Monthly Archives: September 2015

Sep
30

Beach Daisies Fragrance


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Beach Daisies FragranceBeach Daisies Fragrance Oil Spotlight

The beach daisy is an adorable little flower known for being a fast-spreading groundcover. It can grow to be up to 18 inches tall and flowers year round in the southern parts of Florida. This plant thrives in mostly dry and even slightly salty environments– ideal for the beach! It even helps keep sand from eroding. Both butterflies and birds are attracted to this beautiful beach bloom.

What Does Beach Daisies Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

Imagine sweeping yourself away to the beach; where you will smell the aromas of fresh spring flowers and green grass while walking on the warm sands.  Natures Garden’s beach daisies fragrance begins with top notes of Asian lemongrass, dune grass, and daisy petals; followed by middle notes of gardenia bloom, ylang ylang, and clove leaf; sitting on base notes of blond woods, amber sands, and sheer musk.

How Do Our Customers Use Beach Daisies Fragrance Oil?

Candles! This refreshing floral fragrance performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. It is gel wax compatible! This means you can put adorable wax embeds in your gel wax candles; we’ve got a cute retro flowers embed mold and even a daisies embed mold! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this inviting aroma in vegetable waxes and paraffin waxes is 10%. Our coloring suggestions are to use 3 drops of yellow plus a little orange liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax or shred an ample amount of yellow and orange color block into your melted wax. Never use crayons to color your candles; it will clog the wick!

Room scents! This sunny scent comes across nice and strong in aroma beads and its maximum recommended usage percentage in incense and potpourri is 50%. We’ve got an adorable daisy cookie cutter– ideal for making aroma bead air fresheners

Soaps! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this alluring aura in bath gels, bath oils, and soaps is 5%. Our cold process soap testing found that this vacation fragrance caused acceleration in CP soap, so we recommend soaping this scent at lower temperatures. Otherwise, there was no discoloration, no ricing, no separation, and very strong scent retention! Our coloring suggestions are to use yellow and orange soap colorants in the amount that satisfies you. You’re welcome to try natural soap colorants, but pay close attention to the description on the individual pages, some colorants may be affected by different soapmaking processes.

We’ve also got some awesome flower-shaped soap molds: the tried and true flower-shaped mold Bailey uses in our soap testing videos, another marvelous mold for making large retro flowers, a mold for making small retro flowers, and my personal favorite the bite-sized daisy mold. We have a couple of sunflower soap molds as well– beach daisies are often called beach sunflowers, so it works out perfectly!

Body products! This beach scent performs perfectly in perfumes and its maximum recommended usage percentage in lotions and body sprays is 5%.

Cleaning products! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this summer-y scent in cleaning products is 5%.

Sep
29

Beach Bum Fragrance


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Beach Bum FragranceBeach Bum Fragrance Oil Spotlight

What’s more relaxing than a day spent bumming around at the beach? Finding a good spot to lay out your blanket or towel on the sand, kickin’ off your flip flops, laying down and just soaking up the sun (being sure to put on sunscreen first, of course). The calming sound of the waves, the fresh breeze coming off the water- what more could you ask for? How about the fragrance of fresh fruits and florals? Such a calming scene, I’m falling asleep just describing it.. so relaxing.

What Does Beach Bum Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

This fragrance captures the essence of summer like no other fragrance; combining juicy mandarin, sand jasmine, and refreshing oceanic mist. An NG Original Scent!

Top Notes:  bergamot, fresh air, eucalyptus, mandarin
Mid Notes:  gardenia, lavender, rose, sand jasmine
Base Notes:  tuberose, musk

How Do Our Customers Use Beach Bum Fragrance Oil?

Candles! This summertime scent performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. It is gel wax compatible! That means you can put wax embeds in your candles such as sea horses and shells or the perfect beach footwear- flip flops! The maximum recommended usage percentage in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. Our coloring suggestions for candles are to use 3 drops blue plus a small amount (try dipping the tip of a toothpick in the dye, then your wax) of green liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax or shred a small amount of blue and even smaller amount of green color block into your melted wax. Never color your candles with crayons– it will clog the wick!

Room scents! This oceanic aroma comes across nice and strong in aroma beads, and the maximum recommended usage percentage in incense and potpourri is 50%.

Soaps!  The maximum recommended usage percentage for this fresh fruit and floral fragrance in soaps, bath gels, and bath oils is 5%. Our cold process soap testing found that this fun fragrance caused slight acceleration, but no ricing and no separation with strong scent retention in cured bars. The CP soap made with this scent discolored to a very light beige. The vanillin content of this fragrance is 0%, but there are over 40 ingredients used to make fragrances that could possibly cause discoloration. Since there was very slight discoloration in the soap, there also might be very slight discoloration of your bath and body products. Our coloring suggestions for bath and body products are to use blue and green soap colorants in the amount that satisfies you. Never color bath and body products with candle dye– you will end up coloring yourself!

We’ve got some flip flop molds for full-sized soaps, or you can use the embed molds listed above to make sample-sized soaps with this relaxing aroma!

Body products! This sunny scent performed perfectly in perfumes and the maximum recommended usage percentage in lotions and body sprays is 5%.

Cleaning products! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this vacation fragrance is 5%.

Sep
28

Bay Rum Fragrance


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Bay Rum FragranceBay Rum Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Ahoy, mateys! Rum is commonly thought of as the drink of choice of pirates. And why wouldn’t it be? They made careers off of rum-running: transporting alcohol overseas to colonies where drinking was prohibited. Pirates often consumed rum as bumbo- a drink made from rum, water, sugar, and nutmeg or cinnamon.

Bay Rum, more specifically, is a product with high-alcohol content made in the Caribbean using rum and the leaves or berries of the appropriately named bay rum tree. It’s often used in aftershave, cologne, and lotions (hint, hint, nudge, nudge, you can use this fragrance oil to make your own). Not as pirate-y, but I already wrote most of this post with pirates in mind, so I’m gonna leave it as is. And surely, pirates had to shave their faces, too? (Unless their pirate name had the word “beard” in it.) Why not with bay rum-scented products?

What Does Bay Rum Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

It be a spicy, cultural blend of crushed cloves, cinnamon sticks, patchouli, and crisp pine needles, with a sweet orange freshness.

Top Notes:  orange, apple
Mid Notes:  cinnamon, clove, cool mint
Base Notes:  pine, cedarwood, vanilla, musk, patchouli

How Do Our Customers Use Bay Rum Fragrance Oil?

Candles, o’ course! This swashbucklin’ scent performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax and is nice and strong in soy wax. ‘Tis not gel wax compatible. . The maximum recommended usage percentage in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax be 10%. Our coloring suggestion for candles arrr to use 3 drops of blue plus a small amount of black liquid candle dye (dip the tip of a toothpick in it) per 4 pounds of wax, or shred a small amount of blue color block into your melted wax. Black candle colorant only comes in liquid dye form. Don’t color your candles with crayons unless ye be lookin’ fer trouble–it’ll clog the wick!

Robust room scents! This seafaring scent comes across nice and strong in arrroma beads and the maximum recommended usage percentage in incense and potpourri is 50%.

Soaps! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this complex accord in bath oils, bath gels, and soaps is 5%. Our cold process soap testing found that this fragrance caused slight acceleration of trace, but no ricing, no separation, and discolored to a light butterscotch. Scent retention was wonderful. This fragrance has a 0.3% vanillin content, so it may slightly discolor your bath and body products. If ye’d like to defend against this, try our Vanilla White Color Stabilizer. Our coloring suggestions for bath and body products are to use black and blue soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you. You can also try activated charrrcoal as a natural black soap colorant. Never color ye bath and body products with candle dye- ye’ll color yerself!

Check out arrr Jolly Roger and doubloon molds for shapin’ up yer soap!

Body products! This spicy scent performed perfectly in perfumes and the maximum recommended usage percentage in lotions and body sprays is 5%.

Swabbin’ the deck! The maximum recommended usage percentage fer this hardy aroma in cleaning products is 5%.

~Nature’s GARRRden!

Sep
27

Natural Soap Colorants: Katie Makes Soap Part 2


This entry was posted in bath and body, bath products, citrus notes, melt and pour soap, Natures Garden, Natures Garden Wholesale, red Moroccan clay, Rose Clay, soap, soap colorants, Soap making supplies and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by .

Natural Soap ColorantsHi, there! It’s me, Katie, again. I’ve already told you about my first attempt at soapmaking. and guess what? I made more soap! Or at least tried to. This time I decided to experiment with natural soap colorants in melt and pour soap. (Different soap processes can affect natural colorants differently, but you’re generally OK with melt and pour- read the pages on the colorants for more information.) I wanted to make a color gradient with natural soap colorants, and I had the following powders: Red Moroccan Clay Powder, Orange Peel Powder, Carrot Powder, Rose Clay Powder, and Lemon Peel Powder. I used red clay, orange peel, and carrot in my first soap, and I got rose clay and lemon peel for a pink lemonade soap idea that I had (didn’t work out, going to try again- that blog will be coming soon!).

So, when you want to disperse a powder evenly in soap for coloring purposes, you want to ‘wet’ it with vegetable glycerin. Soap loves glycerin. I got a two pound slab of Shea Butter Melt and Pour, and first cut it in half because I was using a 1lb loaf mold. Then- lucky me- that slab was divided evenly into 20 squares- five rows of four- and I had five powders- so I separated my melt and pour base into five cups of four squares each. Then I measured out 0.1 oz of each powder into separate lil glass bowls. (One tenth of an ounce is the smallest amount [in ounces] that my scale would register.) I added 0.1 oz of veggie glycerin to each of my fruit and veggie powders, but the lemon peel powder was not mixing well- so I added more! I used 0.2 oz veggie glycerin for my fruit and veggie powders. I had to beat out the lumps of the carrot powder but with the extra veggie glycerin, it ended up being a very thin liquid. The others were more like pastes. I added 0.1 oz of veggie glycerin to my clay powders and that was enough to turn them into a workable texture. Woohoo! Here are my powders lined up:Powders

Out of habit, I had originally thought the lemon peel mixture would be the lightest- yellow, right? But it was actually a light brown. Hmm. Well. My eyes didn’t lie. So I lined the powders up this way since it seemed to be the most aesthetically pleasing- looked like a gradient and that’s what I was going for.

This time, I used the microwave for my melting and wow, that was so much faster and easier than trying to use the stove. I still wasn’t 100% sure on my carrot, orange, and lemon powders being in the correct order for a proper gradient (lemon = yellow, right, brain?) so I put my four squares each of melt and pour (cut up, of course, for easier melting) into three glass containers with spouts and thoroughly stirred in my powder-glycerin mixtures.

Natural Soap Colorants

Lemon was clearly the darkest of the three. It was a close call between carrot and orange, but orange was definitely closer to the color of the lemon powder soap. Well, alright. I had to melt them again because melt and pour isn’t really designed for stopping and taking photos and then I began pouring them into the mold one layer at a time. I poured my carrot layer first and sprayed the top with rubbing alcohol to get rid of air bubbles. I let that sit for.. I’m not sure exactly- about half an hour? It was only 1/5 of a pound so it didn’t take too terribly long to set up. Then I sprayed the top of that layer with rubbing alcohol (it evaporates out- so no worries there) and poured the next layer, sprayed it with rubbing alcohol, and let it set up. I repeated these steps for all five layers.

Natural Soap ColorantsI let the soap sit for a while before I popped it out of the mold to admire it, and then waited even longer before I cut it. I ended up with five ~1″ thick bars. I just cut it on a cutting board with a big knife- nothing fancy, so it’s not exact. And behold these beauties: the dark spots in the middle layers are likely spots where my powder clumped up but the carrot powder also seemed to settle into little specks on the bottom. I like it. It’s super cute. The lemon layer is also the most malleable, the other layers are quite hard and the lemon layer has a small bit of give. This bar smells slightly citrus-y near the lemon and orange layers, but overall, no overwhelming scent – I was more focused on the appearance anyway. It lathers like a dream, though. <3

Natural Soap ColorantsWhat did I learn? Well, the concentration of your powder is very important in determining coloring. That failed soap I mentioned above? I used the same amount of rose clay powder (and veggie glycerin to color an entire pound of it and you can really tell the difference 5x colorant concentration makes. The red clay layer actually looks closer to the solid-colored soap. Interesting. I think if I made another gradient soap, I would pick one colorant and do the different layers in different concentrations. No guess work when it comes to the proper order that way. It’s also been brought to my attention that certain non-clay powders may have the tendency to oxidize and eventually turn brown. I think they worked well in this soap not to mention the added benefits, but I may stick with clay for colorants in the future.

Here’s my first soap side-by-side with my second soap. So cute! Different combinations and different concentrations make different colors. I can’t wait to experiment with this further!

SidebySide

Sep
25

Banana Nut Bread Fragrance


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Banana Nut Bread FragranceBanana Nut Bread Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Every time my mom makes banana nut bread- it’s not long before we’ve eaten it all. To be fair, I eat most of it. It’s absolutely delicious- who could resist the fresh banana and spicy sweet flavor? I’m making myself hungry… This is definitely one of my fragrances. It’s not on my list of favorite fragrances, but picking 10 out of 800+, I was bound to miss some. This delicious bakery scent smells just like the real thing. (There’s even a recipe for banana nut bread on the fragrance oil page–click the picture or the blog title to go there!)

What Does Banana Nut Bread Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

This fragrance oil from Natures Garden is the aroma of freshly baked banana nut bread. Not too nutty, with plenty of creamy, ripened banana.  Not surprisingly, this is A Best Seller!

Top Notes:  ripe banana, orange zest, cardamom
Mid Notes:  cinnamon, nutmeg, clove
Base Notes:  vanilla extract, baked bread, crushed pecan

How Do Our Customers Use Banana Nut Bread Fragrance Oil?

Creating captivating candles! This freshly baked fragrance performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax and is nice and strong in soy wax. It is not gel wax compatible. The maximum recommended usage percentage for this sweet, spicy scent in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. Our coloring suggestion for candles is to use 2 drops yellow plus a tiny bit* of brown liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax, or shred a small amount of yellow and even smaller amount of brown color block into your melted wax. *It may help to dip the tip of a toothpick into your dye and use that to add a tiny amount of brown to your wax. Anyway, remember not to color your candles with crayons; it will clog the wick!

Inventing inviting room scents! This delicious dessert scent comes across nice and strong in aroma beads. The maximum recommended usage percentage for this banana bakery aroma in incense and potpourri is 50%.

Setting up sumptuous soaps! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this authentic, appetizing aroma in soaps, bath oils, and bath gels is 5%. Our cold process soap testing found that this fresh banana bread fragrance caused slight acceleration of CP soap, but no ricing, no separation, and nice, strong scent retention. Cured bars discolored to a brown color. This is possibly due to the 3.31% vanillin content of the fragrance; vanillin can cause shades of brown discoloration in bath and body products- the more vanillin, the darker the brown. If you’d like to combat discoloration, you’re welcome to try our Vanilla White Color Stabilizer– designed to correct discoloration due to vanilla content. Our soap coloring recommendations are to use yellow and brown soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you. You’re also welcome to try natural soap colorants– but be mindful of the information listed on their pages, some soap processes may affect the intended color of your finished product. Also- never use candle dye in bath and body products- or you’ll end up coloring yourself!

Designing delectable body products! This fresh bakery fragrance performed perfectly in perfumes, and its maximum recommended usage percentage in lotions and body sprays is 5%.

Lastly, they construct pretty-smelling cleaning products. The maximum recommended usage percentage of this sweet and spicy scent in cleaning products is 5%.

Sep
24

Banana Cream Pie Fragrance


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Banana Cream Pie FragranceBanana Cream Pie Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Bananas, vanilla, and cream make an excellent pie filling- this description alone is making my mouth water- but imagine being able to smell that scent any time you’d like without the work of baking a pie! That’s where Banana Cream Pie fragrance oil comes in.  You do need to mix your ingredients to use this fragrance oil in applications, but the scent lasts much longer. It’s much easier to light a candle than it is to bake a pie- no? Cream pies also have a reputation of being thrown in people’s faces for comedic effect (or charity or both, really) but you don’t have to worry about that with fragrance oil! The only way your face will smell like Banana Cream Pie is if you use this fragrance oil to make a sumptuous soap. Just remember that you can’t eat it, no matter how delicious it smells. (Though we do have some delicious lip flavorings if that’s what you’d like.)

What Does Banana Cream Pie Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

The aroma of freshly made banana cream pie.  The fragrance begins with top notes of ripe banana, quince, and apple; middle notes of juicy pearberry, Anjou pear, clove buds, and plantain leaves; base notes of vanilla extract, pie crust, and butter rum.

How Do Our Customers Use Banana Cream Pie Fragrance Oil?

Candles, of course! This fresh bakery fragrance performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. It is not gel wax compatible. The maximum recommended usage percentage for this delicious dessert scent in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. Our coloring suggestions for candles are to use 5 drops of yellow liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax or shred a small amount of yellow color block into your melted wax. Never color your candles with crayons; it will clog the wick!

Room scents! This appetizing aroma comes across nice and strong in aroma beads. The maximum recommended usage percentage in incense and potpourri is 50%.

Soaps! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this fruit pie fragrance in soaps, bath gels, and bath oils is 5%. Our cold process soap testing found that this fragrance caused some acceleration, but no separation and no ricing. Cured CP soap bars retained a very strong scent. The cured soap did discolor to a light brown/orange color– almost the color of pie crust? Maybe? Check it out for yourself in the soap testing video or on the fragrance oil page. The discoloration of cold process soap made with this fragrance may be attributed to its 3% vanillin content. Vanilla White Color Stabilizer may help prevent discoloration due to vanilla- but over 40 ingredients can cause discoloration- remember you are responsible for the results in your finished products. Our coloring suggestions for soap are to use yellow soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you. You’re welcome to try natural soap colorants– but pay attention to the descriptions- different colorants maybe altered by different soap-making processes.

If you’d like to make some pie-shaped, pie-scented soap, check out our adorable pie heart soap mold!

Body products! This sweet scent performs perfectly in perfumes and the maximum recommended usage percentage in beautiful banana body-sprays and luscious lotions is 5%.

Cleaning products! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this bakery scent in cleaning products is 4%.

Sep
21

Bamboo and White Grapefruit Fragrance


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Bamboo and White Grapefruit FragranceBamboo and White Grapefruit Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Bamboo is a grass-like plant with many subspecies. The varieties grown in the United States reach heights between 15 and 39 feet. Some of the largest timber bamboo can grow to be about 100 feet tall. Timber bamboo? That’s right- bamboo is used in building and can hold more weight than wood, brick, or concrete. It also rivals the strength of steel. Isn’t that the stuff pandas eat? They do! Bamboo comprises most of a panda’s diet- but they focus their attentions on the soft shoots, stems and leaves. Speaking of diets, grapefruits are super healthy and can even help your body metabolize fat. This fruit is actually a hybrid of the sweet orange and the pomelo. Like most citrus fruits, the grapefruit contains lots of Vitamin C and has a sweet to bitter taste- depending on the variety. They’re high in fiber and possess many other health benefits. Both grapefruit plants and bamboo are evergreens. When we hear this, we may tend to think Christmas trees, but I think it’s a good indication that this scent is always fresh!

What Does Bamboo and White Grapefruit Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

One of the most amazing fragrances we have ever smelled!  This fresh, complex fragrance begins with top notes of White Grapefruit, Petitgrain, and Tangerine; leading to middle notes of Mandarin, Tangerine, and Mimosa Petals; and balanced with base notes of Rainforest Bamboo, Juniper Berries, and Musk.

How Do Our Customers Use Bamboo and White Grapefruit Fragrance Oil?

Candles! This complex accord performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax and is nice and strong in soy wax. It is also gel wax compatible! The maximum recommended usage percentage in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. Our coloring recommendations for candles are to use 2 drops green liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax or shred a small amount of green color block into your melted wax. Never color candles with crayons; it’ll clog your wick!

Room scents! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this fresh, fruity fragrance in incense and potpourri is 50%. This scent comes across nice and strong in aroma beads.

Soaps! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this invigorating aroma in soaps, bath oils, and bath gels is 5%. Our cold process soap testing results found that in CP soap, this fragrance caused slight acceleration, but no ricing, no separation, and no discoloration! The scent retention in cured bars was nice and strong. This fragrance is unlikely to cause discoloration in your bath and body products because the vanillin content is 0%. (No discoloration in CP soap is a good sign, too!) Our coloring suggestions for this fragrance are to use green liquid soap colorant in the amount you desire. Never use candle dye to color your bath and body products or they will end up coloring you!

Body products! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this sweet, strong scent in lotions and perfumes is 5%. It was found to have performed perfectly in perfumes.

Cleaning products! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this fresh fruit and floral fragrance in cleaning products is 5%.

Sep
20

Balsam and Cedar Fragrance


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Balsam and Cedar FragranceBalsam and Cedar Fragrance Oil Spotlight

We already met our buddy the balsam fir- a.k.a. the Christmas Tree. So what’s the deal with cedar? Cedar wood is used in all sorts of amazing applications from building ships, houses, log cabins, fences, furniture, canoes, and even guitars, to bug repellent. Smells great, too! California incense-cedar is the primary type of wood used for making pencils. This kind of explains why I loved holding pencils under my nose as a kid- cedar wood smells fantastic. And pencil mustaches are cool, too. :{o (That’s a mustachioed smiley. Try holding a pencil between your upper lip and your nose to see what I’m talking about: pencil mustache.)

What Does Balsam and Cedar Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

A camphoraceous woody blend of pine, eucalyptus, cedarwood; finished with sweet balsam.  This fragrance is composed of top notes of  orange, raspberry, and plum;  middle notes of lily, carnation, and hyacinth;  base notes of balsam, pine, eucalyptus, and cedarwood.

How Do Our Customers Use Balsam and Cedar Fragrance Oil?

Candles! This fresh forest fragrance performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax, and is nice and strong in soy wax. It is gel wax compatible! That means you could make some gel candles with embeds (check out our Christmas tree embed molds). The maximum recommended usage percentage for this woodsy aura in vegetable waxes and paraffin wax is 10%. Our candle coloring recommendations are 5 drops green plus 1 drop brown liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax or shred a small amount of green and brown color block into your melted wax. Never color your candles with crayons; it will clog the wick.

Room scents! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this sophisticated scent in potpourri and incense is 50%. It comes across nice and strong in aroma beads.

Bath and body products! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this complex accord in soaps, bath oils, and bath gels is 5%. Our cold process soap testing found that this fragrance caused slight acceleration in CP soap, but no ricing and no separation. It retained a very strong scent and cured bars discolored to a lavender/tan color. The vanillin content of this fragrance is 0%, but there are over 40 ingredients used in fragrance manufacturing that can lead to the discoloration of products. Products with high vanillin contents tend to discolor to varying shades of brown, but this one has a tiny bit of purple (I personally think it’s a pretty cute color). Our coloring recommendations are to use green and brown soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you. If you’d like to go for a more earthy tone and add some extra nutrients- check out our natural soap colorants. Just be sure to read the descriptions because different soap processes cause different reactions with your herbs and can affect the intended color of your soap. Also- feel free to check out our tree-shaped soap molds!

Body products without the bath! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this interesting aroma in lotions and body-sprays is 5%. It performed perfectly in perfumes.

Cleaning products! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this evergreen aura in cleaning products is 5%.

Sep
19

Balsam Fragrance


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Balsam FragranceBalsam Fragrance Oil Spotlight

Balsam fir trees, native to northern North America, are evergreen trees that thrive in cooler environments. You may know them better as… CHRISTMAS TREES. That’s right, balsam fir trees are your seasonal superhero’s secret identity. It takes about a decade for these trees to reach ideal Christmas tree height- 6 or 7 feet- but they can live to be up to 200 years old and grow up to 60 feet in height. Can you imagine how many presents would fit under that tree?!

What Does Balsam Fragrance Oil Smell Like?

This fresh pine balsam aroma is great for Christmas time, or all year round. Use by itself, or for mixing creative new scents for your line.

How Do Our Customers Use Balsam Fragrance Oil?

They design delightful decorative candles! Balsam Fragrance Oil performs perfectly in joy wax and wow wax and is nice and strong in soy wax. It is not gel wax compatible. The maximum recommended usage percentage in vegetable and paraffin waxes is 10%. Our coloring suggestion for candles made with this wonderful pine scent are to use 4 drops green plus a little black liquid candle dye per 4 pounds of wax, or shred a small amount of green color block into your melted wax. Black candle colorant only comes in liquid candle dye. Please remember that our liquid candle dyes are VERY CONCENTRATED and as someone who likes to mix colors for painting and various craft applications, let me tell you that you only need a tiny amount of black color to make something darker. Itty bitty tiny little bit of black. You can always add more, but I recommend using the tip of a toothpick, dipping it in your dye, and then dipping it in your wax. Also- never use crayons to color your candles; it’ll clog the wick.

They scent rooms without using wax! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this fresh fir fragrance in incense and potpourri is 50%. It came across nice and strong in aroma beads. You could also modify our Glamour Aroma Bead Air Freshener Recipe, use Balsam Fragrance Oil instead of I’m Too Sexy Fragrance Oil and use Christmas-tree-shaped (or any Christmas shape your heart desires) cookie cutters to make cute little Christmas ornaments! Remember, though, that once you use baking tools to make a recipe with fragrance oils, do not use them again in cooking applications. Even minute residue from your recipe could make you sick if you eat it. Set your fragrance fun equipment aside from you cooking equipment; better safe than sorry!

They also invent amazing bath and body products! The maximum recommended usage percentage for this simply spectacular scent in soaps, bath oils, and bath gels is 3.5%. Our cold process soap testing found that this amazing aroma performed perfectly in CP soap: no acceleration, no ricing, no separation, no discoloration, and very, very strong scent retention. The vanillin content of this fragrance is 0% so it is unlikely to discolor your bath and body products. Our coloring suggestions are to use green and black soap colorant in the amount that satisfies you. (Don’t forget what I said above about using black in a color mix!) We’ve also got some natural soap colorants that you’re welcome to try! We’ve got a handful of natural green soap colorants, and for black: activated charcoal. Be sure to read the pages on the powders- some soapmaking processes may affect the intended color of your soap. (You can also read-up on the nutrients and other benefits of these natural colorants!)

Check out our Christmas tree soap molds for festive holiday soapmaking!

They create body products for outside of the bath! This fresh pine aroma performs perfectly in perfumes, and the maximum recommended usage percentage in lotions and body-sprays is 3.5%.

They even come up with cool cleaning products. The maximum recommended usage percentage for this fragrance in cleaning products is 3.5%.