to rebatch.  Although it was the very first time we ever attempted a rebatch, here is the process we did to show how to rebatch soap (pictures included).

Step 1:  Grate the soap.  This was no small feat for us.  In total, 4 pounds of soap took us about 45 minutes to do.

grating soap for rebatch

Step 2:  Melt the soap back down.  For this we selected to use our crock pot.  Since we had missed the first opportunity to add the sunflower oil, we did this now to the grated soap.

superfatting the rebatch

Step 3:  Stir.  Actually, this step is more like trying to rotate the soap.  Since you never want to scorch your soap when using a crock pot, this stir was more like a rotation of the soap within the crock pot.

melting the grated soap

Step 4:  Wait about 25-30 minutes, then check the soap again and stir/rotate.  The longer the soap melts, you will notice more of it becoming very gel like.

soap is still melting down

Step 5:  At this point, we noticed that the soap looked a little dry.  If this occurs, add a little water.

adding water to rebatch
Step 6:  Stir to disperse the water among all of the soap.

stirring the water through all of the soap
Step 7:  Wait for another 20 minutes or so, then give the soap a good stir.

a final good stir before rescenting
Step 8:  Add fragrance and stir.  Although we did scent the original batch, we wanted to rescent the rebatch for any scent that may have been lost through the saponification process and the reheating process.

rescenting and stirring one final time
Step 9:  Get your mold, and start to fill it with the soap.  Remember to tap your mold as you fill to reduce any bubbles that may be trapped in your soap.

molding your rebatch soap
Step 10:  Continue filling your mold and tapping it until all of the soap is out of the crock pot and into your mold.

molded rebatch soap
Step 11:  Insulate and wait.  The soap will need about 12 hours or so in the mold.  Once the time elapses, remove the soap from the molds and slice.

Our rebatched soap bars are awesome now.  They have a creamy full lather, and even better they don’t crumble and are actual bars!  Although the finished rebatch bars do have a rustic appeal, it kind of suits them.  Overall, this was a great learning experience, and we were able to save the 4 pound batch of soap.  Learning how to rebatch really was not difficult, and was well worth the effort in the end.

 

Garden Scent

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

garden scentMoon Flower Fragrance Oil- Fragrance Oil Spotlight

A beautiful garden scent, Moon Flower Fragrance Oil is a chart topper when it comes to sophisticated feminine aromas.  In fact, this garden scent is so realistic; the aroma is just like walking through a garden filled with wonderful floral aromas.  An enticing and invigorating scent, Moon Flower fragrance works well in many different mediums.  Many of our customers consider this garden scent a favorite.  With its lovely and powdery alluring aromas, this fragrance oil is considered a keeper.

What does Moon Flower Fragrance Smell  Like?

A sophisticated, modern spicy floral arrangement fragrance oil by Natures Garden.  Intoxicating night blooming jasmine with fresh red roses and sweet lilies come together with spices of cinnamon, clove and mysterious anise.

How do our customers use Moon Flower Fragrance Oil?

For candle crafters and home scenters; if the winter time blues have got you down, it is time to think flowers with this garden scent.  Many of our customers use this fragrance oil in their soy, Palm, parasoy blends, Joy, Gel, and Pillar of Bliss waxes.  And, this scent has phenomenal hot and cold scent throw!  As for the home scenting, this aroma is terrific.  The performance is remarkable in aroma beads, diffusers, oil burners, and smelly jellies.

On the bath and body end of products, this garden scent comes with a recommended usage rate of 5%.  A fabulous fragrance, moon flower is used to scent:  lotions, perfume oils, foaming body butters, melt and pour soaps, body scrubs, and body sprays.  In fact, many of our customer’s state that their customers adore the fresh flowery scent this fragrance gives their products.  Finally, for those of you that are cold process soapers, this fragrance is awesome.  Here are the official results: Some acceleration.  No discoloration.  Scent is great, and soaps beautifully!

moon flower sachet pillows
If you would like to use this garden scent in a recipe, click here to view the Moon Flower Sachet Pillow Recipe.